Thick triangular muscle in the SHOULDER whose function is to abduct, flex, and extend the arm. It is a common site of INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS.
General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.
The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.
Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.
Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).
Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.
An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.
General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.
Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.
Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.
A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).
General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.
General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.
Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.
General or unspecified injuries to the hand.
Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.
Injuries involving the vertebral column.
Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.
Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).
General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.
General or unspecified injuries to the heart.
Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.
Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".
General or unspecified injuries to the posterior part of the trunk. It includes injuries to the muscles of the back.
Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)
A relatively common sequela of blunt head injury, characterized by a global disruption of axons throughout the brain. Associated clinical features may include NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE; DEMENTIA; and other disorders.
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.
A spectrum of clinical liver diseases ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to ACUTE LIVER FAILURE, caused by drugs, drug metabolites, and chemicals from the environment.
Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.
Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)
Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.
Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.
Injuries to blood vessels caused by laceration, contusion, puncture, or crush and other types of injuries. Symptoms vary by site and mode of injuries and may include bleeding, bruising, swelling, pain, and numbness. It does not include injuries secondary to pathologic function or diseases such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.
General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.
General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.
Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.
Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.
Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.
Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.
Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.
Injuries caused by electric currents. The concept excludes electric burns (BURNS, ELECTRIC), but includes accidental electrocution and electric shock.
Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
An 'accident' in a medical context often refers to an unintended event or harm that occurs suddenly and unexpectedly, resulting in injury or illness, and is typically not planned or intended.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.
Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.

Non-fatal injuries sustained by seatbelt wearers: a comparative study. (1/203)

The injuries sustained by 969 drivers and front-seat passengers in road-traffic accidents were studied. Altogether 196 (20-2%) of the drivers and passengers were wearing seat belts and 773 (79-8%) were not. The injuries among the two groups differed greatly in both severity and distribution. A total of 54 (27-6%) of the seatbelt wearers sustained one or more fractures compared with 300 (38-8%) of the non-wearers, and 18 (9-2%) of the seatbelt wearers were severely injured compared with 300 (38-8%) of the non-wearers. Soft-tissue injuries to the face were sustained by only 29 (14-8%) of the seatbelt wearers compared with 425 (55%) of the non-wearers. Since wearing seatbelts may become compulsory, the type and pattern of injuries to be expected in wearers should be appreciated.  (+info)

Systemic hormonal, electrolyte, and substrate changes after non-thermal limb injury in children. (2/203)

Relatively little is known regarding the hormonal changes after injury in children. Adult protocols are often applied to children, although the latter often have different physiological responses to trauma. Twenty children with an angulated displaced fracture of the radius and/or ulna (injury severity score 9) were studied prospectively for changes in adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisol, angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin, urea, electrolytes, and glucose. Two blood samples were taken: one an arrival at the accident and emergency department and one preoperatively several hours later. There were marked increases in adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisol, and arginine vasopressin above the normal range. Five (25%) cases demonstrated greater early increases in adrenaline than those reported for adult injuries of similar severity. Early hypokalaemia in four cases had corrected towards normal within a few hours, without potassium supplementation.  (+info)

Injuries caused by falling soccer goalposts in Denmark. (3/203)

OBJECTIVE: A falling soccer goalpost is associated with the potential risk of serious injury that can sometimes even be fatal. The aim of the study was to analyse the extent of the problem in Denmark and focus on the mechanism of injury and prevention. METHODS: Data were analysed for the period 1989-1997 from the European Home and Leisure Accident Surveillance System, which is an electronic register of the injuries seen in the casualty departments of the hospitals of five selected cities in Denmark representing 14% of the Danish population; in addition, fatal accidents in the whole of Denmark since 1981 were examined. Forty two injured persons were interviewed about the circumstances of the accident. Attempts were made to estimate the proportion of goalposts secured by counterweight in the five different regions, compared with the proportion secured with ground stakes and those that were unsecured, by analysing data from the largest producers of goalposts in Denmark. RESULTS: In the period 1981-1988, two fatal accidents were recorded. In the period 1989-1997, 117 people were injured by a falling goalpost; six of the injuries required hospitalisation. Some 88% of the injured were under the age of 15. In a telephone interview with 42 of the injured, 50% stated that the goalpost fell because someone was hanging on the crossbar. Comparing the five different regions with respect to the proportion of goalposts secured by counterweight and the number of accidents, the following relation was found. Areas in which a high percentage of the goalposts were secured by a counterweight correlated inversely with a high number of accidents (r = -0.9; p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Soccer is a widely played sport and it is important to be aware that accidents caused by falling goalposts can occur and that they presumably can be prevented by proper use of goalposts, by using secure goalposts, and by securing old goalposts with a counterweight.  (+info)

Risk of upper limb injury in left handed children: a study in Greece. (4/203)

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether left handed children are at increased risk for injuries, particularly upper limb injuries. SETTING: Athens, Greece, during a six month period in 1995-96. METHODS: Cases were 129 children 4-14 years old with unintentional upper limb injuries from a population based injury database. Two control children matched for gender and age were selected from among those seen at the same medical institution for minor, non-injury ailments. On the basis of information provided by the children and their guardians, sociodemographic variables were recorded, hand preference was assessed, and each child's activity score was calculated through an abbreviated version of Achenbach's scale. RESULTS: Left handed children have a moderately increased upper limb injury risk with a tendency of recurrence of this injury. The risk of upper limb injury is also raised among children of young fathers, whereas it appears to be inversely related to crowding index and activity score--three variables that were controlled for as potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides limited support for the hypothesis that left handed children are at increased risk for injury. The excess risk, if genuine, is likely to be limited to cultural settings in which right handedness is perceived as the norm.  (+info)

Late repair of simultaneous bilateral distal biceps brachii tendon avulsion with fascia lata graft. (5/203)

A 50 year old rock climber sustained a bilateral rupture of the distal biceps brachii tendons. He retained some flexion power in both arms but minimal supination, being weaker on the non-dominant right side. As the patient presented late, with retraction and shortening of the biceps muscle bellies, reconstruction was carried out using fascia lata grafts on both sides. Because of residual weakness on the left (dominant) side, three further surgical procedures had to be carried out to correct for elongation of the graft. A functionally satisfactory outcome, comparable with that on the right side, was eventually obtained. In summary, bilateral fascia lata grafts to bridge the gap between the retracted biceps bellies and the radial tuberosities were successful in restoring function and flexion power to the elbow. Despite being the stronger side, the dominant arm did not respond as well to the initial surgery. This may be due to overuse of this arm after the operation.  (+info)

Vascular injuries of the limbs: a fifteen-year Georgian experience. (6/203)

OBJECTIVES: to analyse the causes of injury, surgical approaches, outcome and complication of vascular trauma of the upper and lower limbs in patients with vascular injuries operated on over a period between 1981 and 1995. PATIENTS: in 157 patients, the injuries were penetrating in 136 cases and blunt in 21. Isolated vascular trauma was present in 92 (58.6%) patients, 65 cases (41.4%) were aggrevated by concomitant bone fractures, severe nerve and soft tissue damage. The most frequently injured vessels were the superficial femoral (20. 6%) and brachial (19.1%) arteries. RESULTS: saphenous vein interposition grafting was applied with good results in 34 patients, polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were used in three cases, end-to-end anastomoses in 42 cases, venous bypasses in five cases, and venous patches in seven cases. Seventeen patients underwent arterial repair and nine, venous repair. Fasciotomy was used in 18 cases, and vessels were ligated in 14 cases. Blood flow was restored in 91 patients (58.0%), and collaterals compensated in 31 cases (19.7%). Fourteen primary and nine secondary amputations were performed. Twelve patients died. The limb salvage rate was 77.7% (84.1% among surviving patients). CONCLUSIONS: most vascular injuries associated with limb trauma can be managed successfully unless associated by severe concomitant damage to bones, nerves and soft tissues.  (+info)

Transcranial doppler detection of fat emboli. (7/203)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The fat embolism syndrome (FES) is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of pulmonary and neurological symptoms as well as skin and mucosal petechiae in the setting of long-bone fractures or their surgical repair. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood, and effective treatments are lacking. We present 5 patients with long-bone fractures in whom in vivo microembolism was detected by transcranial Doppler. METHODS: Five patients with long-bone fractures were monitored with transcranial Doppler for microembolic signals (MESs) after trauma. Two patients also had intraoperative monitoring. A TC-2020 instrument equipped with MES detection software was used. Detected signals were saved for subsequent review. Selected signals satisfied criteria defined previously and were categorized as large or small. RESULTS: Cerebral microembolism was detected in all 5 patients and was transient, resolving within 4 days of injury. Intraoperative monitoring revealed an increase in MESs during intramedullary nail insertion. The characteristics of MESs after injury varied among patients, with large signals being more frequent in the only patient with a patent foramen ovale. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral microembolism after long-bone fractures can be detected in vivo and monitored over time. These findings may have potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.  (+info)

