Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
Streptococcal fibrinolysin . An enzyme produced by hemolytic streptococci. It hydrolyzes amide linkages and serves as an activator of plasminogen. It is used in thrombolytic therapy and is used also in mixtures with streptodornase (STREPTODORNASE AND STREPTOKINASE). EC 3.4.-.
A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
A heterogeneous group of proteolytic enzymes that convert PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. They are concentrated in the lysosomes of most cells and in the vascular endothelium, particularly in the vessels of the microcirculation.
An acylated inactive complex of streptokinase and human lysine-plasminogen. After injection, the acyl group is slowly hydrolyzed, producing an activator that converts plasminogen to plasmin, thereby initiating fibrinolysis. Its half-life is about 90 minutes compared to 5 minutes for TPA; (TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR); 16 minutes for UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR and 23 minutes for STREPTOKINASE. If treatment is initiated within 3 hours of onset of symptoms for acute myocardial infarction, the drug preserves myocardial tissue and left ventricular function and increases coronary artery patency. Bleeding complications are similar to other thrombolytic agents.
A proteolytic enzyme that converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN where the preferential cleavage is between ARGININE and VALINE. It was isolated originally from human URINE, but is found in most tissues of most VERTEBRATES.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.
Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.
Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The hospital unit in which patients with acute cardiac disorders receive intensive care.
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.
Laceration or tearing of cardiac tissues appearing after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.
Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.
The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.
Regional infusion of drugs via an arterial catheter. Often a pump is used to impel the drug through the catheter. Used in therapy of cancer, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, infection, and peripheral vascular disease.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
Use of HIRUDINS as an anticoagulant in the treatment of cardiological and hematological disorders.
First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.
Agents that prevent clotting.
A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.
Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.
Imaging of a ventricle of the heart after the injection of a radioactive contrast medium. The technique is less invasive than cardiac catheterization and is used to assess ventricular function.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
Delivery of drugs into an artery.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.
Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.
Intraocular hemorrhage from the vessels of various tissues of the eye.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
Province of Canada consisting of the island of Newfoundland and an area of Labrador. Its capital is St. John's.
Disease-related laceration or tearing of tissues of the heart, including the free-wall MYOCARDIUM; HEART SEPTUM; PAPILLARY MUSCLES; CHORDAE TENDINEAE; and any of the HEART VALVES. Pathological rupture usually results from myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
A mixture of the enzymes (streptokinase and streptodornase) produced by hemolytic streptococci. It is used topically on surface lesions and by instillation in closed body cavities to remove clotted blood or fibrinous or purulent accumulations. It is also used as a skin test antigen in evaluating generalized cell-mediated immunodeficiency. (Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.-.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.
Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
Shock resulting from diminution of cardiac output in heart disease.
Laceration or tearing of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, usually caused by MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Precursor of plasmin (FIBRINOLYSIN). It is a single-chain beta-globulin of molecular weight 80-90,000 found mostly in association with fibrinogen in plasma; plasminogen activators change it to fibrinolysin. It is used in wound debriding and has been investigated as a thrombolytic agent.
NECROSIS occurring in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY system, including branches such as Heubner's artery. These arteries supply blood to the medial and superior parts of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, Infarction in the anterior cerebral artery usually results in sensory and motor impairment in the lower body.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.
Mechanical devices inserted in the inferior vena cava that prevent the migration of blood clots from deep venous thrombosis of the leg.
Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.
Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).
A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.
A condition in which the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the right ventricular wall.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.
Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Counterpulsation in which a pumping unit synchronized with the patient's electrocardiogram rapidly fills a balloon in the aorta with helium or carbon dioxide in early diastole and evacuates the balloon at the onset of systole. As the balloon inflates, it raises aortic diastolic pressure, and as it deflates, it lowers aortic systolic pressure. The result is a decrease in left ventricular work and increased myocardial and peripheral perfusion.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A measurement of the time needed for FIBRINOLYSIS to occur.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
The use of focused, high-frequency sound waves to produce local hyperthermia in certain diseased or injured parts of the body or to destroy the diseased tissue.
Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.
An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.
The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
Unstable isotopes of thallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Tl atoms with atomic weights 198-202, 204, and 206-210 are thallium radioisotopes.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.
The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.
A selective adrenergic beta-1 blocking agent that is commonly used to treat ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS.
Geraghty AJ, Welch K (June 2011). "Antithrombotic agents for preventing thrombosis after infrainguinal arterial bypass surgery ... rethrombosis after thrombolytic therapy and rethrombosis after vascular surgery. It is also indicated for the prevention of ... undergoing arterial graft surgery to treat peripheral arterial disease and found little difference between the two agents. ... Hao Z, Liu M, Counsell C, Wardlaw JM, Lin S, Zhao X (March 2012). "Fibrinogen depleting agents for acute ischaemic stroke". The ...
... recently formed emboli may be treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis using intra-arterial infusion of a thrombolytic agent ... Anticoagulant therapy is initiated to prevent further enlargement of the thrombus. Continuous IV unfractionated heparin has ... Unlike anticoagulants, thrombolytic agents work directly to resolve the clot over a period of 24 to 48 hours. Direct ... Acute arterial occlusion may develop as a result of arterial dissection in the carotid artery or aorta or as a result of ...
... as contraindications to thrombolytic therapy should undergo rapid assessment. Cardiac sources of embolism can be evaluated as ... Hypotensive agents that can be options include labetalol, nicardipine, clevidipine, hydralazine, enalaprilat.[21] For the ... aneurysmal rupture should be investigated given its association with arterial vasospasm resulting in stroke.[3] Anterior ... Dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel) are recommended to start within 24 hours for 21 days in patients with minor ...
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Pre-hospital thrombolytic therapy in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. NEJM 1993:329:383-9 Moleur P, ... During the same period, he sets up the first European lab mastering animal and human arterial smooth muscle cell line culture. ... he was the first to demonstrate the efficacy of an anti-aggregating agent, ticlopidine, to prevent clinical events with ...
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Vitamin E With the growing number of patients taking oral anticoagulation therapy, studies into reversal agents are gaining ... Adams J, Pepping J (August 2005). "Vitamin K in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and arterial calcification" (PDF ... Anticoagulants are closely related to antiplatelet drugs and thrombolytic drugs by manipulating the various pathways of blood ... Some indications for anticoagulant therapy that are known to have benefit from therapy include: Atrial fibrillation - commonly ...
Antiplatelet agents[edit]. Arterial thrombosis is platelet-rich, and inhibition of platelet aggregation with antiplatelet drugs ... If diagnosed within 12 hours of the initial episode (attack) then thrombolytic therapy is initiated. ... Arterial thrombosis[edit]. Arterial thrombosis is the formation of a thrombus within an artery. In most cases, arterial ... the Seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy". Chest. 126 (3 Suppl): 338S-400S. doi:10.1378/chest. ...
These agents are used commonly by microsurgeons to decrease vascular thrombosis. The antithrombotic effect of dextran is ... In this family, dextran-40 (MW: 40,000 Da), has been the most popular member for anticoagulation therapy. Close to 70% of ... Still, no difference has been detected in antithrombotic effectiveness in comparison of intra-arterial and intravenous ... so possesses thrombolytic features. Outside of these features, larger dextrans, which do not pass out of the vessels, are ...
These therapies are not routinely recommended. Such complications are suggested to be the main reason for mortality in people ... Patients on TPN who have such clots occluding their catheter may receive a thrombolytic flush to dissolve the clots and prevent ... In situations where there is no suitable emulsifying agent for a person at risk of developing essential fatty acid deficiency, ... Catheter complications include pneumothorax, accidental arterial puncture, and catheter-related sepsis. The complication rate ...
"Thrombolytic Therapy: Background, Thrombolytic Agents, Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Myocardial Infarction". Medscape. Tsurupa ... or administered through an arterial catheter directly to the site of occlusion in the case of peripheral arterial thrombi and ... Rivera-Bou WL, Cabanas JG, Villanueva SE (2008-11-20). "Thrombolytic Therapy". Medscape. Wardlaw JM, Murray V, Berge E, del ... "Reduction of the incidence of amputation in frostbite injury with thrombolytic therapy". Archives of Surgery. 142 (6): 546-51, ...
no antiplatelet therapy on the risk of venous or arterial thrombotic events in ICU patients with COVID-19. Study patients will ... TIMI 2A compared the results of 3 strategies of coronary angiography and angioplasty following intravenous thrombolytic therapy ... InTIME II-TIMI 17 compared the single-bolus fibrinolytic agent lanoteplase (nPA) with accelerated rtPA for the treatment of ... ENTIRE-TIMI 23 assessed the safety and efficacy of enoxaparin as an adjunct to thrombolysis with or without GP IIb/IIIa therapy ...
