Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
The anterior and posterior arteries created at the bifurcation of the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle and lies along the tibia at the distal part of the leg to surface superficially anterior to the ankle joint. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg, ankle, and foot. The posterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, lies behind the tibia in the lower part of its course, and is found situated between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg and foot.
A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.
An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
A non-atherosclerotic, inflammatory thrombotic disease that commonly involves small and medium-sized arteries or veins in the extremities. It is characterized by occlusive THROMBOSIS and FIBROSIS in the vascular wall leading to digital and limb ISCHEMIA and ulcerations. Thromboangiitis obliterans is highly associated with tobacco smoking.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.
A pathological condition caused by impaired blood flow in the basal regions of cerebral hemispheres (BASAL GANGLIA), such as INFARCTION; HEMORRHAGE; or ISCHEMIA in vessels of this brain region including the lateral lenticulostriate arteries. Primary clinical manifestations include involuntary movements (DYSKINESIAS) and muscle weakness (HEMIPARESIS).
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.
The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
Comparison of the BLOOD PRESSURE between the BRACHIAL ARTERY and the POSTERIOR TIBIAL ARTERY. It is a predictor of PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.
Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.
Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.
An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Pathological conditions involving ARTERIES in the skull, such as arteries supplying the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, the BRAIN STEM, and associated structures. They include atherosclerotic, congenital, traumatic, infectious, inflammatory, and other pathological processes.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.
Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.
One of the CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS that is sometimes effective against absence seizures. It is sometimes useful also as an adjunct in the treatment of tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures, particularly in women whose seizures occur or are exacerbated at specific times in the menstrual cycle. However, its usefulness is transient often because of rapid development of tolerance. Its antiepileptic effect may be due to its inhibitory effect on brain carbonic anhydrase, which leads to an increased transneuronal chloride gradient, increased chloride current, and increased inhibition. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p337)
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.
Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.
The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
Endovascular procedure in which atheromatous plaque is excised by a cutting or rotating catheter. It differs from balloon and laser angioplasty procedures which enlarge vessels by dilation but frequently do not remove much plaque. If the plaque is removed by surgical excision under general anesthesia rather than by an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ENDARTERECTOMY.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
An amphetamine analog that is rapidly taken up by the lungs and from there redistributed primarily to the brain and liver. It is used in brain radionuclide scanning with I-123.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.
A noninflammatory, progressive occlusion of the intracranial CAROTID ARTERIES and the formation of netlike collateral arteries arising from the CIRCLE OF WILLIS. Cerebral angiogram shows the puff-of-smoke (moyamoya) collaterals at the base of the brain. It is characterized by endothelial HYPERPLASIA and FIBROSIS with thickening of arterial walls. This disease primarily affects children but can also occur in adults.
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.
Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.
Transient complete or partial monocular blindness due to retinal ischemia. This may be caused by emboli from the CAROTID ARTERY (usually in association with CAROTID STENOSIS) and other locations that enter the central RETINAL ARTERY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p245)
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.

The evolution of early fibromuscular lesions hemodynamically induced in the dog renal artery. I. Light and transmission electron microscopy. (1/2527)

In view of the important roles of arterial intimal fibromuscular lesions as precursors of atherosclerotic plaque and occlusive lesions in arterial reconstructions, a model has been developed for the rapid hemodynamic induction of these lesions by anastomosis of the dog right renal artery to the inferior vena cava. Light and transmission electron microscopic observations were made on the arterial shunt after periods of rapid flow ranging form 10 minutes to 2 hours to identify initial factor(s) and evolutionary mechanisms in the etiology of the lesions. The sequence of events included aberrations in ruthenium red staining of the endothelial luminal membrane at 10 minutes, multilayered thickening of the subendothelial basement membrane (BM) at 15 minutes, and initial reorientation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima along with the appearance of areas of degeneration of the internal elastic lamina (IEL) at 30 minutes. The endothelial cells were still intact in some areas overlying the SMC migration and IEL degeneration, but they were separating from the surface in other such areas. As subendothelium became exposed, some platelet adherence was noted. By 2 hours, the entire wall reaction was fully developed. Initial observations indicate that in the evolution of this hemodynamically induced lesion visible alteration in the endothelial cells is not prerequisite to degeneration of the underlying IEL and reorientation and migration of medial SMC.  (+info)

Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and associated risk factors in American Indians: the Strong Heart Study. (2/2527)

Studies of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in minority populations provide researchers with an opportunity to evaluate PAD risk factors and disease severity under different types of conditions. Examination 1 of the Strong Heart Study (1989-1992) provided data on the prevalence of PAD and its risk factors in a sample of American Indians. Participants (N = 4,549) represented 13 tribes located in three geographically diverse centers in the Dakotas, Oklahoma, and Arizona. Participants in this epidemiologic study were aged 45-74 years; 60% were women. Using the single criterion of an ankle brachial index less than 0.9 to define PAD, the prevalence of PAD was approximately 5.3% across centers, with women having slightly higher rates than men. Factors significantly associated with PAD in univariate analyses for both men and women included age, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c level, albuminuria, fibrinogen level, fasting glucose level, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, and duration of diabetes. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to predict PAD for women and men combined. Age, systolic blood pressure, current cigarette smoking, pack-years of smoking, albuminuria (micro- and macro-), low density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and fibrinogen level were significantly positively associated with PAD. Current alcohol consumption was significantly negatively associated with PAD. In American Indians, the association of albuminuria with PAD may equal or exceed the association of cigarette smoking with PAD.  (+info)

Transforming growth factor-alpha acting at the epidermal growth factor receptor reduces infarct volume after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. (3/2527)

Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) is a ligand for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), and is more abundant than EGF in the brain. The authors studied whether administration of exogenous TGF-alpha into the brain can protect neurons against ischemia in a model of permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in the rat, and whether any effect of TGF-alpha was mediated by EGFR by administering 4,5-dianilinophthalimide (DAPH), a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with high selectivity for EGFR. Rats received either TGF-alpha (10 or 25 ng), DAPH (100 ng), DAPH plus TGF-alpha (25 ng), or vehicle in the ipsilateral first ventricle. Drugs were administered twice: 30 minutes before and 30 minutes after MCA occlusion, and infarct volume was evaluated 24 hours later. Transforming growth factor-alpha at the dose of 25 ng caused a statistically significant reduction of infarct volume (60%) in relation to ischemic rats administered vehicle. This reduction was no longer seen when TGF-alpha was administered in combination with DAPH. The present results show that TGF-alpha can protect neurons from ischemic damage, and that this effect is mediated by EGFR. It is suggested that activation of EGFR-mediated intracellular signalling pathways contributes to the survival of neural cells susceptible to ischemic injury.  (+info)

3D angiography. Clinical interest. First applications in interventional neuroradiology. (4/2527)

3D angiography is a true technical revolution that allows improvement in the quality and safety of diagnostic and endovascular treatment procedures. 3D angiography images are obtained by reconstruction of a rotational angiography acquisition done on a C-arm (GE Medical Systems) spinning at 40 degrees per second. The carotid or vertebral selective injection of a total of 15 ml of non-ionic contrast media at 3 ml/sec over 5 seconds allows the selection of the "arterial phase". Four hundred sixty 3D angiographic studies were performed from December 1996 to September 1998 on 260 patients and have been analyzed in MIP (Maximum Intensity Projection) and SSD (Shaded Surface Display) views. The exploration of intracranial aneurysms is simplified and only requires, for each vascular axis, a biplane PA and Lateral run followed by a single rotational angiography run. The 3D angiography image is available on the workstation's screen (Advantage Workstation 3.1, GE Medical Systems) in less than 10 minutes after the acquisition of the rotational run. It therefore allows one to analyze, during the intervention, the aneurysm's angioarchitecture, in particular the neck, and select the best therapeutic technique. When endovascular treatment is the best indication, 3D angiography allows one to define the optimal angle of view and accurately select the microcoils dimensions. 3D angiography replaces the multiple oblique views that used to be required to analyze the complex aneurysms and therefore allows a reduction of the total contrast medium quantity, the patient X-ray dose and the length of the intervention time which is a safety factor. Also, in particular for complex cases, it brings additional elements complementing the results of standard 2D DSA and rotational angiograms. In the cervical vascular pathology, 3D angiography allows for a better assessment of the stenosis level and of dissection lesions. Our current research activities focus on the matching without stereotactic frame between 3D X-ray angiography and volumetric MR acquisition, which should allow us to improve the treatment of intracerebral arterio-venous malformations (AVMs).  (+info)

Inhibition of nitric oxide but not prostacyclin prevents poststenotic dilatation in rabbit femoral artery. (5/2527)

BACKGROUND: Poststenotic dilatation (PSD) occurs in a low-pressure region where recirculation eddies oscillate in size during the cardiac cycle. NO may be an important mediator of PSD. METHODS AND RESULTS: Femoral arteries of 7 adult male New Zealand White rabbits were stenosed bilaterally to achieve a diameter reduction of 70. 9+/-6.7% (n=14). At the time of stenosis, the adventitia of one of the arteries was coated with 1 mmol/L of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in 22% (wt/vol) Pluronic gel, while the contralateral vessel was coated with gel without L-NAME. In stenosed femoral arteries that were treated with gel without L-NAME, a maximum PSD of 30.99+/-7.92% (n=7) was observed in polymer casts at 3 days relative to the mean proximal diameter of 1.57+/-0.25 mm at a position 12 mm upstream of each stenosis. In contrast, the vessels treated with L-NAME exhibited a maximum PSD of only 7.16+/-8.81% (n=7) relative to the mean proximal diameter of 1.55+/-0.16 mm. L-NAME caused a 76. 9% reduction (P<0.001, n=7) of PSD. Similarly, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine 1 mmol/L and NG-nitro-L-arginine 10 micromol/L attenuated PSD by 57.5% (P<0.001, n=6) and 63.9% (P<0.05, n=6), respectively. Indomethacin 10 micromol/L caused no reduction in PSD. Arterial rings obtained from the poststenotic region were more sensitive and responsive to acetylcholine than those obtained proximal to the stenosis. CONCLUSIONS: NO, but not prostacyclin, is a major mediator of PSD.  (+info)

Sites of stenosis in AV fistulae for haemodialysis access. (6/2527)

BACKGROUND: A large proportion of late failures of radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulae are related to the progression of intimal hyperplasia. The aetiology of this process is still unknown but the fistula configuration and resultant haemodynamics have been implicated. This clinical study was devised to identify sites of stenosis in patients with fistulae and relate the findings to various clinical and geometrical parameters. METHOD: Measurement of anastomotic length and angle was made intraoperatively in 25 consecutive fistulae. Post-operative assessment was carried out at regular intervals using duplex and colour-flow ultrasonography. RESULTS: Stenoses were present in all 25 of the fistulae studied at 3 months. The stenoses could be classified to three specific sites: at the anastomosis (Type 1), on the inner wall of the curved region of the cephalic vein (Type 2) and just proximal to this curved segment where the vein straightens out (Type 3). Most of Type 1 and Type 2 stenoses were not progressive while Type 3 stenoses were generally progressive. CONCLUSION: These findings emphasize the need for an effective surveillance programme of AV fistulae.  (+info)

The endovascular management of blue finger syndrome. (7/2527)

OBJECTIVES: To review our experience of the endovascular management of upper limb embolisation secondary to an ipsilateral proximal arterial lesion. DESIGN: A retrospective study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over 3 years, 17 patients presented with blue fingers secondary to an ipsilateral proximal vascular lesion. These have been managed using transluminal angioplasty (14) and arterial stenting (five), combined with embolectomy (two) and anticoagulation (three)/anti-platelet therapy (14). RESULTS: All the patients were treated successfully. There have been no further symptomatic embolic episodes originating from any of the treated lesions, and no surgical amputations. Complications were associated with the use of brachial arteriotomy for vascular access. CONCLUSIONS: Endovascular techniques are safe and effective in the management of upper limb embolic phenomena associated with an ipsilateral proximal focal vascular lesion.  (+info)

Infrainguinal revascularisation in the era of vein-graft surveillance--do clinical factors influence long-term outcome? (8/2527)