Seasonal variations in incidence of fractures among elderly people. (8/203)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate seasonal variations in the incidence of fall related fractures among people 65 years and older. POPULATION AND METHODS: A prospective, population based cohort study was performed on people aged 65 years and older followed up from 1990 to 1997, a total of 459,904 person years. Cases were identified through a prospective registration system. RESULTS: There were 10,992 (2390 per 100,000 person years) fall related fractures. The risk was higher in the colder seasons (October through March) among people aged 65-79 years (relative risk (RR) = 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32 to 1.47) and in people aged 80 years and older (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.22). For arm fractures, the RR was 1.69 (95% CI 1.56 to 1.83) among people aged 65-79 years and 1.30 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.43) among those aged 80 years and older. The RR for hip fractures was 1.27 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.37) among people aged 65-79 years and 1.08 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.15) for people aged 80 years and older. Slipping on ice and snow seems to entirely explain the excessive incidence of hip and arm fractures during winter months. CONCLUSION: Season affects the incidence of all types of fractures in elderly people. Slipping on ice and snow seems to be a causal mechanism behind the seasonal effect. Preventive measures targeting this causal mechanism are likely to reduce the risk of fracture, but the size of the effect is difficult to estimate with certainty.  (+info)

The deltoid muscle is a large, triangular-shaped muscle that covers the shoulder joint. It is responsible for shoulder abduction (raising the arm away from the body), flexion (lifting the arm forward), and extension (pulling the arm backward). The muscle is divided into three sections: the anterior deltoid, which lies on the front of the shoulder and is responsible for flexion and internal rotation; the middle deltoid, which lies on the side of the shoulder and is responsible for abduction; and the posterior deltoid, which lies on the back of the shoulder and is responsible for extension and external rotation. Together, these muscles work to provide stability and mobility to the shoulder joint.

Arm injuries refer to any damage or harm sustained by the structures of the upper limb, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions. Common arm injuries include fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, tendonitis, and nerve damage. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, limited mobility, numbness, or weakness in the affected area. Treatment varies depending on the type and severity of the injury, and may include rest, ice, compression, elevation, physical therapy, medication, or surgery.

In medical terms, the arm refers to the upper limb of the human body, extending from the shoulder to the wrist. It is composed of three major bones: the humerus in the upper arm, and the radius and ulna in the lower arm. The arm contains several joints, including the shoulder joint, elbow joint, and wrist joint, which allow for a wide range of motion. The arm also contains muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and other soft tissues that are essential for normal function.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

A brain injury is defined as damage to the brain that occurs following an external force or trauma, such as a blow to the head, a fall, or a motor vehicle accident. Brain injuries can also result from internal conditions, such as lack of oxygen or a stroke. There are two main types of brain injuries: traumatic and acquired.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by an external force that results in the brain moving within the skull or the skull being fractured. Mild TBIs may result in temporary symptoms such as headaches, confusion, and memory loss, while severe TBIs can cause long-term complications, including physical, cognitive, and emotional impairments.

Acquired brain injury (ABI) is any injury to the brain that occurs after birth and is not hereditary, congenital, or degenerative. ABIs are often caused by medical conditions such as strokes, tumors, anoxia (lack of oxygen), or infections.

Both TBIs and ABIs can range from mild to severe and may result in a variety of physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms that can impact a person's ability to perform daily activities and function independently. Treatment for brain injuries typically involves a multidisciplinary approach, including medical management, rehabilitation, and supportive care.

Athletic injuries are damages or injuries to the body that occur while participating in sports, physical activities, or exercise. These injuries can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

1. Trauma: Direct blows, falls, collisions, or crushing injuries can cause fractures, dislocations, contusions, lacerations, or concussions.
2. Overuse: Repetitive motions or stress on a particular body part can lead to injuries such as tendonitis, stress fractures, or muscle strains.
3. Poor technique: Using incorrect form or technique during exercise or sports can put additional stress on muscles, joints, and ligaments, leading to injury.
4. Inadequate warm-up or cool-down: Failing to properly prepare the body for physical activity or neglecting to cool down afterwards can increase the risk of injury.
5. Lack of fitness or flexibility: Insufficient strength, endurance, or flexibility can make individuals more susceptible to injuries during sports and exercise.
6. Environmental factors: Extreme weather conditions, poor field or court surfaces, or inadequate equipment can contribute to the risk of athletic injuries.

Common athletic injuries include ankle sprains, knee injuries, shoulder dislocations, tennis elbow, shin splints, and concussions. Proper training, warm-up and cool-down routines, use of appropriate protective gear, and attention to technique can help prevent many athletic injuries.

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) refer to damage to the spinal cord that results in a loss of function, such as mobility or feeling. This injury can be caused by direct trauma to the spine or by indirect damage resulting from disease or degeneration of surrounding bones, tissues, or blood vessels. The location and severity of the injury on the spinal cord will determine which parts of the body are affected and to what extent.

The effects of SCI can range from mild sensory changes to severe paralysis, including loss of motor function, autonomic dysfunction, and possible changes in sensation, strength, and reflexes below the level of injury. These injuries are typically classified as complete or incomplete, depending on whether there is any remaining function below the level of injury.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal cord injuries to prevent further damage and improve the chances of recovery. Treatment usually involves immobilization of the spine, medications to reduce swelling and pressure, surgery to stabilize the spine, and rehabilitation to help regain lost function. Despite advances in treatment, SCI can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities.

Reperfusion injury is a complex pathophysiological process that occurs when blood flow is restored to previously ischemic tissues, leading to further tissue damage. This phenomenon can occur in various clinical settings such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke, or peripheral artery disease after an intervention aimed at restoring perfusion.

The restoration of blood flow leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators, which can cause oxidative stress, cellular damage, and activation of the immune system. This results in a cascade of events that may lead to microvascular dysfunction, capillary leakage, and tissue edema, further exacerbating the injury.

Reperfusion injury is an important consideration in the management of ischemic events, as interventions aimed at restoring blood flow must be carefully balanced with potential harm from reperfusion injury. Strategies to mitigate reperfusion injury include ischemic preconditioning (exposing the tissue to short periods of ischemia before a prolonged ischemic event), ischemic postconditioning (applying brief periods of ischemia and reperfusion after restoring blood flow), remote ischemic preconditioning (ischemia applied to a distant organ or tissue to protect the target organ), and pharmacological interventions that scavenge ROS, reduce inflammation, or improve microvascular function.

The Injury Severity Score (ISS) is a medical scoring system used to assess the severity of trauma in patients with multiple injuries. It's based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), which classifies each injury by body region on a scale from 1 (minor) to 6 (maximum severity).

The ISS is calculated by summing the squares of the highest AIS score in each of the three most severely injured body regions. The possible ISS ranges from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating more severe injuries. An ISS over 15 is generally considered a significant injury, and an ISS over 25 is associated with a high risk of mortality. It's important to note that the ISS has limitations, as it doesn't consider the number or type of injuries within each body region, only the most severe one.

Leg injuries refer to damages or harm caused to any part of the lower extremity, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and other soft tissues. These injuries can result from various causes such as trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions. Common leg injuries include fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, contusions, and cuts. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, stiffness, weakness, or difficulty walking. The specific treatment for a leg injury depends on the type and severity of the injury.

Lung injury, also known as pulmonary injury, refers to damage or harm caused to the lung tissue, blood vessels, or air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs. This can result from various causes such as infection, trauma, exposure to harmful substances, or systemic diseases. Common types of lung injuries include acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia, and chemical pneumonitis. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing, cough, chest pain, and decreased oxygen levels in the blood. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, or mechanical ventilation.

Eye injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the eye or its surrounding structures. These injuries can vary in severity and may include:

1. Corneal abrasions: A scratch or scrape on the clear surface of the eye (cornea).
2. Chemical burns: Occurs when chemicals come into contact with the eye, causing damage to the cornea and other structures.
3. Eyelid lacerations: Cuts or tears to the eyelid.
4. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: Bleeding under the conjunctiva, the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye.
5. Hyphema: Accumulation of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, which is the space between the cornea and iris.
6. Orbital fractures: Breaks in the bones surrounding the eye.
7. Retinal detachment: Separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
8. Traumatic uveitis: Inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye, caused by trauma.
9. Optic nerve damage: Damage to the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain.

Eye injuries can result from a variety of causes, including accidents, sports-related injuries, violence, and chemical exposure. It is important to seek medical attention promptly for any suspected eye injury to prevent further damage and potential vision loss.

Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and damage to the lung tissue, which can lead to difficulty breathing and respiratory failure. It is often caused by direct or indirect injury to the lungs, such as pneumonia, sepsis, trauma, or inhalation of harmful substances.