If the myocardial infarction is treated with thrombolytic therapy, the mortality increases to over 70%, mostly due to bleeding ... The target blood pressure should be a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 60 to 75 mmHg, or the lowest blood pressure tolerated. ... In acute dissection, fast-acting agents which can be given intravenously and have doses that are easier to adjust (such as ... These individuals have been self-selected as survivors of the acute episode and can be treated with medical therapy as long as ...
Depletion of vitamin K by coumadin therapy increases risk of arterial calcification and heart valve calcification, especially ... A reversal agent for dabigatran, idarucizumab, is currently the only NOAC reversal agent approved for use by the FDA. Rates of ... Anticoagulants are closely related to antiplatelet drugs and thrombolytic drugs by manipulating the various pathways of blood ... Some indications for anticoagulant therapy that are known to have benefit from therapy include: *Atrial fibrillation - commonly ...
Intra-arterial (into an artery), e.g. vasodilator drugs in the treatment of vasospasm and thrombolytic drugs for treatment of ... Intramuscular (into a muscle), e.g. many vaccines, antibiotics, and long-term psychoactive agents. Recreationally the ... it is here used to treat constipation under opiate pain therapy and does not affect the pain-reducing effect of the opiate. The ... transdermal patches such as fentanyl in pain therapy, nicotine patches for treatment of addiction and nitroglycerine for ...
... but this is less than the risk of a stroke following thrombolytic drug therapy. As with any procedure involving the heart, ... Allergic reaction to the contrast dye used is possible, but has been reduced with the newer agents. Deterioration of kidney ... PCI is used primarily to open a blocked coronary artery and restore arterial blood flow to heart tissue, without requiring open ... 85% of patients in the medical therapy arm elected to have PCI at the end of the trial. The 2019 ISCHEMIA trial has confirmed ...
Thrombolytic agents (e.g., tissue plasminogen activator) have been used with some success to break down an existing aortic ... People who continue to have symptoms despite drug therapy can consider more invasive therapies. Intravenous phenylephrine (or ... Borgeat K, Wright J, Garrod O, Payne JR, Fuentes VL (2014). "Arterial thromboembolism in 250 cats in general practice: 2004- ... Septal reduction therapy is not recommended in asymptomatic people. The primary goal of medications is to relieve symptoms such ...
Dong B, Jirong Y, Liu G, Wang Q, Wu T (2006). "Thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism". Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2): ... External agents/. occupational. lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's ... 2006). "D-dimer testing to determine the duration of anticoagulation therapy". N. Engl. J. Med. 355 (17): 1780-9. doi:10.1056/ ... Chest spiral CT scan with radiocontrast agent showing multiple filling defects of principal branches of the pulmonary arteries ...
"Reducing bleeding complications after thrombolytic therapy for stroke: clinical potential of metalloproteinase inhibitors and ... Sindrom platipnea-ortodeoksia merupakan kondisi yang jarang terjadi dengan simtoma berupa dispnea dan desaturasi arterial. PFO ... "Effects of the spin trap agent disodium- [tert-butylimino)methyl]benzene-1,3-disulfonate N-oxide (generic NXY-059) on ... "Microplasmin: a novel thrombolytic that improves behavioral outcome after embolic strokes in rabbits". Department of ...
... is also used clinically as a thrombolytic agent in the treatment of severe or massive deep venous thrombosis, ... Consequently, urokinase has been preferentially used in deep venous thrombosis and peripheral arterial occlusive disease where ... a potential target for anti-invasive cancer therapy". Biochemical Society Transactions. 30 (2): 177-83. doi:10.1042/BST0300177 ... However, incompatibilities between the human and murine systems hamper clinical evaluation of these agents. Moreover, urokinase ...
Beta blocker therapy such as metoprolol or carvedilol is recommended to be started within 24 hours, provided there is no acute ... Other medications include: Aspirin is continued indefinitely, as well as another antiplatelet agent such as clopidogrel or ... Inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, move into affected arterial walls. Over time, they become laden with cholesterol ... Pre-hospital thrombolysis reduces time to thrombolytic treatment, based on studies conducted in higher income countries, ...
Reversal agentsEdit. With the growing number of patients taking oral anticoagulation therapy, studies into reversal agents are ... Anticoagulants are closely related to antiplatelet drugs and thrombolytic drugs by manipulating the various pathways of blood ... which can lead to increased risk of arterial calcification and heart valve, especially if too much Vitamin D is present.[51][52 ... Some indications for anticoagulant therapy that are known to have benefit from therapy include: *Atrial fibrillation - commonly ...
... the Seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy»։ Chest 126 (3 Suppl): 338S-400S։ PMID 15383478։ doi: ... MedlinePlus , Arterial embolism Update Date: 5/8/2008. Updated by: Sean O. Stitham, MD and David C. Dugdale III, MD. Also ... Policosanol: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic signifi cance of a new lipid-lowering agent American Heart Journal, Volume ...
It is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.[4] Degradation[edit]. Prostacyclin, which has a half-life of 42 seconds,[5 ... PG-X, later known as prostacyclin, is 30 times more potent than any other then-known anti-aggregatory agent. ... Thrombolytic drugs/. fibrinolytics. *Plasminogen activators: r-tPA *Alteplase. *Reteplase. *Tenecteplase. *Desmoteplase†. *UPA ...
... the Seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy»։ Chest 126 (3 Suppl): 338S-400S։ PMID 15383478։ doi: ... MedlinePlus , Arterial embolism Update Date: 5/8/2008. Updated by: Sean O. Stitham, MD and David C. Dugdale III, MD. Also ... Policosanol: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic signifi cance of a new lipid-lowering agent American Heart Journal, Volume ...
Antiplatelet agents[edit]. Arterial thrombosis is platelet-rich, and inhibition of platelet aggregation with antiplatelet drugs ... If diagnosed within 12 hours of the initial episode (attack) then thrombolytic therapy is initiated. ... Arterial thrombosis[edit]. Arterial thrombosis is the formation of a thrombus within an artery. In most cases, arterial ... the Seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy". Chest. 126 (3 Suppl): 338S-400S. doi:10.1378/chest. ...
intra-arterial (into an artery), e.g. vasodilator drugs in the treatment of vasospasm and thrombolytic drugs for treatment of ... intramuscular (into a muscle), e.g. many vaccines, antibiotics, and long-term psychoactive agents. Recreationally the ... it is here used to treat constipation under opiate pain therapy and does not affect the pain-reducing effect of the opiate. ... transdermal patches such as fentanyl in pain therapy, nicotine patches for treatment of addiction and nitroglycerine for ...
Factors affecting survival rates for acute vertebrobasilar artery occlusions treated with intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy: ... or clot location in the basilar artery influences the relative mortality risk after intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy for ... Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency/drug therapy*. *Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency/mortality. Substance. *Fibrinolytic Agents. LinkOut ...
Overdose most often occurs when a full dose of a fibrinolytic agent is given to a small patient with a low body weight. In ... ... Overdoses of fibrinolytic agents can cause severe hemorrhagic complications. ... Intra-arterial prourokinase for acute ischemic stroke. The PROACT II study: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. Dec 1999. 282( ... Thrombolytic Therapy Q&A What are the potential complications from overdoses of fibrinolytic agents used in thrombolytic ...
Fibrinolytic Agents / administration & dosage* * Humans * Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery / complications* * Infarction, ... Intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy for hyperacute ischemic stroke caused by tandem occlusion Cerebrovasc Dis. 2008;26(2):184-9 ... Although tandem occlusion is occasionally found during intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT), as of yet no clear therapeutic ...
The Guide to Peripheral and Cerebrovascular Intervention brings together experts in the field of endovascular therapy to cover ... Antiplatelet therapy and oral anticoagulation following peripheral arterial bypass surgery. *Antirestenotic agents ... Thrombolytic therapy. *Long-term antiplatelet therapy in PVD. * ... Arterial supply of the lower extremities. *Venous drainage of ... The Guide to Peripheral and Cerebrovascular Intervention brings together experts in the field of endovascular therapy to cover ...
Combined Modality Therapy. Equipment Safety. Fibrinolytic Agents / therapeutic use*. Humans. Microspheres. Thrombolytic Therapy ... 0/Fibrinolytic Agents; EC 3.4.21.68/Tissue Plasminogen Activator From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library ... have been shown to be a potential alternative to fibrinolytic agents to recanalize discrete peripheral thrombotic arterial ... Moreover, potential enhancement of intra-arterial tPA delivery is being clinically tested with 1.7-2.1 MHz pulsed wave ...