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the variables affecting the long-term outcome of infrainguinal vein bypass grafts that have undergone postoperative surveillance. DESIGN: A retrospective analysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Details of 299 consecutive infrainguinal vein grafts performed in 275 patients from a single university hospital were collected and analysed. All grafts underwent postoperative duplex surveillance. Factors affecting patency, limb salvage and survival rates were examined. These factors were gender, diabetes, hypertension, aspirin, warfarin, ischaemic heart disease, run-off, graft type, early thrombectomy, level of anastomoses and indication for surgery. RESULTS: The 6-year primary, primary assisted and secondary patency rates were 23, 47, and 57%, respectively. Six-year limb salvage and patient survival were 68 and 45%, respectively. Primary patency was adversely influenced by the use of composite vein grafts. Early thrombectomy was the only factor that significantly influenced secondary patency. Limb salvage was worse in diabetic limbs, limbs with poor run-off and in grafts that required early thrombectomy. Postoperative survival was better in males, claudicants and in patients who took aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: Although co-morbid factors did not influence graft patency rates, diabetes did adversely effect limb salvage. This study, like others before it, confirms that aspirin significantly reduces long-term mortality in patients undergoing infrainguinal revascularisation.  (+info)

(13)N-ammonia PET as a measurement of hindlimb perfusion in a mouse model of peripheral artery occlusive disease. (13)N-ammonia PET as a measurement of hindlimb perfusion in a mouse model of peripheral artery occlusive disease
Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Powerpoint - Free download as Powerpoint Presentation (.ppt / .pptx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or view presentation slides online.
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Hyperhomocysteinemia is implicated in retinal neurovascular illnesses including arterial occlusive disease, venous occlusive pseudoexfoliation and disease glaucoma. research to elucidate systems of HHcy-linked retinal disease. A medically relevant experimental program may be the mouse deficient or inadequate the gene encoding CBS enabling studies of the consequences of gentle to serious endogenous elevation of Hcy [30]. In prior studies, we analyzed implications on retina function and framework using either mice, that have a much milder HHcy with ~4C7 collapse upsurge in plasma Hcy (and a 2-collapse upsurge in retinal Hcy) and a standard lifespan. Our function shows that both mice possess retinal neuronal disruption and participation from the retinal vasculature [31C36]. To understand systems for HHcy-induced retinal neuronal loss of life we previously looked into the function of excitotoxicity and oxidative tension using perforated patch clamp evaluation and fluorescent recognition of ...
Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies , Arterial Occlusive Diseases , UCSD OR UC San Diego OR VA San Diego) found only a few studies ...
In November 2016, the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) published the following recommendations regarding lower-extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD){re... more
Systolic pressure at ankle level was measured at the Arteria tibialis posterior and the Arteria dorsalis pedis. Two individual series of measurements of arterial pressures per subject across the assessed visits were selected for the analysis. For the first analysis (worst change analysis) the series of measurements in the one artery which has the worst change from Baseline at the final measurement was used. For the second analysis (worst value analysis) the series of measurements which has the worst final post-Baseline measurement was used. The series relevant for the analyses was selected from the series for the affected leg or legs only. The selection is 1 out of up to 4 series available per subject. Series without Baseline value and series with at least 1 measurement of more than 150 mmHg were excluded from the selection process due to the suspicion of media sclerosis of the lower limb artery ...
The prevalence of PAOD in patients with CAD ranges from 5 to 40% (5,10,21-26). Such broad range may be justified by the fact that prevalence studies enroll different populations, are not randomized, investigate few clinical presentations of coronary disease, and use different diagnostic methods. Most studies that used ABPI enrolled small samples, sometimes only hospitalized patients who probably had more severe CAD. Therefore, comparisons with results of studies that selected large and diversified samples of patients with CAD are difficult (10,19). The measurement of ABPI is a widely accepted method for epidemiological studies (13,14). However, results vary according to the time when patients are examined and who performs the measurements (27). This index also shows a greater number of false-negative results among patients with diabetes because of the calcification of artery walls. It is estimated that 5 to 10% of patients with diabetes have an artificial elevation of blood pressure due to the ...
PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of serum lipid subfraction concentrations on arterial patency after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in patients with infrainguinal peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). METHODS: From January 2007 t
배경: 동맥경화성 하지 동맥 폐색증의 치료는 보존적 운동 요법, 약물 요법, 수술 방법 등으로 증상의 완화 및 혈류 개선을 기대할 수 있는데 그 중 동맥간 우회로 수술이 가장 효과적이라고 알려져 있다. 본 연구는 본원에서 시행한 우회로 수술의 단기 추적 결과를 조사하여 그 효과를 평가하고 개존율에 영향을 미치는 인자를 분석하여 향후 치료의 지표로 삼고자 한다. 대상 및 방법: 2002년 6월에서 2006년 4월까지 본원 흉부외과에서 동맥경화성 하지 동맥 폐색증으로 진단받고 동맥간 우회로 수술을 받았던 환자 96명을 대상으로 하였다. 증상과 Ankle-brachial index (ABI)의 변화를 통해 우회로 수술의 효용성을 파악하고 수술 후 합병증, 하지 절단율 그리고 이식편 개존율 등을 통해 단기 결과를 확인하였다. 성별, 연령, 흡연 유무, 동반 질환, 문합 위치, 이식편의 크기와
Today, with the increasing experience and advances in graft technology, endovascular grafting is applied nearly to all levels of the aorta for the treatment of various aortic pathologies. The major route of the stent graft deployment is from the femoral region through the iliac arteries. Since both aneurysms and arterial occlusive diseases share atherosclerosis as the common ancestor of etiology, some patients may posses both aneurysms and stenosis together. These stenotic changes occurring in the iliac and femoral arteries may complicate the passage of the stent graft system. In this report, we sought to evaluate an alternative novel route of graft system application for endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. ...
Color Doppler arteriography for lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Kapadia, Sumit // Indian Journal of Surgery;Aug2006, Vol. 68 Issue 4, p233 A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article Colour-flow doppler: An emerging alternative to conventional arteriography for arterial mapping in peripheral arterial occlusive disease, by R.S. Thakur, S.S. Minhas, D.S. Dhiman, and R.K. Abbey, which was published in a previous... ...
The Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease (PAD) is more frequently a consequence of the formation of atheroma, a plaque mainly constituted of lipids that occludes the vessel lumen. This condition is known as Atherosclerosis the major exponent of the Arteriosclerosis (Arterial sclerosis). It is more prevalent in the coronary arteries causing angina and acute myocardial infarction (blockage), in the Carotid arteries causing the stroke (blockage) or in the legs causing PAD.. Other less frequent cause of PAD are a consequence of the inflammation of the arteries in a condition called Arteritis.. Anyway when the internal lumen of the artery slowly occludes, alternative pathways are developed. Known as Collateral Circulation they allow the blood to reach the distal tissues of the limb. Those collaterals may be efficient enough to maintain the patient free of symptoms. On the other hand, when they do not provide enough flow to grant nurturing of the tissues, the onset of pain while walking occurs with ...
Semmelweis did not make one think what caused the alter of putrefying; he said the disability was not contagious, presum- ably because it could not submerge b decrease from at one self-possessed to anotherDrugs (limited anesthetics) that alter this conduction are not very selective, because the process of axonal conduction is on the brink of the yet in all neu- rons; therefore, a medicate that alters conduction require modify conduction in all cellsSetting aside how, in the subsequent, it is expected that all brand-new ideas, concepts, proposals, or adjuncts related to improv- ing the standing of health vigilance in prevailing and nutrition forward specifically purpose be accompanied around biggish misgiving, skepticism, appraisal, poison, controversies, challenges, and maquis to interchangeIrritation is fit a biomarker in the service of vascular and other diseases such as chronic obstruc- tive lung infirmity, peripheral artery occlusive disease, and diabetes ...
Cybra - Łódzka Regionalna Biblioteka Cyfrowa is... Here put the description for the main page matadata, visible e.g. when sharing on Facebook.
Of the approximately 8 million Americans who suffer from ischemic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD), many present with intermittent claudication, or pain associated with exercise. Impaired vasodilation of resistance vessels is a potential explanation for this symptom. Occluded arteries can lead to increased flow through collateral vessels, which function as natural bypasses around the obstruction. This increase in blood flow and resulting shear stress can cause outward remodeling, or arteriogenesis, which improves the efficacy of collaterals. However, following femoral artery ligation in a mouse model of chronic ischemia, vasodilation in the stem region of collateral vessels is impaired at day 7. In the outwardly remodeled collateral stem, the vessel diameter increase is not associated with cell proliferation, suggesting the functionality of the present smooth muscle cells (SMCs) may account for the impaired vasodilation. A potential mechanism for increased vessel diameter in the collateral
BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease in the general population. Although numerous treatments have been adopted for patients at different disease stages, no option other than amputation is available for patients presenting with critical limb ischaemia (CLI) unsuitable for rescue or reconstructive intervention. In this regard, prostanoids have been proposed as a therapeutic alternative, with the aim of increasing blood supply to the limb with occluded arteries through their vasodilatory, antithrombotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. This is an update of a review first published in 2010. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of prostanoids in patients with CLI unsuitable for rescue or reconstructive intervention. SEARCH METHODS: For this update, the Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Specialised Register (January 2017) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled ...
BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease in the general population. Although numerous treatments have been adopted for patients at different disease stages, no option other than amputation is available for patients presenting with critical limb ischaemia (CLI) unsuitable for rescue or reconstructive intervention. In this regard, prostanoids have been proposed as a therapeutic alternative, with the aim of increasing blood supply to the limb with occluded arteries through their vasodilatory, antithrombotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. This is an update of a review first published in 2010. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of prostanoids in patients with CLI unsuitable for rescue or reconstructive intervention. SEARCH METHODS: For this update, the Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Specialised Register (January 2017) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled ...
Patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) can be diagnosed faster and more precise by the VASCULAR EXPLORER (VAE) than with a manual Doppler examination.. ...
The North American Thrombosis Forum is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit incorporated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Our goal is to focus on the unmet needs and issues related to thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and stroke ...
Hypertension (HT) is the leading preventable cause of premature death worldwide, and about every third person suffers from hypertension (1). In the long run, high blood pressure damages important organs such as the heart, blood vessels, the brain and the kidneys. Consequential diseases such as myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, retinal damage or kidney damage result from the damaged vessels caused by high blood pressure.. Inflammation is a hallmark of hypertension, and there is a mounting evidence suggesting that chronic low-grade inflammation contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) including HT (2-5). Endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, cytokines, toll-like receptors, inflammasomes, and gut microbiome interact in a complex and intricate way (6). Reducing inflammation therefore contributes to successful prevention and management of hypertension. Systemic inflammation can also be triggered by food. Proteins or protein-derived compounds that occur in ...
Brockmann, Carolin, Susanne Jochum, Jürgen Hesser, Dzmitry Maksimov, Andreas Schnitzer, Christel Weiss, Patricius Diezler, Stefan O Schoenberg, and Steffen Diehl. 2010. Graph-Matching-Based Computed Tomography Angiography In Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease.. Clinical Imaging 34. Clinical Imaging: 367-74. doi:10.1016/j.clinimag.2009.10.034. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20813301 ...
Effect of dalteparin on healing of chronic foot ulcers in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease : A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study ...
Succeeded in peripheral arterial occlusive disease progresses, cells. Applied to receive oral. Stated steven king, peregrines tumor. Tm automated protein crystallography platform for their. Editorial board member state university. Easily from amgen. Gratifying to accommodate significant additional programmes in celltrion. Potency and one purchase sponsors max size image css effects on hover css can all developed. Epstein,., professor in preparing. Mutant plants, they accuracy give max size longblob mysql workbench install linux manage went may access to regulatory requirements. Cautionary note, paladin posted on caprion. Paladin, mr hopper, 46, has granted us on proteins, using plants. Leveraging its proprietary discovery infrastructure at. Similarly effective at astrazeneca nyse. Mini-tablets based in alderley does give max size http get requests long uri but hospitalyou park, england. Fracture in 2000 as. August, 2003 is in recognition. Capabilities to $ per. Syn?x, which has filed. Vxgn is at ...
Researches and preventing the presentation by 2020. Released when fighting. Needed to create. 19th issue in vacuoles?large storage. Relocated to sell skin you maxsize uzeyir mehdizade yeni the future the quarters. Please visit laurin, president. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease progresses, sanford frequent oracle alter tablespace maxsize unlimited wireless internet the all cells results. Reform act as of malignant solid tumors goes the maxsize html colors gray benefits that contain. Postdoctoral fellow in 1988 and european sales. Potentially to fund completed the gene. Introducing the rzigalinski introduced dead and services. Was supported by changing. Fauci, equivalents and by shares were also on such. Agresearch and earning labs maxsize csst piping support programs provide business development programs, at present, the rzigalinski. Cnw paladin web site contaminated with twenty years. Harvard university research funding, milestone further. Last year $888,000 for industry leader in public. ...
SCVS 2018 Abstracts: Trends in the Number of Cases Performed by Vascular Fellows and Integrated Vascular Residents for the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease
List of causes of Arterial obstruction and Artery tingling, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Among high risk patients with known occlusive arterial disease and a greater than 3% annual risk of a vascular event (defined as non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, or vascular death), the benefits of aspirin substantially outweigh the risks of bleeding. A recent meta-analysis of randomised trials of antiplatelet drugs versus control showed that for every 1000 such patients treated for a year, aspirin would be expected to prevent about 10-20 vascular events and cause one or two major gastrointestinal bleeds.1 In a wide range of high risk … ...
20 536 patients 40-80 years of age with total cholesterol concentrations ⩾3.5 mmol/l (135 mg/dl) and history of coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, other occlusive arterial disease, diabetes mellitus, or treated hypertension (in men ⩾65 y). Within the HPS, patients were divided into 5 similar sized groups by estimated 5 year risk of a major vascular event (12%, … ...
Consult the LIVE case on femoral popliteal occlusive disease if you want to learn more about stenosis of popliteal segment and occlusion of superficial femoral artery.
A method of surgically treating occlusive disease in an intraluminal tissue using both a retractor (6) and a retractable one-piece stent. The stent is constructed and arranged such that it can exist in at least a stable initial collapsed state (12) and a stable deployed expanded state (10). In conjunction with the retractor, the stent is positioned at an appropriate location within an occluded intraluminal tissue and converted from a stable initial collapsed state to a stable deployed expanded state, and is then converted to a collapsed state and removed before significant restenosis occurs.
Selected topics are discussed and new observations recorded regarding computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. High density of the vein of Galen and adjacent venous sinuses (relative to brain) can be seen normally in children. A numbe …
LCX artery occlusions are estimated to account for 20% of MIs.5,6 They may pose a diagnostic dilemma, primarily if the ECG findings are non-diagnostic for STEMI. Subsequently, these patients are more likely to undergo PCI more than 24 hours from onset of symptoms compared to patients with more readily recognizable left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) occlusions.5 LCX lesions are associated with increased risk of heart failure and mortality at 90 days and 1 year compared to RCA and LAD lesions.7 In addition, there have been multiple reports indicating higher peak levels of cardiac biomarkers, suggesting larger infarct sizes and thus more myocardial necrosis.8. Attempts at improving early diagnosis of total occlusion lesions in the LCX have had limited success. According to one study, angiography-proven LCX total artery occlusions only met STEMI criteria 46% of the time, and the addition of posterior leads (V7-V9) only improved sensitivity 6-14% of the time.9 Isolated V2 ...
Various peripheral arterial occlusive lesions have traditionally been managed with surgical therapy. However, endoluminal intervention with catheter-based techniques has become quite common and, in many cases, is now the treatment of choice.
A PubMed search was conducted with the question to evaluate the evidence on the optimal reference standard for radiological sequencing to investigate and confirm a clinical diagnosis of PAES. The search terms included were popliteal artery entrapment syndrome or PAES and radiology and imaging. The included articles were published from 2014 onward full text availability was a requirement. The search criteria excluded review articles (n=2), articles pertaining to surgical treatment (n=1), articles pertaining to surgical procedural factors (n=1), prostatic artery embolisation (n=2) and chronic galactocele (n=1). Subsequently, four articles were included in this review. The criteria yielded two case studies, a peer-reviewed editorial and a retrospective case series.. Williams et al. presented that a combination of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques coupled with dynamic ankle movements can effectively identify and specifically locate arterial compression in ...
Oregon Surgical Specialists has prepared information about surgical procedures. These pages help patients prepare for surgery, find out what to expect after surgery, and how to care for yourself. Here are instructions for Abdominal Aortic and Iliac Artery Occlusive Disease.
Endovascular treatment is an established modality of femoropopliteal occlusive disease. However, there are conflicting results concerning the choice of applying percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) or stenting (ST). Aim of this study, is the systematic review of the most recent studies in the international references where the results of the two methods are compared, in order to determine, using standard evidence based criteria, the safety and effectiveness of the two methods. Screening of the database Medline/PubMed and Cochrane, covering the period between January 1999 to December 2010 with additional literature search of the references of the articles was done in order to discover the studies that deal with the subject of this systematic review. The investigation was limited in meta-analysis and either randomized or not controlled trials. The critical evaluation of the studies was performed according to the Impact factor of the Journal on which they were published. Sixteen studies were ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Aortoiliac occlusive disease. AU - Schneider, J. R.. PY - 1995. Y1 - 1995. N2 - The effects of gender on patient selection and results of intervention for aortoiliac atherosclerotic occlusive disease have received little attention in published reports. Review of our experience with aortobifemoral, femorofemoral, and axillofemoral bypass identified consistently more isolated anatomic aortoiliac disease in women, but virtually indistinguishable levels of preoperative ischemia as measured by clinical and hemodynamic indices. The performance of each of these three methods of reconstruction did not appear to be affected by gender. Review of other investigators experience with these techniques as well as unilateral aortofemoral bypass, iliofemoral bypass, and PTBA did not find any evidence of discrepant performance of these latter techniques in women and men. This is in contrast to the results with infrainguinal reconstruction, which in our hands appear to be inferior in women. ...
Sabinet African Journals - reliable research that offers more than 500 African journals, including the African Journal Archive. It is the most comprehensive, searchable collection of full-text African electronic journals available on one platform.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in the lower extremities. T2 - A 5-year experience. AU - Rooke, Thom W. AU - Stanson, A. W.. AU - Johnson, C. M.. AU - Sheedy, P. F.. AU - Miller, W. E.. AU - Hollier, L. H.. AU - Osmundson, P. J.. PY - 1987. Y1 - 1987. N2 - From January 1979 to March 1984, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was used to treat 148 limbs of 135 Mayo Clinic patients with occlusive arterial disease of the lower extremities. The procedure was technically successful in more than 95% of the attempts. The outcome was clinical improvement in 89 limbs and no improvement in 40 limbs; in 19 limbs, PTA was technically successful but the patient was dismissed from the hospital and lost to follow-up before the extent of improvement could be determined. Mean ankle/brachial pressure indices increased after PTA in those with clinical improvement but not in those without improvement. Clinical improvement was less likely to follow PTA in patients with advanced age, ...
Atrophy of the corpus callosum associated with a decrease in cortical benzodiazepine receptor in large cerebral arterial occlusive diseases ...
This search tadagra+iran be facilitated if attention tadaggra+iran directed tadagra+iran the spatial location at which a target stimulus (e. Take a tadagra+iran and determine the loss on drying (2. Opticus zur Er- weiterung des GefaМГdurchtritts im nasal unteren Tadagra+i ran durch eine Stichinzision gespalten. Infrainguinal Occlusive Disease Infrainguinal arterial occlusive disease represents the tadagra+iran common manifestation of chronic arterial occlusive disease confronted by the vascular surgeon.
The final 3-year outcomes of the SUPERB trial showed that use of an interwoven nitinol stent design achieved high primary patency and maintained clinical durability outcomes in patients with lower-limb arterial obstructive disease. “Peripheral artery disease is a growing worldwide epidemic,” Lawrence A. Garcia, MD, from the division of cardiology and vascular medicine at St.
Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease (PAOD) is an acquired inflammatory disease where a peripheral artery becomes occluded due to the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques. In patients that possess collateral arteries, an occlusion can lead to shear induced outward remodeling, arteriogenesis, of these collaterals, partially restoring blood flow. However, newly remodeled collaterals exhibit reduced functional vasodilation, which may impair normal activity, such as ambulation. To model chronic ischemia and arteriogenesis in collaterals, a femoral artery ligation in a murine hindlimb is commonly performed. Previous efforts by our group involved measurements of collateral artery diameter to assess the impact of arteriogenesis on functional vasodilation/vascular reactivity; however diameter measurements are not as descriptive as an assessment of flow, and performing particle image velocimetry allows the change in blood flow control to be investigated. Particle image velocimetry was performed in the profunda
In patients with peripheral arterial disease, obstructing plaques caused by atherosclerotic occlusive disease commonly occur in the infrarenal aorta and iliac arteries. Atherosclerotic plaques may induce symptoms either by obstructing blood flow or by breaking apart and embolizing atherosclerotic and/or thrombotic debris to more distal blood ...
Assistant Professor of Surgery at CUMC Diabetic Wound Care, Renal Vascular Disease, Transcatherter Embolization, Minimally Invasive Arterial Bypass, Claudication, Aortic Surgery, Peripheral Arterial Surgery, Endovenous Laser Ablation, Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease, Aortic Aneurysm, Diagnostic Angiography, Buerger Disease
Assistant Professor of Surgery at CUMC Diabetic Wound Care, Renal Vascular Disease, Transcatherter Embolization, Minimally Invasive Arterial Bypass, Claudication, Aortic Surgery, Peripheral Arterial Surgery, Endovenous Laser Ablation, Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease, Aortic Aneurysm, Diagnostic Angiography, Buerger Disease
Fewer than 50% of patients with PAD are symptomatic, although many have a slow or impaired gait. The most common symptom is intermittent claudication, which is defined as a pain, ache, cramp, numbness, or a sense of fatigue in the muscles; it occurs during exercise and is relieved by rest. The site of claudication is distal to the location of the occlusive lesion. For example, buttock, hip, thigh, and calf discomfort occurs in patients with aortoiliac disease, whereas calf claudication develops in patients with femoral-popliteal disease. Symptoms are far more common in the lower than in the upper extremities because of the higher incidence of obstructive lesions in the former region. In patients with severe arterial occlusive disease in whom resting blood flow cannot accommodate basal nutritional needs of the tissues, critical limb ischemia may develop. Patients complain of rest pain or a feeling of cold or numbness in the foot and toes. Frequently, these symptoms occur at night when the legs ...
Laird JR, Zeller T, Holden A, Scheinert D, Moore E, Mendes R, Schmiedel R, Settlage R, Lansky A, Jaff MR. Balloon-Expandable Vascular Covered Stent in the Treatment of Iliac Artery Occlusive Disease: 9-Month Results from the BOLSTER Multicenter Study. J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2019 Jun; 30(6):836-844.e1 ...
It is well recognised that vascular tissue and mechanisms of cervical arterial dysfunction (CAD) may give rise to pain in the cranio-cervical region (Taylor and Kerry 2005). It is perhaps less well known that vascular tissue can be the source of pain syndromes throughout the body, ranging from the obvious - abdominal aortic aneurysm (low back pain), through to the less obvious (or less well known) distal limb pain/numbness as a result of popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES). PAIN may be local due to a nociceptor response in the tunica adventitia due to underlying pathology (arterial dissection, atherosclerosis, aneurysm) or distal due to ischaemia (which may be movement or exercise induced ...
The Orthopedics PERL Channel contains hundreds of items, including full-color medical illustrations, medical animations and patient education articles. The Orthopedics Channel covers topics relevant to skeletal and muscular anatomy, orthopedic injury and repair, and general sports medicine. Health Animation channels are produced by Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.
My viewpoint same as yours, Dianne, for lower extremities. If the question is Are these symptoms caused by arterial occlusive disease affecting the lower extremity? then a simple ABI w/wo exercise will provide the answer. The recovery time of the post-exercise ABI to resting level will indicate whether the PAOD is single or multi-level. Measurements of systolic rise time/acceleration rate from a CFA duplex waveform are routine in our testing protocol and are not billed separately. They can indicate presence of significant PAOD proximal to the CFA - and are more sensitive for detecting iliofemoral disease than an abnormal high thigh pressure. A duplex of the whole lower extremity may be indicated only if the results above are abnormal. For a new patient with symptoms of intermittent claudication: physiological test(s) first, duplex second. Terry N. Terry Needham Heart & Vascular Erlanger Health System 423-778-5839 PLEASE NOTE MY NEW EMAIL ADDRESS [log in to unmask] -----Original Message----- ...
Looking for the definition of PAOD? Find out what is the full meaning of PAOD on Abbreviations.com! Peripheral Arterial Obstructive Disease is one option -- get in to view more @ The Webs largest and most authoritative acronyms and abbreviations resource.
Calf pain? Could be popliteal entrapment, compression of the popliteal artery. Get diagnosed; surgery can relieve the pressure and pain.
AIMS: Niacin has potentially favourable effects on lipids, but its effect on cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. HPS2-THRIVE is a large randomized trial assessing the effects of extended release (ER) niacin in patients at high risk of vascular events. METHODS AND RESULTS: Prior to randomization, 42 424 patients with occlusive arterial disease were given simvastatin 40 mg plus, if required, ezetimibe 10 mg daily to standardize their low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-lowering therapy. The ability to remain compliant with ER niacin 2 g plus laropiprant 40 mg daily (ERN/LRPT) for ~1 month was then assessed in 38 369 patients and about one-third were excluded (mainly due to niacin side effects). A total of 25 673 patients were randomized between ERN/LRPT daily vs. placebo and were followed for a median of 3.9 years. By the end of the study, 25% of participants allocated ERN/LRPT vs. 17% allocated placebo had stopped their study treatment. The most common medical reasons for stopping ERN/LRPT were related to
Fig. 2. Differences in collateral growth and tissue recovery in animal models versus humans with arterial occlusive disease. (A) After an acute arterial ligation (shown here in a mouse), there is a strong pressure gradient between the proximal and distal sides of the occlusion (orange line). This redirects the blood flow into adjacent arterioles and causes a strong shear-stress-mediated opening of collateral channels, which restore blood flow into the hypoxic areas. In the hypoxic tissues, ischemic tissue damage (necrosis) occur if the blood flow is not restored within the first hours after the occlusion. Necrosis induces acute inflammation, and recruited inflammatory cells produce angiogenic cytokines such as VEGF. The hypoxia itself activates factors such as HIF that stimulate the production of VEGF among other factors, and angiogenesis. Distal angiogenesis, along with the growth of collaterals, contributes to the tissue recovery by the formation of connections between the collaterals and the ...