The symptoms of ALI include shortness of breath, rapid breathing, cough, and low oxygen levels in the blood. The condition can progress rapidly and may require mechanical ventilation to support breathing. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the injury, providing supportive care, and managing symptoms.

In severe cases, ALI can lead to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), a more serious and life-threatening condition that requires intensive care unit (ICU) treatment.

Neck injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in any part of the neck, including soft tissues (muscles, ligaments, tendons), nerves, bones (vertebrae), and joints (facet joints, intervertebral discs). These injuries can result from various incidents such as road accidents, falls, sports-related activities, or work-related tasks. Common neck injuries include whiplash, strain or sprain of the neck muscles, herniated discs, fractured vertebrae, and pinched nerves, which may cause symptoms like pain, stiffness, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the neck, shoulders, arms, or hands. Immediate medical attention is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment to prevent further complications and ensure optimal recovery.

Abdominal injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the abdomen, an area of the body that is located between the chest and the pelvis. This region contains several vital organs such as the stomach, liver, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Abdominal injuries can range from minor bruises and cuts to severe internal bleeding and organ damage, depending on the cause and severity of the trauma.

Common causes of abdominal injuries include:

* Blunt force trauma, such as that caused by car accidents, falls, or physical assaults
* Penetrating trauma, such as that caused by gunshot wounds or stabbing
* Deceleration injuries, which occur when the body is moving at a high speed and suddenly stops, causing internal organs to continue moving and collide with each other or the abdominal wall

Symptoms of abdominal injuries may include:

* Pain or tenderness in the abdomen
* Swelling or bruising in the abdomen
* Nausea or vomiting
* Dizziness or lightheadedness
* Blood in the urine or stool
* Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
* Rapid heartbeat or low blood pressure

Abdominal injuries can be life-threatening if left untreated, and immediate medical attention is necessary to prevent complications such as infection, internal bleeding, organ failure, or even death. Treatment may include surgery, medication, or other interventions depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known as acute renal failure, is a rapid loss of kidney function that occurs over a few hours or days. It is defined as an increase in the serum creatinine level by 0.3 mg/dL within 48 hours or an increase in the creatinine level to more than 1.5 times baseline, which is known or presumed to have occurred within the prior 7 days, or a urine volume of less than 0.5 mL/kg per hour for six hours.

AKI can be caused by a variety of conditions, including decreased blood flow to the kidneys, obstruction of the urinary tract, exposure to toxic substances, and certain medications. Symptoms of AKI may include decreased urine output, fluid retention, electrolyte imbalances, and metabolic acidosis. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the injury and providing supportive care, such as dialysis, to help maintain kidney function until the injury resolves.

Hand injuries refer to any damage or harm caused to the structures of the hand, including the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, blood vessels, and skin. These injuries can result from various causes such as trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions. Examples of hand injuries include fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, cuts, burns, and insect bites. Symptoms may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury, but they often include pain, swelling, stiffness, numbness, weakness, or loss of function in the hand. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal recovery and prevent long-term complications.

Blast injuries are traumas that result from the exposure to blast overpressure waves, typically generated by explosions. These injuries can be categorized into primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries.

1. Primary Blast Injuries: These occur due to the direct effect of the blast wave on the body, which can cause barotrauma to organs with air-filled spaces such as the lungs, middle ear, and gastrointestinal tract. This can lead to conditions like pulmonary contusion, traumatic rupture of the eardrums, or bowel perforation.

2. Secondary Blast Injuries: These result from flying debris or objects that become projectiles due to the blast, which can cause penetrating trauma or blunt force injuries.

3. Tertiary Blast Injuries: These occur when individuals are thrown by the blast wind against solid structures or the ground, resulting in blunt force trauma, fractures, and head injuries.

4. Quaternary Blast Injuries: This category includes all other injuries or illnesses that are not classified under primary, secondary, or tertiary blast injuries. These may include burns, crush injuries, inhalation of toxic fumes, or psychological trauma.

It is important to note that blast injuries can be complex and often involve a combination of these categories, requiring comprehensive medical evaluation and management.

Thoracic injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the thorax, which is the part of the body that contains the chest cavity. The thorax houses vital organs such as the heart, lungs, esophagus, trachea, and major blood vessels. Thoracic injuries can range from blunt trauma, caused by impacts or compressions, to penetrating trauma, resulting from stabbing or gunshot wounds. These injuries may cause various complications, including but not limited to:

1. Hemothorax - bleeding into the chest cavity
2. Pneumothorax - collapsed lung due to air accumulation in the chest cavity
3. Tension pneumothorax - a life-threatening condition where trapped air puts pressure on the heart and lungs, impairing their function
4. Cardiac tamponade - compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac
5. Rib fractures, which can lead to complications like punctured lungs or internal bleeding
6. Tracheobronchial injuries, causing air leaks and difficulty breathing
7. Great vessel injuries, potentially leading to massive hemorrhage and hemodynamic instability

Immediate medical attention is required for thoracic injuries, as they can quickly become life-threatening due to the vital organs involved. Treatment may include surgery, chest tubes, medications, or supportive care, depending on the severity and type of injury.

Spinal injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur to the vertebral column, which houses and protects the spinal cord. These injuries can be caused by various factors such as trauma from accidents (motor vehicle, sports-related, falls, etc.), violence, or degenerative conditions like arthritis, disc herniation, or spinal stenosis.

Spinal injuries can result in bruising, fractures, dislocations, or compression of the vertebrae, which may then cause damage to the spinal cord and its surrounding tissues, nerves, and blood vessels. The severity of a spinal injury can range from mild, with temporary symptoms, to severe, resulting in permanent impairment or paralysis below the level of injury.

Symptoms of spinal injuries may include:
- Pain or stiffness in the neck or back
- Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the limbs
- Loss of bladder or bowel control
- Difficulty walking or maintaining balance
- Paralysis or loss of sensation below the level of injury
- In severe cases, respiratory problems and difficulty in breathing

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal injuries to prevent further damage and ensure proper treatment. Treatment options may include immobilization, surgery, medication, rehabilitation, and physical therapy.

Knee injuries refer to damages or harm caused to the structures surrounding or within the knee joint, which may include the bones (femur, tibia, and patella), cartilage (meniscus and articular cartilage), ligaments (ACL, PCL, MCL, and LCL), tendons (patellar and quadriceps), muscles, bursae, and other soft tissues. These injuries can result from various causes, such as trauma, overuse, degeneration, or sports-related activities. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, stiffness, instability, reduced range of motion, and difficulty walking or bearing weight on the affected knee. Common knee injuries include fractures, dislocations, meniscal tears, ligament sprains or ruptures, and tendonitis. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal recovery and prevent long-term complications.

The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is a standardized system used by healthcare professionals to classify the severity of traumatic injuries. The scale assigns a score from 1 to 6 to each injury, with 1 indicating minor injuries and 6 indicating maximal severity or currently untreatable injuries.

The AIS scores are based on anatomical location, type of injury, and physiological response to the injury. For example, a simple fracture may be assigned an AIS score of 2, while a life-threatening head injury may be assigned a score of 5 or 6.

The AIS is used in conjunction with other scoring systems, such as the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS), to assess the overall severity of injuries sustained in a traumatic event. These scores can help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care, triage, and resource allocation.

Facial injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the face, which may include the bones of the skull that form the face, teeth, salivary glands, muscles, nerves, and skin. Facial injuries can range from minor cuts and bruises to severe fractures and disfigurement. They can be caused by a variety of factors such as accidents, falls, sports-related injuries, physical assaults, or animal attacks.

Facial injuries can affect one or more areas of the face, including the forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, ears, mouth, and jaw. Common types of facial injuries include lacerations (cuts), contusions (bruises), abrasions (scrapes), fractures (broken bones), and burns.

Facial injuries can have significant psychological and emotional impacts on individuals, in addition to physical effects. Treatment for facial injuries may involve simple first aid, suturing of wounds, splinting or wiring of broken bones, reconstructive surgery, or other medical interventions. It is essential to seek prompt medical attention for any facial injury to ensure proper healing and minimize the risk of complications.

Heart injuries, also known as cardiac injuries, refer to any damage or harm caused to the heart muscle, valves, or surrounding structures. This can result from various causes such as blunt trauma (e.g., car accidents, falls), penetrating trauma (e.g., gunshot wounds, stabbing), or medical conditions like heart attacks (myocardial infarction) and infections (e.g., myocarditis, endocarditis).

