Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Ulnar Artery: The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Bronchial Arteries: Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.Peripheral Nervous System: The nervous system outside of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system has autonomic and somatic divisions. The autonomic nervous system includes the enteric, parasympathetic, and sympathetic subdivisions. The somatic nervous system includes the cranial and spinal nerves and their ganglia and the peripheral sensory receptors.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Renal Artery Obstruction: Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Temporal Arteries: Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Peripheral Arterial Disease: Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Transposition of Great Vessels: A congenital cardiovascular malformation in which the AORTA arises entirely from the RIGHT VENTRICLE, and the PULMONARY ARTERY arises from the LEFT VENTRICLE. Consequently, the pulmonary and the systemic circulations are parallel and not sequential, so that the venous return from the peripheral circulation is re-circulated by the right ventricle via aorta to the systemic circulation without being oxygenated in the lungs. This is a potentially lethal form of heart disease in newborns and infants.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Uterine Artery: A branch arising from the internal iliac artery in females, that supplies blood to the uterus.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Leukocytes, Mononuclear: Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.15-Hydroxy-11 alpha,9 alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dienoic Acid: A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Retinal Artery Occlusion: Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Meningeal Arteries: Arteries which supply the dura mater.Phenylephrine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Calcitonin gene-related peptide. A 37-amino acid peptide derived from the calcitonin gene. It occurs as a result of alternative processing of mRNA from the calcitonin gene. The neuropeptide is widely distributed in neural tissue of the brain, gut, perivascular nerves, and other tissue. The peptide produces multiple biological effects and has both circulatory and neurotransmitter modes of action. In particular, it is a potent endogenous vasodilator.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral: A group of malignant lymphomas thought to derive from peripheral T-lymphocytes in lymph nodes and other nonlymphoid sites. They include a broad spectrum of lymphocyte morphology, but in all instances express T-cell markers admixed with epithelioid histiocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. Although markedly similar to large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, LARGE-CELL, IMMUNOBLASTIC), this group's unique features warrant separate treatment.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection: The splitting of the vessel wall in one or both (left and right) internal carotid arteries (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the internal carotid artery and aneurysm formation.Prazosin: A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha: One of the two major pharmacological subdivisions of adrenergic receptors that were originally defined by the relative potencies of various adrenergic compounds. The alpha receptors were initially described as excitatory receptors that post-junctionally stimulate SMOOTH MUSCLE contraction. However, further analysis has revealed a more complex picture involving several alpha receptor subtypes and their involvement in feedback regulation.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Coronary Artery Bypass, Off-Pump: Coronary artery bypass surgery on a beating HEART without a CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS (diverting the flow of blood from the heart and lungs through an oxygenator).Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Internal Mammary-Coronary Artery Anastomosis: Direct myocardial revascularization in which the internal mammary artery is anastomosed to the right coronary artery, circumflex artery, or anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery is the most frequent choice, especially for a single graft, for coronary artery bypass surgery.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Vertebral Artery Dissection: Splitting of the vessel wall in the VERTEBRAL ARTERY. Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the vertebral artery, aneurysm formation, or THROMBOEMBOLISM. Vertebral artery dissection is often associated with TRAUMA and injuries to the head-neck region but can occur spontaneously.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Mesenteric Artery, Inferior: The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Mice, Inbred C57BLRNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Nitroglycerin: A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Tunica Media: The middle layer of blood vessel walls, composed principally of thin, cylindrical, smooth muscle cells and elastic tissue. It accounts for the bulk of the wall of most arteries. The smooth muscle cells are arranged in circular layers around the vessel, and the thickness of the coat varies with the size of the vessel.Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Blood Cells: The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Vasomotor System: The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Biological Factors: Endogenously-synthesized compounds that influence biological processes not otherwise classified under ENZYMES; HORMONES or HORMONE ANTAGONISTS.Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Schwann Cells: Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.Circle of Willis: A polygonal anastomosis at the base of the brain formed by the internal carotid (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL), proximal parts of the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries (ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), the anterior communicating artery and the posterior communicating arteries.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Constriction: The act of constricting.Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.