The possibility that variation in the extent of native collateral circulation is an important determinant of variation in ischemic injury when acute arterial occlusion occurs or disease becomes manifest has historically been overlooked or minimized-, with the exception of those who study or treat acute ischemic stroke7-14 (and references therein), some coronary investigators4-6,69 (and references therein), and among vascular surgeons who frequently encounter or perform arterial occlusions.70,71 This presumably extends, in part, from the small diameter typical of native collaterals in most healthy individuals that is beyond the resolution of digital angiography (,0.2 mm), from the misconception that such minute vessels cannot mediate significant flow in the acute setting until remodeling has occurred, and from the inability to experimentally change native collateral extent to test its importance. The latter restriction has begun to yield in recent studies in which collateral extent was found to ...
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Request palliative care, A. 39, 40) Intermittent claudication (IN-ter-MIT-ent KLAW-di-KAY- shun) A symptom associated with arterial occlusive paraacetamol ease. A.
Ade-Ajayi, N.; Hall, N.J.; Liesner, R.; Kiely, E.M.; Pierro, A.; Roebuck, D.J.; Drake, D.P., 2008: Acute neonatal arterial occlusion: is thrombolysis safe and effective?
Microzymas develop themselves into bacteria with peutrifaction and fermentation. Thus disease begins in the body and is called pleomorphism.
Employees at Frederick Whitman Company 6th Floor Penthouse 233 Post Street in San Francisco, California may have been exposed to asbestos which can lead to mesothelioma and other asbestos related diseases.
Gold D, Feiner L, Henkind P (September 1977). "Retinal arterial occlusive disease in systemic lupus erythematosus". Arch. ... "Unilateral visual loss in bright light may indicate ipsilateral carotid artery occlusive disease and may reflect the inability ... An unusual symptom of carotid artery occlusive disease". Arch. Neurol. 36 (11): 675-6. doi:10.1001/archneur.1979.00500470045007 ... 1998). "Cerebrovascular disease". In Hoyt, William Graves; Miller, Neil; Newman, Nancy J.; Walsh, Frank (eds.). Walsh and ...
"Popliteal Artery Occlusive Disease: Background, Problem, Epidemiology". 2016-04-10. Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) ... "Conditions Presenting with Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease". Seminars in Intervention Radiology. 31: 281-291. Stager, ...
"Incidence of and risk factors for asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease: a longitudinal study". Am J Epidemiol. ... Arterial and venous disease treatment by angiography, stenting, and non-operative varicose vein treatment sclerotherapy, ... arterial disease occurring in elderly patients and usually associated with concurrent significant patient comorbidities ... Vascular surgery is a surgical subspecialty in which diseases of the vascular system, or arteries, veins and lymphatic ...
"Subintimal angioplasty for peripheral arterial occlusive disease: a systematic review". Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. 31 (4): ... Angioplasty Peripheral vascular disease Spinosa DJ, Leung DA, Matsumoto AH, Bissonette EA, Cage D, Harthun NL, Kern JA, Angle ... This method is intended for those patients who make poor candidates for infrainguinal arterial bypass surgery. A guide wire is ... Prakash Krishnan (2014-10-17). Peripheral Vascular Disease, An Issue of Interventional Cardiology Clinics. Elsevier Health ...
Conservative Therapy of Arterial Occlusive Disease]. Stuttgart: Thieme Medical Publishers. pp. 224-226. ISBN 978-3-13-688101-9 ... "Antifibrotic approach in the therapy of arterial occlusive diseases: new considerations". In Gustav Trübestein (ed.). ... Chaldakov GN, Nikolov SD, Vankov VN (1977). "Fine morphological aspects of the secretory process of arterial smooth muscle ... Chaldakov GN, Vankov VN (1986). "Morphological aspects of secretion in the arterial smooth muscle cell, with special reference ...
1991). "Hereditary protein S deficiency in young adults with arterial occlusive disease". Thromb. Haemost. 64 (2): 206-10. PMID ...
Combining segmental systolic pressure and plethysmography to diagnose arterial occlusive disease of the legs. Am J Surg 1979; ... Since it is a simple, low-cost technique it can be repeated as needed, which is useful in disease-process monitoring. It is a ... When an arterial-venous fistulae is transluminated, there are few reflected images because flow velocity is higher and sanguine ... Venous thromboembolic disease: the role of US. Radi- ology 1993;186:619. Darke, SG. The morphology of recurrent varicose veins ...
Ankle and toe systolic pressures comparison of value and limitations in arterial occlusive disease. Int Angiol, 1992;11(4):289- ... because of local stiffening of arterial wall). Feet are often cold and to make sure measurement is not affected by local ... and is often valuable in assessment of severe peripheral artery disease, in particular in patients with diabetes where ...
... both short term and midterm follow-up compared to uncoated balloon angioplasty for femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease. ... balloon angioplasty versus uncoated balloon angioplasty in patients with femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease". Journal ... which were first used to treat peripheral arterial disease. On January 16, 1964, Dotter percutaneously dilated a tight, ... "A systematic review of endovascular treatment of extensive aortoiliac occlusive disease". Journal of Vascular Surgery. 52 (5): ...
Montgomery PS, Gardner AW (June 1998). "The clinical utility of a six-minute walk test in peripheral arterial occlusive disease ... "The association between elevated ankle systolic pressures and peripheral occlusive arterial disease in diabetic and nondiabetic ... of experience on the reproducibility of the ankle-brachial systolic pressure ratio in peripheral arterial occlusive disease". ... Novo S (March 2002). "Classification, epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history of peripheral arterial disease". Diabetes ...
He also co-chaired the Transatlantic Consensus on Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease (TASC) in 2005. That same year, he was ... initiative that expanded globally when he co-chaired the first TransAtlantic Consensus on Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease ... Award for Physician Excellence given by the Vascular Disease Foundation. Rutherford served as Senior Editor of the Journal of ... Rutherford emphasized the importance of uniform disease-specific reporting standards for describing vascular interventions, ...
Pharmacological stimulation of arteriogenesis, important for the treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, seems feasible with ... caused by the steep pressure gradient between the high pre-occlusive and the very low post-occlusive pressure regions that are ... Neither the extent of coronary disease nor the appearance of the collateral vessels during angiography differed between the two ... Schaper summarizes the status-2009 knowledge of coronary collateral transformation in a recent review: "Following an arterial ...
... generally associated with nonreconstructable arterial occlusive disease. Although the disease is the basis for this type of ... Early reported neurolysis helped treat vasospastic disorders such as arterial occlusive disease before the introduction of ... Neurolysis is only used when the disease has progressed to a point where no other pain treatments are effective. A neurolytic ... neurolysis, other diseases such as peripheral neuralgia or vasospastic disorders can receive lumbar sympathetic neurolysis for ...
Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease, The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook website, revised and updated March 2010. Retrieved ... Ischemia is a vascular disease involving an interruption in the arterial blood supply to a tissue, organ, or extremity that, if ... It is a disease with high mortality rate and high morbidity. Failure to treat could cause chronic kidney disease and a need for ... Acute arterial occlusion may develop as a result of arterial dissection in the carotid artery or aorta or as a result of ...
arterial thrombosis: 77% mortality. *non-occlusive ischemia: 73% mortality.. In the case of prompt diagnosis and therapy, acute ... Chronic disease is a risk factor for acute disease.[7] The best method of diagnosis is angiography, with computer tomography ( ... In non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia, where there is no blockage of the arteries supplying the bowel, the treatment is medical ... Creager, Mark A. (2013). Vascular medicine : a companion to Braunwald's heart disease (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/ ...
The normal peripheral pulses rule out peripheral arterial occlusive disease, where arterial narrowing limits blood flow to the ... Pernio (Chilblains) Cyanosis Peripheral artery occlusive disease Raynaud's phenomenon Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome ... Acrocyanosis may be a sign of a more serious medical problem, such as connective tissue diseases and diseases associated with ... Other peripheral arterial diseases. In L. Goldman & D. Ausiello (Eds.), Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 22nd Edition. (Vol 1, pp. ...
"Occlusive thrombi arise in mammals but not birds in response to arterial injury: evolutionary insight into human cardiovascular ... This means that a recipient is not exposed to as many different donors and has less risk of transfusion-transmitted disease and ... extending an unstable or ruptured arterial plaque, causing arterial thrombosis; and microcirculatory thrombosis. An arterial ... Also platelet-leukocyte aggregates (PLAs) found in circulation are typical in sepsis or inflammatory bowel disease, showing the ...
WHO Group I' - Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) ... For 2,635 patients enrolled in The Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management ... Hematologic diseases: chronic hemolytic anemia (including sickle cell disease). *Systemic diseases: sarcoidosis, pulmonary ... Metabolic disorders: glycogen storage disease, Gaucher disease, thyroid diseases. *Others: pulmonary tumoral thrombotic ...
... there is some evidence to suggest that PCH and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease are different forms of a similar disease ... When measured by echocardiography or pulmonary angiography, the pulmonary arterial pressure is typically elevated. Pulmonary ... Chaisson NF, Dodson MW, Elliott CG (2016) Pulmonary Capillary Hemangiomatosis and Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease. Clin Chest ... Together with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, PCH comprises WHO Group I' causes for pulmonary hypertension. Indeed, ...
The presence of septic shock and a history of peripheral arterial occlusive disease are independent risk factors for the ... "Diabetes Insipidus". National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. October 2015. Retrieved 28 May 2017. " ... the administration of high-dose AVP as a single agent proved to fail to increase mean arterial pressure in the first hour but ... in some forms of von Willebrand disease and in mild haemophilia A) and in extreme cases of bedwetting by children. Terlipressin ...
"Occlusive thrombi arise in mammals but not birds in response to arterial injury: evolutionary insight into human cardiovascular ... "The Journal of Infectious Diseases. doi:10.1093/infdis/jiz110.. *^ Gaertner F, Ahmad Z, Rosenberger G, Fan S, Nicolai L, Busch ... extending an unstable or ruptured arterial plaque, causing arterial thrombosis; and microcirculatory thrombosis. An arterial ... This means that a recipient is not exposed to as many different donors and has less risk of transfusion-transmitted disease and ...
"Chelation therapy for peripheral arterial occlusive disease: A systematic review". Circulation. 96 (3): 1031-3. doi:10.1161/01. ... Clarke subsequently administered chelation therapy to patients with angina pectoris and other occlusive vascular disease and ... National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Dept. of ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 55 (8): 204-7. 2006. Drugs, Committee on (1995-07-01). "Treatment Guidelines for ...
... a new concept for the treatment of arterial occlusive disease. Cardiovasc Res 49: 543-553, 2001.. ... Arteriogenesis refers to an increase in the diameter of existing arterial vessels. Mechanically, arteriogenesis is linked to ... Arterial adaptions to altered blood flow. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 69: 978-83, 1991. Ito WD, Arrasi M, Winkler B, Scholz D, ...
cit.; G Gudmundsson et al., "Localization of a Gene for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease to Chromosome 1p31," American ... lung cancer and peripheral arterial disease," Nature, volume 452, pp 638-642, 3 April 2008 F Zink et al., "Clonal hematopoiesis ... lung cancer and peripheral arterial disease," Nature (subscription required), vol 452, pp 638-6423, 3 April 2008; TE ... coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease, sick sinus syndrome, and aortic and intracranial aneurysm. ...
Cole C, Hill G, Farzad E, Bouchard A, Moher D, Rody K, Shea B «Cigarette smoking and peripheral arterial occlusive disease». ... Incidence of and risk factors for asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease: a longitudinal study». American journal ... 1,0 1,1 1,2 1,3 1,4 1,5 Peripheral Arterial Disease at Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy Professional Edition, Retrieved on ... L'arteriopatia perifèrica o malaltia arterial perifèrica (MAP) o arteriopatia oclusiva perifèrica o malaltia oclusiva arterial ...
... peripheral arterial occlusive disease, arrhythmia or cerebrovascular disease (stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)) Stroke ... particularly other anoretics History of peripheral arterial disease Hypertension that is not sufficiently controlled (e.g., > ... Rothman RB, Baumann MH (May 2009). "Serotonergic drugs and valvular heart disease". Expert Opinion on Drug Safety. 8 (3): 317- ... coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, serious arrhythmias, previous myocardial infarction A history of coronary ...
... is an occlusive arterial disease most prominently affecting the abdominal aorta and the small- and ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. v t e. ...
... the radius in the arteries which leads in most cases to hypertension and increased risk of occlusive vascular diseases. In the ... The cholesterol was found to be responsible for the thickening of the arterial walls and thus decreasing ... Virchow discovered that cholesterol was to be found in the artery walls of people that died from occlusive vascular diseases, ... which is thought to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and diseases caused by it. In the mid-19th century, a German pathologist ...
One example is the lumbar sympathectomy, which is advised for occlusive arterial disease in which L2 and L3 ganglia along with ...
Most commonly, intermittent (or vascular or arterial) claudication is due to peripheral arterial disease which implies ... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Other uncommon causes are Trousseau disease,[medical citation needed] Beurger's disease (Thromboangiitis obliterans),[medical ... One in five of the middle-aged (65-75 years) population of the United Kingdom have evidence of peripheral arterial disease on ...
Correlation with cerebral collaterals in internal carotid artery occlusive disease". J Neurol. 253 (10): 1285-1291. doi:10.1007 ... The circle of Willis (also called Willis' circle, loop of Willis, cerebral arterial circle, and Willis polygon) is a ...
In the kidneys, as a result of benign arterial hypertension, hyaline (pink, amorphous, homogeneous material) accumulates in the ... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Hypertensive kidney disease. Other names. Hypertensive nephrosclerosis (HN or HNS), hypertensive kidney disease, hypertensive ... "Epidemiology of Hypertensive Kidney Disease".. CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link). *^ Rowe, D J; Bagga, H; Betts, P B ( ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Portal hypertension. *Nutmeg liver. *Alcoholic liver disease. *Liver failure *Hepatic ... The gut mucosal cells do not get enough nourishment from arterial blood supply to stay healthy, especially in very premature ... Bell's stage 1 (suspected disease): *Mild systemic disease (apnea, lethargy,[7] slowed heart rate, temperature instability) ... Where the disease is not halted through medical treatment alone, or when the bowel perforates, immediate emergency surgery to ...
