PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The blood pressure in the ARTERIES. It is commonly measured with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER on the upper arm which represents the arterial pressure in the BRACHIAL ARTERY.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
The pressure due to the weight of fluid.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Techniques for measuring blood pressure.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.
Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.
The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.
The pressure of the fluids in the eye.
Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.
The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.
The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.
The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.
The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.
The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.
An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.
The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.
The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.
Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.
Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.
Sodium excretion by URINATION.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
Agents having as their major action the interruption of neural transmission at nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Because their actions are so broad, including blocking of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, their therapeutic use has been largely supplanted by more specific drugs. They may still be used in the control of blood pressure in patients with acute dissecting aortic aneurysm and for the induction of hypotension in surgery.
The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.
Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.
Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.
Devices for continuously measuring and displaying the arterial blood pressure.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
Sodium chloride used in foods.
Persistent high BLOOD PRESSURE due to KIDNEY DISEASES, such as those involving the renal parenchyma, the renal vasculature, or tumors that secrete RENIN.
A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.
Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.
External decompression applied to the lower body. It is used to study orthostatic intolerance and the effects of gravitation and acceleration, to produce simulated hemorrhage in physiologic research, to assess cardiovascular function, and to reduce abdominal stress during childbirth.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
The position or attitude of the body.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
A BLOOD PRESSURE regulating system of interacting components that include RENIN; ANGIOTENSINOGEN; ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME; ANGIOTENSIN I; ANGIOTENSIN II; and angiotensinase. Renin, an enzyme produced in the kidney, acts on angiotensinogen, an alpha-2 globulin produced by the liver, forming ANGIOTENSIN I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme, contained in the lung, acts on angiotensin I in the plasma converting it to ANGIOTENSIN II, an extremely powerful vasoconstrictor. Angiotensin II causes contraction of the arteriolar and renal VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE, leading to retention of salt and water in the KIDNEY and increased arterial blood pressure. In addition, angiotensin II stimulates the release of ALDOSTERONE from the ADRENAL CORTEX, which in turn also increases salt and water retention in the kidney. Angiotensin-converting enzyme also breaks down BRADYKININ, a powerful vasodilator and component of the KALLIKREIN-KININ SYSTEM.
Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.
The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.
Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.
A method of non-invasive, continuous measurement of MICROCIRCULATION. The technique is based on the values of the DOPPLER EFFECT of low-power laser light scattered randomly by static structures and moving tissue particulates.
A nicotinic antagonist that has been used as a ganglionic blocker in hypertension, as an adjunct to anesthesia, and to induce hypotension during surgery.
Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.
The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.
The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).
Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
A diet which contains very little sodium chloride. It is prescribed by some for hypertension and for edematous states. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.
A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.
The posture of an individual lying face up.
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
Plethysmographic determination in which the intensity of light reflected from the skin surface and the red cells below is measured to determine the blood volume of the respective area. There are two types, transmission and reflectance.
An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).
A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.
An increase in the excretion of URINE. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
An antagonist of ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR with antihypertensive activity due to the reduced pressor effect of ANGIOTENSIN II.
The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.
Injections into the cerebral ventricles.
The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.
A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.
GRAY MATTER located in the dorsomedial part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA associated with the solitary tract. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from most organ systems including the terminations of the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves. It is a major coordinator of AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM regulation of cardiovascular, respiratory, gustatory, gastrointestinal, and chemoreceptive aspects of HOMEOSTASIS. The solitary nucleus is also notable for the large number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS which are found therein.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.
The predominant form of mammalian antidiuretic hormone. It is a nonapeptide containing an ARGININE at residue 8 and two disulfide-linked cysteines at residues of 1 and 6. Arg-vasopressin is used to treat DIABETES INSIPIDUS or to improve vasomotor tone and BLOOD PRESSURE.
The act of constricting.
A class of drugs whose main indications are the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. They exert their hemodynamic effect mainly by inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. They also modulate sympathetic nervous system activity and increase prostaglandin synthesis. They cause mainly vasodilation and mild natriuresis without affecting heart rate and contractility.
Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Procedure in which arterial blood pressure is intentionally reduced in order to control blood loss during surgery. This procedure is performed either pharmacologically or by pre-surgical removal of blood.
Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.
The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.
A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.
A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.
Drugs that selectively bind to and activate alpha adrenergic receptors.
A nicotinic cholinergic antagonist often referred to as the prototypical ganglionic blocker. It is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and does not cross the blood-brain barrier. It has been used for a variety of therapeutic purposes including hypertension but, like the other ganglionic blockers, it has been replaced by more specific drugs for most purposes, although it is widely used a research tool.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.
Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.
An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.
Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.
Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)
The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.
The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.
A nicotinic antagonist that has been used as a ganglionic blocking agent in hypertension.
The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.
The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
A nicotinic antagonist used primarily as a ganglionic blocker in animal research. It has been used as an antihypertensive agent but has been supplanted by more specific drugs in most clinical applications.
The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
A hormone secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX that regulates electrolyte and water balance by increasing the renal retention of sodium and the excretion of potassium.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.
The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.
Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.
An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.
A nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist. It is used in the treatment of hypertension and hypertensive emergencies, pheochromocytoma, vasospasm of RAYNAUD DISEASE and frostbite, clonidine withdrawal syndrome, impotence, and peripheral vascular disease.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.
A steroid metabolite that is the 11-deoxy derivative of CORTICOSTERONE and the 21-hydroxy derivative of PROGESTERONE.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.
A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.
Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.
Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.
The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.
The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.
A phenethylamine found in EPHEDRA SINICA. PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is an isomer. It is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used for asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.
A 21-amino acid peptide produced in a variety of tissues including endothelial and vascular smooth-muscle cells, neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, and endometrial cells. It acts as a modulator of vasomotor tone, cell proliferation, and hormone production. (N Eng J Med 1995;333(6):356-63)
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
Instruments for measuring arterial blood pressure consisting of an inflatable cuff, inflating bulb, and a gauge showing the blood pressure. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
Posture while lying with the head lower than the rest of the body. Extended time in this position is associated with temporary physiologic disturbances.
Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
An angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that is used to treat HYPERTENSION and HEART FAILURE.
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.
The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)
A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)
Forced expiratory effort against a closed GLOTTIS.
An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.
A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION.

Development and validation of a novel method to derive central aortic systolic pressure from the radial pressure waveform using an n-point moving average method. (1/407)

 (+info)

Medical management of stable coronary artery disease. (2/407)

All patients with stable coronary artery disease require medical therapy to prevent disease progression and recurrent cardiovascular events. Three classes of medication are essential to therapy: lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet agents. Lipid-lowering therapy is necessary to decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a target level of less than 100 mg per dL, and physicians should consider a goal of less than 70 mg per dL for very high-risk patients. Statins have demonstrated clear benefits in morbidity and mortality in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease; other medications that can be used in addition to statins to lower cholesterol include ezetimibe, fibrates, and nicotinic acid. Blood pressure therapy for patients with coronary artery disease should start with beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. If these medications are not tolerated, calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor blockers are acceptable alternatives. Aspirin is the first-line antiplatelet agent except in patients who have recently had a myocardial infarction or undergone stent placement, in which case clopidogrel is recommended. Anginal symptoms of coronary artery disease can be treated with beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, nitrates, or any combination of these. Familiarity with these medications and with the evidence supporting their use is essential to reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease.  (+info)

Differential effects of late-life initiation of low-dose enalapril and losartan on diastolic function in senescent Fischer 344 x Brown Norway male rats. (3/407)

 (+info)

Tolerance to central hypovolemia: the influence of oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity. (4/407)

 (+info)

A flow-diverting stent is not a pressure-diverting stent. (5/407)

 (+info)

Storm in a coffee cup: caffeine modifies brain activation to social signals of threat. (6/407)

 (+info)

Implication of CD38 gene in podocyte epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and glomerular sclerosis. (7/407)

 (+info)

Clinical importance of diastolic sonoelastographic scoring in the management of thyroid nodules. (8/407)

 (+info)