8170268 - Thrombolytic therapy. agents, indications, and laboratory monitoring.. 25422328 - The mystery of recurrent idiopathic ... cerebrovascular and coronary arterial thrombosis.. 19919968 - Right to left shunt following radiofrequency catheter ablation of ... With adequate supportive therapy, recovery usually occurs within days or weeks. The effect of T3/T4 therapy has been studied in ... We therefore cautiously advocate the use of thyroid hormonal therapy to any patient with the ESS and/or a stunned myocardium.. ...
Arterial/Venous: Acute/Chronic. Peripheral Vascular Disease. A term used to describe a group of diseases that involve ... thrombolytic therapy (acute emboli/arterial graft occlusion) • arterial bypass (vascular) grafting (e.g., femoral-popliteal ... I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described. ... Acute Arterial Insufficiency(Acute Arterial Occlusion) • usually involves complete blockage, is of sudden onset, and ...
The intravascular administration of thrombolytic agents originated in the 1960s with the intravenous (IV) treatment of ... Local thrombolytic therapy of acute peripheral arterial ischaemia with tissue plasminogen activator: a dose-ranging study. Br J ... This agent is emerging as the thrombolytic of primary consideration in the setting of peripheral arterial occlusion. Alteplase ... Alternate thrombolytic agents are not available at the medical center. Further therapy with tissue-type plasminogen activator ( ...
untreatable increase of arterial blood pressure (,185mmHg systolic, ,110mmHg diastolic). *intracranial hemorrhage, ... appropriate temporal bony window without echocontrast agents for insonation with TCCS. *full functional independence prior to ... Ultrasound Enhanced Thrombolytic Therapy of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion. The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Ultrasound Enhanced Thrombolytic Therapy of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion. Official Title ICMJE Transcranial Ultrasound ...
Thrombolytic agents for arterial and venous thromboses in neonates Cochrane Systematic Reviews, 21-Oct-2008 Clinically ... Thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism Cochrane Systematic Reviews, 6-Dec-2018 Thrombolytic therapy is usually reserved ... Evidence suggests that thrombolytic agents may dissolve blood clots more rapidly than heparin and may reduce the death rate ... Thyroid hormone therapy might prevent this m *Thyroid surgery for Graves disease and Graves ophthalmopathy Cochrane ...
No current and/or recent (within 1 month) use of a thrombolytic agent; low dose. thrombolytic therapy for maintenance of ... No clinically significant peripheral arterial disease. - Non-pregnant and non-nursing; the effect of the combination of ... Radiation therapy must have been completed at least three weeks before initiation of. protocol therapy. - No major surgical ... stable regimen of anti-hypertensive therapy. - No HIV-positive patients receiving combination anti-retroviral therapy because ...
Thrombolytic therapy is a useful tool in the management of acute peripheral arterial ischaemia. Fibrinolytic drugs are used to ... A variety of techniques are used to deliver these agents. *Inhaled corticosteroids compared to placebo for prevention of ... Youll find summarized evaluations of the worlds best literature on the effectiveness of therapy for 3,300+ clinical problems ... Infusion techniques for peripheral arterial thrombolysis Cochrane Systematic Reviews, 19-Oct-2008 ...
THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY. RATIONALE Limb and/or organ viability is enhanced by rapid resolution of arterial occlusion. Platelets ... However, arterial dilation may not be uniform, and flow to muscle beds may not be altered. Moreover, these agents are ... Consequently, we have considered using thrombolytic agents again, but not with t-PA because it is very expensive.. AMPUTATION. ... Therapy of Thromboembolism. TREATMENT GOALS. Therapy is directed toward (1) managing concomitant CHF or serious arrhythmias ...
Coagulation abnormalities (INR,2.0 PT,16s), with bleeding tendency or are receiving thrombolytic or anticoagulant therapy. ... Arterial thrombus or phlebothrombosis within 6 months.. *Hypertension that can not be well controlled through antihypertensive ... Antineoplastic Agents. Protein Kinase Inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action. ... adjuvant therapy includes cisplatin given concurrent with primary radiation therapy (CCRT) and adjuvant chemotherapy given ...
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Combined intravenous (IV) and intra-arterial (IA) thrombolytic therapy may be faster and easier to ... in addition to the fast and easy introduction of the thrombolytic agent via the IV route. Although different thrombolytic ... Combined intravenous and intra-arterial r-TPA versus intra-arterial therapy of acute ischemic stroke: Emergency Management of ... Thrombolytic Therapy. V thrombolysis was performed by using rTPA (Actilyse; Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany). A total dose of 0.9 ...
Intra-Arterial Therapy: infusion of thrombolytic agent into vessel or clot within 24 hours of onset of symptoms ... I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described. ... Treatment consists of conservative therapy (aspirin and heparin) or IV thrombolysis (,3 hrs) or IA thrombolysis (up to 24 hours ... Reliably assesses basilar artery patency, inconclusive in patients with advanced arterial calcification ...
... today many centers employ intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy as the initial intervention, infusing thrombolytic agents ... Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy has been studied in this regard, offering the potential to restore arterial perfusion ... Acute peripheral arterial occlusion: predictors of success in catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy. Radiology. 1994; 193:561- ... until the patient can be adequately anticoagulated with oral agents.(19,20) Thrombolytic agents are of value inpatients with ...
... under treatment with oral anti-diabetic agents. Arterial blood gases revealed acute hypoxemic (Type I) respiratory failure. ... Combination of thrombolytic and immunosuppressive therapy for coronavirus disease 2019: A case report ... An Uncommon Cause of Arterial Hypertension.. Abstract An Uncommon Cause of Arterial Hypertension Abstract. A 54-year-old ... Source: Advances in Therapy - August 20, 2018. Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research ...
Thromboembolism, or the development of a clot within blood vessels, can occur in arteries or veins, but arterial ... thrombolytic agents, and, occasionally, antiplatelet agents (for arterial thrombosis). Avoid giving antiplatelet agents to ... These agents can be added to therapy for mild, moderate, or severe pain and may reduce the need for narcotics. ... On occasion, surgical thrombectomy may be necessary, especially after major cardiac surgery or if thrombolytic agents fail or ...
... diabetes awareness ribbon charms thrombolytic therapy therapy consisting of the administration of a pharmacological agent to ... There were 3 that had a few glitches in the video or the audio although effects of exercise training on arterial function in ... Stem Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine offering an innovative and regenerative approach to its Autologous Adipose Stem ... Cell Therapy and Stem Cell Treatments. More From BioPortfolio on "Comparative Trial Between 3 Types of Insulin Infusion ...
... diabetes awareness ribbon charms thrombolytic therapy therapy consisting of the administration of a pharmacological agent to ... There were 3 that had a few glitches in the video or the audio although effects of exercise training on arterial function in ... Stem Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine offering an innovative and regenerative approach to its Autologous Adipose Stem ... Cell Therapy and Stem Cell Treatments. More From BioPortfolio on "Comparative Trial Between 3 Types of Insulin Infusion ...
The safety of AGGRASTAT® when used in combination with thrombolytic agents has not been established. During therapy with ... occurs at the arterial access site for cardiac catheterisation. Fatal bleedings have been reported. AGGRASTAT® should be used ... Bleeding is the most common complication encountered during therapy with AGGRASTAT®. Administration of AGGRASTAT® is associated ...
They have also been reported for use in conjunction with thrombolytic agents, thus permitting the use of a lower dose of ... Both treatment of an occlusive coronary thrombus by thrombolytic therapy and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty ( ... With respect to the coronary arterial vasculature, abnormal thrombus formation due to the rupture of an established ... acute vessel closure associated with thrombolytic therapy and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), transient ...
Thrombolytic Therapy. Acute Peripheral Arterial Occlusion. B - In individual patients with acute peripheral arterial occlusion ... B - For occluded non-haemodialysis central venous catheters local treatment with short dwell instillation of thrombolytic agent ... Parenteral Thrombolytic Therapy. A - Patients admitted with stroke within four and a half hours of definite onset of symptoms, ... A - Antiplatelet therapy is recommended for patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. ...
The safety of AGGRASTAT when used in combination with thrombolytic agents has not been established. During therapy with ... Most major bleeding associated with AGGRASTAT occurs at the arterial access site for cardiac catheterization. Fatal bleedings ... Bleeding is the most common complication encountered during therapy with AGGRASTAT. Administration of AGGRASTAT is associated ...
... systemic thrombolysis then thrombolytic agents can be infused directly into the pulmonary artery via a pulmonary arterial ... WHAT ARE THE CONTRAINDICATIONS TO THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY?. Thrombolytic therapy carries a significant risk of bleeding, ... WHAT ARE APPROVED THROMBOLYTIC REGIMENS?(1). The following thrombolytic agents have been tested in randomised trials for the ... The use of thrombolytic agents accelerates fibrinolysis resulting in a rapid resolution of thrombus. Common agents studied in ...