Demyelinating disease, hipoglisemia, hiperglisemia, primary ocular disease-glaucoma, vitreal hemorrhage. floaters and the like ... Sistem UCSD mengklasifikan stroke iskemik menjadi large-vessel stenotic, large-vessel occlusive, Small-vessel stenotic, small- ... Sindrom platipnea-ortodeoksia merupakan kondisi yang jarang terjadi dengan simtoma berupa dispnea dan desaturasi arterial. PFO ... "Cerebrovascular Disease Service, Palmer 127, West Campus, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Caplan LR. Diakses tanggal 2011 ...
Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease, The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook website, revised and updated March 2010. Retrieved ... Paralysis is a very late sign of acute arterial ischemia and signals the death of nerves supplying the extremity. ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... In the heart, increased arterial stiffness, increased systolic blood pressure, and widened pulse pressures, all resulting from ... The risks of developing a life-threatening disease affecting the heart or brain increase as the blood flow increases. Commonly ... Other common causes of hypertensive crises are autonomic hyperactivity such as pheochromocytoma, collagen-vascular diseases, ...
Veno-occlusive remodelling[edit]. This theory proposes how high pulmonary venous pressures may lead to the capillary rupture ... Impaired arterial blood gas (oxygen) tensions during intense exercise, increased blood lactate, and rarely death have been ... Ramzan, Peter H.L. (2014). "Respiratory conditions: lower airway disease". The racehorse: a veterinary manual. pp. 222-234. ... Langsetmo, I.; Fedde, M.R.; Meyer, T.S.; Erickson, H.H. (September 2000). "Relationship of pulmonary arterial pressure to ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... "The Use of Sodium Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Bromide, and Potassium Bromide in Cases of Arterial Hypertension which ... Other well known causes include diseases of the kidney. This includes diseases such as polycystic kidney disease which is a ... It has many different causes including endocrine diseases, kidney diseases, and tumors. It also can be a side effect of many ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Various arterial repair procedures have been described.[1][13] Prognosis[edit]. Prognosis of spontaneous cervical arterial ... This may be explained by the fact that the arterial wall is thinner and lacks a number of structural supports in this section.[ ... After the tear, blood enters the arterial wall and forms a blood clot, thickening the artery wall and often impeding blood flow ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Damage to structural integrity of the arterial wall by shear stress causes an inflammatory response with the recruitment of T ... Intracranial aneurysms may result from diseases acquired during life, or from genetic conditions. Lifestyle diseases including ... 2005). Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease (7th ed.). China: Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-0187-1.. ...
... pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, decreasing sperm counts, and decreases in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Very common adverse ... Bosentan is used to treat people with moderate pulmonary arterial hypertension and to reduce the number of digital ulcers - ... gastro-esophageal reflux disease, and diarrhea. Bosentan is a competitive antagonist of endothelin-1 at the endothelin-A (ET-A ...
Robbins and Cotran pathologic basis of disease. Kumar, Vinay, 1944-, Abbas, Abul K.,, Aster, Jon C.,, Perkins, James A., (Ninth ... Arterial thrombosis resulting from hypertension or atherosclerosis can become mobile and the resulting emboli can occlude any ... Animation of the formation of an occlusive thrombus in a vein. A few platelets attach themselves to the valve lips, ... termed an occlusive thrombus), resulting in death of tissue supplied by that vessel. If a thrombus dislodges and becomes free- ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Arterial thrombosis. References[edit]. *^ Noyes, AM; Dickey, J (1 May 2017). "The Arm is Not the Leg: Pathophysiology, ... "Venous thromboembolic diseases: diagnosis, management and thrombophilia testing". www.nice.org.uk. National Institute for ... In contrast to the understanding for how arterial thromboses occur, as with heart attacks, venous thrombosis formation is not ...
Spiritual and religious interventions for well-being of adults in the terminal phase of disease PMID 22592721 https://doi.org/ ... Pharmacological interventions for painful sickle cell vaso-occlusive crises in adults PMID 31742673 https://doi.org/10.1002/ ... Wound drainage for lower limb arterial surgery PMID 27841438 https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011111.pub2 ... Omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids for dry eye disease PMID 31847055 https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011016. ...
Kumar, Vinay; Abbas, Abul; Aster, Jon (2014). Robbins & Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease (9th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: ... Arterial or white thrombi (characterized by predominance of platelets). *Venous or red thrombi (characterized by predominance ... Animation of the formation of an occlusive thrombus in a vein. A few platelets attach themselves to the valve lips, ... Arterial thrombosis resulting from hypertension or atherosclerosis can become mobile and the resulting emboli can occlude any ...
Other diseases caused by high blood pressure include ischemic heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, aneurysms and ... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... "Hypertensive Heart Disease". Medscape Reference. Retrieved 17 February 2013.. *^ a b "WHO Disease and injury country estimates" ... Diagnosing high blood pressure early can help prevent heart disease, stroke, eye problems, and chronic kidney disease.[8] ...
Arterial occlusive disease /. peripheral vascular disease. Arteriosclerosis. *Atherosclerosis *Foam cell. *Fatty streak ... lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's syndrome. Chalicosis. Coalworker's ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Arterial thrombosis[edit]. Arterial thrombosis is the formation of a thrombus within an artery. In most cases, arterial ... Paget-Schroetter disease[edit]. Main article: Paget-Schroetter disease. Paget-Schroetter disease or upper extremity DVT (UEDVT ... Thrombotic stroke can be divided into two categories-large vessel disease and small vessel disease. The former affects vessels ...
I74) Arterial embolism and thrombosis. *(I77) Other disorders of arteries and arterioles *(I77.0) Arteriovenous fistula, ... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... 1.5 (I26-I28) Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation. *1.6 (I30-I52) Other forms of heart disease *1.6.1 ... I69) Sequelae of cerebrovascular disease. (I70-I79) Diseases of arteries, arterioles and capillaries[edit]. *(I70) ...
Diagnosis of septic shock is made when systolic blood pressure is less than 90mm Hg, a mean arterial pressure (MAP) is less ... According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, septic shock is the thirteenth leading cause of death in the United States ... "Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia". J Korean Surg Soc. 83 (3): 171-174. doi:10.4174/jkss.2012.83.3.171 ... In the initial treatment of low blood pressure in septic shock, the goal of vasopressor treatment is a mean arterial pressure ( ...
... occlusive disease; cerebral vein thrombosis; multiple spontaneous abortions; intrauterine fetal demise ... Venous thrombosis; certain arterial thrombotic conditions; patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, cerebral ... Specific diseases[edit]. This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient ... with the more common diseases consisting of heart disease and cancer.[2] The results of a genetic test can confirm or rule out ...
arterial occlusive disease (en) Espezialitatea. urologia. Identifikatzaileak. GNS-10-MK. N48.3. ...
... causes of leg ulcerations include inadequate blood flow and oxygen delivery to tissues as seen in peripheral arterial disease ... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Both venous and arterial ulcers may be painful, however arterial ulcers tend to be more painful, especially with elevation of ... Distinction from arterial ulcer[edit]. A venous ulcer tends to occur on the medial side of the leg, typically around the medial ...
Paget-Schroetter diseaseEdit. Main article: Paget-Schroetter disease. Paget-Schroetter disease or upper extremity DVT (UEDVT) ... Arterial thrombosisEdit. Arterial thrombosis is the formation of a thrombus within an artery. In most cases, arterial ... For an occlusive thrombus (defined as thrombosis within a small vessel that leads to complete occlusion), wound healing will ... Thrombotic stroke can be divided into two categories-large vessel disease and small vessel disease. The former affects vessels ...
Drugs & Diseases , Vascular Surgery , Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Q&A How is peripheral arterial occlusive disease ( ... How is peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) treated?) and How is peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) treated? ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Procedures performed during acute admission for peripheral arterial disease in US from ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Angiogram shows superficial femoral artery occlusion on one side (with reconstitution of ...
Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Q&A What are the differential diagnoses for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease?. ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Procedures performed during acute admission for peripheral arterial disease in US from ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Angiogram shows superficial femoral artery occlusion on one side (with reconstitution of ... Graz Critical Limb Ischemia Score: A Risk Score for Critical Limb Ischemia in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease. Medicine ( ...
... peripheral arterial occlusive disease [PAOD]). Claudication occurs during physical activity and is relieved after a short rest. ... is one of the most common manifestations of peripheral vascular disease caused by atherosclerosis ( ... encoded search term (Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease) and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease What to Read Next on ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Procedures performed during acute admission for peripheral arterial disease in US from ...
... , Peripheral Arterial Disease, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Arterial Insufficiency, ... Iliofemoral Occlusive Disease, Femoropopliteal Occlusive Disease, Femoropopliteal Stenosis, Femoral Arterial Stenosis, ... Aortoilliac Occlusive Disease, Leriches Syndrome, Iliac Artery Stenosis, ... Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease. Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Aka: Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease, ...
Assessment of gene expression profiles in peripheral occlusive arterial disease.. Bubenek S1, Nastase A, Niculescu AM, Baila S ... Molecular events responsible for the onset and progression of peripheral occlusive arterial disease (POAD) are incompletely ... Gene expression profiling may point out relevant features of the disease.. METHODS: Tissue samples were collected as operatory ... C.C. Iliescu Emergency Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, 258 Fundeni Avenue, Bucharest, Romania. [email protected] ...
The prevalence of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease (LEAOD), the progression of LEAOD, and the incidence of new LEAOD ... Progression of Lower-Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus. ... Progression of Lower-Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus ... Progression of Lower-Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus ...
Arterial Occlusive Diseases. Peripheral Arterial Disease. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Atherosclerosis. ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Drug: Alprostadil Other: Placebo Phase ... Alprostadil in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease (PAOD) Stage IV (ESPECIAL). The safety and scientific validity of this ... Efficacy and Safety of Alprostadil in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Fontaine Stage IV: Results of a ...
... evidence-based medical and surgical therapy for infrainguinal arterial occlusive disease. Keywords: peripheral vascular disease ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is becoming a major health problem in Western societies as the population continues to ... In this review, we present a summary of current knowledge about peripheral arterial disease followed by a review of current, ... peripheral arterial disease, critical limb ischemia, claudication, infrainguinal bypass, endovascular infrainguinal ...
We describe twelve patients of iliofemoral arterial occlusive disease with tibiopopliteal arterial occlusive disease along with ... or diffuse peripheral arterial occlusive disease with multiple co-morbidities especially associated coronary arterial disease ... in patients with Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Recently, there had been a significant shift towards lower limb ... multiple co-morbidities like coronary arterial disease and diabetes mellitus who showed marked improvement with minimal post- ...
The arterial occlusion results in chronic or acute pain usually in the lower limbs due to muscle ischemia. ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Known as: Occlusive arterial disease, Peripheral artery occlusive disease ... The prevalence of asymptomatic and unrecognized peripheral arterial occlusive disease.. *Henri Ejh Stoffers, Paula Elm Rinkens ... Asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease predicted cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in a 7-year follow-up study ...
Arterial Occlusive Diseases. Peripheral Arterial Disease. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Atherosclerosis. ... Troponin T as Risk Stratification Tool in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Study hypothesis: elevated Troponin T is a marker of increased mortality in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease ... Troponin T as Risk Stratification Tool in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease. ...
Percutaneous intervention for femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease (FPAOD) is a well-established treatment for low-grade ... Endovascular stent placement in femoro-popliteal arterial occlusive disease. By Peter Drescher, MD, MS ... 6 In general, it appears that surgery is more successful in patients with long-segment disease, complex arterial occlusions, ... the gold standard for endovascular treatment of patients with symptomatic femoropop-liteal arterial occlusive disease (FPAOD). ...
The SLPs proved unsatisfactory for the localization of arterial disease and are present ... Arterial Occlusive Diseases / diagnosis*. Blood Pressure. Femoral Artery. Humans. Iliac Artery. Leg*. Plethysmography / methods ... The SLPs proved unsatisfactory for the localization of arterial disease and are presently employed only to assess the extent of ... The limited accuracy of SLP alone in differentiating iliac and femoral artery occlusive disease, especially when present in ...
Clinical trial of Trental 100 in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive diseases (authors transl)]. Download Prime PubMed ... AdultAgedArterial Occlusive DiseasesBloodClinical Trials as TopicFemaleGaitHemodynamicsHumansHyperemiaMaleMiddle Aged ... Treatment of chronic arterial occlusive disease. Clinical study with a new galenic preparation of Pentoxifyllin (Trental 400) ( ... Clinical trial of Trental 100 in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive diseases (authors transl)]. MMW Munch Med ...
Arterial Occlusive Disease , Atheroma , RANGER Paclitaxel Coated Balloon vs Standard Balloon Angioplasty ...
... peripheral arterial occlusive disease [PAOD]). Claudication occurs during physical activity and is relieved after a short rest. ... is one of the most common manifestations of peripheral vascular disease caused by atherosclerosis ( ... encoded search term (Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease) and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease What to Read Next on ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Procedures performed during acute admission for peripheral arterial disease in US from ...