Salusin-beta (Human) 4418-s 0.1 mg | 65.00 EURAla - Ile - Phe - Ile - Phe - Ile - Arg - Trp - Leu - Leu - Lys - Leu - Gly - His - His - Gly ...
Broch O. 1, Bein B. 1, Gruenewald M. 1, Carstens A. 1, Illies C. 1, Schöneich F. 2, Steinfath M. 1, Renner J. 1 ✉. 1 Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany; 2 Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany. ...
Tricuspid insufficiency is a disorder involving backward flow of blood across the tricuspid valve, which separates the right ventricle from the right atrium
Looking for The Clinical Measurement Retinal Arterial Pressure ...? Read The Clinical Measurement Retinal Arterial Pressure ... from here. Check 238 flipbooks from . s The Clinical Measurement Retinal Arterial Pressure ... looks good? Share The Clinical Measurement Retinal Arterial Pressure ... online.
Twenty patients, affected by mitral disease associated with tricuspid insufficiency and selected for mitral commissurotomy on the basis of clinical evidence of advanced heart disease, have been studied before and after surgery. The further course of the disease could be related to various clinical and pathophysiologic conditions, the importance of which in the selection of patients is stressed.. ...
From Summary: The development and the use of a chart for estimating the pressure losses in jet-engine combustion chambers are described. By means of the chart, the pressure losses due to fluid friction and to momentum changes in the air flow accompanying combustion can be separately evaluated. The over-all pressure losses computed from the pressure-loss chart are within 7 percent of the experimental values for the three types of combustion chambers considered herein.
Pre-operative Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes Associated with Vasoplegia in Recipients of Orthotopic Heart Transplantation in the Contemporary Era. Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN Patarroyo M, Simbaqueba C, Shrestha K, Starling RC, Smedira N, Tang WH, Taylor DO. J Heart Lung Transplant. 2012 Mar;31(3):282-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2011.10.010 Epub…
Looking for online definition of arterial pressure in the Medical Dictionary? arterial pressure explanation free. What is arterial pressure? Meaning of arterial pressure medical term. What does arterial pressure mean?
Tricuspid insufficiency except as rarely found in the fetus is generally due to a relative insufficiency rather than to an actual disease of the tricuspid valve.
That we found a statistically significant difference between arterial and venous sampler filling times and a statistically significant relationship between MAP and filling times was not surprising, and we believe the difference between arterial and venous sampler filling times to be clinically important. Our results are consistent with a previous laboratory study, although our times differed from theirs.4 Our arterial group had a normal estimated MAP of 91 mm Hg and a mean filling time of 15 s/mL, whereas Johnson et al created a normal group using a simulation with a MAP of 93 mm Hg and measured a filling time of 16 s for a 2 mL sample. When filling time is converted to s/mL, the filling time equals 8 s/mL for the laboratory study, which is nearly twice as fast as our human group. This difference illustrates the importance of performing this study using human subjects. Some reasons for this difference may include various differences between human subjects and a laboratory simulation, such as ...
This paper considers the effect of excessive total pressure losses for heat transfer problems in fluid flows with a high circumferential swirl component. At RWTH Aachen University, a novel gas generator concept is under research. This design avoids some disadvantages of small gas turbines and uses a rotating combustion chamber. During the predesign of the rotating combustion chamber using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools, unexpected high total pressure losses were detected. To analyze this unknown phenomenon, a gas-dynamic model of the rotating combustion chamber has been developed to explain the unexpected high Rayleigh pressure losses. The derivation of the gas-dynamic model, the physical phenomenon related to the high total pressure losses in high-swirl combustion, the influencing factors, as well as thermodynamic interpretation of the Rayleigh pressure losses, are presented in this paper. In addition, the CFD results are validated by the gas-dynamic model derived. The results ...
Boilers - Home Heating Steam and Hot Water Systems - Vokera Linear 24 pressure loss problem - Hi all, I need some help/advice. I have had a Vokera Linear 24 combi boiler for 4 years and am
Definition of artificial lung - Any of various devices designed to assist breathing or to behave like a lung; (in later use especially) a device connected to the
Unsolicited. This document was submitted to SPE (or its predecessor organization) for consideration for publication in one of its technical journals. While not published, this paper has been included in the eLibrary with the permission of and transf
Blood pressure is what this is the effect of blood on the walls of blood vessels. In other words, increasing the pressure of the fluid in the circulatory system in comparison with the atmospheric indices.
Detects and locates quickly and reliably gas leaks and pressure losses in pipes, pressurised systems, etc. by forming highly visible bubbles when applied over any leak. ...
Rterial pressures for control and experimental groups. No statistically significant differences were observed among mean arterial pressures during 5day
Relationship between the changes of perfused capillary density, when mean arterial pressure (MAP) was increased from the baseline to a MAP of 85 mmHg, with the
Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare and potentially fatal form of elevated blood pressure in the lungs.
Clinical trial for Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension , A Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Macitentan 75 mg in Inoperable or Persistent/Recurrent Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension
Pulmonary arterial pressure response to PGF2α without and with pretreatment with Nw-nitro-L-arginine(NNLA).Values are means±SE of 12 experiments.
At the University of Pittsburgh, researchers headed by William Federspiel, have been developing an artificial lung to overcome the limitations of
A normal range for mean arterial blood pressure is 70 to 110, according to GlobalRPh. A minimum of 60 is required to supply enough blood to nourish the coronary arteries, brain and kidneys. If mean...
In the 2009 European Guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PH), one section covers aspects of pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The practical implementation of the guidelines for this disease is of crucia …
Acute venous thromboembolism resolves in most cases. However, an estimated 0.5%-3.8% of pulmonary embolism (PE) survivors develop chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) resulting from mechanical obstruction of the pulmonary arteries [1-3]. Most patients with CTEPH have experienced a PE in their lifetime; however, up to 25% of patients have never reported a thrombotic event [4].
Sekhon, Ainslie and Griesdale identify cerebral autoregulation as one of the factors relevant to secondary brain injury after Hypoxic Ischaemic Brain Injury (HIBI). In order to discuss cerebral autoregulation in more detail it is necessary to first discuss mean arterial pressure. What is Mean Arterial Pressure? The mean arterial pressure is the average arterial…
Dr. Gustavo A. Heresi presents Serum CXC-Chemokine Ligand 10 is Associated with Severity of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension, recorded live at the UC San Diego Health Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center National Proceedings: CTEPH 2017., TV Network
Patients who have completed the 16 weeks treatment of the CHEST-1 trial (study number 11348) will be asked to participate in this long term extension study with BAY63-2521. The aim of the long term study is to collect additional information to evaluate the safety and tolerability of BAY63-2521. Patients will be treated with open label medication on their individual optimal dose between 0,5 mg - 2,5 mg tid ...
Vasoplegia occurs in up to 16% of patients who undergo heart transplantation (HT) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of a 61-year-old man with ischemic cardiomyopathy receiving sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto; Novartis, Cambridge, MA) who developed profound hypotension after HT. He was treated with intravenous methylene blue and high-dose vasopressors, but developed acute kidney injury requiring dialysis and a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. This case supports a potent vasodilatory effect of sacubitril/valsartan, and if confirmed by other studies, might warrant consideration for withholding treatment while awaiting HT, particularly in patients with risk factors for vasoplegia ...
BACKGROUND:A central-to-radial arterial pressure gradient may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), which, in some patients, may last for a prolonged time after CPB. Whenever there is a pressure gradient, the radial artery pressure measure may underestimate a more centrally measured systemic pre
Bayer HealthCare launched an educational website for US physicians about the rare, life-threatening condition chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
M L Quinn, N T Smith, J E Mandel, J F Martin, A M Schneider; AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF ARTERIAL PRESSURE IN THE OPERATING ROOM: SAFETY DURING EPISODES OF ARTIFACT AND HYPOTENSION ?. Anesthesiology 1988;69(3A):A327. Download citation file:. ...
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click Continue we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click Find out more for information on how to change your cookie settings ...
the doc is doing a translaminar MIDLINE t9-10 epidural sterioid injection. He raised the needle over the t9-10 interlaminar space and did an epidural
BACKGROUND Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is associated with proximal pulmonary artery obstruction and vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that pulmonary arterial smooth muscle (PASMC) and endothelial cells (PAEC) may actively contribute to remodeling of the proximal pulmonary vascular wall in CTEPH. Our present objective was to characterize PASMC and PAEC from large arteries of CTEPH patients and investigate their potential involvement in vascular remodeling. METHODS Primary cultures of proximal PAEC and PASMC from patients with CTEPH, with non-thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (PH) and lung donors have been established. PAEC and PASMC have been characterized by immunofluorescence using specific markers. Expression of smooth muscle specific markers within the pulmonary vascular wall has been studied by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Mitogenic activity and migratory capacity of PASMC and PAEC have been investigated in vitro. RESULTS PAEC express CD31 on their
TY - JOUR. T1 - Long-Term Outcomes after Percutaneous Transluminal Pulmonary Angioplasty for Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension. AU - Inami, Takumi. AU - Kataoka, Masaharu. AU - Yanagisawa, Ryoji. AU - Ishiguro, Haruhisa. AU - Shimura, Nobuhiko. AU - Fukuda, Keiichi. AU - Yoshino, Hideaki. AU - Satoh, Toru. PY - 2016/12/13. Y1 - 2016/12/13. KW - angioplasty. KW - angioplasty, balloon. KW - hypertension, pulmonary. KW - thromboembolism. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85006052065&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85006052065&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.024201. DO - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.024201. M3 - Letter. C2 - 27956405. AN - SCOPUS:85006052065. VL - 134. SP - 2030. EP - 2032. JO - Circulation. JF - Circulation. SN - 0009-7322. IS - 24. ER - ...
Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is an uncommon consequence of acute pulmonary embolism. We report CTEPH in a 58-year-old male who had pleurisy with a small haemorrhagic pleural effusion three months ago. The six-month course of
A deletion/insertion (Del/Ins) polymorphism of 28 base pairs (bp) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of fibrinogen alpha gene ( FGA) was associated with thromboembolic diseases, but the underlying me
Please login to see all eligible discussion postings Either the content youre seeking doesnt exist or it requires proper authentication before viewing. ...
1. A satisfactory method for the direct determination of the pulmonary arterial pressure in rats is described.. 2. The arithmetical mean of the blood pressure in the pulmonary artery in a series of thirty-four normal albino rats under nembutal anesthesia is 256 mm. H20 (18.8 mm. Hg).. 3. Intravenous epinephrine causes an abrupt but briefly sustained rise in the pulmonary arterial pressure with a gradual return to normal.. ...
Plaque composition in plexogenic and thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: the critical role of thrombotic material in pultaceous core formation ...
The blood pressure is in our body is always changing and it is part of the human physiology and biology. It is very rare for a person to have blood pressure that is always the same no matter what. This is true. It is just not going to happen for anyone. The reason behind this is that we do different things like eat, sit and stand, breath differently, move around and do many other things throughout a day.. Every time that we do something different, our blood pressure will change. It is going to react to the different position that we are in. it is very important that doctors and other professionals have the set rate for each person that relates to blood pressure and what it should be. It is just impossible for anyone to take his or her blood pressure all the time throughout the day. This is where arterial pressure starts. What this is will be the average value for a persons blood pressure and it will stand for the persons health and blood pressure on a regular and normal day.. There are ...
Read about the pulmonary thromboendarterectomy surgical procedure performed at UC San Diego and how it can help patients suffering from Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH).
A Jet Airways flight returned to Mumbai, Indias financial capital, on Thursday after dozens of passengers complained of ear pain and nose bleeding due to the loss in cabin pressure.
If you care about your health, you should maintain normal weight. Use BMI Calculator to find out your Body Mass Index, which reveals if you are.... ...
AbeBooks.com: Arterial Pressure and Hypertension (Circulatory Physiology) (9780721643625) by Arthur C. Guyton and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices.
With volumetric mesh, two-dimensional mesh weave successfully conquers the third dimension.. It can be woven using a variety of materials, thereby enabling many individual product properties such as temperature resistance or media resistance. In the filtration process, volumetric mesh stands out thanks to its low pressure loss. An innovative weaving technique allows volume porosities of up to 90%, while the defined irregular filter openings guarantee reliable filtration even when the filtration area is reduced. Alongside the impressive functionality, the outstanding price-performance ratio makes it particularly attractive for cost-sensitive applications.. ...
Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a potentially curable condition [1]. The current treatment of choice for CTEPH is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) in patients who are considered candidates for surgical therapy. However, some CTEPH patients have thrombotic disease that affects the distal segmental pulmonary artery branches, while others have major medical co-morbidities which make them less than optimal candidates for surgical PEA. So, what are the alternatives when there is an inadequate response to medical therapy with pulmonary vasodilating agents such as Riociguat? Angioplasty has been performed in most vascular beds with excellent results since Dr. Andreas Gruentzig paved the way for balloon angioplasty. However, experience with angioplasty in the pulmonary vasculature has been mostly limited to pediatric patients with congenital pulmonary artery stenosis.. A group from Boston had explored the possibility of performing pulmonary angioplasty to treat patients with CTEPH ...