Some common types of heart injuries include:

1. Contusions: Bruising of the heart muscle due to blunt trauma.
2. Myocardial infarctions: Damage to the heart muscle caused by insufficient blood supply, often due to blocked coronary arteries.
3. Cardiac rupture: A rare but life-threatening condition where the heart muscle tears or breaks open, usually resulting from severe trauma or complications from a myocardial infarction.
4. Valvular damage: Disruption of the heart valves' function due to injury or infection, leading to leakage (regurgitation) or narrowing (stenosis).
5. Pericardial injuries: Damage to the pericardium, the sac surrounding the heart, which can result in fluid accumulation (pericardial effusion), inflammation (pericarditis), or tamponade (compression of the heart by excess fluid).
6. Arrhythmias: Irregular heart rhythms caused by damage to the heart's electrical conduction system.

Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial for managing heart injuries, as they can lead to severe complications or even be fatal if left untreated.

Myocardial reperfusion injury is a pathological process that occurs when blood flow is restored to the heart muscle (myocardium) after a period of ischemia or reduced oxygen supply, such as during a myocardial infarction (heart attack). The restoration of blood flow, although necessary to salvage the dying tissue, can itself cause further damage to the heart muscle. This paradoxical phenomenon is known as myocardial reperfusion injury.

The mechanisms behind myocardial reperfusion injury are complex and involve several processes, including:

1. Oxidative stress: The sudden influx of oxygen into the previously ischemic tissue leads to an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage cellular structures, such as proteins, lipids, and DNA.
2. Calcium overload: During reperfusion, there is an increase in calcium influx into the cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells). This elevated intracellular calcium level can disrupt normal cellular functions, leading to further damage.
3. Inflammation: Reperfusion triggers an immune response, with the recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, to the site of injury. These cells release cytokines and other mediators that can exacerbate tissue damage.
4. Mitochondrial dysfunction: The restoration of blood flow can cause mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, to malfunction, leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors and contributing to cell death.
5. Vasoconstriction and microvascular obstruction: During reperfusion, there may be vasoconstriction of the small blood vessels (microvasculature) in the heart, which can further limit blood flow and contribute to tissue damage.

Myocardial reperfusion injury is a significant concern because it can negate some of the benefits of early reperfusion therapy, such as thrombolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), used to treat acute myocardial infarction. Strategies to minimize myocardial reperfusion injury are an area of active research and include pharmacological interventions, ischemic preconditioning, and remote ischemic conditioning.

Soft tissue injuries refer to damages that occur in the body's connective tissues, such as ligaments, tendons, and muscles. These injuries can be caused by various events, including accidents, falls, or sports-related impacts. Common soft tissue injuries include sprains, strains, and contusions (bruises).

Sprains occur when the ligaments, which connect bones to each other, are stretched or torn. This usually happens in the joints like ankles, knees, or wrists. Strains, on the other hand, involve injuries to the muscles or tendons, often resulting from overuse or sudden excessive force. Contusions occur when blood vessels within the soft tissues get damaged due to a direct blow or impact, causing bleeding and subsequent bruising in the affected area.

Soft tissue injuries can cause pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited mobility. In some cases, these injuries may require medical treatment, including physical therapy, medication, or even surgery, depending on their severity and location. It is essential to seek proper medical attention for soft tissue injuries to ensure appropriate healing and prevent long-term complications or chronic pain.

Back injuries refer to damages or traumas that affect the structures of the back, including the muscles, nerves, ligaments, bones, and other tissues. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as sudden trauma (e.g., falls, accidents), repetitive stress, or degenerative conditions. Common types of back injuries include strains, sprains, herniated discs, fractured vertebrae, and spinal cord injuries. Symptoms may vary from mild discomfort to severe pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness, depending on the severity and location of the injury. Treatment options range from conservative measures like physical therapy and medication to surgical intervention in severe cases.

A closed head injury is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that occurs when there is no penetration or breakage of the skull. The brain is encased in the skull and protected by cerebrospinal fluid, but when the head experiences a sudden impact or jolt, the brain can move back and forth within the skull, causing it to bruise, tear blood vessels, or even cause nerve damage. This type of injury can result from various incidents such as car accidents, sports injuries, falls, or any other event that causes the head to suddenly stop or change direction quickly.

Closed head injuries can range from mild (concussion) to severe (diffuse axonal injury, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma), and symptoms may not always be immediately apparent. They can include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, memory loss, difficulty concentrating, mood changes, sleep disturbances, and in severe cases, loss of consciousness, seizures, or even coma. It is essential to seek medical attention immediately if you suspect a closed head injury, as prompt diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the outcome.

Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a type of traumatic brain injury that occurs when there is extensive damage to the nerve fibers (axons) in the brain. It is often caused by rapid acceleration or deceleration forces, such as those experienced during motor vehicle accidents or falls. In DAI, the axons are stretched and damaged, leading to disruption of communication between different parts of the brain. This can result in a wide range of symptoms, including cognitive impairment, loss of consciousness, and motor dysfunction. DAI is often difficult to diagnose and can have long-term consequences, making it an important area of study in traumatic brain injury research.

Craniocerebral trauma, also known as traumatic brain injury (TBI), is a type of injury that occurs to the head and brain. It can result from a variety of causes, including motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports injuries, violence, or other types of trauma. Craniocerebral trauma can range in severity from mild concussions to severe injuries that cause permanent disability or death.

The injury typically occurs when there is a sudden impact to the head, causing the brain to move within the skull and collide with the inside of the skull. This can result in bruising, bleeding, swelling, or tearing of brain tissue, as well as damage to blood vessels and nerves. In severe cases, the skull may be fractured or penetrated, leading to direct injury to the brain.

Symptoms of craniocerebral trauma can vary widely depending on the severity and location of the injury. They may include headache, dizziness, confusion, memory loss, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, changes in vision or hearing, weakness or numbness in the limbs, balance problems, and behavioral or emotional changes. In severe cases, the person may lose consciousness or fall into a coma.

Treatment for craniocerebral trauma depends on the severity of the injury. Mild injuries may be treated with rest, pain medication, and close monitoring, while more severe injuries may require surgery, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Prevention is key to reducing the incidence of craniocerebral trauma, including measures such as wearing seat belts and helmets, preventing falls, and avoiding violent situations.

Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a medical term that refers to liver damage or injury caused by the use of medications or drugs. This condition can vary in severity, from mild abnormalities in liver function tests to severe liver failure, which may require a liver transplant.

The exact mechanism of DILI can differ depending on the drug involved, but it generally occurs when the liver metabolizes the drug into toxic compounds that damage liver cells. This can happen through various pathways, including direct toxicity to liver cells, immune-mediated reactions, or metabolic idiosyncrasies.

Symptoms of DILI may include jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), fatigue, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and dark urine. In severe cases, it can lead to complications such as ascites, encephalopathy, and bleeding disorders.

The diagnosis of DILI is often challenging because it requires the exclusion of other potential causes of liver injury. Liver function tests, imaging studies, and sometimes liver biopsies may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment typically involves discontinuing the offending drug and providing supportive care until the liver recovers. In some cases, medications that protect the liver or promote its healing may be used.

Occupational injuries refer to physical harm or damage occurring as a result of working in a specific job or occupation. These injuries can be caused by various factors such as accidents, exposure to hazardous substances, repetitive strain, or poor ergonomic conditions. They may include wounds, fractures, burns, amputations, hearing loss, respiratory problems, and other health issues directly related to the nature of work. It's important to note that occupational injuries are preventable with proper safety measures and adherence to regulations in the workplace.

Carotid artery injuries refer to damages or traumas that affect the carotid arteries, which are a pair of major blood vessels located in the neck that supply oxygenated blood to the head and neck. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as penetrating or blunt trauma, iatrogenic causes (during medical procedures), or degenerative diseases.

Carotid artery injuries can be categorized into three types:

1. Blunt carotid injury (BCI): This type of injury is caused by a sudden and severe impact to the neck, which can result in intimal tears, dissection, or thrombosis of the carotid artery. BCIs are commonly seen in motor vehicle accidents, sports-related injuries, and assaults.
2. Penetrating carotid injury: This type of injury is caused by a foreign object that penetrates the neck and damages the carotid artery. Examples include gunshot wounds, stab wounds, or other sharp objects that pierce the skin and enter the neck.
3. Iatrogenic carotid injury: This type of injury occurs during medical procedures such as endovascular interventions, surgical procedures, or the placement of central lines.

Symptoms of carotid artery injuries may include:

* Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)
* Neurological deficits such as hemiparesis, aphasia, or visual disturbances
* Bleeding from the neck or mouth
* Pulsatile mass in the neck
* Hypotension or shock
* Loss of consciousness

Diagnosis of carotid artery injuries may involve imaging studies such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), or conventional angiography. Treatment options include endovascular repair, surgical repair, or anticoagulation therapy, depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Peripheral nerve injuries refer to damage or trauma to the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These nerves transmit information between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body, including sensory, motor, and autonomic functions. Peripheral nerve injuries can result in various symptoms, depending on the type and severity of the injury, such as numbness, tingling, weakness, or paralysis in the affected area.