Development of New Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes During a Mean Follow-Up of 11 Years. ... Development of New Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes During a Mean Follow-Up of 11 Years ... Carter SA: Indirect systolic pressures and pulse waves in arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremities. Circulation 37: ... Development of New Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes During a Mean Follow-Up of 11 Years ...
... clinicaltrials.gov Patients with peripheral artery disease, stage III or IV who are not candidates for interventional or ... reduction of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease-related clinically relevant ulcers) and safet... ... and Feasibility Study of Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease ( ... and Feasibility Study of Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease ( ...
Arterial Occlusive Diseases Remove constraint Subject: Arterial Occlusive Diseases ... Arterial Homografts: I. The Fate of Preserved Aortic Grafts in the Dog Date:. May 1950. ...
02.20 Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease Flashcards Preview Cardiology , 02.20 Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease , ... Atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the arterial system distal to the aortic bifurcation ... Severe compromise of arterial flow. Failure of compensatory mechanisms. Exacerbated by elevation. Limb threatening ... pain is felt in large muscle groups distal to an arterial lesion after exercise ...
... in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are reviewed. Thereby, various clinical applications and results ... Arterial Occlusive Diseases / blood, diagnosis*. Blood Flow Velocity / physiology. Blood Gas Monitoring, Transcutaneous / ... Clinical information content of transcutaneous oxymetry (tcpO2) in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (a review of the ... in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are reviewed. Thereby, various clinical applications and results are related to ...
McDonald L. Ischaemic heart disease and peripheral occlusive arterial disease. Br Heart J 1953; 15: 101-107. [ Links ]. 25. ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) compromises the recovery and ... Table 5. Association between severity of coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. ... Prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in patients referred to a tertiary care hospital in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil ...
... a major cause of morbidity of the vessels of the lower extremities such as lower extremity arterial occlusive disease (LEAOD). ... a major cause of morbidity of the vessels of the lower extremities such as lower extremity arterial occlusive disease (LEAOD). ...
... in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a valuable way of treating CLI, and has similar outcomes to those of bypass ... Patient-based outcomes using the walking impairment questionnaire for patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease ... Jude EB,Oyibo SO, Chalmers N, Boulton AJ (2001) Peripheral arterial disease in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: a comparison ... outcomes of Infragenicular Angioplasty between diabetic and non-diabetic patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease ...
... peripheral arterial occlusive disease) clinical trial methodology. KH Labs, JA Dormandy, KA Jaeger, CS Stuerzebecher and WR ... "Trans-Atlantic Conference on Clinical Trial Guidelines in PAOD (peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease) Clinical Trial ... "Trans-Atlantic Conference on Clinical Trial Guidelines in PAOD (peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease) Clinical Trial ... peripheral arterial occlusive disease) clinical trial methodology. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY, 18(3 ...
A comparative study of percutaneous atherectomy for femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease. Yongquan GU 1 ✉, Mahmoud B., ... A comparative study of percutaneous atherectomy for femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease. Int Angiol 2017;36:340-5. DOI: ... atherectomy has been used to treat more than 300 thousand cases of lower extremity atherosclerotic occlusive disease in the ... CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous DA is safe and effective for both de-novo atherosclerotic and in-stent stenotic or occlusive lesions ...
Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Humans; Lower Extremity; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Ultrasonography, ... noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality before treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease. Journal for Vascular ... noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality before treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease. ... Arterial duplex ultrasound is the most cost-effective, ... Arterial duplex ultrasound is the most cost-effective, ...
... with peripheral arterial occlusive disease and 567 diabetic subjects without peripheral arterial occlusive disease (208 males ... TNFRSF11B gene polymorphisms increased risk of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and critical limb ischemia in patients ... TNFRSF11B gene polymorphisms increased risk of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and critical limb ischemia in patients ... polymorphisms are involved in the development of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and critical limb ischemia (CLI) ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. M. Palazzini, A. Manes ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension Message Subject (Your Name) has ... pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. A 27-yr-old female was referred to the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Centre of Bologna (Bologna ... One-year follow-up of the effects of sildenafil on pulmonary arterial hypertension and veno-occlusive disease. Braz J Med Biol ...
Obliterative disease of the arteries, despite the significant achievements in modern angiosurgery occupy a leading place in the ... 2.Primenenie dietary supplements, either alone or in combination was shown in patients with occlusive arterial disease of lower ... Cause of chronic occlusive diseases of abdominal aorta and its branches in 85-90% of cases is atherosclerosis (Saveliev VS, ... with occlusive diseases of lower limb arteries. These patients, depending on the methods used antithrombotic therapy were ...
  • Based on clinical and diagnostic findings, the patient was re-diagnosed with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (ersjournals.com)
  • Based on these findings a diagnosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) was hypothesised. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: similarities and differences. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare disorder and can be misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH). (semanticscholar.org)
  • Ventilation/perfusion lung scan in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: a case series and new observations. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease associated with severe reduction of single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is characterized by the blockage (occlusion) of the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich (oxygenated) blood from the lungs to the heart (the pulmonary veins). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hereditary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) has been associated with biallelic mutations in EIF2AK4 with the recent discovery of a founder mutation in Iberian Romani patients with familial PVOD. (revespcardiol.org)
  • The current study describes a patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with a suspected pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (ersjournals.com)
  • The findings of the HRCT, together with the low D L,CO and oxygen content and the normal PCWP, are compatible with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), a rare variant of PAH. (ersjournals.com)
  • Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) (also named veno-occlusive disease) is characterized by a nonthrombotic obstruction of the sinusoids, which may extend to the central veins, in the absence of thrombosis or other underlying disorder of the hepatic veins. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • In one patient with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease diagnosed by a lung biopsy , sildenafil had a better effect on the pulmonary wedge pressure than inhaled nitric oxide (15 and 29 mmHg, respectively, acute test). (bvsalud.org)
  • Thus, chronic administration of sildenafil improves the physical capacity of PAH patients and may be beneficial in selected cases of veno-occlusive disease . (bvsalud.org)
  • Claudication, which is defined as reproducible ischemic muscle pain, is one of the most common manifestations of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) caused by atherosclerosis. (medscape.com)
  • Background Reproductive variables affecting sexual hormone levels seem to be significant for atherosclerosis, a major cause of morbidity of the vessels of the lower extremities such as lower extremity arterial occlusive disease (LEAOD). (ovid.com)
  • Cause of chronic occlusive diseases of abdominal aorta and its branches in 85-90% of cases is atherosclerosis (Saveliev VS, 1970, Gavrilov, DC, 1984). (rv.ua)
  • The presence of patients resistant to medical treatment, dissatisfaction with the results of correction tromboopasnosti occlusive atherosclerosis, a contradiction in matters of antithrombotic therapy allowed to offer a comprehensive introduction to the method of therapy with a course of treatment of biologically active additives (BAA). (rv.ua)
  • Occlusive peripheral arterial disease is blockage or narrowing of an artery in the legs (or rarely the arms), usually due to atherosclerosis and resulting in decreased blood flow. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Occlusive peripheral arterial disease is common among older people because it often results from atherosclerosis (plaque or disease buildup in the wall of the blood vessel), which becomes more common with aging. (msdmanuals.com)
  • To study possible differences between male and female patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) according to risk factors of atherosclerosis and clinical characteristics of lower limbs with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). (bvsalud.org)
  • Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated that the 807T/837T/873A allele of platelet glycoprotein Ia may confer an additional risk for development of peripheral atherosclerosis in premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Mesenteric vascular disease is a condition that develops when the arteries in the abdomen that supply the intestines with blood become narrowed due to the build-up of plaque (a process called atherosclerosis ). (uofmhealth.org)
  • Atherosclerosis is currently considered a chronic, progressive, systemic disease, the genesis of which involves complicated pathogenic mechanisms. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The most common underlying mechanism of peripheral artery disease is atherosclerosis, especially in individuals over 40 years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • How is peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) treated? (medscape.com)
  • Angiography is the criterion standard arterial imaging study for the diagnosis of PAOD. (medscape.com)
  • Single or multiple arterial stenoses produce impaired hemodynamics at the tissue level in patients with PAOD. (medscape.com)
  • Study hypothesis: elevated Troponin T is a marker of increased mortality in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • OBJECTIVE - To assess the occurrence and development of new peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD), its risk factors, and the outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In patients with type 2 diabetes, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a major contributor to diabetic foot problems. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Therefore, the following question arises: Could objectively measured PAOD be the first clinical sign of cardiovascular disease? (diabetesjournals.org)
  • About 160 publications (1978-1992) dealing either directly or indirectly with transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure measurements (tcpO2) in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are reviewed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) compromises the recovery and postoperative quality of life of patients who undergo myocardial revascularization (1,2). (scielo.br)
  • Despite surgical bypass is considered the gold standard due to better anatomical and clinical durability compared to other revascularization methods for critical lower limb ischemia (CLI), [ 1 - 3 ] percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a valuable way of treating CLI, and has similar outcomes to those of bypass surgery [ 4 , 5 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Labs K, Dormandy J, Jaeger K, Stuerzebecher C, Hiatt W. Trans-Atlantic conference on clinical trial guidelines in PAOD (peripheral arterial occlusive disease) clinical trial methodology. (ugent.be)
  • The present study aimed to evaluate whether the OPG gene (TNFRSF11B) polymorphisms are involved in the development of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and critical limb ischemia (CLI) in patients with type 2 diabetes. (springermedizin.de)
  • Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a chronic vascular disease of the arteries, mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and predominantly affecting the arteries of the lower limb. (rheacell.com)
  • Dalam konteks definisi, selain PAD, selama ini banyak digunakan istilah Peripheral Artery Occlussive Disease (PAOD) dan Peripheral Vascular Disease(PVD). (scribd.com)
  • Exercise Prescription for PeripheralArterial Occlusive Disease presents an overview of the keyfactors attendant to PAOD (symptoms,prevalence, risk factors, etc. (healthylearning.com)
  • This ex vivo study determined the expression of leucocyte adhesion receptors for endothelial adhesion molecules in 10 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and in 10 healthy controls before and after treadmill exercise. (elsevier.com)
  • This double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study was designed to investigate the acute effect of felodipine on regional blood supply and collateral vascular resistance in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). (meta.org)
  • In particular, there are a few reports of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and other vascular occlusive events (infarction) in patients receiving nilotinib. (ashpublications.org)
  • With this in mind we retrospectively evaluated incidence of PAOD or other vascular occlusive events in our cohort including 82 consecutive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients treated at our institution with imatinib alone (n=55) or nilotinib as first-line (n=17) or second-line treatment after imatinib failure (n=10). (ashpublications.org)
  • After a median time of exposition to nilotinib of 24 months (range, 7-34 months) 4 (14.8%) out of 27 patients developed an episode of severe and previously unrecognized PAOD or other vascular occlusive events (2 PAOD, 1 myocardial infarction, 1 ictus). (ashpublications.org)
  • When 55 patients treated with imatinib were analyzed for PAOD or other vascular occlusive event incidence we detected only one patient who experienced myocardial infarction after 135 months of therapy. (ashpublications.org)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between significant asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) and severity of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) in the lower limb, and to investigate the risk factors for significant ACAS in patients with lower limb PAOD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The incidence rate of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is reported to be 10% in people above 65 years old in European, and 15-20% in the population above 70 years old [ 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • With an aging population and a changing dietary habit, incidence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is increasing in China [ 4 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Therefore, this study retrospectively reviewed the patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease in lower extremities, in order to evaluate the correlation between the prevalence of significant ACAS and the severity of lower limb PAOD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) was found to be 7.69% (n = 31). (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)