The main findings of this study are as follows: In a large (n=1185), community-based sample of African ancestry, independent of confounders including mean arterial pressure (distending pressures), reflected waves (RI or Pb) accounted for more of the variation in PPc and LVMI than did Pf, whereas Pi accounted for more of the variation in PPc and LVMI than did aortic systolic pressure augmentation (AIx or Pa). The marked contrasting contributions of indexes of reflected waves, RI or Pb and AIx or Pa, as compared with Pf and Pi toward variations in PPc and LVMI were noted below as well as above the age threshold (50 years) when Pf or Pi began to increase as well as in women and men considered separately.. Several previous studies have reported on a relatively greater contribution of Pa as compared with Pi to age-related increases in PPc.24-26 However, it is now recognized that Pa may be confounded by considerable overlap between forward and backward waves and that there is a poor relationship ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Role of spinal V1a receptors in regulation of arterial pressure during acute and chronic osmotic stress. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
This may occur at the top of the lungs, although not in health. Here the arterial pressure is not quite above alveolar pressure by the time it reaches this height. As such, blood flow through the lung unit does not occur. In health, this means that the arterial pressure at this height is 0 (as this is alveolar pressure) but the application of alveolar pressure (e.g. through IPPV) can require higher arterial pressure ...
Mean arterial pressure. *pH arterial. *Heart rate. *Respiratory rate. *Sodium (serum). *Potassium (serum) ...
Pulmonary arterial pressure[edit]. Periodic oscillations of the pulmonary arterial pressure occur with respiration. Pulmonary ... Pulmonary arterial pressure[edit]. Pulmonary arterial pressure fluctuates with respiration and rises during REM sleep. ... Arterial blood gases[edit]. The Arterial blood gasses pCO2 increases by 3-7mmHg, pO2 drops by 3-9mmHg and SaO2 drops by 2% or ... Arterial blood gases[edit]. Hypoxemia due to hypoventilation is noted in REM sleep but this is less well studied than NREM ...
Arterial blood pressure falls. This destimulates baroreceptors in the carotid sinus and aortic arch which link to the nucleus ... whether the problem is primarily increased venous back pressure (preload), or failure to supply adequate arterial perfusion ( ... Binding to alpha-1 receptors results in systemic arterial vasoconstriction. This helps restore blood pressure but also ... This increase in volume or pressure backs up to the left atrium and then to the pulmonary veins. Increased volume or pressure ...
2 partial pressure in the arterial blood. In healthy individuals, the difference between arterial blood and expired gas CO. 2 ... represents the partial pressure of carbon dioxide measured by the capnogram as a function of time t. {\displaystyle t}. since ... represents the alveolar partial pressure of carbon dioxide.. *. α. {\displaystyle \alpha }. represents the inverse of the dead ... Capnography is the monitoring of the concentration or partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO. 2) in the respiratory gases. Its ...
arterial partial-pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) , 65 torr (20 mmHg) over baseline PaCO2 (evidence of hypercapnic ... the ratio of the arterial partial-pressure of oxygen to the fraction of oxygen in the gases inspired (PaO2/FiO2) , 300 (the ... If the person has been sufficiently fluid resuscitated but the mean arterial pressure is not greater than 65 mmHg, vasopressors ... hypotension with blood pressure , 5th percentile for age or systolic blood pressure , 2 standard deviations below normal for ...
PWV intrinsically varies with blood pressure.[14] PWV increases with pressure for two reasons: *Arterial compliance (. d. V. / ... 4.2 Using pressure and volume, or pressure and diameter. *4.3 Using pressure-flow velocity, pressure-volumetric flow ... decreases with increasing pressure due to the curvilinear relationship between arterial pressure and volume. ... Using pressure and volume, or pressure and diameter[edit]. This is based on the method described by Bramwell & Hill[17] who ...
"Arterial blood pressure"), which defend the arterial blood pressure against changes, especially hypotension. ... is directly proportional to the arterial blood pressure, making this tissue an ancillary arterial blood pressure sensor. ... monitor the arterial blood pressure.[46] Rising pressure is detected when the walls of the arteries stretch due to an increase ... when the arterial blood pressure falls, or to slow down (bradycardia) when the pressure rises above set point.[13] Thus the ...
Arterial baroreceptors are reset to a higher pressure in hypertensive patients, and this peripheral resetting reverts to normal ... Cardiac output and peripheral resistance are the two determinants of arterial pressure. Cardiac output is determined by stroke ... Mark AL (December 1996). "The sympathetic nervous system in hypertension: a potential long-term regulator of arterial pressure ... Klabunde, Richard E. (2007). "Cardiovascular Physiology Concepts - Mean Arterial Pressure". Archived from the original on ...
Cardiac output and peripheral resistance are the two determinants of arterial pressure and so blood pressure is normally ... This causes the arterial pressure to rise as the cardiac output increases. Local autoregulatory mechanisms counteract this by ... As arterial pressure increases in response to high sodium chloride intake, urinary sodium excretion increases and the excretion ... A blood pressure test can be done in a health care provider's office or clinic. To track blood pressure readings over a period ...
Langsetmo, I.; Fedde, M.R.; Meyer, T.S.; Erickson, H.H. (September 2000). "Relationship of pulmonary arterial pressure to ... Pulmonary capillary transmural pressure is determined by pulmonary capillary pressure and airway pressure. The horse has very ... High pulmonary blood pressures[edit]. The most widely accepted theory is that high transmural pressures lead to pulmonary ... During inspiration, the high positive pressures in the pulmonary blood vessels pushing out are met by negative pressures ...
Decrease in partial pressure of alveolar CO2. Decrease in partial pressure of arterial CO2. Increase in blood pH, (respiratory ... that pressure on the vagus nerve causes changes to pulse rate and blood pressure and is dangerous in cases of carotid sinus ... In some versions the bear-hug is replaced by pressure on the neck in which case blackout is a hybrid of strangulation and self- ... This alone is enough to cause a blackout, but it is widely believed that the effect is enhanced if lung air pressure is ...
Dumler, Francis (January 2009). "Dietary Sodium Intake and Arterial Blood Pressure". Journal of Renal Nutrition. 19 (1): 57-60 ... High blood pressure: Evidence shows an association between salt intakes and blood pressure among different populations and age ... of their blood pressure; for people with normal blood pressure, the decrease was negligible. Weak evidence indicated that these ... He, F. J.; Li, J.; MacGregor, G. A. (4 April 2013). "Effect of longer term modest salt reduction on blood pressure: Cochrane ...
Mullan B. A.; Young I. S.; Fee H.; McCance D. R. (2002). "Ascorbic acid reduces blood pressure and arterial stiffness in type 2 ... Blood pressure control[edit]. Modulating and ameliorating diabetic complications may improve the overall quality of life for ... Other health problems compound the chronic complications of diabetes such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated ... Mangoni AA, Sherwood RA, Swift CG, Jackson SHD (2002). "Folic acid enhances endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in ...
VO2 or arterial blood pressure in sports medicine or home care.[45] ... "Non-invasive monitoring of central blood pressure by electrical impedance tomography: first experimental evidence." Med. Biol. ...
Knight WD, Seth R, Boron J, Overton JM (2009). "Short-term physiological hyperleptinemia decreases arterial blood pressure". ... Hyperleptinemia produced by infusion or adenoviral gene transfer decreases blood pressure in rats. Leptin microinjections into ... but decreased after the administration of continuous positive airway pressure. In non-obese individuals, however, restful sleep ...
... is proportional to the average arterial pressure. As aortic and pulmonary pressures increase, the afterload increases ... and pulmonic pressure or pulmonary artery pressure (for the right ventricle). The pressure in the ventricles must be greater ... The diastolic blood pressure in the aorta falls, due to regurgitation. This increases pulse pressure.[citation needed] Mitral ... in addition to the blood pressure required to eject blood into the aorta. For instance, if the blood pressure is 120/80, and ...
2007). "Aging enhances pressure-induced arterial superoxide formation". American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory ...
Increases mean arterial pressure.. Angiotensin IVEdit. Arg , Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe. Angiotensin IV is a hexapeptide that, ... regulation of systemic arterial blood pressure by renin-angiotensin. • regulation of apoptotic process. • positive regulation ... Increases in systemic blood pressure will maintain renal perfusion pressure; however, constriction of the afferent and efferent ... decreased intrarenal blood pressure (,90mmHg systolic blood pressure[6] ) at the juxtaglomerular cells, or decreased delivery ...
May 2009). Früh K (ed.). "Cytomegalovirus infection causes an increase of arterial blood pressure". PLOS Pathog. 5 (5): ... A study published in 2009 links infection with CMV to high blood pressure in mice, and suggests that the result of CMV ... Kahl, M.; Siegel-Axel, D.; Stenglein, S. (1 August 2000). "Efficient Lytic Infection of Human Arterial Endothelial Cells by ... a protein known to contribute to high blood pressure. CMV encodes a protein, UL16, which is involved in the immune evasion of ...
Fritsch-Yelle, JM; Charles, JB; Jones, MM; Wood, ML (March 1996). "Microgravity decreases heart rate and arterial pressure in ... However, one crewmember experienced a 5-beat run of ventricular tachycardia during a lower-body negative pressure protocol, and ... The arrhythmias occurred during effort tests, extravehicular activities (EVAs), lower body negative pressure sessions, and ...
... and arterial vasoconstriction. Thus, it regulates the body's mean arterial blood pressure. Renin can also be referred to as a ... A more detailed analysis of this line indicated plasma creatinine was also increased and males had lower mean arterial pressure ... A decrease in arterial blood pressure (that could be related to a decrease in blood volume) as detected by baroreceptors ( ... pressure-sensitive cells). This is the most direct causal link between blood pressure and renin secretion (the other two ...
Pulmonary arterial hypertension, elevated pressure in the pulmonary arteries. Most commonly it is idiopathic (i.e. of unknown ...
The baroreceptor reflex can correct for a change in arterial pressure by increasing or decreasing heart rate. In contrast, the ... This phenomenon occurred even if arterial blood pressure did not increase. He further observed that heart rate increased when ... Boron, Walter F.; Boulpaep, Emile L. (2011). "Chapter 23: Regulation of Arterial Pressure and Cardiac Output". Medical ... This results in an increase in the pressure of the right atrium, which stimulates the atrial stretch receptors (low pressure ...
... plays a major role in regulating arterial blood pressure and breathing. It regulates blood pressure by regulating the activity ... Ann M. Schreihofer, Alan F. Sved (2011). "The Ventrolateral Medulla and Sympathetic Regulation of Arterial Pressure". In Ida J ...
MAP = mean arterial pressure (in mmHg), the average pressure of blood as it leaves the heart ... During each heartbeat, systemic arterial blood pressure varies between a maximum (systolic) and a minimum (diastolic) pressure. ... The ideal blood pressure in the brachial artery, where standard blood pressure cuffs measure pressure, is ,120/80 mmHg. Other ... Since pressure is a function of force per unit area, (P = F/A), the larger the surface area, the lesser the pressure when an ...
Davis also developed a device that provided an uninterrupted measurement of arterial blood pressure that would not interfere ... Davis, R.C. (1957). "Continuous recording of arterial pressure: An analysis of the problem". Journal of Comparative and ... with the subject's true blood pressure, and he is credited with introducing the cathode-ray oscilloscope technique for ...
Normalization of arterial pressure after barodenervation: role of pressure natriuresis. Am J Physiol. 1990;259(6 Pt 2):R1172- ... Osborn, J. W.; England, S. K. (December 1990). "Normalization of arterial pressure after barodenervation: role of pressure ... England, S. K.; Wooldridge, T. A.; Stekiel, W. J.; Rusch, N. J. (May 1993). "Enhanced single-channel K+ current in arterial ... She found that calcium dependent potassium channel function is aberrant in specific patches of arterial muscle in rats in rats ...
"Dietary sodium and arterial blood pressure: evidence against genetic susceptibility". British Medical Journal. 291 (6508): 1525 ... High Blood Pressure. Excerpt from High Blood Pressure at your fingertips. Third edition: London: Class Publishing; 2004. Hart ... He was also the first doctor to routinely measure every patient's blood pressure and as a result was able to reduce premature ... Hart JT, Savage W, Fahey T. High Blood Pressure at Your Fingertips: The Comprehensive and Medically Accurate Manual on How to ...
Intracranial pressure will rise as a result of continued brain growth within the rigid skull.[16] It appears that in children ... wide-set eyes • split uvula or cleft palate • arterial tortuosity • aortic root dilatation • aneurysms 609192 610168 613795 ... Elevated intracranial pressureEdit. When the ICP is elevated the following symptomes may occur: vomiting, visual disturbance, ... The causes of an elevation of the intracranial pressure are best understood using the Monro-Kellie doctrine.[21] The Monro- ...
Pulse oximeters should be used to monitor the level of arterial oxygen saturation that is the basic measure of hypoxic training ... Commonly used are air separation systems employing semi-permeable membrane technology or pressure swing adsorption or (PSAS). ... The therapeutic range of arterial oxygen desaturation for IHT is SpO2 = 75% - 88% and must be selected based upon the ... hypoxicators have a built-in pulse oximeter used to monitor and in some cases control the temporary reduction of arterial ...
Pressure should be firm and be applied for at least five minutes and up to 20 minutes; tilting the head forward helps decrease ... The bleeding can also be stopped by intra-arterial embolization using a catheter placed in the groin and threaded up the aorta ... This applies pressure to Little's area (Kiesselbach's area), the source of the majority of nose bleeds, and promotes clotting. ... The flow of blood normally stops when the blood clots, which may be encouraged by direct pressure applied by pinching the soft ...
... high blood pressure, and vision conditions.[123] Other reviews have found no evidence of significant benefit for asthma,[124][ ... the association between chiropractic therapy and vertebral arterial dissection is not proven.[16] However, it has been ... "Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association With Cervical Manipulative Therapy: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From ... "The quality of reports on cervical arterial dissection following cervical spinal manipulation". PLoS ONE. 8 (3): e59170. ...
pulmonary gas pressures. *alveolar gas equation. *alveolar-arterial gradient. *hemoglobin. *oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation ... This negative pressure generates airflow because of the pressure difference between the atmosphere and alveolus. Air enters, ... which results in expansion of the intrapleural space and an increase in negative pressure according to Boyle's law. ...
Arterial and venous hypoxia, or the deprivation of adequate oxygen supply to certain areas of the brain, occurs when a tumor ... Pressure areas where the brain tissue has been compressed by a tumor also appear hyperintense on T2-weighted scans and might ... Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) may be attributable to the direct mass effect of the tumor, increased blood volume, or ... Headaches as a result of raised intracranial pressure can be an early symptom of brain cancer.[13] However, isolated headache ...
Dentali F, Squizzato A, Ageno W. The metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for venous and arterial thrombosis. Semin. Thromb. ... Informativeness of indices of blood pressure, obesity and serum lipids in relation to ischaemic heart disease mortality: the ...