Reducing bleeding complications after thrombolytic therapy for stroke: clinical potential of metalloproteinase inhibitors and ... anticoagulant agents and prophylactic neuroprotection with pharmacologic agents; Relation with carotid endarterectomy, bypass ... Intra-arterial thrombolysis in 24 consecutive patients with internal carotid artery T occlusions. Arnold M; Nedeltchev K; ... Effective therapies that reduce mortality and increase the chances of living symptom-free or, at least, in independence are ...
IV thrombolytic therapy Intravenous administration of a thrombolytic agent, such as tissue plasminogen activator (TPA), to ... dissolve an arterial clot. "The Joint Commission Connect" The name given to the Joint Commissions extranet site, a secured ... Types include targeted agents, alkylating agents, antimetabolites, plant alkaloids and terpenoids, topoisomerase inhibitors, ... antitumor antibiotics, monoclonal antibodies, and biologics and related agents. Hormonal therapies are not included. ...
... so the rationale for thrombolytic treatment is to achieve arterial recanalization with a relatively safe agent soon enough to ... Pilot and Preliminary Studies of Thrombolytic Therapy for Stroke. In: Lyden P.D. (eds) Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Stroke. ... Zeumer H, Freitag H-J, Zanella F, Thise A, Arning C. Local intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy in patients with stroke: ... Hacke W, Zeumer H, Ferbert A, Bruckmann H, del Zoppo G. Intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy improves outcome in patients with ...
Intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy improves outcome in patients with acute vertebrobasilar occlusive disease. Stroke. 1988; 19 ... numerous reports advocate local delivery of the thrombolytic agent.4,5,7 Several studies also found the delay in therapy onset ... Analysis of the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy in ischemic stroke. Stroke. 2002; 33: 2866-2871. ... Studies with major cohort size (,40) reporting the results of thrombolytic therapy of BAO with predominantly intra-arterial1,2, ...
  • Although tandem occlusion is occasionally found during intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT), as of yet no clear therapeutic strategy has been elucidated. (nih.gov)
  • Ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis in acute arterial ischemia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Peripheral native arterial thrombolysis, case 5, part 2. (medscape.com)
  • Thrombolysis of an acute thrombolytic occlusion in the popliteal artery. (medscape.com)
  • Peripheral native arterial thrombolysis, case 7. (medscape.com)
  • Thrombolysis with intravenous(iv) tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is the only effective and approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Compared with the IV approach, intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis is reported to have higher recanalization rates and an extended therapeutic window ( 4 - 6 ). (ajnr.org)
  • 4 , 5 ) These rather dismal results have prompted interest in a less invasive strategy for treating the arterial obstruction, namely, pharmacologic thrombolysis. (ispub.com)
  • In healthcare settings these type 2 diabetes causes yahoo devices are often used by healthcare personnel to administer insulin to diabetes kidney changes diabetes awareness ribbon charms thrombolytic therapy therapy consisting of the administration of a pharmacological agent to cause thrombolysis of an abnormal blood clot. (amazonaws.com)
  • Sussman B, Fitch T. Thrombolysis with fibrinolysin in cerebral arterial occlusion. (springer.com)
  • Intra-arterial thrombolysis in 24 consecutive patients with internal carotid artery T occlusions. (ebscohost.com)
  • Background In 2003, the EMEA approved the use of intravenous thrombolysis with rt-PA (Actilyse(r)) for therapy of acute ischaemic stroke within three hours from system onset, under the condition that these patients are treated according to the SITS-MOST protocol (Safe Implementation of. (ebscohost.com)
  • The rate of hemorrhagic complications in BAO thrombolysis is ≈8%, thus similar to that of rtPA therapy of anterior circulation stroke. (ahajournals.org)
  • Recanalization rates reported with mechanical thrombectomy, even when combined with thrombolytic agents, however, range from 43% to 64%, which suggests a large population of stroke patients refractory to both thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. (ajnr.org)
  • Efficacy of intra-arterial thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. (ebscohost.com)
  • We have seen emergent stroke therapy rapidly progress from essentially supportive care to thrombolytics, to in some centers, emergent intra-arterial thrombolysis. (epmonthly.com)
  • In Japan the MELT trial (MCA Embolism Local fibrinolytic intervention Trial) attempted to answer whether intra-arterial thrombolysis was a feasible alternative. (epmonthly.com)
  • Thrombolysis has been proved to be the most rapid and effective therapy to reduce the obstruction of pulmonary circulation and normalize hemodynamic parameters. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In patients with acute vision loss from nonarteritic central retinal artery occlusion, acute strategies to restore retinal perfusion include noninvasive "standard" therapies and thrombolysis (intravenous or intra-arterial). (mdedge.com)
  • Under those circumstances, endovascular stroke therapy went through a great evolution during the past two decades of intravenous thrombolysis. (jkns.or.kr)
  • Off-label indications include catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and deep vein thrombosis. (statpearls.com)
  • It seems that thrombolysis therapy in patients with the risk factors of recurrent stroke, must be done with more preparation and readiness for concurrent processing. (archneurosci.com)
  • CLOTBUST was an international four-center phase II trial, which demonstrated that, in patients with acute ischemic stroke, transcranial Doppler (TCD) monitoring augments tPA-induced arterial recanalization (sustained complete recanalization rates: 38% vs. 13%) with a non-significant trend toward an increased rate of clinical recovery from stroke, as compared with placebo. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We have performed the clinical trial to demonstrate efficacy and safety of IATT with streptokinase as a thrombolytic agent in ischemic stroke patients hospitalized at the Republican Research Center of Emergency Medicine (Tashkent, Uzbekistan). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke in patients who have already experienced a noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association and the American College of Chest Physicians have published guidelines that provide recommendations on antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. (uspharmacist.com)
  • 1 Antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke, particularly those that are of noncardioembolic origin, and is the treatment of choice. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The 2012 American College of Chest Physicians guidelines for antithrombotic therapy for ischemic stroke advise long-term antiplatelet therapy in patients who have had a noncardioembolic stroke. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Currently, the only approved therapies for acute ischemic stroke are IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a thrombolytic agent that clears the thrombus within the blood vessel, or intra-arterial catheter thrombectomy. (strokecenter.org)
  • Despite the availability of therapy, it reaches only approximately 7% of ischemic stroke victims in the United States5. (strokecenter.org)
  • The potential neuroprotective agent, dodecafluoropentane emulsion (DDFPe) has recently shown strong positive effects in pre-clinical animal models of acute ischemic stroke6-11. (strokecenter.org)
  • We can divide up the areas of major stroke research into those therapies dealing with ischemic stroke and those that are related to hemorrhagic infarction. (epmonthly.com)
  • The DIAS (Desmoteplase In Acute Ischemic Stroke) study attempted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravenous desmoteplase, a thrombolytic agent that is very fibrin-specific and not neurotoxic. (epmonthly.com)
  • i.e. was there an ischemic penumbra that could be viable and thus saved after acute therapy. (epmonthly.com)
  • One of the more promising agents - NXY-059 - had been tested in animal models of ischemic stroke and had been shown to improve functional recovery and reduce the size of cerebral infarction in those models. (epmonthly.com)
  • It was hoped that neuroprotective agents would be the next step in the evolution of the treatment of ischemic stroke but it seems more research is needed in this area. (epmonthly.com)
  • Thrombolytic agents are used to lyse already formed blood clots in clinical settings where ischemia may be fatal ( acute mycardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, ischemic stroke, and arterial thrombosis). (pharmacologycorner.com)
  • Conventional ischemic stroke treatments include intravenous thrombolytic therapy and intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy, which includes stent retriever devices. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Increase in the number of cerebral stroke cases across the globe coupled with high prices for AIS therapy contribute towards significant growth of ischemic cerebral stroke prevention therapeutics market worldwide. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • The ischemic penumbra loses autoregulation, and perfusion is directly linked to mean arterial pressure. (aafp.org)
  • Focal ischemic cerebral infarction occurs when the arterial blood flow to a specific region of the brain is reduced below a critical level resulting in neuronal cell death. (allindianpatents.com)
  • This suggests that the plasminogen system may be involved both in establishing a cerebral -ischemic infarct and in its extension during thrombolytic therapy. (allindianpatents.com)
  • Thus, in those patients with persistent cerebral arterial occlusion, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke may cause infarct extension, which would not only partially offset the established overall beneficial effect of arterial recanalization (10, 11), but indeed be harmful to a subgroup of patients. (allindianpatents.com)