Other peripheral vascular disease (443) > Other specified peripheral vascular disease (443.8) > Erythromelalgia (443.82). ICD- ... It is postulated that the acral small superficial arteries intensely constrict and dilate during the sharp decline of ... Erythromelalgia, formerly known as Mitchell's disease (after Silas Weir Mitchell), is a rare vascular peripheral pain disorder ... falling under the class of other peripheral vascular disease, as the following two billing code systems will show: ICD-9-CM ...
It can evaluate central (abdominal) and peripheral arteries and veins; it helps determine the amount of vascular stenosis ( ... Applying spectral Doppler to the renal artery and selected interlobular arteries, peak systolic velocities, resistive index and ... peak systolic velocity of the renal artery above 180 cm/s is a predictor of renal artery stenosis of more than 60%, and the ... Some laboratories show arteries as red and veins as blue, as medical illustrators usually show them, even though some vessels ...
This causes vasodilation and a reduction peripheral vascular resistance, thus lowering blood pressure. Its effects on cardiac ... Variant angina: amlodipine blocks spasm of the coronary arteries and restores blood flow in coronary arteries and arterioles in ... Peripheral edema (fluid accumulation in the tissues) occurs at rate of 10.8% at a 10 mg dose (versus 0.6% for placebos), and is ... It works partly by increasing the size of arteries. Amlodipine was first patented in 1986 with commercial sale beginning in ...
Peripheral vascular examination King, D; Morton, R; Bevan, C (Nov 13, 2013). "How to use capillary refill time". Archives of ... Prolonged capillary refill time may also suggest peripheral artery disease. It is generally accepted that the test is affected ... A prolonged capillary refill time may be a sign of shock and can also indicate dehydration and decreased peripheral perfusion. ...
... resistant to the vascular damage caused by balloon catheter-induced injury of the external carotid artery; e) less likely to ... vascular complications due to sickle cell anemia; other cardiovascular diseases including heart attack, stroke, and peripheral ... SNP variant rs768963 in TBX2R was associated with increased frequency of large artery atherosclerosis, small artery occlusion, ... is licensed in Italy for the treatment of clinical arterial thrombosis and peripheral artery disease. These drugs are not yet ...
... peripheral artery disease, and chronic kidney disease. Cardiac output and peripheral resistance are the two determinants of ... It does this by regulating the peripheral vasculature, and kidney function, which in turn affect cardiac output, vascular ... Peripheral resistance is determined by functional and anatomic changes in small arteries and arterioles. Single gene mutations ... It acts on the musculature of arteries, raising peripheral resistance and thereby elevating blood pressure. Angiotensin II also ...
Peripheral resistance is determined by functional and anatomic changes in small arteries and arterioles. The pathophysiology of ... One possible mechanism involves a reduction in vascular compliance due to the stiffening of the arteries. This can build up due ... Local autoregulatory mechanisms counteract this by increasing vascular resistance to maintain normotension in local vascular ... vascular volume expands secondary to movement of fluids into the intra-vascular compartment. This causes the arterial pressure ...
The company is currently focusing on treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD). www.annexinpharmaceuticals.com Martz, Lauren ... May 26, 2014). "Annexin: Attenuating vascular inflammation" (PDF). BioCentury: A18. Retrieved 1 February 2015. http://www. ...
Cigarette smoke causes shrinkage in the arteries, which heightens their chance of developing peripheral vascular disease. ...
Peripheral vascular disease; femoral artery stenosis Renal artery stenosis Stroke, carotid artery stenosis Aortic aneurysm ... cholesterol deposition in artery wall) Median arcuate ligament syndrome, celiac artery stenosis - external compression ... Bruit (English: /ˈbruːi/; from French, "noise"), or vascular murmur, is the abnormal sound generated by turbulent flow of blood ... or a localized high rate of blood flow through an unobstructed artery. The bruit may be heard ("auscultated") by pressing a ...
In most cases, veins are much more likely to be affected than arteries. Venous sinus thrombosis is the most frequent vascular ... On the other hand, thrombosis and aneurysms of the large cerebral arteries are rarely reported. Peripheral nervous system ... Because Non-parenchymal NBD targets vascular structures, the symptoms arise in the same area. The main clinical characteristic ... In non-parenchymal NBD, vascular complications such as cerebral venous thrombosis primarily occurs. Other distinct ...