Surgery is the last resort; vascular surgeons can perform either endarterectomies on arterial blockages or perform an arterial ... Blood pressure. Hypertension. *Hypertensive heart disease. *Hypertensive emergency. *Hypertensive nephropathy. *Essential ... Most commonly, intermittent (or vascular or arterial) claudication is due to peripheral arterial disease which implies ... One of the hallmarks of arterial claudication is that it occurs intermittently. It disappears after a very brief rest and the ...
pulmonary gas pressures. *alveolar gas equation. *alveolar-arterial gradient. *hemoglobin. *oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation ... Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) MIP, also known as negative inspiratory force (NIF), is the maximum pressure that can be ... pressure measured at the airway opening (PaO) during an occlusion at end-inspiration and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP ... Represented by centimeters of water pressure (cmH2O) and measured with a manometer. Maximum inspiratory pressure is an ...
Elevated intracranial pressure is generally accepted to be a late effect of HACE.[21][22] High central venous pressure may also ... FiO2 should be titrated to maintain arterial oxygen saturation of greater than 90%, bearing in mind that oxygen supply is often ... If a lumbar puncture is performed, it will show normal cerebral spinal fluid and cell counts but an increase in pressure.[7] In ... The leaking may be caused by increased pressure, or it may be caused by inflammation that makes the endothelium vulnerable to ...
... usually noradrenaline for hypotension not responding to initial fluid resuscitation to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) , ...
... causes arterial/arteriolar vasodilation leading to a decrease in blood pressure by activating peripheral D1 ... Adverse effects include headache, flushing, nausea, hypotension, reflex tachycardia, and increased intraocular pressure.[4][10] ... Fenoldopam mesylate administration should be undertaken with caution to patients with glaucoma or raised intraocular pressure ... resulting in vasodilation of most arterial beds, including renal, mesenteric, and coronary arteries.[8] to cause a reduction in ...
... then pneumatic tourniquets are applied to the limb and inflated 30mmHg above arterial pressure to occlude all blood vessels and ... The safest tourniquet equipment should have IVRA-specific features such as independent limb occlusion pressure measurements for ... while sufficient but not excessive tourniquet pressure ensures that anesthetics remain within the limb without risking injury. ...
Advanced COPD leads to high pressure on the lung arteries, which strains the right ventricle of the heart.[5][37][38] This ... An analysis of arterial blood is used to determine the need for oxygen; this is recommended in those with an FEV1 less than 35 ... Supplemental oxygen is recommended in those with low oxygen levels at rest (a partial pressure of oxygen less than 50-55 mmHg ... The greatest reduction in air flow occurs when breathing out, as the pressure in the chest is compressing the airways at this ...
Diastolic function of the heart also becomes affected.[53] Elevated arterial pressure (i.e., hypertension) can be a consequence ... Automatic positive airway pressure, or automatic positive airway pressure, also known as "Auto CPAP", incorporates pressure ... The additional pressure holds open the relaxed muscles. There are several variants: *Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP ... and provides two different pressures, a higher one during inhalation and a lower pressure during exhalation. This system is ...
Notably, it is never filled with blood in physiological settings as it does not receive arterial blood circulation.[5] ... By opening Schlemm's canal, the pressure inside the eye is relieved. Long-term results are available, published in May 2009 in ... which was associated with a reduction in intraocular pressure.[2] ... designed to enhance and restore the eye's natural drainage system to provide sustained reduction of intraocular pressure. ...
Fluid is push out through the intercellular cleft at the arterial end of the capillary because that's where the pressure is the ... Two opposing forces achieve this balance; hydrostatic pressure and colloid osmotic pressure, using the intercellular clefts are ... The larger the intercellular cleft, the lesser the pressure and the more fluid will flow out the cleft. This enlargement of the ...
These studies demonstrated the restoration of heart rate, cardiac output and mean aortic pressures in animal subjects with ... in the arterial-venous system, physical activity as determined by an accelerometer, body temperature, ATP levels, adrenaline, ... the British Journal of Anaesthesia suggests this must be done to raise the ventricular pressure to 10-15 mmHg to induce ...
High blood pressure in the long term can damage the endothelium, commonly known as the blood vessel lining. This leads to a ... In the kidneys, as a result of benign arterial hypertension, hyaline (pink, amorphous, homogeneous material) accumulates in the ... Hypertensive kidney disease is a medical condition referring to damage to the kidney due to chronic high blood pressure. It ... The aim of the medical treatment is to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease by reducing blood pressure and albumin ...
The gut mucosal cells do not get enough nourishment from arterial blood supply to stay healthy, especially in very premature ... support for blood pressure, parenteral nutrition,[15] and prompt antibiotic therapy. ...
In female mice, the deletion of eNOS and COX-1 did not affect mean arterial blood pressure, while males become hypertensive[1] ... Recently, EDHF has been implicated in gender-related differences in blood pressure control. The generation of animals that lack ... and blood pressure, and in particular when production of NO is compromised. Moreover, depending on the type of cardiovascular ... and its importance at the level of small arteries delivers a theoretical opportunity to control systemic blood pressure. There ...
Samples from the earlobe are seen to be a more appropriate site for the prediction of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen.[ ... Samples from capillaries from either the earlobe or the fingertip can be used to predict the arterial partial pressure of ... The source of the blood is reflected in the name of each test; arterial blood gases come from arteries, venous blood gases come ... Analysis of paired arterial and venous specimens can give insights into the aetiology of acidosis in the newborn.[2] ...
... especially where there is pre-existing raised intracranial pressure or where the tumor is causing near-total obstruction of a ... "Gastrointestinal complications associated with hepatic arterial Yttrium-90 microsphere therapy". Journal of vascular and ... Much research has been devoted to overcoming hypoxia including the use of high pressure oxygen tanks, hyperthermia therapy ( ...
It also helps in keeping the internal organs intact and in creating intra-abdominal pressure, such as when exercising or ... The rectus abdominis has many sources of arterial blood supply. Classification of the vascular anatomy of muscles: First, the ...
a b MDGuidelines , Arterial Embolism And Thrombosis From The Medical Disability Advisor by Presley Reed, MD. Retrieved on April ... arterial embolism.[1] Angioscopy is also used as an adjunctive procedure during vascular bypass to visualize valves within ...
In medicine, Friedreich's sign is the exaggerated drop in diastolic central venous pressure seen in constrictive pericarditis ( ... Arterial. *aortic aneurysm (Cardarelli's sign, Oliver's sign). *pulmonary embolism (McConnell's sign). *radial artery ... and manifested as abrupt collapse of the neck veins or marked descent of the central venous pressure waveform. ...
... ostrich respiration can be thought of as a high velocity-low pressure system.[62] At rest, there is small pressure differences ... The ophthalmic rete is analogous to the carotid rete found in mammals, as it also facilitates transfer of heat from arterial ... The brain was found to maintain a warmer temperature when compared to carotid arterial blood supply. Researchers hypothesize ... that is to say that the ratio of solutes to water in the plasma is shifted down whereby reducing osmotic pressure in the plasma ...
Direct comparison of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and externally applied pressure is the basic arterial blood pressure ... At the pressure balance point, where pressure in the cuff equals systolic artery pressure, a 'whooshing' noise can be heard as ... At this pressure balance point, the applied external pressure (Pe) equals to the intracranial pressure (ICP). ... Externally applied pressure is equal to systolic blood pressure in this case. The examiner slowly releases the air from the ...
... made by the Mayo investigators was to show that maintenance of arterial pressure rather than venous return was required to ... partial pressure breathing), which also enhances resistance to high G. The effects of anti-g suits and partial pressure ... Berger' Gradient Pressure SuitEdit. In the United States, physiologists Drs. Earl H. Wood, Edward Baldes, Charles Code and ... The counter pressure effect occurs instantaneously without any time delay versus an up to two second delay before reaching full ...
... refers to a condition in which an arterial spasm leads to vasoconstriction. This can lead to tissue ischemia and ... include a severe drop in blood pressure. ...
... high systolic blood pressure and elevated bad cholesterol levels in asymptomatic individuals, according to a new study ... Non-calcified arterial plaque is associated with diabetes, ... Non-calcified arterial plaque is associated with diabetes, high ... CT angiography links arterial plaque with diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol Published on June 3, 2015 ... Plaque that forms in the arterial walls can restrict blood flow and, in some cases, rupture, leading to potentially fatal heart ...
... arterial pressure translation, English dictionary definition of arterial pressure. Noun 1. arterial pressure - the pressure of ... arterial pressure is the product of cardiac output and vascular... ... Define arterial pressure. arterial pressure synonyms, arterial pressure pronunciation, ... arterial pressure. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.. Related to arterial pressure: Arterial blood pressure ...
... and mean arterial pressures with simultaneous pressures measured from arterial catheters in six preterm infants. Oscillometric ... arterial pressure measurements were performed with the Omega automatic instrument, using the recomme … ... and mean arterial pressures with simultaneous pressures measured from arterial catheters in six preterm infants. Oscillometric ... Arterial pressure measurement in preterm infants Crit Care Med. 1986 Aug;14(8):735-8. doi: 10.1097/00003246-198608000-00014. ...
THE DETERMINATION OF ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE Br Med J 1905; 1 :968 ... THE DETERMINATION OF ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE. Br Med J 1905; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.2313.968 ...
There was an increase in mean arterial pressure when the nonspecific NO inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA) was infused ... Blood pressure was recorded online (Windaq, DATAQ Instruments Inc) through the femoral arterial cannula. After a 45-minute ... Blood pressure was recorded online continuously. In some experiments, splenic arterial and venous blood flow was also recorded ... The venous cannula was used for infusing saline and drugs; the arterial cannula was used for monitoring blood pressure. Through ...
Raised arterial pressure in parents of proteinuric insulin dependent diabetics. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1987; 295 :515 ... Arterial pressure is raised early in the subset of insulin dependent diabetics at risk of later development of progressive ... There was a significant correlation between the mean arterial pressures in the proteinuric patients and the higher mean blood ... for systolic pressure and 8 mm Hg (95% confidence interval 0.8 to 15.2 mm Hg) for diastolic pressure. These differences were ...
A normal range for mean arterial blood pressure is 70 to 110, according to GlobalRPh. A minimum of 60 is required to supply ... mean arterial pressure = diastolic pressure + (1/3) × pulse pressure. Pulse pressure equals systolic minus diastolic pressure. ... Mean arterial pressure is critical because it is a time-weighted average of blood pressure readings in the large arteries ... If mean arterial pressure falls below 60 for an appreciable length of time, vital organs can be deprived of oxygen. There are ...
As in other species also in the anaesthetized rabbit the ventilatory minute volume increases with decreasing arterial oxygen ... pressure, thereby counteracting the fall of PAO2. The present paper... ... Oxygen Transport Pure Oxygen Minute Volume Anaesthetize Rabbit Arterial Oxygen Pressure These keywords were added by machine ... Schöne H., Wiemer W., Kiwull P. (1973) Role of the Carotid Chemoreflexes in the Regulation of Arterial Oxygen Pressure. In: ...
... high systolic blood pressure and elevated bad cholesterol levels in asymptomatic individuals, according to a new study. ... Non-calcified arterial plaque is associated with diabetes, ... Non-calcified arterial plaque is associated with diabetes, high ... CT angiography links arterial plaque with diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol. Radiological Society of North America ... Plaque that forms in the arterial walls can restrict blood flow and, in some cases, rupture, leading to potentially fatal heart ...
... of hypertension today and that pulse pressure as an independent cardiovascular risk factor has focused attention on arterial ... stiffness and wave reflections as the most important factors determining these pressures. In recent … ... We recognize that increased systolic pressure is the most challenging form ... Arterial stiffness and pulse pressure in CKD and ESRD Kidney Int. 2012 Aug;82(4):388-400. doi: 10.1038/ki.2012.131. ...
Blood Pressure) abbreviated? TA stands for Tension Arterial (Spanish: Blood Pressure). TA is defined as Tension Arterial ( ... Segun el criterio propuesto por la Guia K-DOQI se define como: "Un descenso de la tension arterial sistolica [mayor que o igual ... Es necesario ensenaremos a realizar la toma de tension arterial y del nivel de glucemia capilar antes de la toma de los ... S.v. "TA." Retrieved August 21 2019 from https://www.acronymfinder.com/Tension-Arterial-(Spanish%3a-Blood-Pressure)-(TA).html ...
indirect arterial blood pressure synonyms, indirect arterial blood pressure pronunciation, indirect arterial blood pressure ... English dictionary definition of indirect arterial blood pressure. adj. 1. Of, like, or in an artery or arteries. 2. Of, ... arterial - of or involving or contained in the arteries; "arterial disease"; "the arterial system"; "arterial blood". ... arterial. (redirected from indirect arterial blood pressure). Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia. ar·te·ri·al. (är-tîr′ē-əl) ...
Non-anesthetized α1D-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, ... The α1D-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction. ... The α1D-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction. ... Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to α1 ...
... the evolution of pressure (P) in an arterial segment can be described as follows: where and are the corresponding space and ... A Novel Interpretation for Arterial Pulse Pressure Amplification in Health and Disease. Manuel R. Alfonso,1 Ricardo L. ... R. C. Cascaval, "A Boussinesq model for pressure and flow velocity waves in arterial segments," Mathematics and Computers in ... Arterial pressure waves have been described in one dimension using several approaches, such as lumped (Windkessel) or ...
Continuous monitoring of transduced pressures, arterial blood pressures, in particular, is part of the standard of ... Arterial Catheter Pressure Cable Corrosion Leading to Artifactual Diagnosis of Hypotension. Skidmore, Kimberly, MD; Chen, Joan ... Home , November 2002 - Volume 95 - Issue 5 , Arterial Catheter Pressure Cable Corrosion Leading to Artifa... ... Arterial Catheter Pressure Cable Corrosion Leading to Artifactual Diagnosis of Hypotension Anesthesia & Analgesia95(5):1192- ...
Arterial pressure can be estimated in the upper thigh, above the knee, and in the upper calf by placing blood pressure cuffs at ... Peripheral Arterial Disease: Pulse and Blood Pressure Measurement. Topic Overview. Pulse and blood pressure measurements taken ... Blood pressure. For peripheral arterial disease, blood pressure might be taken at the ankles, toes, legs, and arms. ... Large differences between pressures at the various levels suggest arterial blockage. As with toes, finger pressures can be ...