  • Diffusion magnetic resonance signatures of early tissue ischemic injury can be reversed in humans by prompt thrombolytic vessel recanalization. (nih.gov)
  • Cerebral perfusion monitoring in animal models of acute ischemic stroke allows to confirm successful arterial occlusion and exclude subarachnoid hemorrhage. (jove.com)
  • However, the thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only treatment of acute ischemic stroke that exists. (jove.com)
  • JNC-6 cogently recommends that "Patients with acute ischemic stroke who are treated with fibrinolytic agents require careful blood pressure monitoring, especially over the first 24 hours after starting treatment. (ahajournals.org)
  • He reported no previous ecg for ischemic arterial stroke. (projectathena.org)
  • Complications of intravenous t-PA for acute ischemic stroke are commonly related to hemorrhage, arterial reocclusion, anaphylaxis, or reperfusion damage. (archneurosci.com)
  • Therefore, one potential role of cerebral perfusion CT is its use to distinguish between the infarcted core and the ischemic penumbra and to identify candidates for thrombolytic therapy. (unicare.com)
  • Double-Blind Evaluation of Intravenous Plasmin Therapy in Carotid and Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion. (springer.com)
  • Basilar artery occlusion (BAO) is a relatively infrequent but catastrophic disease with dismal natural course, carrying 85% to ≈95% mortality even during anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy if not recanalized. (ahajournals.org)
  • For example, when ischaemic stroke has been examined, venous infarction has been grouped separately, 6 alongside arterial occlusion, 4 or not at all. (bmj.com)
  • 14 However, although pregnancy clearly increases the risk of venous thrombosis, most cerebral infarctions are due to arterial occlusion. (bmj.com)
  • Oxygenated blood or other medium is then perfused through the conduit in a controlled manner, preferably at a controlled pressure below the arterial pressure, to maintain oxygenation and relieve ischemia in tissue distal to the occlusion. (google.es)
  • Optionally, the occlusion may be treated while perfusion is maintained, typically by introducing a thrombolytic or other agent into the occlusive material using the perfusion conduit or by employing mechanical means to remove the obstruction. (google.es)
  • Intra-arterial or intravenous catheter occlusion. (pharmacologycorner.com)
  • Local intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute occlusion of the central retinal artery: a meta-analysis of the published data. (mdedge.com)
  • Central retinal artery occlusion: local intra-arterial fibrinolysis versus conservative treatment, a multicenter randomized trial. (mdedge.com)
  • Cilioretinal arteries and retinal arterial occlusion. (mdedge.com)
  • Multimodal CT is designed to demonstrate the infarcted tissue (plain CT or PCT), the site of arterial occlusion (CT angiography) and its hemodynamic consequences (PCT). (unicare.com)
  • The thrombi may dislodge and may travel anywhere in the circulatory system, where they may lead to pulmonary embolus, an acute arterial occlusion causing the oxygen and blood supply distal to the embolus to decrease suddenly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute arterial occlusion may develop as a result of arterial dissection in the carotid artery or aorta or as a result of iatrogenic arterial injury (e.g., after angiography). (wikipedia.org)
  • Arterial thrombosis (ie. (slideserve.com)
  • Treatment of cerebral sinus thrombosis with thrombolytics has been reported in cases with a deteriorating clinical course despite anticoagulant therapy. (essentialevidenceplus.com)
  • The systemic arterial system is almost exclusively involved, as right-sided heart and deep venous thrombosis are rare in cats. (maxshouse.com)
  • Management includes assessment of the extent of the thrombosis and clinical consequences, a search for thrombophilic risk factors, and anticoagulation therapy. (medscape.com)
  • The treatment of cerebrovascular thrombosis and embolism with fibrinolytic agents. (springer.com)
  • Combined therapy with Phenformin plus Stanozolol in patients with occlusive arterial disease and recurrent venous thrombosis. (springer.com)
  • Using this technology, we were able to noninvasively detect platelet aggregation in arterial thrombosis of the carotid arteries in mice, and to observe the success of a thrombolytic therapy (Figure 2). (herzzentrum.de)
  • In a different approach using the same contrast agent, we were able to detect platelet aggregation in cerebrovascular inflammation before the onset of clinical symptoms, or in thrombosis of coronary vessels in mice. (herzzentrum.de)
  • Thromboembolism (prophylaxis and/or treatment)-Anticoagulants are indicated for prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous [or arterial] thrombosis (and its extension) and pulmonary embolism {05}3 {05}2 {05}1 {05}0 {03}9 {03}8 {03}7 {03}6 {03}5 . (drugs.com)
  • ST elevation myocardial infarction.Arterial thrombosis. (pharmacologycorner.com)
  • Intra-arterial urokinase for treatment of retrograde thrombosis following resection of an arteriovenous malformation. (elsevier.com)
  • A case of retrograde thrombosis of the left middle cerebral artery immediately following resection of a parietal AVM is reported in a patient with a retained intra-arterial catheter from preoperative embolization. (elsevier.com)
  • Thrombosis, either arterial or venous, is a fatal and disabling consequence of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in developed countries. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Thrombosis can be arterial and venous, thromboembolism - pulmonary, systemic and paradoxical. (medadvicees.com)
  • Thrombolytic drugs( fibrinolytic drugs) are used in the acute period of MI, and even with massive or submissive PE, even with thrombosis of large arteries and in the first hours after a stroke of thromboembolic origin. (medadvicees.com)
  • The use of thrombolytic agents is not recommended at the time of treatment of thrombosis of the veins of the lower extremities. (medadvicees.com)
  • Arterial/Venous: Acute/Chronic. (slideserve.com)
  • Arterial and venous punctures should be minimized. (drugs.com)
  • Certain cases of large and extensive CVST are refractory to standard anticoagulation therapy and develop venous obstructive congestive ICH ( 6 ). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Venous problems like venous outflow obstruction and low-flow states can cause acute arterial ischemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effect of T3/T4 therapy has been studied in three conditions in which the ESS and myocardial functional depression have been documented - (i) transient regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, (ii) transient global myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass, and (iii) transient inadequate global myocardial perfusion in brain-dead potential organ donors. (biomedsearch.com)
  • 1 Ideally, as this cytoprotective therapy would usually be administered after the onset of ischemia, candidate agents would need to be effective when administered during reperfusion. (ahajournals.org)
  • Animal models had shown that neuroprotectants, including free-radical trapping agents, minimize injury after ischemia. (epmonthly.com)
  • Neuroprotective therapies designed to interfere with cytotoxic events initiated by ischemia are undergoing clinical trials that should be completed within the next year. (aafp.org)
  • Biousse V. Acute retinal arterial ischemia: an emergency often ignored. (mdedge.com)
  • It was recently demonstrated that the neurotoxic effect of t-PA on persistent focal cerebral ischemia also occurred with other thrombolytic agents, including streptokinase and staphylokinase (9). (allindianpatents.com)
  • Because it is not possible to distinguish between patients who will and those who will not achieve cerebral arterial recanalization with thrombolytic therapy, the development of specific conjunctive strategies to counteract the neurotoxic effects of thrombolytic agents on persisting focal cere¬bral ischemia appear to be warranted. (allindianpatents.com)
  • Serial diffusion and perfusion imaging studies were acquired in patients experiencing acute hemispheric cerebral ischemia treated with intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy within 6 hours of symptom onset. (nih.gov)
  • Purpose: To present the management of acute arterial ischemia following major abdominal and orthopedic surgery using a percutaneous thrombectomy device and a low dose of thrombolytic agent. (elsevier.com)
  • Restoration of blood flow with thrombolytic agents like tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is the only way that may rescue patients exposed to cerebral ischemia. (archneurosci.com)
  • Paralysis is a very late sign of acute arterial ischemia and signals the death of nerves supplying the extremity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ischemia is a vascular disease involving an interruption in the arterial blood supply to a tissue, organ, or extremity that, if untreated, can lead to tissue death. (wikipedia.org)
  • An aneurysm is one of the most frequent causes of acute arterial ischemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factors affecting survival rates for acute vertebrobasilar artery occlusions treated with intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy: a meta-analytical ap. (nih.gov)
  • Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred and improve recovery after stroke in some people. (essentialevidenceplus.com)
  • Since the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) study ( 1 ) was done, intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) therapy within 3 hours after the onset of symptoms has been widely used. (ajnr.org)
  • Anticoagulants plus streptokinase therapy in progressive stroke. (springer.com)
  • Zeumer H, Freitag H-J, Zanella F, Thise A, Arning C. Local intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy in patients with stroke: urokinase versus recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). (springer.com)
  • del Zoppo G, Zeumer H, Harker LA. Thrombolytic therapy in stroke: Possibilities and hazards. (springer.com)
  • Reducing bleeding complications after thrombolytic therapy for stroke: clinical potential of metalloproteinase inhibitors and spin trap agents. (ebscohost.com)