1490). New York: McGraw-Hill ISBN 0-07-140235-7 (2006). Peripheral vascular disorders. In R.S. Porter, T.V. Jones, & M.H. Beer ... Pernio (Chilblains) Cyanosis Peripheral artery occlusive disease Raynaud's phenomenon Kurklinsky AK, Miller VM, Rooke TW. " ... "Acrocyanosis: The Flying Dutchman." Vascular Medicine 2011 Aug;16(4):288-301 Olin, J.W. (2004). Other peripheral arterial ... The normal peripheral pulses rule out peripheral arterial occlusive disease, where arterial narrowing limits blood flow to the ...
... is a gene-therapy drug for treatment of peripheral artery disease, including critical limb ischemia; it delivers ... AdisInsight Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy - HSCI Page accessed 5 June 2016 "Gene Therapy for PAD Approved". 6 ... the gene encoding for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Neovasculogen is a plasmid encoding the CMV promoter and the ...
... is used to treat narrowing in arteries caused by peripheral artery disease. Unlike angioplasty and stents, which ... While atherectomy is usually employed to treat arteries it can be used in veins and vascular bypass grafts as well. Atherectomy ... Other common places are the brachial artery, radial artery, popliteal artery, dorsalis pedis, and others. There are four types ... It is an alternative to angioplasty for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, but the studies that exist are not adequate ...
HHcy is related to several vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke. Recently ... One kind of Dementia is Vascular dementia, which has risk factor for strokes that are related to nutrition such has diabetes ... Elevated homocysteine has been associated with increased risk of vascular events, as well as dementia. Differences lie in the ... Findings may include demylenation and degeneration of various affected parts of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. ...
Can vascular pathology in cerebral and coronary fields predict peripheral artery disease in a cohort of diabetic patients?, ... The effect of age and lipid profiles on peripheral vascular disease in a cohort of diabetic patients Esculapio, Vol.1, No. 3, ... Anthropometric measurements as a determinant and predictor of peripheral vascular disease in a cohort of diabetic patients, ...
SEMS are also sometimes used in the vascular system, usually in the aorta and peripheral vascular system. In the past they have ... been used for saphenous vein graft and native coronary artery percutaneous coronary interventions. Self-expandable metallic ...
This form is sometimes called peripheral vascular failure, shock or peripheral vascular shutdown. A milder or preliminary form ... Peripheral circulatory collapse involves outlying arteries and veins in the body and can result in gangrene, organ failure or ... Peripheral collapses usually involve abnormally low blood pressure and result in collapsed arteries and/or veins, leading to ... A circulatory collapse is defined as a general or specific failure of the circulation, either cardiac or peripheral in nature. ...
... is associated with the development of coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, brain attack ... Peripheral vascular disease and increased risk of infection have important implications in the care of the acutely ill patient ... It is a disease of the large blood vessels, including the coronary arteries, the aorta, and the sizable arteries in the brain ... and peripheral vascular disease (in the limbs) Macrovascular disease (macroangiopathy) refers to atherosclerosis. ...
... in patients with peripheral artery disease". Vascular Medicine. 19 (4): 297-306. doi:10.1177/1358863X14534516. PMID 24872402. ...
Vascular stents are commonly placed as part of peripheral artery angioplasty. Common sites treated with peripheral artery ... "Efficacious Use of Nitinol Stents in the Femoral and Popliteal Arteries". Journal of Vascular Surgery. 38 (6): 1178-1183. doi: ... Vascular stents made of metals can lead to thrombosis at the site of treatment or to inflammation scarring. Drug-eluting stents ... The most common use for coronary stents is in the coronary arteries, into which a bare-metal stent, a drug-eluting stent, a ...
It is caused by poor circulation of the blood to the affected area, called Peripheral artery disease. The poor blood flow is ... This is caused by insufficiency of the arteries supplying the jaw muscles, associated with giant cell arteritis. Vascular (or ... The prognosis for patients with peripheral vascular disease due to atherosclerosis is poor; patients with intermittent ... Peripheral Arterial Disease at Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy Professional Edition[not in citation given] Comer CM, ...
The contractile function of vascular smooth muscle regulates the lumenal diameter of the small arteries-arterioles called ... pulmonary arteries and veins, and other peripheral vessels. See Atherosclerosis. Atromentin has been shown to be a smooth ... However, the smooth muscle within the Aorta and Pulmonary arteries (the Great Arteries of the heart) is derived from ... "Sphingosine-1-phosphate modulates spiral modiolar artery tone: A potential role in vascular-based inner ear pathologies?". ...