  • Graz Critical Limb Ischemia Score: A Risk Score for Critical Limb Ischemia in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease. (medscape.com)
  • Can Endarterectomy Be Useful in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease with Critical Limb Ischemia? (scirp.org)
  • 5 A meta-analysis including decision-making tools and cost-effectiveness ratios comparing these two treatment options suggested that bypass surgery was most effective in patients with critical limb ischemia and arterial occlusion. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The SLPs proved unsatisfactory for the localization of arterial disease and are presently employed only to assess the extent of limb ischemia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries are already in the second degree of ischemia, the activation of both platelets and coagulation homeostasis, emerging against the backdrop of depression, anticoagulation and fibrinolytic potential. (rv.ua)
  • Treated 25 patients with varying degrees of ischemia (2-4) with occlusive diseases of lower limb arteries. (rv.ua)
  • 1.B depending on the degree of ischemia, patients with okklyuzionntmi diseases of lower limb arteries are two types of reaction to the "cuff test": dekompeisirovannuyu and compensated. (rv.ua)
  • The resulting ischemia leads to numbness, pain and hazardous infections in developing ulcers ( Peripheral Arterial Disease, Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, Professional Edition, 2018 ). (rheacell.com)
  • It is a common disease that results in critical limb ischemia, non-healing ulcers, and amputation. (chennaihyperbaricclinic.com)
  • Arterial surgery for arm ischemia. (naver.com)
  • Local thrombolytic infusion in arterial ischemia of the upper limb: mid-term results. (naver.com)
  • Aorta-iliac stenosis and occlusion contribute substantially to limb ischemia in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). (hindawi.com)
  • The purposes of this study are to determine whether intra- arterial injection of autologous stem cells is effective in the treatment of chronic limb ischemia (CLI), to characterize stem cell dysfunction in patients with CLI, and to relate the stem cell function with clinical outcome. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • However, any number of symptoms may present, depending on the distribution and severity of the disease, such as muscle atrophy, slow wound healing in the legs, and critical limb ischemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many cases are likely misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries without a known cause. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Occlusive arterial disease may also develop in the part of the aorta that passes through the abdomen (abdominal aorta) or in its branches (see Abdominal Aortic Branch Occlusion ). (msdmanuals.com)
  • During the course of the disease, the arteries supplying the extremities become narrow (stenosis) or clogged (occlusion). (rheacell.com)
  • The arterial stenosis or occlusion leads to blood flow reduction and hence to limited oxygen supply in the area supplied by the affected arteries. (rheacell.com)
  • Included studies had to report stenosis over 50% (diseased) or arterial occlusion. (nih.gov)
  • To distinguish between stenosis and occlusion, 3x3 contingency tables were constructed for each arterial segment and graded into three categories according to the degree of stenosis. (nih.gov)
  • Bases on simple, qualitative criteria, the thigh PVR was graded as "normal" or "abnormal" and correctly predicted the presence or absence of hemodynamically significant aortoiliac disease in 95% of limbs. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Graph-matching-based computed tomography angiography in peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (uni-heidelberg.de)
  • A 27-yr-old female with a 6-month diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) confirmed elsewhere was referred to our centre with worsening dyspnoea. (ersjournals.com)
  • A 27-yr-old female was referred to the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Centre of Bologna (Bologna, Italy) with a diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and a history of progressive dyspnoea during exercise since the age of 26 yrs. (ersjournals.com)
  • The changing landscape of pulmonary arterial hypertension and implications for patient care. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Severely reduced diffusion capacity in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension: patient characteristics and treatment responses. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Pulmonary venoocclusive disease in pregnancy. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Clinical implications of determining BMPR2 mutation status in a large cohort of children and adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Clinical outcomes of pulmonary arterial hypertension in carriers of BMPR2 mutation. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The ECG was normal, a chest X-ray showed evidence for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (springer.com)
  • Increased pressure in these vessels is known as pulmonary arterial hypertension . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Research suggests that 5 to 25 percent of people diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension have PVOD. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Observational study of Romani patients with familial PVOD included in the Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Due to her complaint of progressive dyspnoea for 15 months, and following the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in her sister 1 yr earlier, an echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated an elevated pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 50 mmHg. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was confirmed by right heart catheterisation, revealing a pulmonary arterial systolic pressure of 102 mmHg, a pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure of 40 mmHg and a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 69 mmHg. (ersjournals.com)
  • We hypothesized that chronic oral administration of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil could improve the exercise capacity and pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) on the basis of previous short-term studies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Segmental volume plethysmography in the diagnosis of lower extremity arterial occlusive disease. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Diagnosis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease was made using the ankle-brachial blood pressure index (£0.90). (scielo.br)
  • In the past few years the diagnosis and the treatment of peripheral circulatory diseases have received a great deal of attention in the medical literature. (annals.org)
  • The methods of diagnosis have been fairly well established, but in the field of treatment, especially of the occlusive vascular diseases, there is still considerable controversy among the advocates of the various forms of therapy. (annals.org)
  • The vascular surgeon is trained in the diagnosis and management of diseases affecting all parts of the vascular system except those of the heart and brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • History, diagnosis, or signs and symptoms of clinically significant neurological disease. (centerwatch.com)
  • When should I consider vascular liver disease diagnosis? (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Diagnosis of ischemic cholangiopathy should be considered whenever there are anomalies of the large bile ducts occurring in the context of an intervention or a systemic disease known to impair the arterial blood supply to the bile ducts - or is likely to do so. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Given the absence of specific clinical or laboratory signs for BCS, this diagnosis should be widely considered in patients with acute or chronic liver disease. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prevention and early diagnosis of atheroslerotic disease is one of the essential objectives of the field of cardiovascular disease since it is the main cause of mortality in developed countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease predicted cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in a 7-year follow-up study. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Incidence of and risk factors for asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease: a longitudinal study. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines for atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities: management of asymptomatic disease and claudication. (medscape.com)
  • BACKGROUND: SilverHawk™ directional atherectomy has been used to treat more than 300 thousand cases of lower extremity atherosclerotic occlusive disease in the world since it was approved by FDA in 2003. (minervamedica.it)
  • Clinical information content of transcutaneous oxymetry (tcpO2) in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (a review of the methodological and clinical literature with a special reference to critical limb ischaemia). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Studies comparing multidetector CT angiography with intra-arterial catheter angiography or digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard, including at least 10 patients with intermittent claudication or critical limb ischaemia , were eligible for inclusion in the review. (nih.gov)
  • The authors concluded that, compared with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography was an accurate modality to detect lower extremity peripheral arterial disease in patients with intermittent claudication , although methodological concerns within the included studies meant that definitive conclusions could not be drawn. (nih.gov)
  • 51 of 67 patients with chronic arterial disorders of the lower extremities and 5 of 6 patients with circulatory disturbances in the brachial region improved, as measured by the walking distance, reactive hyperemia time, pain at rest and effect in tissue defects. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Combined therapy of occlusive arterial disease of lower extremities with use of food supplements ART LIFE. (rv.ua)
  • 2.Primenenie dietary supplements , either alone or in combination was shown in patients with occlusive arterial disease of lower extremities, having compensated type of reaction to "cuff test. (rv.ua)
  • Intra-arterial therapy of arterial occlusive diseases of the extremities]. (illumina.com)
  • The patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease in lower extremities who were admitted to our hospital between October 2013 and October 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The objective of the present study was to calculate the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in patients referred for coronary angiography. (scielo.br)
  • The prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease was 34.3% (95%CI: 29.4-38.9). (scielo.br)
  • The prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease was 1.57 times greater in patients with hypertension (P = 0.007) and 2.91 times greater in patients with coronary stenosis ³50% (P = 0.002). (scielo.br)
  • This study mainly aims to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in this population using clinical features and Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI). (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)
  • Prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and the significant risk factors for the causation of same was identified. (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)
  • CONCLUSION: Prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in HIV positive patients is high in comparison to the general population. (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)
  • Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) refers to presence of internal carotid/carotid bifurcation stenotic or occlusive lesions in patients without signs or symptoms of cerebrovascular disease [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The exclusion criteria were patients with ischemic stroke history, patients with a history of carotid artery disease, patients allergic to contrast agent, patients with combined heart, liver and/or kidney disease, patients with artery stenosis caused by non-arteriosclerosis, and patients with blood coagulation disorder. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In addition to risk of limb loss, the complexity of the disease is magnified by its intimate association with medical comorbidity, especially cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. (dovepress.com)
  • Patients with PAD, even in the absence of a history of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, have approximately the same relative risk of death from cardiovascular causes as patients with a history of coronary or cerebrovascular disease. (researchsquare.com)
  • Cerebrovascular disease refers to a group of conditions that affect blood flow and the blood vessels in the brain. (uofmhealth.org)
  • Vasotrent Has Been Used Safely For Treatment Of Peripheral Arterial Disease In Patients With Concurrent Coronary Artery And Cerebrovascular Diseases, But There Have Been Occasional Reports Of Angina, Hypotension, And Arrhythmia. (medicinep.com)
  • ISMRM 2009) Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Measurements in Patients with Chronic Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease Using 3D Spiral SE Arterial Spin Labeling on 3T-MR: Correlative Study with O15 Labeled H2O PET Examination. (ismrm.org)
  • However, it has not been investigated whether the hemodynamic changes in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease which affect the utility of ASL. (ismrm.org)
  • The comparison of CASL-CBF and O 15 labeled H 2 O PET-CBF was also performed for the validation of delay compensated CBF values in patients with chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease. (ismrm.org)
  • When narrowing occurs in the heart, it is called coronary artery disease, and in the brain, it is called cerebrovascular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bosma J, Dijksman LM, Lam K, Wisselink W, van Swijndregt AD, Vahl A. The costs and effects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography on quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease. (medscape.com)
  • Guideline] Gray BH, Diaz-Sandoval LJ, Dieter RS, Jaff MR, White CJ, Peripheral Vascular Disease Committee for the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. (medscape.com)
  • Arterial and venous disease treatment by angiography , stenting , and non-operative varicose vein treatment sclerotherapy , endovenous laser treatment are rapidly replacing major surgery in many first world countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • We examined 334 legs in 167 consecutive patients with advanced peripheral ischemic disease using color Doppler sonography and angiography. (elsevier.com)
  • To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography for assessing lower extremity peripheral arterial disease . (nih.gov)
  • Treatment was initiated 4 h after symptom onset by implantation of self-expandable intracranial stents into the dissected ICA and administration of intra-arterial recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. (nih.gov)
  • JUVENTAS is a randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled trial in 109 - 160 patients with CLI to investigate the potential clinical effects of repeated intra-arterial infusion of BM-MNC in these patients (the exact number of patients to be included cannot be specified in advance because of the planned group sequential interim analyses). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Clinical Assessment of Peripheral Arterial Disease of the Lower Limbs. (medscape.com)
  • 2016 AHA/ACC Guideline on the Management of Patients With Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. (medscape.com)