  • 5,6 Instead of witnessing the natural course, some stroke centers have adopted interventive protocols to manage BAO, mostly with intra-arterial thrombolytics. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2 There has been growing interest in the role of oestrogens in stroke, 3 and risk factors unique to women include pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal hormone therapy. (bmj.com)
  • Background and Purpose -Reliable identification of stroke patients in the field by prehospital personnel could expedite delivery of acute stroke therapy. (ahajournals.org)
  • Using highly-detailed information derived from the Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center's advanced diagnostic capabilities, the multidisciplinary team of specialists in the Center works together to deliver the best treatment combination for each patient, including medical, interventional, and surgical therapies. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • Center specialists often use intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolytic agents in the treatment of stroke. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • In the last decade, Intra-Arterial (IA) stroke therapy - a technique in which thrombolytic agents and devices are passed through the arteries directly to the clot site - has gained notable momentum as an effective and safe treatment option for patients. (rehacare.com)
  • Strong evidence from recent observational and interventional studies indicates, however, that patients who experience a stroke or an acute myocardial infarction are likely to experience a recurrent event of the same type.1,2 Therefore, it is appropriate for the clinician to select preventive therapy specifically directed at stroke prevention. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Although single antiplatelet therapy is the standard for stroke prevention, some data suggest that short courses of dual antiplatelet therapy in selected patients may provide additional protection against recurrent stroke. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The presence or absence of risk factors (e.g., advanced age, history of bleeding or stroke, diabetes, hypertension {05}6 ) strongly influences both the decision about whether to initiate anticoagulant therapy and the choice of anticoagulant. (drugs.com)
  • Therapies for stroke are advancing rapidly, and we as emergency physicians are in the forefront of care. (epmonthly.com)
  • As most stroke patients are seen in the emergency department, it is important for us to keep up with new and emerging therapies as they soon may play a role in our treatment and indeed become the standard of care. (epmonthly.com)
  • This exposes a stroke recovery gap, the difference observed between theclinical response to thrombolytic therapy in a given population of patientspresenting with ischaemic stroke and the potential clinical recovery if all of thepenumbra were salvaged under ideal circumstances. (dokumen.tips)
  • However, fibrinolytic therapy can be given safely to only a fraction of patients with acute stroke, and more broadly applicable therapies are needed. (aafp.org)
  • Thus, hospitals providing care for patients with acute stroke should organize clinical protocols and pathways for effective implementation of therapies. (aafp.org)
  • Collaborative meta-analysis of randomised trials of antiplatelet therapy for prevention of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke in high risk patients. (mdedge.com)
  • No successful therapy for this condition, which causes postoperative stroke, has previously been reported. (elsevier.com)
  • The results of the 2013 randomized trials for endovascular stroke therapy were neutral, although they were limited by insufficient imaging screening at enrollment, early-generation devices with less efficacy, and treatment delays. (jkns.or.kr)
  • In this review, details of recent development regarding endovascular stroke therapy will be discussed with a focus on direct aspiration or clot aspiration thrombectomy. (jkns.or.kr)
  • A subset of patients do not respond to standard anticoagulation therapy, leading to the progression of CVST with hemorrhagic stroke, which represents a major challenge for its treatment. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Thus, the authors found that spontaneously occurring low arterial pressures are indeed beneficial, but in those patients who were treated and whose pressure was of the lower stratum, stroke incidence was greater. (ahajournals.org)
  • It is clear that the only way to resolve this important question is to conduct a prospective trial in which arterial pressure is lowered by treatment to different goal values in those patients with and without other cardiovascular conditions which could predispose them to stroke. (ahajournals.org)
  • Recurrence of stroke in the same or other cerebral arteries only rarely causes early deterioration during or shortly after thrombolytic administration. (archneurosci.com)
  • We report a patient who experienced a second stroke despite intravenous thrombolytic therapy. (archneurosci.com)
  • Also performing appropriate randomized trial to compare the incidence of recurrent stroke in patients under t-PA therapy and controls were still needed. (archneurosci.com)
  • For individuals with symptoms of acute stroke, the key management decisions are related to whether or not the person is a candidate for thrombolytic therapy, based on infarct size, size of penumbra or time from symptom onset. (unicare.com)
  • To determine whether recanalization, coma at presentation, or clot location in the basilar artery influences the relative mortality risk after intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy for acute vertebrobasilar artery occlusions. (nih.gov)
  • Combined intravenous (IV) and intra-arterial (IA) thrombolytic therapy may be faster and easier to initiate than monotherapy, and its recanalization rate may be better as well. (ajnr.org)
  • This strategy achieved high complete arterial recanalization rates and good functional outcomes. (ajnr.org)
  • Despite the advantage of the rapid and easy initiation of thrombolytic therapy, IV rTPA treatment is limited by low recanalization rates, particularly in larger proximal arterial occlusions ( 2 , 3 ). (ajnr.org)
  • The critical event is usually the formation of an acute thrombus, so the rationale for thrombolytic treatment is to achieve arterial recanalization with a relatively safe agent soon enough to improve patient outcome. (springer.com)
  • 4 Because of the infrequency and the clinical variability of the disease, it has been difficult to obtain evidence-based data on the true efficacy of recanalization therapies. (ahajournals.org)
  • 4,5,7 Several studies also found the delay in therapy onset to be a critical prognostic factor, apart from recanalization. (ahajournals.org)
  • What are the risks of recanalization therapy? (ahajournals.org)
  • Time is brain" in the posterior circulation, as well as in the anterior territory, but available observational studies suggest that recanalization therapies for BAO can potentially benefit patients up to 24 to 36 hours after symptom onset. (ahajournals.org)
  • This prompted an evolution in endovascular recanalization therapy during the past two decades, moving from intraarterial thrombolytics infusion to modern mechanical thrombectomy techniques. (jkns.or.kr)
  • What are the potential complications from overdoses of fibrinolytic agents used in thrombolytic therapy? (medscape.com)
  • Overdoses of fibrinolytic agents can cause severe hemorrhagic complications. (medscape.com)
  • Moreover, intravenous gaseous microspheres with ultrasound have been shown to be a potential alternative to fibrinolytic agents to recanalize discrete peripheral thrombotic arterial occlusions or acute arteriovenous graft thromboses. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Special therapeutic combinations are used containing platelet inhibitors (ticlopidine), antifibrin drugs (subcutaneous heparin), minor fibrinolytic agents (mesoglycan) and hemorheological drugs (pentoxyphylline). (ebscohost.com)
  • Treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with intravenous thrombolytic agents is gaining wide acceptance as a result of the demonstrated ability of fibrinolytic agents to restore coronary arterial patency, 1 improve left ventricular function 2-4 and reduce mortality. (houstonmethodist.org)
  • abstract = "Treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with intravenous thrombolytic agents is gaining wide acceptance as a result of the demonstrated ability of fibrinolytic agents to restore coronary arterial patency,1 improve left ventricular function2-4 and reduce mortality.5,6 Most published trials have excluded patients with previous coronary artery bypass grafting, primarily because of difficulty in identifying the infarct-related coronary artery. (houstonmethodist.org)
  • No published data exist concerning intravenous thrombolytic therapy in these patients. (houstonmethodist.org)
  • Moreover, potential enhancement of intra-arterial tPA delivery is being clinically tested with 1.7-2.1 MHz pulsed wave ultrasound (EKOS catheter) in ongoing phase II-III clinical trials. (biomedsearch.com)
  • 6,8 Introduction of an intra-arterial catheter to administer thrombolytics locally may at times be difficult and time-consuming, considering the often stenosed and elongated arteriosclerotic vertebral arteries, and can increase treatment delay if considered the sole therapy mode. (ahajournals.org)
  • With the widespread use of catheter-based reperfusion therapies, an ideal opportunity exists to use more sophisticated invasive modalities to overcome the imprecision of angiographic flow and to characterize myocardial perfusion more accurately. (ahajournals.org)
  • Since reteplase causes lysis of the fibrin plug, which is necessary to stop bleeding at puncture sites, careful attention should be paid to potential sites of bleeding during therapy (injection site, arterial puncture sites, catheter insertion sites, etc. (drugs.com)
  • White blood cells may become severely anemic patient with return of results, and antifibrinolytic agents such as polymyositis may complain of increasing left lower lobe alveolar disease starting in the middle ear, sinuses, or air injected inadvertently during catheter-ization. (projectathena.org)
  • On occasion, surgical thrombectomy may be necessary, especially after major cardiac surgery or if thrombolytic agents fail or are contraindicated, or if a limb or organ are threatened. (medscape.com)