Peripheral vascular disease and/or neuropathy increase risk of sudden death due to coronary artery disease, Significant ... Nephropathy causing proteinuria Coronary artery disease Significant peripheral vascular disease may reduce inert gas washout ... autonomic or peripheral neuropathy increases the risk of exaggerated hypotension when leaving the water. ...
2010). "Evaluation of trans sodium crocetinate on safety and exercise performance in patients with peripheral artery disease ... and intermittent claudication". Vascular Medicine. 16 (5): 346-352. doi:10.1177/1358863X11422742. PMID 22003000. "Safety and ... in restoring tissue oxygen levels and improving the ability to walk in a clinical trial of patients with peripheral artery ...
Ernst E (2010). "Vascular accidents after neck manipulation: cause or coincidence?". Int J Clin Pract. 64 (6): 673-77. doi: ... Vertebrobasilar artery stroke (VAS) is statistically associated with chiropractic services in persons under 45 years of age,[ ... Impressions are made on the peripheral afferent fiber-endings; these create sensations that are transmitted to the center of ... Chung CL, Côté P, Stern P, L'espérance G (2014). "The Association Between Cervical Spine Manipulation and Carotid Artery ...
... Hiroshi Suzuki1 and Yoshitaka Iso2 ... Hiroshi Suzuki and Yoshitaka Iso, "Clinical Application of Vascular Regenerative Therapy for Peripheral Artery Disease," BioMed ...
... or atherosclerosis of peripheral vessels, is the most common cause of symptomatic stenosis in the human vascular tree. The ... pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to PVD are similar to those of coronary artery disease (CAD). ... encoded search term (Peripheral Vascular Disease Imaging) and Peripheral Vascular Disease Imaging What to Read Next on Medscape ... Peripheral vascular disease (PVD), or atherosclerosis of peripheral vessels, is the most common cause of symptomatic stenosis ...
PAD occurs when pelvis and leg arteries become narrow or blocked. Learn more about PAD treatment at UVA, including bypass ... Understanding Peripheral Artery Disease. PAD, or peripheral artery disease, usually occurs when pelvis and leg arteries become ... Peripheral artery disease (PAD) usually occurs when pelvis and leg arteries become narrow or blocked. This is caused by the ... Your surgeon inserts a wire into the wall of the affected artery. Once the wire passes the blockage, we move it into the artery ...
Dietary Nitrates and Vascular Function in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Peripheral Arterial Disease. Atherosclerosis. Arteriosclerosis. Arterial Occlusive Diseases. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Vascular conductance will be calculated using blood flow/mean arterial pressure (via finger plethysmograph). ... ECG gated arterial waveforms will be obtained via applanation tonometry from the carotid and femoral arteries. The pulse wave ...
... of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) through the popliteal artery and to identify the risk factors for these... ... To evaluate vascular complications associated with endovascular treatment (EVT) ... Transpopliteal approach Vascular complications Peripheral arterial disease This is a preview of subscription content, log in to ... To evaluate vascular complications associated with endovascular treatment (EVT) of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) through ...
Cagent Vasculars Serranator® has achieved regulatory approvals from FDA and European Medicines Agency, paving way for ... Cagent Vascular Announces CE Mark of Serranator, Next Generation Device for Vessel Dilatation in Peripheral Artery Disease ... Cagent Vascular has also achieved its ISO 13485 Certification. The Serranator® is one of a family of peripheral artery disease ... About Cagent Vascular Cagent Vascular is leading the way for next generation technology for vessel dilatation. It is the second ...
... peripheral artery disease treatment has faced several issues: Under-diagnosis of PAD, a lack of effective treatments for in PAD ... While treatment of coronary artery disease has progressed dramatically over the past 50 years, ... What does vascular protection mean for patients with peripheral artery disease?. While the treatment of coronary artery disease ... CAD) has progressed dramatically over the past 50 years, peripheral artery disease (PAD) treatment has faced several issues:. * ...
... peripheral arterial disease , SDF1 Plasmid Treatment for Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease ... SDF1 Plasmid Treatment for Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease Brief description of study. To investigate the efficacy of ... healing and limb loss in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease with non-healing chronic wounds who undergo an open ...