Peripheral nerve injuries are classified into three main categories based on the degree of damage:

1. Neuropraxia: This is the mildest form of nerve injury, where the nerve remains intact but its function is disrupted due to a local conduction block. The nerve fiber is damaged, but the supporting structures remain intact. Recovery usually occurs within 6-12 weeks without any residual deficits.
2. Axonotmesis: In this type of injury, there is damage to both the axons and the supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium). The nerve fibers are disrupted, but the connective tissue sheaths remain intact. Recovery can take several months or even up to a year, and it may be incomplete, with some residual deficits possible.
3. Neurotmesis: This is the most severe form of nerve injury, where there is complete disruption of the nerve fibers and supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium, epineurium). Recovery is unlikely without surgical intervention, which may involve nerve grafting or repair.

Peripheral nerve injuries can be caused by various factors, including trauma, compression, stretching, lacerations, or chemical exposure. Treatment options depend on the type and severity of the injury and may include conservative management, such as physical therapy and pain management, or surgical intervention for more severe cases.

Ankle injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the ankle joint and its surrounding structures, including bones, ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The ankle joint is a complex structure composed of three bones: the tibia (shinbone), fibula (lower leg bone), and talus (a bone in the foot). These bones are held together by various strong ligaments that provide stability and enable proper movement.

There are several types of ankle injuries, with the most common being sprains, strains, and fractures:

1. Ankle Sprain: A sprain occurs when the ligaments surrounding the ankle joint get stretched or torn due to sudden twisting, rolling, or forced movements. The severity of a sprain can range from mild (grade 1) to severe (grade 3), with partial or complete tearing of the ligament(s).
2. Ankle Strain: A strain is an injury to the muscles or tendons surrounding the ankle joint, often caused by overuse, excessive force, or awkward positioning. This results in pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the ankle.
3. Ankle Fracture: A fracture occurs when one or more bones in the ankle joint break due to high-impact trauma, such as a fall, sports injury, or vehicle accident. Fractures can vary in severity, from small cracks to complete breaks that may require surgery and immobilization for proper healing.

Symptoms of ankle injuries typically include pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, and difficulty walking or bearing weight on the affected ankle. Immediate medical attention is necessary for severe injuries, such as fractures, dislocations, or significant ligament tears, to ensure appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Treatment options may include rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE), immobilization with a brace or cast, physical therapy, medication, or surgery, depending on the type and severity of the injury.

Nonpenetrating wounds are a type of trauma or injury to the body that do not involve a break in the skin or underlying tissues. These wounds can result from blunt force trauma, such as being struck by an object or falling onto a hard surface. They can also result from crushing injuries, where significant force is applied to a body part, causing damage to internal structures without breaking the skin.

Nonpenetrating wounds can cause a range of injuries, including bruising, swelling, and damage to internal organs, muscles, bones, and other tissues. The severity of the injury depends on the force of the trauma, the location of the impact, and the individual's overall health and age.

While nonpenetrating wounds may not involve a break in the skin, they can still be serious and require medical attention. If you have experienced blunt force trauma or suspect a nonpenetrating wound, it is important to seek medical care to assess the extent of the injury and receive appropriate treatment.

Vascular system injuries refer to damages or disruptions to the body's vascular system, which is made up of the heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, disease, or surgical complications. They may result in bleeding, blockage of blood flow, or formation of blood clots, leading to serious consequences like tissue damage, organ failure, or even death if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Traumatic injuries to the vascular system can include cuts, tears, or bruises to the blood vessels, which can lead to internal or external bleeding. Blunt trauma can also cause damage to the blood vessels, leading to blockages or aneurysms.

Diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions can weaken the blood vessels and make them more prone to injury. Surgical complications, such as accidental cuts to blood vessels during operations, can also lead to vascular system injuries.

Treatment for vascular system injuries may include surgery, medication, or lifestyle changes, depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Traffic accidents are incidents that occur when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, a pedestrian, an animal, or a stationary object, resulting in damage or injury. These accidents can be caused by various factors such as driver error, distracted driving, drunk driving, speeding, reckless driving, poor road conditions, and adverse weather conditions. Traffic accidents can range from minor fender benders to severe crashes that result in serious injuries or fatalities. They are a significant public health concern and cause a substantial burden on healthcare systems, emergency services, and society as a whole.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

"Trauma severity indices" refer to various scoring systems used by healthcare professionals to evaluate the severity of injuries in trauma patients. These tools help standardize the assessment and communication of injury severity among different members of the healthcare team, allowing for more effective and consistent treatment planning, resource allocation, and prognosis estimation.

There are several commonly used trauma severity indices, including:

1. Injury Severity Score (ISS): ISS is an anatomical scoring system that evaluates the severity of injuries based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). The body is divided into six regions, and the square of the highest AIS score in each region is summed to calculate the ISS. Scores range from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating more severe injuries.
2. New Injury Severity Score (NISS): NISS is a modification of the ISS that focuses on the three most severely injured body regions, regardless of their anatomical location. The three highest AIS scores are squared and summed to calculate the NISS. This scoring system tends to correlate better with mortality than the ISS in some studies.
3. Revised Trauma Score (RTS): RTS is a physiological scoring system that evaluates the patient's respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological status upon arrival at the hospital. It uses variables such as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), systolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate to calculate a score between 0 and 7.84, with lower scores indicating more severe injuries.
4. Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS): TRISS is a combined anatomical and physiological scoring system that estimates the probability of survival based on ISS or NISS, RTS, age, and mechanism of injury (blunt or penetrating). It uses logistic regression equations to calculate the predicted probability of survival.
5. Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS): PTS is a physiological scoring system specifically designed for children under 14 years old. It evaluates six variables, including respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, systolic blood pressure, capillary refill time, GCS, and temperature to calculate a score between -6 and +12, with lower scores indicating more severe injuries.

These scoring systems help healthcare professionals assess the severity of trauma, predict outcomes, allocate resources, and compare patient populations in research settings. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized care for each patient.

Finger injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the fingers, which can include cuts, bruises, dislocations, fractures, and sprains. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as accidents, sports activities, falls, or direct blows to the finger. Symptoms of finger injuries may include pain, swelling, stiffness, deformity, numbness, or inability to move the finger. The treatment for finger injuries varies depending on the type and severity of the injury, but may include rest, immobilization, ice, compression, elevation, physical therapy, medication, or surgery. It is essential to seek medical attention promptly for proper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries to prevent further complications and ensure optimal recovery.

Foot injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the various structures of the foot, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves. These injuries can result from various causes such as accidents, sports activities, falls, or repetitive stress. Common types of foot injuries include fractures, sprains, strains, contusions, dislocations, and overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Symptoms may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury but often include pain, swelling, bruising, difficulty walking, and reduced range of motion. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal healing and prevent long-term complications.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Penetrating wounds are a type of traumatic injury that occurs when an object pierces through the skin and underlying tissues, creating a hole or cavity in the body. These wounds can vary in severity, depending on the size and shape of the object, as well as the location and depth of the wound.

Penetrating wounds are typically caused by sharp objects such as knives, bullets, or glass. They can damage internal organs, blood vessels, nerves, and bones, leading to serious complications such as bleeding, infection, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and properly.

The management of penetrating wounds involves a thorough assessment of the wound and surrounding tissues, as well as the identification and treatment of any associated injuries or complications. This may include wound cleaning and closure, antibiotics to prevent infection, pain management, and surgery to repair damaged structures. In some cases, hospitalization and close monitoring may be necessary to ensure proper healing and recovery.

Burns are injuries to tissues caused by heat, electricity, chemicals, friction, or radiation. They are classified based on their severity:

1. First-degree burns (superficial burns) affect only the outer layer of skin (epidermis), causing redness, pain, and swelling.
2. Second-degree burns (partial-thickness burns) damage both the epidermis and the underlying layer of skin (dermis). They result in redness, pain, swelling, and blistering.
3. Third-degree burns (full-thickness burns) destroy the entire depth of the skin and can also damage underlying muscles, tendons, and bones. These burns appear white or blackened and charred, and they may be painless due to destroyed nerve endings.

Immediate medical attention is required for second-degree and third-degree burns, as well as for large area first-degree burns, to prevent infection, manage pain, and ensure proper healing. Treatment options include wound care, antibiotics, pain management, and possibly skin grafting or surgery in severe cases.

Occupational accidents are defined as unexpected and unplanned events that occur in the context of work and lead to physical or mental harm. These accidents can be caused by a variety of factors, including unsafe working conditions, lack of proper training, or failure to use appropriate personal protective equipment. Occupational accidents can result in injuries, illnesses, or even death, and can have significant impacts on individuals, families, and communities. In many cases, occupational accidents are preventable through the implementation of effective safety measures and risk management strategies.