Higher aortic systolic blood pressure and greater arterial stiffness, in part due to reduced pulse pressure amplification and ... We then studied the effects of chronic smoking on blood pressure (BP), the aortic pressure waveform, and pulse pressure ... The influence of heart rate on augmentation index and central arterial pressure in humans. J Physiol. 2000; 525: 263-267. ... Mahmud A, Feely J. Acute effect of caffeine on arterial stiffness and aortic pressure waveform. Hypertension. 2001; 38: 227-231 ...
Find Woman Measuring Arterial Blood Pressure By stock images in HD and millions of other royalty-free stock photos, ... woman measuring arterial blood pressure by her self, controlling blood pressure, hospital and medicine concept s ... pressure. arterial. cardiac. cardio. cardiovascular. care. check. clinic. doctor. elderly. hand. health. hospital. hypertension ...
Arterial stiffness, systolic blood pressure and logical treatment of arterial hypertension. Hypertension. 1990;15:339-347. ... Aortic Function in Arterial Hypertension Determined by Pressure-Diameter Relation. Effects of Diltiazem. Christodoulos ... Aortic Function in Arterial Hypertension Determined by Pressure-Diameter Relation. Christodoulos Stefanadis, John Dernellis, ... Aortic Function in Arterial Hypertension Determined by Pressure-Diameter Relation. Christodoulos Stefanadis, John Dernellis, ...
Abstract 17203: Increasing Age, Arterial Stiffness, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure. Marwah Abdalla, Laura DiCola, Paul Muntner, ... Abstract 17203: Increasing Age, Arterial Stiffness, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure. Marwah Abdalla, Laura DiCola, Paul Muntner, ... Abstract 17203: Increasing Age, Arterial Stiffness, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure. Marwah Abdalla, Laura DiCola, Paul Muntner, ... Background: Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and ...
... several types of hypertension are insensitive to TZD reduction of arterial pressure and, further, TZD fail to reduce arterial ... several types of hypertension are insensitive to TZD reduction of arterial pressure and, further, TZD fail to reduce arterial ... This review 1) comprehensively describes findings associated with TZD reduction of arterial pressure; 2) differentiates between ... proposes a working model for TZD chronic reduction of arterial pressure through vascular dilation. ...
Having one cup of blueberries daily could help reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness, both of which are linked to heart ... Diet and High Blood Pressure. High blood pressure or hypertension is defined as a blood pressure of above 140 mm Hg (systolic) ... The participants blood pressure, arterial stiffness and select blood biomarkers were recorded at the beginning and post the 8- ... Fruits to Help Lower Blood Pressure. Top reasons why you should eat fruits to lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart ...
Adult systolic and diastolic blood pressures and arterial compliance as measured by pulse wave velocity in two arterial ... To examine the relation between disproportionate fetal growth and adult blood pressure and to investigate whether arterial ... Diastolic pressure fell by 1.9 mm Hg (95% CI 0.9 to 2.9) for each pound (454 g) gain in birth weight and by 2.4 mm Hg (95% CI ... Systolic blood pressure decreased by 2.7 mm Hg (95% CI 0.8 to 4.6) for each pound (454 g) gain in birth weight and by 3.4 mm Hg ...
Growth in utero, adult blood pressure, and arterial compliance. Message subject: (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from ...
Estimating Cardiac Output from Arterial Blood Pressure Waveforms: a Critical Evaluation using the MIMIC II Database. Computers ... Estimating Cardiac Output from Arterial Blood Pressure Waveforms: a Critical Evaluation using the MIMIC II Database. Computers ... Cardiac Output Estimation using Arterial Blood Pressure Waveforms. [MEng thesis]. Cambridge, MA: Massachusetts Institute of ... based on features of the arterial blood pressure waveform. ... Cardiac Output Estimation from Arterial Blood Pressure ...
Mean Arterial Pressure - Mean Venous Pressure) / Cardiac Output Therefore, Mean arterial pressure can be determined from: M A P ... Mean Arterial Pressure Calculator More Information on usage of the Mean Arterial Pressure. ... Mean Arterial Pressure, Richard E. Klabunde, Ph.D Calculating the mean arterial pressure (MAP) Nursing center2011-12-08 Nosek, ... July 2008). "Pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure in relation to ischemic stroke among patients with uncontrolled ...
Both Extremes of Arterial Carbon Dioxide Pressure and the Magnitude of Fluctuations in Arterial Carbon Dioxide Pressure Are ... MAP measured by arterial catheter pressure transducer and arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry were recorded ... Blood pressure was measured from a pressure transducer connected to the umbilical arterial catheter. Positioning of the tip of ... mean arterial blood pressure • NIRS = near-infrared spectroscopy • HbO2 = oxygenated hemoglobin • Hb = hemoglobin • HbD = ...
A novel reservoir-wave separation technique was used to obtain arterial reservoir pressure (pressure generated by arterial ... Men demonstrate less change in regional diastolic pressure concomitant with increased augmentation index and arterial reservoir ... Systolic augmentation index (sAIx) and diastolic augmentation index (dAIx) were used as estimates of pressure from wave ... and reservoir pressure (,svg style=vertical-align:-0.1638pt;width:58.712502px; id=M2 height=11.375 version=1.1 viewBox ...
Mean Arterial Pressure in Spinal Cord Injury (MAPS): Determination of Non-inferiority of a Mean Arterial Pressure Goal of 65 ... Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury (MAPS). The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... Mean arterial blood pressure is maintained ,= 65 mmHg for 7 days following acute SCI. ... Induced hypertension with mean arterial blood pressure ,= 85 mmHg for 7 days following acute SCI. ...
Device: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring with arterial stiffness evaluation at 6-12 ... International Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness Telemonitoring (VASOTENS). The safety and ... International Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness Telemonitoring. Actual Study Start Date :. November ... Ambulatory blood pressure and arterial stiffness web-based telemonitoring in patients at cardiovascular risk. First results of ...
  • We recently completed the first pilot study of nicotinamide riboside supplementation in healthy middle-aged and older adults and demonstrated that 6 weeks of supplementation decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) by 8 mmHg in individuals with baseline SBP of 120-139 mmHg (elevated SBP/stage 1 hypertension) compared with placebo, and lowered arterial stiffness, a strong independent predictor of CVD and related morbidity and mortality. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • At six months, the between-group differences in diastolic BP reduction (0.41 mmHg) and mean arterial pressure (2.24 mmHg) were not significant. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It was found that participants who received the blueberry powder on average had a 7 mmHg (5.1 percent) decrease in systolic blood pressure that measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats, and a 5 mmHg (6.3 percent) reduction in diastolic blood pressure that measures the pressure in the arteries between heartbeats. (medindia.net)
  • Current guidelines for the clinical management of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) recommend maintenance of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) at 85 to 90 mmHg for the first seven days after SCI as a clinical option. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This prior pilot study randomized patients with acute SCI to a spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP = MAP - intrathecal pressure (ITP)) target of ≥ 75 mmHg or to a control group (hypotension avoidance, MAP ≥ 65 mmHg). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This was done during supine rest with and without lower body negative pressure (-50 mmHg) (LBNP). (diva-portal.org)
  • Even 1 minute at a mean arterial pressure of 50 mmHg, or accumulative effects over short periods, increases the risk of mortality by 5% and can result in organ failure or complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • The prevalence of hypertension was 15.2% in a sample of 284 children and mean values of systolic blood pressure of 101.7 (±13.2) mmHg and diastolic blood pressure of 66.0 (±11.2) mmHg. (scielo.br)
  • A prevalência de hipertensão arterial foi de 15,2% em uma amostra de 284 crianças, cujos dados forneceram valores médio de pressão arterial sistólica de 101,7 (±13,2) mmHg e de pressão arterial diastólica de 66,0 (±11,2) mmHg. (scielo.br)
  • The carotid sinus receptors respond to pressures ranging from 60-180 mmHg (Figure 2). (scribd.com)
  • We then have MATLAB filter and display the data obtained, producing a mean arterial blood pressure in mmHg. (instructables.com)
  • 135/85 mmHg, or nocturnal blood pressure >120/70 mmHg. (scirp.org)
  • As a next translational step, we will conduct a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to further assess the safety and efficacy of oral nicotinamide riboside (3 months vs placebo) for decreasing SBP and arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older men and women with SBP between 120 and 139 mmHg at baseline. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The ABI in affected legs is usually less than 0.8 and digital pressures are lower than 50 mmHg. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Between 20 and 80 years, systolic pressure increased from 100 to 122 mmHg, and diastolic pressure decreased from 76 to 55 mmHg. (diva-portal.org)
  • When taking cardiac adaptations into account as well, systolic and diastolic pressure increased from 100 to 151 mmHg and decreased from 76 to 69 mmHg, respectively. (diva-portal.org)
  • Premature vascular aging and arterial stiffening are observed with progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in end-stage renal disease(ESRD). (nih.gov)
  • Thiazide diuretic (TZD)-mediated chronic reduction of arterial pressure is thought to occur through decreased total peripheral vascular resistance. (frontiersin.org)
  • and 5) proposes a working model for TZD chronic reduction of arterial pressure through vascular dilation. (frontiersin.org)
  • It is widely agreed that decreased total peripheral vascular resistance underlies TZD chronic pressure reduction ( Table 1a ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Recently it has been suggested that hydrostatic effects cannot be the sole arbitrator of pressure changes in the systemic circulation with postural shifts in vivo and additional consideration should be given to dynamic vascular mechanical properties [ 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Continuous noninvasive arterial blood pressure monitoring using the vascular unloading technology during complex gastrointestinal endoscopy: a prospective observational study. (wikipedia.org)
  • It's a simple way to assess your vascular condition from the comfort of your own home, by measuring your blood pressure and arterial flexibility. (allhealthguides.com)
  • Short-term swim training improved arterial blood pressure and vascular functions. (utexas.edu)
  • In summary, regular swimming exercise can attenuate reductions in and partially restore the loss of vascular function including central arterial compliance and endothelial function in middle-aged and older adults. (utexas.edu)
  • Conclusions: Vascular SIK1 activation might represent a novel mechanism involved in the prevention of high blood pressure development triggered by high-salt intake through the modulation of the contractile phenotype of VSMCs via transforming growth factor-beta 1-signaling inhibition. (diva-portal.org)
  • To investigate the relation of pressure and vascular wall thickening in hypertension, we coarcted the abdominal aorta upstream to the renal arteries in 14 rats. (ahajournals.org)
  • Four to six weeks after surgery we perfusion-fixed vascular tissues of the hindquarters, including kidneys, with formalin at in vivo levels of pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • These results indicate that vascular wall thickening occurs in conduit arteries and smaller renal arterioles in the normotensive hindquarters of coarcted rats, providing morphometric evidence for non-pressure-related mechanisms involved in vascular growth in this form of hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • Measurements of Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channel activity in isolated arterial myocytes (using patch clamp electrophysiological techniques) in parallel with measurements of constrictor/dilator responses (using pressure myography) can reveal important information about the roles of Kv7 channels in vascular smooth muscle physiology and pharmacology. (jove.com)
  • Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and N 2 O. Heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), cardiac index (CI), total systemic vascular resistance index (TSVRI), BIS, end-tidal sevoflurane concentration (EtSEVO), and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO 2 ) were measured during the study period. (medsci.org)
  • Some studies have indicated that remifentanil may be associated with significant hemodynamic changes characterized by decreases in arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance [ 8 , 9 ]. (medsci.org)
  • Despite the AVP effects on vascular tone and fluid volume, arterial pressure rises only for a period of 7-10 days and then gradually returns to normal levels during chronic administration of excess AVP, even if daily fluid intake is maintained at a constant level ( 2 , 10 ). (physiology.org)
  • Patients with arterial ulcers often have a history of peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis, and/or smoking. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Chronic inflammation may impair vascular function and lead to an increase of arterial stiffness, an important determinant of cardiovascular risk. (bmj.com)
  • The rate at which aortic pressure waves travel-the pulse wave velocity (PWV)-is determined in part by vascular stiffness. (bmj.com)
  • These pressure changes are usually explained by changes of the arterial system alone (increase in arterial stiffness and vascular resistance). (diva-portal.org)
  • The adaptations of vessel diameter represented by vascular conductance (VC), muscle blood flow (MBF) and oxygen delivery (DO2est) were investigated during rest and exercise using the effects of gravity to manipulate muscle perfusion pressure (MPP) by placing the heart above (head-up tilt) and below (head-down tilt) the level of the muscle. (uwaterloo.ca)
  • 3. Group 2 rats developed higher arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance and left ventricular weight and greater renal histological changes, with lower effective renal plasma flow, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate, than group 1. (clinsci.org)
  • 6,7) Furthermore, it is a consensus that an excessive sodium content intake is related to higher arterial pressure and to cardiovascular complications. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We recognize that increased systolic pressure is the most challenging form of hypertension today and that pulse pressure as an independent cardiovascular risk factor has focused attention on arterial stiffness and wave reflections as the most important factors determining these pressures. (nih.gov)
  • In recent years, many studies emphasized the role of arterial rigidity in the development of cardiovascular diseases, and it was shown that stiffening of arteries is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. (nih.gov)
  • Moreover,arterial stiffening is linked to decreased glomerular filtration rate, and is predictive of kidney disease progression and the patient's cardiovascular outcome. (nih.gov)
  • This model captures many key features of wave propagation in the systemic network and, in particular, pulse pressure amplification (PPA), which is a mechanical biomarker of cardiovascular risk. (hindawi.com)
  • Arterial stiffness is increasingly being recognized as an important cardiovascular risk factor and an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular death. (ahajournals.org)
  • Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality. (ahajournals.org)
  • Data collection will include ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of blood pressure and arterial stiffness, and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Variability in arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow has traditionally been interpreted as a marker of cardiovascular decompensation, and has been associated with negative clinical outcomes across varying time scales, from impending orthostatic syncope to an increased risk of stroke. (frontiersin.org)