An increased risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) exists in which patient group(s): ... Peripheral artery disease: Testing & therapy. Take Quiz. Diagnosing lower extremity peripheral artery disease. Take Quiz. ...
Vascular stents are the devices which are used for the ... Vascular Stents Market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.8% ... Vascular Stents Market 2018 - Research Process , Macroeconomic Indicators , by application (coronary artery, peripheral artery ... On basis of application they are coronary artery, peripheral artery and other. On the basis of type the market is segmented ... Vascular stents are used to unblock the arteries and relieve the obstruction of blood flow. Different types of materials are ...
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. 2013;33:1092-1097, originally published April 10, 2013 ... Total Adiponectin and Risk of Symptomatic Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease in MenSignificance. Michel M. Joosten, ... peripheral artery disease. Introduction. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived protein that has gained considerable research ... Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that affects an estimated 10 million US adults ...
It is also called renal artery stenosis (RAS). You may be evaluated for kidney artery diseas ... artery disease is a form of peripheral artery disease that reduces blood flow through the renal arteries, which supply blood to ... Kidney Artery Disease Diagnosis Overview Kidney (renal) artery disease is a form of peripheral artery disease that reduces ... If your kidney artery disease is severe (a renal artery is more than 50% blocked) or causing damage to your kidney or other ...
... the relative contribution of thrombotic events and vascular inflammation to vascular pathogenesis in PAD patients are not well ... and peripheral arteries (peripheral artery disease [PAD]). CAD can be divided into stable disease and unstable disease that ... Dual Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Therapy for Coronary Artery Disease and Peripheral Artery Disease Patients. Nigel Mackman, ... Dual Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Therapy for Coronary Artery Disease and Peripheral Artery Disease Patients ...
Peripheral Vascular/Artery Disease (PAD). St. Joseph Medical Center is proud to serve patients from all over Kansas City and ... Peripheral Vascular/Artery Disease (PAD). This refers to diseases of blood vessels outside the heart and brain. Its often a ... Angioplasty is a non-surgical procedure that can be used to dilate (widen) narrowed or blocked peripheral arteries. A thin tube ... It stays in that spot, keeping the diseased artery open.. If the narrowing involves a long portion of an artery, surgery may be ...
Peripheral Vascular Disease Affects The Arteries, The Veins Or The Lymph Vessels And The Most Severe Type Of PVD Is Peripheral ... Artery Disease. Vascular Surgeons At Barnes-Jewish & Washington University Heart & Vascular Center Treat Claudication, Critical ... Peripheral Artery Disease Peripheral Artery Disease and Critical Limb Ischemia. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) affects the ... The most severe type of PVD is peripheral artery disease (PAD), which affects the arteries that carry blood to the legs, arms, ...
DCB reduced the NH in peripheral arteries compared to uncoated balloons. Vascular function impairment was directly related to ... CRT-603 Effect of Drug-coated Balloon on Porcine Peripheral Arteries: Physiologic Vascular Function, Safety and Efficacy ... CRT-603 Effect of Drug-coated Balloon on Porcine Peripheral Arteries: Physiologic Vascular Function, Safety and Efficacy ... CRT-603 Effect of Drug-coated Balloon on Porcine Peripheral Arteries: Physiologic Vascular Function, Safety and Efficacy ...
Home » Peripheral and central arterial pressure and its relationship to vascular target organ damage in carotid artery, retina ... Peripheral and central arterial pressure and its relationship to vascular target organ damage in carotid artery, retina and ... Provides information on a study which compared the thickness of the common carotid artery (CCA) and internal carotid artery ( ... and vascular structure and function as evaluated by the carotid artery intimamedia thickness, retina arteriovenous index, pulse ...
In a bypass surgery for atherosclerosis, peripheral artery disease (PAD) or peripheral vascular disease (PVD), your surgeon ... tube to your artery above and below the blockage. This creates a new pathway that oxygen-rich blood can flow through. In most ... creates a new pathway so blood can flow around an artery in your leg thats been blocked by fatty deposits called plaque.. ...
Part 2 Vascular Disorders Vascular Disorders 1 1. Peripheral Artery Disease of Lower Extremities (PAD) 2. Critical Limb ... View Vascular Disorders - Part 2.pptx from NURSING CARDIAC at Broward College. ... Vascular Disorders - Part 2.pptx - Part 2 Vascular Disorders Vascular Disorders 1 1 Peripheral Artery Disease of Lower ... Peripheral Artery Disease • Pathophysiology  Narrowing or occlusion of peripheral arteries  This results in pain  ...