Penetrating eye injuries are a type of ocular trauma where a foreign object or substance pierces the outer layers of the eye and damages the internal structures. This can result in serious harm to various parts of the eye, such as the cornea, iris, lens, or retina, and may potentially cause vision loss or blindness if not promptly treated.

The severity of a penetrating eye injury depends on several factors, including the type and size of the object that caused the injury, the location of the wound, and the extent of damage to the internal structures. Common causes of penetrating eye injuries include sharp objects, such as metal shards or glass fragments, projectiles, such as pellets or bullets, and explosive materials.

Symptoms of a penetrating eye injury may include pain, redness, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, floaters, or the presence of a foreign body in the eye. If you suspect that you have sustained a penetrating eye injury, it is essential to seek immediate medical attention from an ophthalmologist or other healthcare professional with experience in treating eye trauma.

Treatment for penetrating eye injuries may include removing any foreign objects or substances from the eye, repairing damaged tissues, and administering medications to prevent infection and reduce inflammation. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the injury and restore vision. Preventing eye injuries is crucial, and appropriate protective eyewear should be worn when engaging in activities that pose a risk of eye trauma.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Whiplash injuries are a type of soft tissue injury to the neck that occurs when the head is suddenly and forcefully thrown backward (hyperextension) and then forward (hyperflexion). This motion is similar to the cracking of a whip, hence the term "whiplash."

Whiplash injuries are most commonly associated with rear-end automobile accidents, but they can also occur from sports accidents, physical abuse, or other traumatic events. The impact of these forces on the neck can cause damage to the muscles, ligaments, tendons, and other soft tissues in the neck, resulting in pain, stiffness, and limited mobility.

In some cases, whiplash injuries may also cause damage to the discs between the vertebrae in the spine or to the nerves exiting the spinal cord. These types of injuries can have more serious consequences and may require additional medical treatment.

Whiplash injuries are typically diagnosed based on a combination of physical examination, patient history, and imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans. Treatment for whiplash injuries may include pain medication, physical therapy, chiropractic care, or in some cases, surgery.

Needlestick injuries are sharp object injuries typically involving hollow-bore needles, which can result in exposure to bloodborne pathogens. They often occur during the use or disposal of contaminated needles in healthcare settings. These injuries pose a significant risk for transmission of infectious diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. It is essential to follow strict protocols for handling and disposing of needles and other sharp objects to minimize the risk of needlestick injuries.

Smoke inhalation injury is a type of damage that occurs to the respiratory system when an individual breathes in smoke, most commonly during a fire. This injury can affect both the upper and lower airways and can cause a range of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

Smoke inhalation injury can also lead to more severe complications, such as chemical irritation of the airways, swelling of the throat and lungs, and respiratory failure. In some cases, it can even be fatal. The severity of the injury depends on several factors, including the duration and intensity of the exposure, the individual's underlying health status, and the presence of any pre-existing lung conditions.

Smoke inhalation injury is caused by a combination of thermal injury (heat damage) and chemical injury (damage from toxic substances present in the smoke). The heat from the smoke can cause direct damage to the airways, leading to inflammation and swelling. At the same time, the chemicals in the smoke can irritate and corrode the lining of the airways, causing further damage.

Some of the toxic substances found in smoke include carbon monoxide, cyanide, and various other chemicals released by burning materials. These substances can interfere with the body's ability to transport oxygen and can cause metabolic acidosis, a condition characterized by an excessively acidic environment in the body.

Treatment for smoke inhalation injury typically involves providing supportive care to help the individual breathe more easily, such as administering oxygen or using mechanical ventilation. In some cases, medications may be used to reduce inflammation and swelling in the airways. Severe cases of smoke inhalation injury may require hospitalization and intensive care.

Gunshot wounds are defined as traumatic injuries caused by the penetration of bullets or other projectiles fired from firearms into the body. The severity and extent of damage depend on various factors such as the type of firearm used, the distance between the muzzle and the victim, the size and shape of the bullet, and its velocity.

Gunshot wounds can be classified into two main categories:

1. Penetrating gunshot wounds: These occur when a bullet enters the body but does not exit, causing damage to the organs, tissues, and blood vessels along its path.

2. Perforating gunshot wounds: These happen when a bullet enters and exits the body, creating an entry and exit wound, causing damage to the structures it traverses.

Based on the mechanism of injury, gunshot wounds can also be categorized into low-velocity (less than 1000 feet per second) and high-velocity (greater than 1000 feet per second) injuries. High-velocity gunshot wounds are more likely to cause extensive tissue damage due to the transfer of kinetic energy from the bullet to the surrounding tissues.

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals with gunshot wounds, as they may experience significant blood loss, infection, and potential long-term complications such as organ dysfunction or disability. Treatment typically involves surgical intervention to control bleeding, remove foreign material, repair damaged structures, and manage infections if present.

Electric injuries refer to damage to the body caused by exposure to electrical energy. This can occur when a person comes into contact with an electrical source, such as a power line or outlet, and the electrical current passes through the body. The severity of the injury depends on various factors, including the voltage and amperage of the electrical current, the duration of exposure, and the path the current takes through the body.

Electric injuries can cause a range of symptoms and complications, including burns, cardiac arrest, muscle damage, nerve damage, and fractures or dislocations (if the victim is thrown by the electrical shock). In some cases, electric injuries can be fatal. Treatment typically involves supportive care to stabilize the patient's vital signs, as well as specific interventions to address any complications that may have arisen as a result of the injury. Prevention measures include following safety guidelines when working with electricity and being aware of potential electrical hazards in one's environment.

A contusion is a medical term for a bruise. It's a type of injury that occurs when blood vessels become damaged or broken as a result of trauma to the body. This trauma can be caused by a variety of things, such as a fall, a blow, or a hit. When the blood vessels are damaged, blood leaks into the surrounding tissues, causing the area to become discolored and swollen.

Contusions can occur anywhere on the body, but they are most common in areas that are more likely to be injured, such as the knees, elbows, and hands. In some cases, a contusion may be accompanied by other injuries, such as fractures or sprains.

Most contusions will heal on their own within a few days or weeks, depending on the severity of the injury. Treatment typically involves rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) to help reduce swelling and pain. In some cases, over-the-counter pain medications may also be recommended to help manage discomfort.

If you suspect that you have a contusion, it's important to seek medical attention if the injury is severe or if you experience symptoms such as difficulty breathing, chest pain, or loss of consciousness. These could be signs of a more serious injury and require immediate medical attention.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

An "accident" is an unfortunate event that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in damage or injury. In medical terms, an accident refers to an unplanned occurrence resulting in harm or injury to a person's body, which may require medical attention. Accidents can happen due to various reasons such as human error, mechanical failure, or environmental factors.

Examples of accidents that may require medical attention include:

1. Traffic accidents: These can result in injuries such as fractures, head trauma, and soft tissue injuries.
2. Workplace accidents: These can include falls, machinery malfunctions, or exposure to hazardous substances, resulting in injuries or illnesses.
3. Home accidents: These can include burns, cuts, falls, or poisoning, which may require medical treatment.
4. Sports accidents: These can result in injuries such as sprains, strains, fractures, or concussions.
5. Recreational accidents: These can occur during activities such as swimming, hiking, or biking and may result in injuries such as drowning, falls, or trauma.

Preventing accidents is crucial to maintaining good health and safety. This can be achieved through education, awareness, and the implementation of safety measures in various settings such as homes, workplaces, and roads.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Penetrating head injuries are a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that occurs when an object pierces the skull and enters the brain tissue. This can result in damage to specific areas of the brain, depending on the location and trajectory of the penetrating object. Penetrating head injuries can be caused by various objects, such as bullets, knives, or sharp debris from accidents. They are often severe and require immediate medical attention, as they can lead to significant neurological deficits, disability, or even death.

Multiple trauma, also known as polytrauma, is a medical term used to describe severe injuries to the body that are sustained in more than one place or region. It often involves damage to multiple organ systems and can be caused by various incidents such as traffic accidents, falls from significant heights, high-energy collisions, or violent acts.

The injuries sustained in multiple trauma may include fractures, head injuries, internal bleeding, chest and abdominal injuries, and soft tissue injuries. These injuries can lead to a complex medical situation requiring immediate and ongoing care from a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, including emergency physicians, trauma surgeons, critical care specialists, nurses, rehabilitation therapists, and mental health providers.