  • Aspirin is not advised as a substitute for thrombolytics or mechanical thrombectomy in patients who are eligible for these therapies. (uspharmacist.com)
  • a direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) and forced arterial suction thrombectomy (FAST), will be additionally explained. (jkns.or.kr)
  • Endovascular intra-arterial application of thrombolytic agents and/or mechanical thrombectomy for refractory cases or patients with new ICH on anticoagulation have been described over the last two decades ( 7 ). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Conclusions: Combination therapy with mechanical thrombectomy devices and low dose thrombolytic agents can be used to treat acute arterial occlusions at a single setting. (elsevier.com)
  • 10 Contrary to large anterior circulation strokes, reperfusion injury and brain edema do not seem to be frequent problems in post-thrombolytic reversal of BAO. (ahajournals.org)
  • This strategy is being pursued in an attempt to further reduce mortality in conjunction with reperfusion therapy. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2 These observations ushered in the modern era of reperfusion therapy, and they also firmly established the concept that achieving arterial patency was the predominant mechanism for the prognostic benefit of thrombolytic agents. (ahajournals.org)
  • Currently, arterial patency is the gold standard for assessing the efficacy of different reperfusion protocols. (ahajournals.org)
  • It has, however, become increasingly apparent that contrast velocity alone does not adequately define the level of microvascular perfusion or predict the extent of return of myocardial function after successful reperfusion therapy. (ahajournals.org)
  • Reperfusion arrhythmias during thrombolytic therapy can be a sign of successful lytic therapy. (drugs.com)
  • Reperfusion Therapy, Cerebral is a topic covered in the 5-Minute Emergency Consult . (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Emergency Central , emergency.unboundmedicine.com/emergency/view/5-Minute_Emergency_Consult/307259/all/Reperfusion_Therapy_Cerebral. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Complications of these agents are commonly related to hemorrhage, arterial reocclusion, anaphylaxis, or reperfusion damage. (archneurosci.com)
  • Tissue within the penumbra is functionally impaired, but may be salvagable by effective reperfusion, such as with thrombolytic treatment. (unicare.com)
  • The use of thrombolytic agents accelerates fibrinolysis resulting in a rapid resolution of thrombus. (bcs.com)
  • In acute thrombotic forms, therapy should be medical, because a thrombus of recent formation is rich in fibrin and may be lyzed by UK. (ebscohost.com)
  • In chronic arteriopathy, the thrombus is lacking or almost lacking in fibrin and thrombolytic therapy is not indicated. (ebscohost.com)
  • Molecular MRI of early thrombus formation using a bimodal alpha2-antiplasmin-based contrast agent. (scmr.org)
  • Plasmin in turn degrades the fibrin matrix of the thrombus, thereby exerting its thrombolytic action. (nih.gov)
  • Localization, as well as the origin of the thrombus and the condition of the patient, are important when deciding whether to perform thrombolytic therapy in a particular case, given the high cost of thrombolytic drugs and the risk of serious complications. (medadvicees.com)
  • Thrombolytic therapy is used to rapidly dissolve a fibrin thrombus and restore anterograde blood flow in the relevant organ or part of it. (medadvicees.com)
  • Thrombolytic therapy with sudden blockage of the vessel should be performed in the first 1-2 hours, then the thrombus is still fresh, it dissolves easily. (medadvicees.com)
  • Common agents studied in the context of PE include Urokinase, Streptokinase and tPA (Alteplase). (bcs.com)
  • The Western Washington Intracoronary Streptokinase randomized trial 1 first demonstrated that intracoronary thrombolytic therapy improved survival for patients presenting within 12 hours of symptom onset of acute myocardial infarction (MI). (ahajournals.org)
  • Recombinant streptokinase (r-SK) is an effective thrombolytic agent developed with gene engineering. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Natural streptokinase (n-SK or SK) is an old thrombolytic agent. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To evaluate the use of the thrombolytic drug streptokinase versus aspirin versus the combination of both for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. (healio.com)
  • The intra-arterial administration of thrombolytic has been studied in the past and shown efficacy and a potential for a reduction in systemic effects, but a follow-up study has not been performed. (epmonthly.com)
  • 1. Jahnke C, Kaufmann J, Stauber B, Goetze S, Fleck E, Paetsch I. Magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring the efficacy of thrombolytic therapy in subacute pulmonary artery embolism. (scmr.org)
  • The safety and efficacy of Retavase ® were evaluated in three controlled clinical trials in which Retavase ® was compared to other thrombolytic agents. (nih.gov)
  • The present invention relates to a protocols for monitoring patient hemostasis and in particular protocols for monitoring the efficacy of patient hemostasis therapies. (justia.com)
  • The intravascular administration of thrombolytic agents originated in the 1960s with the intravenous (IV) treatment of pulmonary embolism. (medscape.com)
  • Thrombolytic therapy is usually reserved for patients with clinically serious or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). (essentialevidenceplus.com)
  • Most cats with systemic arterial thromboembolism have CHF concurrently at the time of clinical embolism. (maxshouse.com)
  • We report a patient who experienced recurrent embolism after intravenous (IV) thrombolytic injection. (archneurosci.com)
  • The degree and extent of symptoms depend on the size and location of the obstruction, the occurrence of clot fragmentation with embolism to smaller vessels, and the degree of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). (wikipedia.org)
  • The management of patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD) has to be planned in the context of natural history, epidemiology, and apparent risk factors that predict deterioration. (ispub.com)
  • This review article highlights the management of peripheral arterial disease on the basis of available facts and data's. (ispub.com)
  • Peripheral arterial disease is a common disease in adults and its complications take a great toll in terms of quality of life and treatment costs. (ispub.com)
  • The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for peripheral arterial disease. (ispub.com)
  • It emerges that peripheral arterial disease places a great burden on healthcare systems and on society as a whole. (ispub.com)
  • Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) comprises those entities that result in obstruction to blood flow in the arteries, exclusive of the coronary and intracranial vessels. (ispub.com)
  • Due to its special mode of action (see below) and its price, Arwin has never been used as 'normal' anticoagulant such as heparin, but only for the symptomatic treatment of moderate to severe forms of peripheral arterial circulatory disorders such as those resulting from years of heavy smoking and/or arteriosclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vertebrobasilar occlusive disease, numerous reports advocate local delivery of the thrombolytic agent. (ahajournals.org)
  • Acute retinal arterial occlusive disorders. (mdedge.com)
  • The Guide to Peripheral and Cerebrovascular Intervention brings together experts in the field of endovascular therapy to cover topics such as the basics of vascular anatomy, the pearls of appropriate case selection, and the fundamental equipment and pharmacotherapy for successful procedures. (nih.gov)
  • 9,10 The outcome reached with this protocol combining recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) with heparin infusion was reported recently to be similar to that achieved with endovascular therapy 2,5,6 ( Figure ). (ahajournals.org)
  • A data analysis was conducted across 6 prospective and retrospective endovascular treatment trials, with various evolutions of the Penumbra Aspiration System being used as the primary therapy. (rehacare.com)
  • Journal of Endovascular Therapy , 11 (3), 339-343. (elsevier.com)
  • The thrombolytic agent is followed by activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) guided use of intravenous heparin and the introduction of an appropriate oral anticoagulant. (bcs.com)
  • This case series illustrates the role of idarucizumab in improving patient safety in rare emergency situations requiring rapid reversal of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran, while highlighting the importance of information and education about the availability and appropriate use of this recently approved specific reversal agent. (springer.com)
  • Since the full therapeutic effects of oral anticoagulants is delayed for several days, heparin is the agent of choice when an immediate anticoagulant effect is required. (drugs.com)
  • Oral anticoagulants are used when treatment is not urgent or for long-term anticoagulant therapy following initial heparin or thrombolytic therapy. (drugs.com)
  • Warfarin injection is used when coumarin anticoagulant therapy is desired in patients who cannot take oral warfarin {05}4 . (drugs.com)
  • Its relationship with lytic therapy might be coincidental as there is such risk associated with invasive vascular procedures (e.g., cardiac catheterization , angiography, vascular surgery) and/or anticoagulant therapy. (drugs.com)
  • However, inactivation of coagulation factors by plasmin may be useful as a localized anticoagulant therapy or as a combined thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In addition, neonates have low levels of antithrombin and plasminogen, which cause relative resistance to heparin and thrombolytic agents, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • It was a relatively small study in which 121 patients were randomized to either receive heparin alone or heparin and half-dose thrombolytic agent. (bcs.com)
  • Several of the indications for the oral anticoagulants are identical to those for aspirin, heparin, other antithrombotic agents, other platelet aggregation inhibitors, and thrombolytic agents. (drugs.com)