... medical therapy may reduce the need for major vascular surgery or endovascular procedures. In this Virtual Expert Roundtable, ... secondary prevention in patients with peripheral artery disease consisted of either aspirin or clopidogrel monotherapy. A new ... Redefining the Scope of Vascular Medicine Therapeutics in Patients with Known Coronary Artery Disease or Peripheral Artery ... Redefining the Scope of Vascular Medicine Therapeutics in Patients with Known Coronary Artery Disease or Peripheral Artery ...
My peripheral vascular reports numbers show mild atherosclerosis and Abi Rt 1.56 LT 1.29 . I also have left leg swelling. Could ... Peripheral Artery Disease Community This patient support community is for discussions relating to Peripheral Artery Disease ( ... Hi all Ive been having tests for peripheral artery disease in my left leg . It has been a few years since starting with just ... Could the the purple toes and the lack of blood pressure in ankles but normal around knees be due to peripheral artery ...
... board-certified vascular surgeons work with a dedicated team of nurses and technologists specializing in vascular disease to ... Complications of Peripheral Vascular Disease and Peripheral Artery Disease. Left untreated, peripheral vascular disease can ... Peripheral Artery & Vascular Disease. High-Quality Treatments for Vascular Disease in Meridian. At Anderson Regional Medical ... Diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease may involve: * Angiogram - an X-ray of the arteries and veins using contrast dye ...
What is Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)?. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), also called peripheral vascular disease (PVD), ... Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) The medical, surgical and catheter-based treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a ... also known as peripheral vascular disease (PVD). The challenge with this life-threatening disease is at least half of the ... Vascular Surgeons. Luke Brewster, MD. Michael Clark, MD. Thomas F. Dodson, MD. Yazan Duwayri, MD. Peter B HDoubler, MD. ...
... is the narrowing of arteries in the extremities, stomach, and head, and can lead to a higher risk of heart problems. ... Peripheral Artery Disease Treatment in Chester, MD. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), also known as peripheral vascular disease ... Peripheral Artery Disease Causes. People who regularly use tobacco are at a much higher risk of developing peripheral artery ... Peripheral Artery Disease Symptoms. Peripheral artery disease symptoms are most often noticed when you engage in more physical ...
... vascular function, and inflammation in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease: A randomized controlled trial. ... vascular function, and inflammation in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease : A randomized controlled trial. In ... Step-monitored home exercise improves ambulation, vascular function, and inflammation in symptomatic patients with peripheral ... Step-monitored home exercise improves ambulation, vascular function, and inflammation in symptomatic patients with peripheral ...
  • Advantage of bilateral internal mammary artery grafting (BIMA grafting) for coronary artery bypass grafting over using a single arterial conduit (left internal mammary artery) is a better survival documented by a meta analysis of 9 observational studies involving over fifteen thousand patients with follow up over 9 years . (cardiophile.org)
  • But there is a reluctance of some cardiac surgeons to use both internal mammary arteries for fear of deep sternal wound infections, often causing mediastinitis. (cardiophile.org)
  • The walls of the arteries also become stiffer and cannot widen (dilate) to allow greater blood flow when needed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Forty-two domestic swine underwent percutaneous FREEWAY overstretch balloon dilation for 1 and 2 minutes of both femoral and iliac (4-5 and 6-8 mm diameter, respectively) arteries. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The peripheral artery tissue drug levels were 141.9±37.9 vs. 566.3±179.9, 43.2±13.6 vs. 149.4±71.8, 23.4±8.4 vs. 30.0±16.6 and 3.2±2.4 vs. 4.0±1.1 ng/mg using 1 vs. 2 minutes balloon inflation time at 1h, 1, 3 and 9 days post-DCB use, respectively. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The NH was significantly smaller in the arteries dilated with FREEWAY compared with control balloon. (onlinejacc.org)
  • A doctor at Scripps Green Hospital this week became the first in California to use a new drug-coated balloon to treat peripheral artery disease in a patient since regulatory approval of the IN.PACT Admiral device in January by the Food and Drug Administration. (scripps.org)