Multiple trauma is a serious condition that can result in long-term disability or even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

He had arm injuries. Nicolaas Nieuwenhout, a 28-years old billiard maker who lived in The Hague. He had head and legs injuries ... He had head and back injuries. Jacobus Paulus de Heer, a 23-years old carpenter. He was born and lived in The Hague and worked ... One of the passengers that lost his arms in the disaster, was offered from the society an amount of 186 Dutch Guilder "as a ... She had severe leg injuries. An unnamed personen was hospitalized in Schiedam. Justice and the board of directors of the ...
"DAVIES SUFFERS ARM INJURY". Bradford City A.F.C. 23 August 2014. Archived from the original on 11 August 2015. Retrieved 11 ... "DAVIES SUFFERS ARM INJURY". Bradford City A.F.C. 11 March 2015. Archived from the original on 22 March 2015. Retrieved 11 ... he suffered an arm injury during a match against Peterborough United and had to be substituted in the 55th minute. It was later ... Following an injury crisis, he was recalled by Middlesbrough in April 2005. In July 2005, Davies was loaned out again, to Derby ...
152-4. "Exsanguination of the arm and hand". The Hand: 124-6. June 1973. "Second Hand Club", British Society for Surgery of the ... Stack, Graham (1981). "Glass injuries". Hand. 13 (2): 111. doi:10.1016/s0072-968x(81)80049-6. PMID 7286794. S2CID 5109399. ... Burchell, Geoffrey (1973). "Exsanguination of the Arm and Hand". Hand. 5 (2): 124-126. doi:10.1016/0072-968X(73)90052-1. PMID ...
He received injuries to his arm. He was said to have survived a previous assassination attempt in 2001. Saddam Hussein's ... Soldiers, who tried to enter the house three times, encountered small arms fire and grenades in the first two attempts. Uday, ... Uday was viewed as their father's heir apparent until he sustained serious injuries in a 1996 assassination attempt. Unlike ... M2 machine guns and small arms. After about four hours of battle (the whole operation lasted 6 hours), the soldiers entered the ...
He made his next start 11 days later on August 31 against Chunichi, but was pulled in the 5th inning after complaining of arm ... The Cardinals were upset by the RedHawks 13-5. Despite his injury, Bullington came back and pitched 3 days later in their semi- ... "Bullington injures pitching arm". The Madison Courier Daily Newspaper. September 2, 2014. Archived from the original on March 5 ... "Bullington's injury diagnosed". The Madison Courier Daily Newspaper. September 4, 2014. Archived from the original on March 5, ...
... internal injuries; multiple severe injuries, unconscious; loss of arm or leg (or part); other chest injury, not bruising; deep ... injuries to casualties who die 30 or more days after the accident from injuries sustained in that accident. Barclays Cycle Hire ... severe head injury, unconscious; severe chest injury, any difficulty breathing; ... Fatality and serious injury figures from Transport for London. Transport for London uses the Department for Transport's ...
2015-03-04). Sports injuries : prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. Berlin. ISBN 9783642368011. OCLC 1111734654 ... Gross anatomy of the upper arm and elbow. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Arm. Look up arm in Wiktionary, the free ... When the arm is fractured this may refer to a fracture of the humerus bone. Veins on the arm may be taken when a coronary ... The veins of the arm carry blood from the extremities of the limb, as well as drain the arm itself. The two main veins are the ...
He had "severe head and arm injuries". A September 2013 incident in New York City highlighted the possible dangers of remote ... Just like full sized helicopters, model helicopter rotors turn at high speeds and can cause severe injuries. Several deaths ...
Arm injuries limited Drott's effectiveness after 1957. He was drafted during the regular phase of the 1961 MLB Expansion Draft ...
Arm injuries plagued Hunter beginning in 1978. In spring training, he was diagnosed with diabetes and combined with his chronic ... Hunter noticed arm weakness while hunting in the winter of 1997-1998. He was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS ... Hunter retired at age 33 following the 1979 season, after developing persistent arm problems, and was inducted into the ... He left the game with a bruised foot and was eventually placed on the 21-day disabled list with the injury, not pitching again ...
"Armed Forces: Quick Skill". Time. July 14, 1967. Archived from the original on November 6, 2007. Retrieved April 26, 2010. US ... Tsui, Cl; Tsui, Kl; Tang, Yh (November 2010). "Ball Bearing (BB) Gun Injuries". Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine. 17 (5 ... A person wearing jeans at this distance would not sustain serious injury. However, even at this distance a BB still might ...
"Rowan suffers arm injury". WWE.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018. Johnson, Mike. "Rowan Update". PWInsider.com. Retrieved August ... Because of his injury, Harper was not drafted to either Raw or SmackDown in the 2016 WWE draft. Harper returned to the ring on ... On March 21, Harper suffered a knee injury during an untelevised match on Raw, sidelining him for five to six months. After ... Soon after, Harper took time off after undergoing surgery for a wrist injury. On March 9, 2019, Harper returned to in-ring ...
"Rowan suffers arm injury". WWE.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018. Johnson, Mike. "Rowan Update". PWInsider.com. Retrieved August ... Harper suffered a knee injury during a Raw dark match and it was reported that the injury would sideline him for five to six ... After four months of inactivity, Rowan returned from injury on the October 19 episode of Raw, when he filled in for Harper (who ... Harper and Rowan suffered injuries during the group's revival, causing the duo to go inactive in 2016. The duo reunited as a ...
"Rowan suffers arm injury". WWE.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018. Powell, Jason (January 27, 2019). "Powell's WWE Royal Rumble ... Rowan returned from injury at the Royal Rumble pay-per-view event on January 27, 2019, interfering on behalf of Daniel Bryan to ... These injuries resulted in the suspension of the feud between The Wyatt Family and The League of Nations. The Wyatt Family ( ... Rowan and Strowman were set to compete in a match at Payback, but Wyatt suffered a calf injury as well as Harper, who ...
Above the anterior arm attachment of the semimembranosus muscle tendon, the tibial attachment of the central arm of the POL is ... Acute grade III injuries with concomitant multiligament injuries or knee dislocation involving medial side injury should ... Medial knee injuries (those to the inside of the knee) are the most common type of knee injury. The medial ligament complex of ... Acute injuries are much easier to diagnose clinically, while chronic injuries may be less apparent due to difficulty in ...
One of the wounded - thirty-year-old nurse David Heffer - died from his injuries in hospital. It was the eighth IRA bomb in ... "IRA pub blast victim dies of his injuries". Independent.co.uk. 14 October 1992. Archived from the original on 25 May 2022. and ... and the first IRA pub bombing in Britain causing injuries since the Hare and Hounds pub bombing in Lower Boxley Road in Kent in ... toilets in the Sussex Arms pub in Upper St Martins Lane near Long Acre, London, killing a man and injuring seven other people. ...
Progressive muscular atrophy Yeoman, P. M.; Seddon, H. J. (August 1961). "Brachial Plexus Injuries: Treatment of the Flail Arm ... Wilkinson, M. C. P.; Birch, R.; Bonney, G. (1 October 1993). "Brachial plexus injury: when to amputate?". Injury. 24 (9): 603- ... A flail limb (also flail arm or flail leg) is a medical term which refers to an extremity in which the primary nerve has been ... The muscles soon wither away from atrophy, and the arm swings loosely at the side like a "dead weight."[citation needed] Flail ...
Arm injuries cut short his career in 1976. He earned induction into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1982, only the second ...
Miranda suffers a broken arm and minor injuries. Bridget dies from internal injuries in the hospital, which devastates Steve ...
There are numerous injuries including a broken arm. Reds' ownership covered all medical expenses for those injured. May 5 - ... An injury in mid-July effectively ends Walker's season and he is later released. No other African-American will play in the ...
3985 the Averting Loss of Life and Injury by Expediting SIVs (ALLIES) Act". House Armed Services Committee - Democrats. 2021-07 ... The Averting Loss of Life and Injury by Expediting SIVs Act (ALLIES) Act is a bipartisan piece of legislation would remove or ...
"Cold Injuries : The Chill Within". Medical Journal, Armed Forces India. 60 (2): 165-171. doi:10.1016/S0377-1237(04)80111-4. PMC ... immersion injuries, animal injuries) Food and water procurement and preparation Drown-proofing, swimming, flotation Special ... The charter of the committee was to find a suitable approach for preparing the U.S. armed forces to deal with the combat and ... Personnel in United States Armed Forces major branches: U.S. Army 471,513, U.S. Navy 325,802, U.S. Air Force 323,222, U.S. ...
Dhar, D (1 October 2007). "Retrospective Study of Injuries in Military Parachuting". Medical Journal Armed Forces India. 63 (4 ... "Arms Trade Registers". armstrade.sipri.org. Archived from the original on 2010-04-14. Retrieved 6 August 2017. "Joint Statement ... An agreement between the Omani and the British governments in 1958 led to the creation of the Sultan's Armed Forces (SAF) and ... "SIPRI arms transfer database". Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Archived from the original on 14 April 2010. ...