  • Oral anticoagulants are used during and following initial heparin therapy {03}4 {03}3 {03}2 to decrease the risk of extension, recurrence, or death. (drugs.com)
  • heparin therapy is withdrawn when a therapeutic prothrombin time has been maintained for an appropriate period {03}1 . (drugs.com)
  • A pilot study of urokinase therapy in cerebral infarction. (springer.com)
  • While urokinase is considered highly experimental in this setting, this case demonstrates that thrombolytic agents should be viewed as therapeutic options worthy of further investigation. (elsevier.com)
  • Patients who have had chemotherapy or therapeutic radiotherapy within 28 days (6 weeks for nitrosoureas or mitomycin C) prior to entering the study or patients with ongoing side effects ≥ grade 2 due to agents administered more than 28 days earlier. (knowcancer.com)
  • Some patients may benefit from simultaneous local low-dose thrombolytic therapy. (hindawi.com)
  • The thrombolytic actions are relatively nonspecific and can result in systemic fibrinolysis. (pharmacologycorner.com)
  • Systemic Enzyme Therapy can stem this tide and help replace what has been lost due to age and other factors. (energeticnutrition.com)
  • Understanding the differences in serrapeptase and nattokinase is an important step in determining which form of systemic enzyme therapy will be most beneficial. (energeticnutrition.com)
  • They are known to have synergistic and complementary effects in experimental studies in vitro and in vivo and also in patients with acute myocardial infarction when the agents are administrated sequentially ( 12 - 17 ). (ajnr.org)
  • The management of patients with acute myocardial infarction has improved dramatically with the restoration of arterial perfusion with thrombolytic and antiplatelet therapy. (ahajournals.org)
  • You'll find summarized evaluations of the world's best literature on the effectiveness of therapy for 3,300+ clinical problems. (essentialevidenceplus.com)
  • The purpose of this presentation is to answer the question of whether a long-term drug induction of hyperfibrinolysis in blood has convincingly been shown to influence the clinical course of arterial vessel disease and the outcome of patients affected by one of its manifestations. (springer.com)
  • Clearly, there is a need to extend the time tion of the existence of the penumbra seems to varywindow for thrombolytic therapy, further maximise from case to case in clinical studies. (dokumen.tips)
  • Recent large clinical trials tested therapies aimed at modifying these outcomes and included BP reduction and hemostatic therapy with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) assisted by computed tomography (CT) angiography (CT-A) findings ( 4 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • This activity outlines the indications, contraindications, activity, adverse events, and toxicity of alteplase in the clinical setting as relates to the essential points necessary for members of an interprofessional team managing the care of patients in need of thrombolytic therapy. (statpearls.com)
  • In clinical practice, perfusion CT requires the use of a non-diffusible indicator, such as an iodine contrast agent. (unicare.com)
  • Perfusion CT (PCT, CT perfusion) can be performed with a diffusible gas indicator such as xenon (Xe), however in clinical practice an iodinated contrast agent is typically used, given the limited availability of medical grade Xe. (unicare.com)
  • Effective therapies that reduce mortality and increase the chances of living symptom-free or, at least, in independence are available. (ebscohost.com)
  • Early non-invasive testing in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients can help to guide specific therapies or interventions, and may therefore help to reduce morbidity and mortality. (herzzentrum.de)
  • The ultimate goals of thrombolytic therapy for this disease are to minimize early morbidity and mortality and to prevent recurrence without provoking excessive bleeding. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • So soon after we believed that the issue had been resolved concerning the existence of a J-shaped curve relationship between myocardial infarction mortality and the level of blood pressure associated with antihypertensive therapy, this "curve" phenomenon has reappeared. (ahajournals.org)
  • Multiple puncture tests tine tests should be leukocyte-depleted to reduce mortality thrombolytic therapy reduces recurrence after several years. (projectathena.org)
  • The effect of thrombolytic agents is directed to dissolution of the fibrin clot . (medadvicees.com)
  • Fibrinolysin therapy in thrombotic diseases of the nervous system. (springer.com)
  • Begin therapy as soon as possible after thrombotic symptoms begin (preferably within 7 days). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Bleeding at injection site, thrombophlebitis at local veins, and (paradoxical) arterial thrombotic events. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antithrombotic effect of a combined Phenformin-Ethylestrenol therapy medication. (springer.com)
  • Subsequently perviousness is maintained by adequate antithrombotic therapy. (ebscohost.com)
  • Additional risk factors for hematoma growth include antithrombotic therapy, hypertension, large initial hematoma size, and genetic predisposition such as with APOE genotype. (frontiersin.org)
  • Ancrod decreases the blood viscosity in affected arteries, leads to less intense pain, improves physical limb mobility, and facilitates physical and ergo therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Currently candidates for thrombolytic therapy are primarily identified by the time since symptom onset, with a target window of opportunity of 3 hours, based on randomized trials of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). (unicare.com)
  • These agents are recommended over no antiplatelet therapy, oral anticoagulants, or the combination of clopidogrel and aspirin. (uspharmacist.com)
  • In some cases, oral anticoagulants may be used in combination with, or sequentially with, one or more of these agents. (drugs.com)
  • Severe and uncontrolled arterial hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • This triad is the result of the body's compensatory mechanism to maintain cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP is the mean arterial blood pressure minus intracranial pressure) through liberation of cathecolamines, leading to hypertension with concomitant bradycardia mediated through the baroreceptor response. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • van de Loo J.C.W. (1984) Long-Term Induction of Fibrinolytic Activity in Chronic Arterial Vessel Disease. (springer.com)
  • Results of the research demonstrated that thrombolytic therapy with reteplase/abciximab before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has no effect on post-myocardial. (ebscohost.com)
  • Avoid giving antiplatelet agents to children receiving anticoagulation unless they are absolutely necessary. (medscape.com)
  • antiplatelet agents, and statins. (futuremarketinsights.com)
  • Alteplase is a thrombolytic agent that is manufactured by recombinant DNA technology. (statpearls.com)
  • However, at least one retrospective series 6 showed a tendency for arterial strokes to occur throughout pregnancy, with a higher incidence in the third trimester and postpartum period. (bmj.com)
  • It would have been helpful to see whether the excess of strokes at the lowest stratum of arterial pressure persisted in those patients under treatment than in those patients with whom other coexistent cardiovascular diseases were excluded. (ahajournals.org)
  • Predictors of Discharge to Home after Thrombolytic Treatment in Right Hemisphere Infarct Patients. (ebscohost.com)
  • Although all three agents have been examined in short (2hours) and long (12-24 hours) duration infusions as a treatment regimen, in general shorter duration regimens are associated with more rapid fibrinolysis and afford a lower risk of bleeding than the longer duration infusions. (bcs.com)
  • The following thrombolytic agents have been tested in randomised trials for the treatment of PE. (bcs.com)
  • An important step towards individualized therapy in cardiovascular medicine is the specific characterization of disease followed by selective treatment. (herzzentrum.de)
  • However, the lack of specific reversal agents has made the management of some patients receiving long-term treatment with NOACs problematic in emergency situations such as major bleeding events or urgent procedures. (springer.com)
  • These findings are significant as they prove that older patients can in fact benefit from IA therapy and that age, alone, is not an exclusion criteria for interventional treatment. (rehacare.com)
  • In this report the authors address some of the difficult treatment decisions encountered in acute therapy and secondary prevention. (ebscohost.com)
  • Thrombolytic treatment should be commenced as soon as possible after high-risk PE was diagnosed. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Regarding the management of CVST, anticoagulation therapy is generally considered as the standard treatment. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • The increased speed of the Turbo Trellis may allow for smaller doses of thrombolytic agents and shorter treatment times. (elsevier.com)
  • As a last resort, before amputating, a thrombolytic therapy with UK was tried to see if with strong fibrinolysis continued for 3 days amputation might be avoided. (ebscohost.com)
  • however, other agents are on the horizon, and much can be done supportively to improve neurologic outcome. (aafp.org)
  • The majority of the cases have a good prognosis with standard therapy, but there is a subgroup of patients with CVST who deteriorate rapidly within a short period of time, with a potentially fatal outcome. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Thrombolytic reversal of diffusion abnormalities has not previously been demonstrated in humans. (nih.gov)
  • and (v) adjunctive therapies such asneuroprotectants. (dokumen.tips)
  • In a pilot study carried out on 12 patients, the angiographic data showed only partial lysis in small arteries or arterial branches. (ebscohost.com)
  • Can be added to the lateral walls are approximated), thrombolytic therapy for arterial embolization. (yogachicago.com)
  • Cholesterol embolization--sometimes fatal--has been reported rarely in patients treated with thrombolytic agents. (drugs.com)