  • Traditionally, clinicians have assessed the cardiovascular status of their patients with static "snapshot" techniques, such as radial pulse for heart rate, brachial sphygmomanometry for arterial pressure, and chest excursions for respiration rate. (frontiersin.org)
  • Strict blood pressure control in this group is strongly advocated to avoid other cardiovascular diseases correlated to hypertension. (diva-portal.org)
  • Patients who underwent cardiovascular surgeries with hemodynamics monitoring using arterial pressure-based CO (APCO) were eligible for this study. (springer.com)
  • By monitoring your arterial stiffness and blood pressure with BioClip Cuff, you get a series of indicators that can help you improve your lifestyle and prevent cardiovascular disease. (allhealthguides.com)
  • Nicotinamide riboside , a dietary supplement available over the counter under the name NIAGEN®, (ChromaDex Inc) is an exogenous NAD+ precursor that reverses age-related arterial dysfunction in aged mice, suggesting that declining NAD+ may play a key role in cardiovascular aging. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Hemodynamic management of cardiovascular failure by using PCO(2) venous-arterial difference. (springer.com)
  • Arterial stiffness due to is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease but is very difficult to measure. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Diet has been reported to influence arterial blood pressure, and evidence indicates that the Mediterranean diet reduces cardiovascular mortality. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • To investigate the augmentation index (AIx) as a measure of arterial stiffness in patients with RA, free of cardiovascular disease or risk factors, by means of a matched cohort pilot study. (bmj.com)
  • This preliminary study suggests that RA is associated with increased arterial stiffness and central BP, independently of clinically manifest cardiovascular disease or risk factors. (bmj.com)
  • Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease, 8 and pulse pressure, a surrogate marker of increased arterial stiffness, is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular events. (bmj.com)
  • Using a physiologically accurate electromechanical cardiovascular simulator, two solid state manometer-tipped pressure transducers and two transit time flow sensors were located at the aortic root and at the aortic bifurcation. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin (ANG) system (with captopril) and of the cardiovascular actions of vasopressin [with 1-(β-mercapto-β,β-cyclopentamethylenepropionic acid), 8- d -arginine vasopressin (d(CH 2 ) 5 DAVP)] had no hypotensive effects in sham-operated rats under any conditions, but antagonism of nicotinic ganglionic transmission (with pentolinium) caused a prompt fall in blood pressure. (portlandpress.com)
  • 5. The results indicate that, in chronically adrenalectomized rats drinking 1% NaCl, blood pressure is maintained by autonomic nervous and renin-ANG systems with no discernible contribution from the peripheral cardiovascular actions of vasopressin. (portlandpress.com)
  • In addition, methods for the quantification of important markers such as elevated arterial stiffness would help reduce the morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular disease. (diva-portal.org)
  • It has recently been shown that the phase relationship between respiration-induced changes in arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR) are different in supine and upright postures. (diva-portal.org)
  • therefore, very small changes in arterial pressure around this 'set point' dramatically alters receptor firing so that autonomic control can be reset in such a way that the arterial pressure remains very near to the set point. (scribd.com)
  • The researchers also found a 17 per cent increase in pregnancy loss for every 10 mm Hg increase in mean arterial pressure , a measure of the average pressure in the arteries during full heart beat cycles. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Mean arterial pressure is critical because it is a time-weighted average of blood pressure readings in the large arteries during a cardiac cycle. (reference.com)
  • It shows the rate at which the heart pumps blood, the rate of blood flow out of the large arteries and the compliance, or elasticity, of the arterial walls. (reference.com)
  • With aging, the rigidity is more pronounced in the aorta than in peripheral conduit arteries, leading to the disappearance or inversion of the arterial stiffness gradient and less protection of the microcirculation from high-pressure transmission. (nih.gov)
  • But blood pressure can be measured using catheters placed inside the arteries. (rexhealth.com)
  • Because the arteries are punctured, this is known as invasive blood pressure monitoring. (rexhealth.com)
  • CONCLUSION--Impairment of fetal growth is associated with raised blood pressure in adult life and decreased compliance in the conduit arteries of the trunk and legs. (bmj.com)
  • But unfortunately these volume changes are not linearly correlated with the arterial pressure- especially when measured in the periphery, where the access to the arteries is easy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hemodynamic conditions in large arteries are significantly affected by the interaction of the pulsatile blood flow with the distensible arterial wall. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The transmission of the pressure pulse along the arm arteries, however, causes distortion of the pulse waveform and depression of the mean blood pressure level. (tudelft.nl)
  • If blood pressure is lower in the legs, it usually means that cholesterol buildup inside the leg arteries is interfering with circulation. (harvard.edu)
  • It also can influence blood pressure readings since these rely on the time taken for arteries to return to normal volume and flow after compression. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Not only did API match brachial arterial stiffness measured by tomography but it also correlated with ultrasound measurement of the stiffness of arteries supplying the heart. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Large arteries are normally compliant structures, capable of buffering pressure changes that occur during the cardiac cycle to maintain constant tissue blood flow. (bmj.com)
  • The measurement of ankle-to- brachial blood pressure index (ABI) to screen for asymptomatic LEAD in diabetic subjects is unreliable since a large proportion of patients have stiff ankle arteries (mediasclerosis) and thus may display a too high ABI. (diva-portal.org)
  • stroke volume cardiac output and arterial blood pressure. (scribd.com)
  • Cardiac output and arterial blood gases were studied before, during, and after intermittent positive pressure breathing, using 40% oxygen (IPPB/O 2 ). (bmj.com)
  • Considering this response of the lung with airflow obstruction, the more frequent use of cardiac output and arterial gas measurements in patients receiving IPPB/O 2 treatments appears desirable. (bmj.com)
  • Additionally, they measured heart rate, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure at the brachial artery in the upper arm. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In most people, the resting ankle pressure is greater than the pressure at the crook of the arm, known as the brachial blood pressure. (rexhealth.com)
  • The ratio of the ankle pressure to the brachial pressure is called the ankle-brachial index (ABI). (rexhealth.com)
  • Blood pressures can be measured at the elbow (brachial), forearm, or wrist. (rexhealth.com)
  • The brachial artery pressure waveform is abnormal in smokers, but the effect of smoking on the aortic pressure waveform in both smokers and nonsmokers, particularly in the younger population, is unknown. (ahajournals.org)
  • 0.01) both brachial and aortic blood pressure, augmentation index, and pulse wave velocity. (ahajournals.org)
  • Another indirect measure of arterial elasticity is aortic-brachial pulse pressure amplification, which is reduced with ageing. (ahajournals.org)
  • McVeigh et al, 10 using invasive methods, demonstrated abnormalities in the brachial artery pressure waveforms of chronic smokers. (ahajournals.org)
  • Arterial ulcers: Assessment with ankle-brachial index (ABI), digital brachial index and Doppler ultrasound for distal pulses can confirm a compromised blood supply to the limb. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • No significant difference in reproducibility between measurements of absolute ankle- and toe blood pressure and indices was found, but a correlation between systemic (brachial) and toe blood pressure variations over time may suggest that indices are more correct in assessing peripheral arterial circulation. (diva-portal.org)
  • We compared automatic oscillometric measurements of systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures with simultaneous pressures measured from arterial catheters in six preterm infants. (nih.gov)
  • Oscillometric arterial pressure measurements were performed with the Omega automatic instrument, using the recommended cuff and the size-larger cuff. (nih.gov)
  • This practice is common, safe, and so reliable that clinicians may question if it really is required to periodically check intraarterial pressure measurements against those obtained from a standard blood pressure cuff (1,2) . (lww.com)
  • Systolic blood pressure was also higher in individuals whose mother's intercristal pelvic diameter was small or whose mother's blood pressure had been raised during pregnancy but these effects were statistically independent of the effects of low birth weight and other measurements that indicate fetal growth retardation. (bmj.com)
  • Many papers report on the accuracy of the device in comparison with intra-arterial or with noninvasive but intermittent blood pressure measurements. (tudelft.nl)
  • For the assessment of beat-to-beat changes in blood pressure and assessment of blood pressure variability Finapres proved a reliable alternative for invasive measurements when mean and diastolic pressures are concerned. (tudelft.nl)
  • By taking accurate blood pressure measurements at different locations along your legs, your doctors can determine if you have any arterial narrowing and, if so, where. (harvard.edu)
  • In order to get accurate blood pressure measurements, your doctor uses a technique called Doppler ultrasound. (harvard.edu)
  • This simple, non-invasive, calculation is able to interpret standard oscillometric measurements to quantify both arterial stiffness and blood pressure simultaneously. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and arterial stiffness measurements were performed using an arteriograph device. (kemri-wellcome.org)
  • The method requires the measurements of pressure and flow and is based on fitting the pulse pressure (systolic minus diastolic pressure) predicted by the two-element windkessel model to the measured pulse pressure. (epfl.ch)
  • A correlation to blood pressure is described in literature and commonly demonstrated by discrete measurements with a sampling rate in the minute range. (arvojournals.org)
  • The measurements show clear dependencies between Mayer waves in retinal vessel width and arterial blood pressure. (arvojournals.org)
  • Thus, it was found that toe blood pressure measurements, alone or in combination with ankle blood pressure measurements, increase the sensitivity for finding early asymptomatic LEAD in diabetic subjects. (diva-portal.org)
  • Furthermore, toe blood pressure measurements can be performed using either the great toe or dig II and a strong concordance is found between these measurements. (diva-portal.org)
  • In addition, since the pole-test, another non-invasive method to measure peripheral blood pressure which is less sensitive to the presence of mediasclerosis compared to ABI, correlated significantly with toe blood pressure measurements this method may be used as an alternative screening method in subjects with previously known LEAD. (diva-portal.org)
  • Study 1 tested the repeatability of Doppler ultra- sound measurements of muscle blood flow velocity (MBV), arterial diameter, MBF and VC. (uwaterloo.ca)
  • We also compared augmentation index, aortic pulse wave velocity (Complior), and blood pressure in 28 subjects (11 chronic smokers) before and for 15 minutes after smoking 1 cigarette (nicotine content, 1.2 mg). (ahajournals.org)
  • MAIN OUTCOME--Adult systolic and diastolic blood pressures and arterial compliance as measured by pulse wave velocity in two arterial segments. (bmj.com)
  • To test the validity of this new method, API results from over 100 volunteers were compared to arterial stiffness determined by pulse wave velocity (tonomography) and carotid arterial compliance (ultrasound). (medicalxpress.com)
  • Cerebral blood flow velocity (determined by transcranial Doppler) and arterial blood pressure (determined by noninvasive servo-controlled plethysmograph) were recorded in 20 patients with carotid artery stenosis and 18 age-matched controls. (ovid.com)
  • At rest, grading of dynamic autoregulation was estimated from the impulse response of the blood pressure-velocity dynamic relationship. (ovid.com)
  • Grading of dynamic autoregulation with the use of undisturbed recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity might provide a safer technique for assessment of patients in whom a sudden drop of arterial blood pressure is not desirable, such as patients with heart or autonomic failure. (ovid.com)
  • Arterial compliance is a marker for cardiac burden in atherosclerotic disease, with the pressure Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) correlated to compliance. (ahajournals.org)
  • There was an increase in mean arterial pressure when the nonspecific NO inhibitor N G -monomethyl- l -arginine (L-NMMA) was infused via the splenic artery but not when the same dose was administered systemically. (ahajournals.org)
  • This accelerated aging is associated with outward remodeling of large vessels, characterized by increased arterial radius not totally compensated for by artery wall hypertrophy. (nih.gov)
  • To this end, numerical simulations were performed using acquired central pressure signals from different subject groups (young, adults, and hypertensive) as input and then comparing the output of the model with measured radial artery pressure waveforms. (hindawi.com)
  • Furthermore, in hypertensive patients, the decrease in large artery compliance (i.e., high values of arterial stiffness) is considered one of the major causes of PP increase. (hindawi.com)
  • the stiffer the artery, the faster a pressure wave travels through it and the extent to which the arterial wave is reflected from the periphery. (ahajournals.org)
  • Systemic arterial blood pressure (SABP) was measured at the radial artery. (go.jp)
  • Detecting pressure changes inside an artery from the outside is difficult, whereas volume and flow changes of the artery can well be determined by using e.g. light, echography, impedance, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • These volume changes must be transformed into pressure, because of the non-linearity of the elastic components of the arterial wall as well as the non-elastic parts of the smooth muscles of the finger artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The method is to unload the arterial wall in order to linearize this phenomenon with a counter pressure as high as the pressure inside the artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • To recover the geometry of the artery in its zero-pressure state which is required for a fluid-structure interaction simulation we utilize inverse finite elastostatics. (biomedsearch.com)
  • To demonstrate the importance in recovering the zero-pressure state of the artery in hemodynamic simulations we compute the time varying flow field with compliant walls for the original and the zero-pressure state corrected geometric configurations of the carotid bifurcation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This technique is possible due to the ability of our pressure transducer to detect the changes in pressure in the cuff caused by the pulsing of blood in the artery of measurement. (instructables.com)
  • Apparatus is disclosed for non-invasively monitoring a subject's blood pressure, in which a flexible diaphragm that encloses a fluid-filled chamber is compressed against tissue overlying an artery, with sufficient force to compress the artery. (google.com)
  • A first, relatively slow servo control system optimizes the amount of artery compression, which occurs at a mean transmural pressure of about zero, by modulating the volume of fluid within the chamber and noting the resulting effect on the pressure within the chamber. (google.com)