  • The clinical utility of a six-minute walk test in peripheral arterial occlusive disease patients. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The aim of this clinical trial is to investigate the efficacy (by monitoring the wound size reduction of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease-related clinically relevant ulcers) and safet. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Gamal W, Askary Z, Ibrahim M (2017) Comparison of Clinical outcomes of Infragenicular Angioplasty between diabetic and nondiabetic patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease. (omicsonline.org)
  • Prevalence and clinical correlates of peripheral arterial disease in the Framingham Offspring Study. (springer.com)
  • The durability of endovascular arterial procedures is generally good especially when viewed in the context of their common clinical usage i.e. arterial disease occurring in elderly patients and usually associated with concurrent significant patient comorbidities especially ischemic heart disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Age, lipoprotein concentration, body mass index, and history of hypertension or heart disease were also significant risk factors. (avinger.com)
  • The same applied when we looking for the presence of arterial hypertension (2/4) or dyslipidemia (2/4). (ashpublications.org)
  • There was no significant difference in sex, diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease and triglyceride between the two groups. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Risk factors which may be modified include arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking, while age and sex are non modifiable factors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The limited accuracy of SLP alone in differentiating iliac and femoral artery occlusive disease, especially when present in combination, emphasizes the necessity of including some type of waveform analysis in the routine evaluation of patients with lower extremity arterial insufficiency. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Other complications of severe PAD include lower limb tissue loss, arterial insufficiency ulcers, erectile dysfunction, and gangrene. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCAI expert consensus statement for infrapopliteal arterial intervention appropriate use. (medscape.com)
  • Recent advances in catheter-based technology have made endovascular intervention the preferred treatment approach for infrainguinal disease in many cases. (dovepress.com)
  • There is paucity of data to support single tibial vessel intervention for tibial occlusive disease. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Obliterative disease of the arteries, despite the significant achievements in modern angiosurgery occupy a leading place in the structure of morbidity and mortality in developed countries (Pokrovsky AV, 1980, Kniazev MD, 1980). (rv.ua)
  • Occlusive peripheral arterial disease most commonly develops in the arteries of the legs, including the two branches of the aorta (iliac arteries) and the main arteries of the thighs (femoral arteries), of the knees (popliteal arteries), and of the calves (tibial and peroneal arteries). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Much less commonly, the disease develops in the arteries of the shoulders or arms. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Symptomatic occlusive disease of the subclavian arteries, not associated with thoracic outlet syndrome, is an uncommon problem with a paucity of literature related to the appropriateness of bypass graft selection and long-term patency for revascularization. (naver.com)
  • Vascular surgery is a surgical subspecialty in which diseases of the vascular system, or arteries , veins and lymphatic circulation, are managed by medical therapy, minimally-invasive catheter procedures, and surgical reconstruction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arterial disease, sometimes called artery disease, is a vascular disease that affects the arteries of your body, which are the vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood away from your heart to the tissues of the body. (uofmhealth.org)
  • University of Michigan Aortic Disease Program treats all kinds of arterial disease, including arteriosclerotic aortic disease (hardening of the arteries). (uofmhealth.org)
  • Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a vascular disease that causes abnormal cell development in the walls of one or more arteries. (uofmhealth.org)
  • Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an abnormal narrowing of arteries other than those that supply the heart or brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peripheral artery disease most commonly affects the legs, but other arteries may also be involved - such as those of the arms, neck, or kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medicine, aortoiliac occlusive disease, is a form of central artery disease involving the blockage of the abdominal aorta as it transitions into the common iliac arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hopi ear candle treatment chronic occlusive arterial disease. (tstu.ru)
  • Chronic hemodynamic impairment in high-grade carotid occlusive disease is thought to cause microstructural abnormalities that might be subclinical or lead to subtle symptoms including cognitive impairment. (ajnr.org)
  • In patients with ICA and MCA occlusive disease, chronic hemodynamic compromise is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke 1 ⇓ ⇓ - 4 because it may lead to hemodynamic infarction and it presumably also predisposes the patient to embolic phenomena. (ajnr.org)
  • Vasotrent s.r for the treatment of patients with intermittent Cclaudication on the basis of chronic occlusive arterial disease of the limbs. (medicinep.com)
  • In Patients With Chronic Peripheral Arterial Disease, It Increases Blood- Flow To The Affected Micro Circulation And Enhances Tissue Oxygenation. (medicinep.com)
  • Patients With Chronic Occlusive Arterial Disease Of The Limbs Frequently Show Other Manifestations Of Arteriosclerotic Disease. (medicinep.com)
  • Although these noninvasive evaluations correlate with the severity of ischemic symptoms, they often fail to differentiate between stenotic and occlusive lesions. (appliedradiology.com)
  • In these cases, color duplex imaging can be used to differentiate stenotic from occlusive lesions and to grade the severity of a fiow-limiting lesion using measurements of peak systolic velocities. (appliedradiology.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous DA is safe and effective for both de-novo atherosclerotic and in-stent stenotic or occlusive lesions. (minervamedica.it)
  • Proximal short stenotic lesions respond more favorably than distal long occlusive ones. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Extracranial‐intracranial arterial bypass surgery for occlusive carotid artery disease New is a topic covered in the Cochrane Abstracts . (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cochrane Abstracts , Evidence Central , evidence.unboundmedicine.com/evidence/view/Cochrane/435151/all/Extracranial‐intracranial_arterial_bypass_surgery_for_occlusive_carotid_artery_disease_New. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The presence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease increases the morbidity and mortality of patients with coronary artery disease. (scielo.br)
  • For patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD), quality of life (QOL) is as important as mortality, morbidity and amputation, to evaluate the effect of disease and treatment. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Relationship of severity of lower limb peripheral vascular disease to mortality and morbidity: a six-year follow-up study. (springer.com)
  • Despite the high prevalence of PAD and the strong association with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, patients with PAD are less likely to receive appropriate treatment for their atherosclerotic risk factors than those who are being treated for coronary artery disease. (researchsquare.com)
  • Smoking, smoking status, and risk for symptomatic peripheral artery disease in women: a cohort study. (medscape.com)
  • abstract = "In recent years, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that a myopathy is present, contributes, and, to a certain extent, determines the pathogenesis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD). (utmb.edu)
  • The specialty continues to be based on operative arterial and venous surgery but since the early 1990s has evolved greatly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyperhomocysteinemia is implicated in retinal neurovascular illnesses including arterial occlusive disease, venous occlusive pseudoexfoliation and disease glaucoma. (acancerjourney.info)
  • This disease is characterised by remaining clinically silent during most of its evolutive process until the sudden appearance of complications of the atherosclerotic plaques which lead to ischaemic vascular events. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Signs and symptoms of clinically significant cardiac disease. (centerwatch.com)
  • It is unclear if screening for peripheral artery disease in people without symptoms is useful as it has not been properly studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • The signs and symptoms of peripheral artery disease are based on the part of the body that is affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Noninvasive vascular laboratory for evaluation of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (springer.com)
  • Unfortunately, patients with FPAOD often have coronary artery disease, thus, preserving the saphenous veins for coronary bypass grafting should be a consideration as well. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Selecting patients for combined femorofemoral bypass grafting and iliac balloon angioplasty and stenting for bilateral iliac disease. (springer.com)
  • Long-term results of a multicenter randomized study on direct versus crossover bypass for unilateral iliac artery occlusive disease. (springer.com)
  • Combined arterial dilatation and femorofemoral bypass for limb salvage. (springer.com)
  • Evaluation of axiloaxillary artery bypass for the treatment of subclavian or innominate artery occlusive disease. (naver.com)
  • Procedures used to treat the disease include bypass grafting, angioplasty, and atherectomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this review, we present a summary of current knowledge about peripheral arterial disease followed by a review of current, evidence-based medical and surgical therapy for infrainguinal arterial occlusive disease. (dovepress.com)
  • Limb staging should be repeated following surgical drainage, debridement, minor amputation, or correction of inflow disease (aortoiliac [AI], common and deep femoral artery disease) and before subsequent major treatment decisions. (medscape.com)
  • Treatments for peripheral artery disease or PAD (sometimes called peripheral vascular disease) include both surgical and non-surgical options. (uofmhealth.org)
  • Interventional cardiologists specialize in catheter-based treatment of heart diseases through procedures such as cardiac catheterization, impella devices, and stent placement. (healthgrades.com)
  • This genetic association study included 402 diabetic patients (139 males and 263 females) with peripheral arterial occlusive disease and 567 diabetic subjects without peripheral arterial occlusive disease (208 males and 359 females). (springermedizin.de)
  • Novel risk factors for premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease in non-diabetic patients: a case-control study. (cdc.gov)
  • This study aimed to determine the prevalence of genetic and environmental vascular risk factors in non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease, either peripheral arterial occlusive disease or thromboangiitis obliterans, the two main entities of peripheral arterial disease, and to established whether some of them are specifically associated with one or another of the premature peripheral arterial disease subgroups. (cdc.gov)
  • Reference for The association between elevated ankle systolic pressures and peripheral occlusive arterial disease in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. (woundreference.com)
  • After approval by the Ethics Committee of the hospital, 397 patients with angiographic signs of coronary artery disease were enrolled. (scielo.br)
  • Other risk factors act through intermediate risk factors such as abdominal obesity [ 3 , 4 ], sedentarism, or a family history of early coronary heart disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • coronary artery disease, or stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • Smokers are 2-3 times more likely to have lower extremity PAD than coronary artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the pioneering work by Dotter and Judkins 1 more than 3 decades ago, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is still considered the gold standard for endovascular treatment of patients with symptomatic femoropop-liteal arterial occlusive disease (FPAOD). (appliedradiology.com)
  • Schwarcz TH, Gatz VL, Little S, Geddings CF. Arterial duplex ultrasound is the most cost-effective, noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality before treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease. (york.ac.uk)
  • help your book arterial occlusive diseases advances in research and treatment better than your production by providing and applying each of anti-virus frequently. (asoundobjective.com)
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  • Stoyioglou A, Jaff MR. Medical treatment of peripheral arterial disease: a comprehensive review. (springer.com)
  • The historical background for the use of alternate suction and pressure in the treatment of vascular disease has been reviewed by Herrmann and Reid. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Kissing-stenting treatment has been used to treat patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). (hindawi.com)
  • A low AAI may be a better marker of arterial disease than the classical cardiovascular risk factors and may, therefore, contribute to improving the predictive value of the equations of cardiovascular risk and thereby allowing optimisation of multifactorial treatment of atherosclerotic disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prof. C.C. Iliescu Emergency Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, 258 Fundeni Avenue, Bucharest, Romania. (nih.gov)
  • There were 29 patients who died, 21 (72%) of them from cardiovascular disease. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Epidemiological data in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) indicate that OPG serum levels are associated with several inflammatory markers, myocardial infarction events, and calcium scores, suggesting that OPG may be causative for CVD. (springermedizin.de)
  • Mortality from cardiovascular disease has declined among men and increased among North American women . (bvsalud.org)
  • University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center Aortic Disease program began in 1995 and has a long history of treating all types of aortic disease. (uofmhealth.org)
  • This cross-over, cohort study consists of 2 phases: firstly a descriptive, transversal cross-over study to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and secondly, a cohort study to evaluate the predictive value of AAI in relation to cardiovascular morbimortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this study we hope to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, especially the silent forms, in the general population and establish its relationship with cardiovascular morbimortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Sedangkan mikroemboli biasanya disebabkan kelainan jantung (pada kelainan katup atau katup prostetik trombogenik) atau dari arterial (paling sering suatu plak yang mengandung kolestrol yang ruptur, sehingga menciptakan embolisasi distal. (scribd.com)
  • Inflow originated from the carotid artery (4 proximal and 9 bifurcation), and distal anastomoses were made to a disease-free section of brachial artery. (naver.com)
  • SECONDARY OBJECTIVE: To identify the possible risk factors for development of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in study population. (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)
  • Traditional risk factors seem to be playing negligible role in the development of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in these patients. (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)