  • Since different pressure effects are realized according to the amount of artery compression, an appropriate control signal can be produced that provides the optimum mean diaphragm pressure. (google.com)
  • In addition, a second, relatively fast servo control system supplies the fluid to and from the chamber, so as to compensate for pressure variations within artery. (google.com)
  • If the pressure in the cuff is less than the systolic ABP and greater than the diastolic pressure, during systole the artery under the cuff will snap open and closed. (vetstream.com)
  • Pressure and flow were calculated in the ascending aorta, thoracic aorta, common carotid, and iliac artery. (epfl.ch)
  • Oxygen saturation, heart rate, mean arterial pressure , end-tidal carbon dioxide, and ANI values were recorded after induction and at 5-min intervals perioperatively. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If mean arterial pressure falls below 60 for an appreciable length of time, vital organs can be deprived of oxygen. (reference.com)
  • As in other species also in the anaesthetized rabbit the ventilatory minute volume increases with decreasing arterial oxygen pressure, thereby counteracting the fall of PA O2 . (springer.com)
  • The present paper describes how effectively the chemoreflex drive approaches, under various conditions, the arterial oxygen pressure to that of the inspiratory gas mixtures. (springer.com)
  • Schöne H., Wiemer W., Kiwull P. (1973) Role of the Carotid Chemoreflexes in the Regulation of Arterial Oxygen Pressure. (springer.com)
  • Consequently, a greater myocardial oxygen demand in the left ventricle and an impaired coronary perfusion are observed due to the decrease in mean arterial diastolic pressure [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • birth weight: 605-1870 g) requiring mechanical ventilation, supplemental oxygen, and invasive blood pressure monitoring by NIRS from 1 to 3 days of age. (aappublications.org)
  • MAP measured by arterial catheter pressure transducer and arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry were recorded simultaneously. (aappublications.org)
  • Moreover, pentaglobin therapy had no negative effect on non-invasive arterial blood pressure , oxygen saturation, or other haematologic values. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The veno-arterial difference in CO 2 tension ("ΔPCO 2 " or "PCO 2 gap") is not a straightforward indicator of anaerobic metabolism since it is influenced by the oxygen consumption. (springer.com)
  • Teboul JL, Mercat A, Lenique F, Berton C, Richard C. Value of the venous-arterial PCO2 gradient to reflect the oxygen supply to demand in humans: effects of dobutamine. (springer.com)
  • 5 in 1961 postulated that this would substantially affect the concentration of other alveolar gases, and experimental data in dogs confirmed that arterial oxygen partial pressure (Pao 2 ) was elevated immediately after commencement of nitrous oxide. (asahq.org)
  • For arterial studies of the legs (called segmental Doppler pressures), Doppler ultrasound is used in place of the stethoscope that doctors usually use when taking blood pressures. (harvard.edu)
  • A Randomized Trial of Continuous Noninvasive Blood Pressure Monitoring During Noncardiac Surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Continuous noninvasive arterial pressure (CNAP) is the method of measuring arterial blood pressure in real-time without any interruptions (continuously) and without cannulating the human body (noninvasive). (wikipedia.org)
  • Continuous noninvasive arterial blood pressure measurement (CNAP) combines the advantages of the following two clinical "gold standards": it measures blood pressure (BP) continuously in real-time like the invasive arterial catheter system (IBP) and it is non-invasive like the standard upper arm sphygmomanometer (NBP). (wikipedia.org)
  • In all other inpatient and outpatient surgeries intermittent, noninvasive blood pressure (NBP) monitoring is the standard of care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, noninvasive devices have to find a way to transform the peripheral volume signal to arterial pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Higher aortic systolic blood pressure and greater arterial stiffness, in part due to reduced pulse pressure amplification and increased arterial wave reflection, suggest that the adverse hemodynamic effects have hitherto been underestimated in young chronic smokers. (ahajournals.org)
  • We first studied the acute effects of cigarette smoking on the aortic pressure waveform by measuring the augmentation index (AIx) and PWV in healthy smokers and nonsmokers. (ahajournals.org)
  • We then studied the effects of chronic smoking on blood pressure (BP), the aortic pressure waveform, and pulse pressure amplification in healthy young subjects compared with nonsmokers. (ahajournals.org)
  • Methods and Results The aortic pressure-diameter relation was obtained before and after diltiazem administration in 15 hypertensives and 15 control normotensives. (ahajournals.org)
  • Instantaneous aortic pressure was measured simultaneously and at the same aortic level with a catheter-tip micromanometer. (ahajournals.org)
  • 6 7 Previous studies using different techniques have shown that aortic elastic properties are compromised in patients with arterial hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • Such information is provided with aortic pressure-diameter relation. (ahajournals.org)
  • Recently, we described a new method to obtain aortic pressure-diameter relation in conscious humans. (ahajournals.org)
  • Aortic pressures were acquired simultaneously and at the same aortic level with a catheter-tip micromanometer. (ahajournals.org)
  • 20 The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of diltiazem, a calcium channel antagonist widely used in the treatment of arterial hypertension, on aortic performance in hypertensive and normotensive subjects using a high-fidelity method for the determination of pressure-diameter relation. (ahajournals.org)
  • In this report, the role of CMV infection as a cause of increased blood pressure and in forming aortic atherosclerotic plaques is examined. (harvard.edu)
  • These results show that CMV infection is a risk factor for increased arterial blood pressure, and is a co-factor in aortic atherosclerosis. (harvard.edu)
  • Receptors within the aortic arch have a higher threshold pressure and are less sensitive than the carotid sinus receptors. (scribd.com)
  • Furthermore, we proposed that aortic PWV is independent of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the setting of isolated systolic hypertension. (ahajournals.org)
  • The oscillometric technique, on the other hand, determines these pressures, as well as the subject's mean pressure, by measuring actual pressure changes that occur in the cuff as the cuff is deflated. (google.com)
  • The automated oscillometric technique (oscillometry) can be used as a method for non-invasive measurement of arterial blood pressure (ABP). (vetstream.com)
  • The DINAMAP ( d evice for i ndirect n oninvasive a utomatic m ean a rterial p ressure) Veterinary Blood Pressure Monitors (Critikon, Tampa, Florida, USA) did much to establish the veterinary commercial market and that trade name is sometimes erroneously used to describe all oscillometric pressure monitors. (vetstream.com)
  • is central venous pressure and usually small enough to be neglected in this formula. (wikipedia.org)
  • An increase in blood volume increases central venous pressure. (scribd.com)
  • The relationship between the differences in pressure and content of carbon dioxide in arterial and venous blood. (springer.com)
  • Arterial and mixed venous blood acid-base balance during hypoperfusion with incremental positive end-expiratory pressure in the pig. (springer.com)
  • Difference in acid-base state between venous and arterial blood during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (springer.com)
  • Wendon JA, Harrison PM, Keays R, Gimson AE, Alexander G, Williams R. Arterial-venous pH differences and tissue hypoxia in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. (springer.com)
  • Among a wide variety of etiologies for chronic leg ulcers, four common types are venous stasis ulcers, arterial ulcers, diabetic neuropathic ulcers, and pressure ulcers. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Pulmonary venous wedge pressure closely reflects the pulmonary arterial mean pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • From the retinal vessel diameters, the equivalent values of arterial and venous vessel diameters CRAE and CRVE were calculated and the Mayer waves around 0.1Hz are extracted by filtering. (arvojournals.org)
  • Outliers for arterial and venous correlation are not necessarily related. (arvojournals.org)
  • The aim of the present thesis was to assess the occurrence of early lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD) in patients with diabetes and to assess novel potential risk markers for development or worsening of LEAD in the same patients. (diva-portal.org)
  • Age and hyperglycemia are the most important risk factors for development and progression of subclinical lower extremity arterial disease in type 2 diabetic subjects. (diva-portal.org)
  • For over a century, many researchers have proposed alternative, minimally invasive or non-invasive methods of estimating CO, based on features of the arterial blood pressure waveform. (physionet.org)
  • is considered to be the perfusion pressure seen by organs in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indeed, a substantial decrease in mean diastolic pressure (perfusion) and a systolic central pressure increase (afterload) are observed in patients over 60 years old as a result of a progressive increase in arterial stiffness [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The product of perfusion pressure (SABP-CAP) and square of the internal diameter of the STA was significantly correlated with AF. (go.jp)
  • An example of the above may be statistically significant correlations between systolic arterial blood pressure , systolic ocular perfusion pressure, diastolic ocular perfusion pressure and blood flow parameters in the PCAs revealed in our study. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 10 ) have shown that the "escape" from the antidiuretic actions of AVP is dependent on the rise of renal arterial perfusion pressure brought about by volume expansion. (physiology.org)
  • The data is analysed electronically and values for systolic, mean and diastolic pressures will be displayed with the heart rate (or more correctly pulse rate). (vetstream.com)
  • This proportedly gives faster and more accurate readings of systolic, mean and diastolic arterial blood pressures. (vetstream.com)
  • Specifically, this project aims at creating an international network of centers performing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and arterial stiffness monitoring, in order to evaluate the impact of such estimates on the clinical outcome of hypertensive patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • New subjects can be enrolled for this project, but they must be submitted to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring because it is required for evaluating their hypertension status, according to current recommendations. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Blood pressure Hypertension Hypotension Ambulatory blood pressure Pulse pressure Zheng L, Sun Z, Li J, et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fasting office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP and measures of arterial stiffness were assessed at baseline and every 4 weeks. (nih.gov)
  • Ambulatory, home, and office blood pressure and arterial stiffness were not different between the high-nitrate diet and the low-nitrate diet. (nih.gov)
  • Patients aged at least 18 years who underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring between March 2013 and June 2015 were enrolled. (scirp.org)
  • The results of the ambulatory monitoring found 61.4% of the patients with hypertension and 37.7% with normal blood pressure. (scirp.org)
  • Thus, the 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) allows a better assessment of those clinical particularities. (scirp.org)
  • 1. Ambulatory blood pressure recordings were made over a 48 h period on six hypertensive patients. (portlandpress.com)
  • Timely diagnosis and control of high arterial blood pressure (AP) are crucial for preventing life-threatening complications and end-organ damage but have been hamperedby the lack of nondisruptive monitors for 24-hour (including essential nighttime) AP tracking. (sbir.gov)
  • Timely diagnosis and control of high arterial blood pressure (AP) are crucial for preventing life-threatening complications and end-organ damage but have been hampered by the lack of nondisruptive monitors for 24-hour (including essential nighttime) AP tracking. (sbir.gov)
  • Give an example of a factor that would tend to raise arterial blood pressure by producing a change in cardiac output, peripheral resistance, and. (enotes.com)
  • Female: PR= 2.09 95%CI= 1.45-3.01), and elevated DAP [Diastolic Arterial Pressure] in girls (PR = 1.96 95%CI= 1.41-2.75). (scielo.br)
  • Recent literature, a nationally representative survey among 200 German and Austrian physicians and additional expert interviews provide strong evidence that in only 15% to 18% of inpatient surgeries blood pressure is measured continuously with invasive catheters (IBP). (wikipedia.org)
  • The technology discussed in this dissertation represents a proof-of-concept of a blood pressure measurement technique that could occupy a clinical middle ground between the invasive catheter and cuff-based techniques. (mit.edu)
  • Arterial Catheter Pressure Cable Corrosion Leading to Artifa. (lww.com)
  • The arterial catheter transducer (Transpac IV Monitoring Kit, Abbott Critical Care Systems, North Chicago, IL) was zeroed to atmospheric pressure and the tubing cleared of bubbles. (lww.com)
  • After observing that movement of the tubing produced appropriate changes in the tracing on the monitor (AS/3 Anesthesia Monitoring System, Datex-Engstrom-Ohmeda, Andover, MA), the radial arterial catheter was placed on the left side, which is the side away from the radiologists. (lww.com)
  • There was no substantial change in arterial catheter or cuff pressure response to tracheal intubation. (lww.com)
  • The resulting light signal is kept constant by controlling the alterable cuff pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • During systole, when blood volume increases in the finger, the control system increases cuff pressure, too, until the excess blood volume is squeezed out. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of this project is to create a mean arterial blood pressure monitoring device than can automatically control cuff pressure and determine the blood pressure without requiring any additional user input. (instructables.com)
  • Researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan, determined arterial stiffness using the relationship between cuff pressure and arterial volume. (medicalxpress.com)
  • When the cuff pressure is just below the systolic ABP a sharp spike or fluctuation (shown in blue) in the pressure of the cuff will be detected. (vetstream.com)
  • The amplitude of the spikes reaches a peak at the mean ABP and cease when the cuff pressure is below diastolic ABP. (vetstream.com)
  • The research addresses many of these inconveniences by developing and evaluating a novel ultrasound-based blood pressure measurement technique that is non-invasive and non-occlusive. (mit.edu)
  • Parsippany, NJ, USA) for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Like in other fields of innovation, the use of small but powerful microcomputers and digital signal processors facilitates the development of efficient blood pressure measurement instruments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr Hidehiko Komine explained, "Interpreting oscillating blood pressure provided the same accuracy of measurement for arterial stiffness as either of the established methods. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Doppler ultrasound techniques (Dopplers) Blood pressure: Doppler ultrasound and oscillometry are relatively widely used in small animal practice for non-invasive measurement of ABP. (vetstream.com)
  • We investigated the temporal correlation of retinal vessel width and arterial blood pressure in the range of the low frequency waves in a multimodal measurement study to gain an understanding of the temporal relation. (arvojournals.org)
  • Simultaneously, the arterial blood pressure was recorded by a continuous blood pressure measurement device (Finapres Medical Systems B.V., Amsterdam, NL). (arvojournals.org)
  • We conclude that the α1D-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction. (jci.org)
  • There are well established sex differences in blood pressure (BP) regulation. (hindawi.com)
  • Although pressure from wave reflections is known to attenuate forward blood flow, it augments incident wave pressure and may thus be involved with BP regulation during a postural perturbation (i.e., preventing a precipitous drop during changes in transmural pressure) [ 9 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • It is possible that sex differences in pressure from wave reflections [ 10 , 12 - 14 ] contribute to hemodynamic (dys)regulation during a gravitational perturbation, but this has not been explicitly investigated. (hindawi.com)
  • Regulation of Blood Pressure by the Central Nervous System. (annals.org)
  • 1) Hypertensive models that are sensitive and insensitive to TZD arterial pressure reduction. (frontiersin.org)
  • In this regard, TZD reduce arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, while TZD lack efficacy in others, i.e., "responders" and "nonresponders," respectively ( Table 1b ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Indeed, as great as 20% of hypertensive patients are resistant to TZD arterial pressure reduction (Dudenbostel et al. (frontiersin.org)
  • We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness in untreated (pre)hypertensive individuals. (nih.gov)
  • 3. Extracts of beef liver and muscle prepared according to the same procedure as employed for renal extracts, failed to lower the blood pressure in hypertensive rats. (aspetjournals.org)
  • 4. The failure of hog renin to produce a lowering of blood pressure in hypertensive rats in our routine four day test seems to militate against the interpretation that the anti-pressor effect of renal extracts might be due to the formation of an anti-renin substance. (aspetjournals.org)
  • With advances both in monitoring technologies and data analysis capabilities, we now have the capacity to capture dynamic changes in patient status by recording and analyzing non-invasive, high frequency hemodynamic waveform data, including ECG, arterial pressure, and most recently, cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Finapres is an acronym for FINger Arterial PRESsure, the device delivers a continuous finger arterial pressure waveform. (tudelft.nl)
  • This minimizes variations in the artery's effective diameter, whereby the pressure within the fluid-filled chamber closely follows the actual arterial pulse waveform. (google.com)
  • Two well known techniques have been used to non-invasively monitor a subject's arterial blood pressure waveform, namely, auscultation and oscillometry. (google.com)
  • Both techniques a determine pressure values only intermittently, because of the need to alternately inflate and deflate the cuff, and they cannot replicate the subject's actual blood pressure waveform. (google.com)
  • Randomized trial of bolus phenylephrine or ephedrine for maintenance of arterial pressure during spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • On the other hand, ketamine a phencyclidine derivative when used in sub-anaesthetic doses produces analgesia while preserving airway patency, increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure by activation of the sympathetic nervous system and reduces the incidence of spinal anaesthesia induced hypotension (11). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The researchers measured blood pressure, heart rate and arterial stiffness immediately after smoking the e-cigarettes and then two and four hours later. (medicalxpress.com)
  • no such effect was seen on heart rate and arterial stiffness in the volunteers who had smoked e-cigarettes without nicotine. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Evidence for a genetic basis was therefore sought by measuring the blood pressures of the 26 surviving parents of 17 insulin dependent diabetic patients with proteinuria and comparing them with those of the parents of 17 matched insulin dependent diabetic patients without proteinuria selected from the same cohort. (bmj.com)
  • Systolic and diastolic pressures were significantly higher in parents of the proteinuric (mean (SD) 161 (27)/94 (14) mm Hg) than in parents of the non-proteinuric patients (146 (21)/86 (11) mm Hg). (bmj.com)
  • There was a significant correlation between the mean arterial pressures in the proteinuric patients and the higher mean blood pressure in their parents. (bmj.com)
  • Arterial stiffening in CKD and ESRD patients is of multifactorial origin with extensive arterial calcifications representing a major covariate. (nih.gov)
  • The concept has quickly found wide acceptance in anesthesia and critical care: The evaluation of Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) allows for goal-directed fluid management in sedated and ventilated patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • 0.01) in blood pressure values and in MMPs levels in all patients with CBTs. (biomedsearch.com)
  • During IPPB/O 2 , cardiac output was definitely lowered without a significant decrease in arterial Pco 2 in the patients with airflow obstruction. (bmj.com)
  • Although in-office medical setting blood pressure check is the most common practice for most patients, it does not detect a number of clinical forms. (scirp.org)
  • We investigated the effect of continuous remifentanil infusion on systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output changes during prolonged tourniquet use in elderly patients under sevoflurane/N 2 O general anesthesia. (medsci.org)
  • Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that infusion with remifentanil prevented an increase in hemodynamic pressure during tourniquet inflation in elderly patients under sevoflurane/N 2 O general anesthesia. (medsci.org)
  • We investigated the effect of continuous intravenous remifentanil administration on systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output in elderly patients under sevoflurane/N 2 O general anesthesia who were undergoing knee surgery accompanied by use of a tourniquet. (medsci.org)
  • Pressure ulcers occur most commonly in individuals who have decreased mobility including the elderly, bedbound patients, paraplegics, and incontinence moistening the skin as well as those with poor healing due to malnutrition. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The aim of this study was to determine whether a higher level of partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) within the normal range in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery had a similar organ-protective effect. (medworm.com)
  • 12 measured serial arterial blood concentrations of enflurane in 14 patients, and found no difference between patients breathing nitrous oxide or nitrous oxide-free gas mixtures. (asahq.org)
  • We measured arterial and end-tidal partial pressures of sevoflurane in patients after induction of anesthesia to determine the existence and magnitude of the second gas effect. (asahq.org)
  • Moreover, even though it is well recognized that 1) several types of hypertension are insensitive to TZD reduction of arterial pressure and, further, TZD fail to reduce arterial pressure in normotensive subjects and animals, and 2) different mechanisms underlie acute and chronic TZD, findings derived from these models and parameters remain largely undifferentiated. (frontiersin.org)
  • Of these two sites for arterial baroreceptors, the carotid sinus is quantitatively the most important for regulating arterial pressure. (scribd.com)
  • Resection of carotid body tumors reduces arterial blood pressure. (biomedsearch.com)
  • only carotid pressure rose (p less than 0.01) in the coarcted rats, tail and femoral pressures remaining normal (p greater than 0.25). (ahajournals.org)
  • the first makes many modeling assumptions and gives an estimate of pulse pressure while the second makes less assumptions and uses the approximation of pulse pressure to obtain absolute values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. (mit.edu)
  • Of these participants, 20 343 had never received a diagnosis of hypertension and were included in an analysis in which systolic and diastolic blood pressure were regressed on the indicated possible predictors, including a 10-point score that reflects adherence to the Mediterranean diet and, alternatively, the score's individual components and olive oil. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The Mediterranean diet score was significantly inversely associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Intakes of olive oil, vegetables, and fruit were significantly inversely associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, whereas cereals, meat and meat products, and ethanol intake were positively associated with arterial blood pressure. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Olive oil intake, per se, is inversely associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Sex differences in the hemodynamic response to changes in hydrostatic pressure gradients [ 3 , 4 ] have been implicated as an important factor contributing to sex differences in orthostatic tolerance [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A further advantage of CNAP is hemodynamic optimization using continuous blood pressure and its parameters derived from physiological rhythms and pulse wave analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • These data were compared with those from healthy controls, matched closely for sex, age, mean peripheral blood pressure, heart rate, and height. (bmj.com)
  • Background:Systemic arterial pressure (AP) depends on two physiological variables: cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR). (iospress.com)
  • Pathological conditions were modeled as changes in arterial elasticity ( E ). Numerical results showed that the model was able to propagate acquired pressure waveforms and to reproduce PPA variations as a consequence of elastic changes. (hindawi.com)
  • The augmentation index, a measure of arterial wave reflection in the aorta, was measured by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor). (ahajournals.org)
  • Systolic augmentation index (sAIx) and diastolic augmentation index (dAIx) were used as estimates of pressure from wave reflections arriving in systole and diastole, respectively. (hindawi.com)
  • Men demonstrate less change in regional diastolic pressure concomitant with increased augmentation index and arterial reservoir pressure. (hindawi.com)
  • 3. Physical activity and sleep have a profound effect on continuous arterial blood pressure recordings and these are independent of time alone. (portlandpress.com)
  • We recorded the end-expiratory tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pet-CO2) as an indirect and continuous way to reflect the PaCO2. (medworm.com)
  • Thus, true continuous, beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring cannot be achieved using these techniques. (google.com)
  • The baseline systolic, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate were recorded. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The pressure transducer used is a differential pressure sensor, though we leave the second port untouched, meaning it is effectively used as a gauge pressure sensor where the given pressure is compared to atmospheric pressure. (instructables.com)
  • A pressure transducer (3) measures the pressure signals, which in turn are interpreted by the microprocessor. (vetstream.com)
  • Veno-arterial carbon dioxide gradient in human septic shock. (springer.com)
  • The associations between age and elevated BP outside of the clinic setting may, in part, be explained by age-related increases in arterial stiffness. (ahajournals.org)
  • Considering that active commuting to school increases the chances of students being more active, and that physical activity may contribute to maintaining healthy body weight, normal body fat proportions and blood pressure levels, this study sought to investigate the prevalence and association between excess weight, excess body fat and high AP among students who actively commuted vs those who passively commuted to school. (scielo.br)
  • Activation of serotonin2 (5-HT2) receptors by quipazine increases arterial pressure and renin secretion in conscious rats. (aspetjournals.org)
  • In summary, although quipazine increases arterial pressure and renin secretion, endogenous 5-HT does not tonically control MAP or PRA in conscious, unrestrained, normotensive rats through 5-HT2 receptors. (aspetjournals.org)
  • During aging, systolic blood pressure continuously increases over time, whereas diastolic pressure first increases and then slightly decreases after middle age. (diva-portal.org)
  • Assessment of cerebral autoregulation has been traditionally performed with static changes in arterial blood pressure. (ovid.com)
  • 1. A method is described for the preparation of renal extracts which are capable of reducing the blood pressure of rats with experimental hypertension. (aspetjournals.org)
  • however, the withdrawal of SCFP caused an increase in blood pressure in the rats. (csic.es)
  • The present study examined the effects of quipazine on mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and PRA in conscious, chronically catheterized male rats. (aspetjournals.org)
  • During combined administration of captopril, d(CH 2 ) 5 DAVP and pentolinium to sham-operated rats, there was no significant recovery of blood pressure. (portlandpress.com)
  • However, the latter contribute importantly to the support of blood pressure when the adrenalectomized rats are rendered hypovolemic and hypotensive by substitution of sodium-free water to drink. (portlandpress.com)
  • Studies in rats, rabbits, humans, and pigeons have shown that a major choroidal regulatory process involves compensation for systemic blood pressure (BP) fluctuation, so as to maintain stable blood flow despite the BP variation. (arvojournals.org)
  • 4. The results suggest that the combination of high sodium intake and meclofenamate exerts a greater damaging effect on the arterial pressure and renal function of SH rats than salt alone. (clinsci.org)
  • ΔP is the change in pressure across the systemic circulation from its beginning to its end. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gravity is an often neglected factor that contributes to the genesis of pressure in the systemic circulation. (hindawi.com)
  • arterial High blood pressure (Arterial hypertension), arterial circulation, angina pectoris, additional treatment of the not insulino-dependent diabetes, balance or re - balance the cholesterol, the herpes, anti-oxidizing, stimulated the immunizing system, anti-ageing, prevention and the treatment of the infections. (conua.com)
  • We propose that the spleen influences systemic blood pressure through a reflex pathway comprising splenic afferent nerves and renal sympathetic control of renin release. (ahajournals.org)
  • Arterial pressure is raised early in the subset of insulin dependent diabetics at risk of later development of progressive renal failure, suggesting that liability to arterial hypertension may play a part in the aetiology of diabetic kidney disease. (bmj.com)
  • 2. Oral administration of similar renal extracts at comparatively high doses failed to produce a comparable effect on the blood pressure. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Phe 2 , Ile 3 , Orn 8 ]- vasopressin) on the renal medullary blood flow and arterial blood pressure. (physiology.org)
  • Such physiological elevations of plasma AVP not only reduce renal medullary flow but also substantially blunt the sensitivity of the pressure-natriuresis-diuresis relationship ( 9 ). (physiology.org)
  • Pulmonary arterial wedge pressure is not significantly different from the left atrial mean pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • During the course of our studies into the control of fluid extravasation from the splenic vasculature, we found that intrasplenic inhibition of NO biosynthesis caused an increase in systemic blood pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • 1-3 During the course of our studies into the effects of NO on splenic function, we found that intrasplenic infusion of very small doses of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N G -monomethyl- l -arginine (L-NMMA) increased systemic blood pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • Klatz R, Goldman R, Pinchuk B, Nelson K, Tarr R. The effects of gravity inversion procedures on systemic blood pressure, intraocular pressure, and central retinal arterial pressure. (jaoa.org)
  • Choroidal vessels compensate for changes in systemic blood pressure (BP) so that choroidal blood flow (ChBF) remains stable over a BP range of approximately 40 mm Hg above and below basal. (arvojournals.org)