"Bonner has broken arm confirmed". BBC Sport. 29 September 2005. Retrieved 29 June 2016. "More injury woe for Bonner". ... In 2004, Bonner joined Oldham Athletic but suffered a career ending injury in September 2005 after breaking his arm in a match ... His arm was pinned back together and he was originally expected to be out for eight weeks. However, his arm failed to knit back ... He soon established himself in the side but after suffering from injury he was unable to reclaim his place and was allowed to ...
BlueJays prospect injury notes". Matz, Eddie (June 21, 2017). "Meet Brazil's Most Valuable Arm". espn.com. Retrieved December 3 ... He returned from the injury to start 2022 with Dunedin before being promoted to the High-A Vancouver Canadians, and later ...
Wilson's injury hindering arm rehab. MLB.com, April 29, 2008, Retrieved on December 3, 2008. Rehabbing Wilson files for free ... He reinjured his arm in early June during a rehab assignment. It required Tommy John surgery, ending his season. Minor leaguer ... However, Wilson was hampered by injuries towards the end of the 2004 season, and the Mets dealt him to the Detroit Tigers on ... After five arduous and injury riddled seasons in the Mets minor-league system, Wilson made his major-league debut on April 24, ...
The driver of the lorry suffered a broken arm. There were no further injuries. The bridge was used as the location for an East- ...
Despite their injuries, all four men escaped the plane and managed to clear the area before the Stinson caught fire and burned ... Smith suffered lacerations, a broken leg, jaw and arm. He was transported to Arlington Hospital. 1951: Model Airplane Meet. The ... He received minor injuries as a result of the accident. As early as 1956, Eakin Properties, Inc., the owners of the airport's ... 1953: Plane crash with injuries. Two people were injured when the Piper Cub they were flying struck a guy wire attached a high ...
Mining Publication: Risk Profile of Cumulative Trauma Disorders of the Arm and Hand in the U.S. Mining Industry U.S. CDC-NIOSH ... A repetitive strain injury (RSI) is an injury to part of the musculoskeletal or nervous system caused by repetitive use, ... RICE is used immediately after an injury happens and for the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury. These modalities can help ... "Repetitive Strain Injury: What is it and how is it caused?" (PDF). Selikoff Centers for Occupational Health. Archived from the ...
His injuries included a complex fracture of his arm. Following his convalescence, he was promoted to Leutnant (second ... and sustained minor injuries. On 1 June, II. Gruppe was withdrawn from the Channel Front and moved to Dortmund for conversion ...
For services to Armed Forces Personnel. Thomas Johnston Brown, Pipe Band Drummer and Instructor, Boghall and Bathgate Caledonia ... For services to People affected by Spinal Cord Injuries. Sandra Marie Garlick, Business Consultant, Woman Who. For services to ... For services to the Armed Forces. Martin Frank Jewell. For services to Business Start Ups and to Charity in Enfield, London. ... For services to the Armed Forces community. Craig Alexander Thomson, Founder, Craig Thomson Scholarship Award. For services to ...
Her injuries are critical; both legs and her right arm are crushed beyond repair. Severe head trauma also causes damage to her ... Her badly damaged arm, legs, and inner ear are replaced with state-of-the-art electronic prostheses. Upon learning of the ... She also has extraordinary strength in her bionic right arm and both legs, which enable her to run at speeds exceeding 60 miles ... Jaime Sommers is a former professional tennis star who suffers near-fatal injuries in a skydiving accident. Following cutting- ...
Understanding Mental Health Canadian Armed Forces Operational Stress Injury Social Support (OSISS) (Symptoms and signs of ... The word 'injury' was chosen to help shift the view of these disorders in order to extend to them the same legitimacy in ... Operational stress injury or OSI is a non-clinical, non-medical term referring to a persistent psychological difficulty caused ... The concept of operational stress injury is still emerging and evolving, and does not as of yet have a commonly accepted fixed ...
Overhead movement of the arms instigates pain. Falling on an outstretched arm and pulling on the shoulder, repetitive lifting ... Meniscus injuries: acute or repeated injury to the meniscus - the shock absorber of the knee - causes meniscus injuries. A ... Types of hard tissue injuries can include dental and bone injuries and are less frequent than soft tissue injuries in sport, ... and past injuries. If injuries have occurred in the past, the season analysis reviews the injury and looks for patterns that ...
116, 1983); (f) a member of the armed forces; or (g) an accompanying close relative of a member of the armed forces." ... The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme, 1995 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, A guide to the Criminal Injuries ... Part A of the CICA tariff covers injuries such as burns, paralysis, medically recognised illness, mental injury, peripheral ... Injuries claimed for must have been caused by a 'crime of violence'. Annex B of the 2012 scheme sets out what this means. The ...
Armed Man, 84, Fatally Shot by Police Outside City Hall in Indiana, WMAQ-TV, December 9, 2014. "Sheriff: Gunman dies after ... "Teen dies of injuries in Phoenix officer shooting". Arizona Republic. Retrieved December 20, 2014. "Marshalltown Police Fatally ... "LAPD Kills Armed Man After He Stabs Woman". ABC7.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. Limon, Janice. "Sheriff: Suicidal man points ... "Man Allegedly Armed With Knife Fatally Shot by LAPD Officers at Hollywood and Highland". KTLA5. Retrieved 6 December 2014. ...
Health Information on Arm Injuries and Disorders: MedlinePlus Multiple Languages Collection ... Arm Injuries and Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Lesiones y enfermedades del brazo: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus ...
Jack Jablonski, 16, Moves Arms Against All Odds After Severe HS Hockey Injuries. By IBTimes Staff Reporter @julia_greenberg 01/ ... Eight days since the game, Jablonski has moved his arms, can flex his left elbow and can move his right arm away from his body ... The former high school hockey players serious injuries will require support for months as he learns to live with his injuries ... Galicich believes Jablonskis injuries were caused when he tucked his chin after being checked from behind into a board at a ...
Tottenhams World Cup-winning goalkeeper Hugo Lloris had to be stretchered off the field after suffering a horrific arm injury ... 1 keepers injury couldnt have been worse for Spurs, which is off to a dreadful start this season after reaching the Champions ... Lloriss arm appeared to buckle underneath him as he landed. He immediately grabbed the appendage and started screaming in pain ... Because based on the apparent severity of Lloris injury, Gazzaniga figures to be be wearing the gloves for Tottenham for the ...
... officers were dispatched to the 2000 block of South 57th Street in response to a report of an armed robbery. ... Around 10:45 p.m. Saturday, officers were dispatched to the 2000 block of South 57th Street in response to a report of an armed ... TEMPLE, Texas - The Temple Police Department is asking for the publics help in locating an armed robbery aspect. ...
Corey Kluber injury update: Indians ace (broken arm) ramps up mound work ... It was just the second time Kluber, 33, threw off the mound since being struck on the right arm by a line drive off the bat of ...
Tennis star Kvitova recovering from arm injury Prostejov (Czech Republic), March 22 (IANS) Czech tennis star Petra Kvitová has ... Tennis star Kvitova recovering from arm injury. Prostejov (Czech Republic), March 22 (IANS) Czech tennis star Petra Kvitová has ... revealed that she has been working hard on her recovery from the left arm injury she suffered after being attacked by a knife- ... The two-time Wimbledon champion received stab wounds in her left arm and the 26-year-old had to undergo surgery on December 21. ...
Cold injuries are of significant military concern because of their adverse impact on operations and the high financial costs of ... Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. Update: Cold weather injuries, active and reserve component, U.S. Armed Forces, July ... The term cold injuries is used to describe injuries that have a central effect, such as hypothermia, as well as injuries that ... Update: Cold Injuries, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2017-June 2022 A U.S. Marine with the Winter ...
Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. Update: Cold weather injuries, active and reserve component, U.S. Armed Forces, July ... Update: Cold Weather Injuries, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2016-June 2020 A student participates in ... Update: Cold Weather Injuries, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2016-June 2020 ... Cold injuries, active duty, U.S. Armed Forces, July 1999-June 2004. MSMR. 2004;10(5):2-10. ...
Surveillance Snapshot: Illness and Injury Burdens, Reserve Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018 Navy Sailors graduate from boot ... Surveillance Snapshot: Illness and Injury Burdens, Recruit Trainees, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2019. ... Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, ... Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, ...
Military injury claims and compensation help from Irwin Mitchell Solicitors - Award winning military lawyers. No Win No Fee ... Working in the armed forces comes with a unique set of risks. Accidents and injuries can happen in any number of ways. Weve ... Serving in the armed forces is, by its very nature, a dangerous job and its generally accepted that accidents and injuries ... The Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) is a government scheme that provides compensation for injury, illness and death ...
Surveillance snapshot: Illness and injury burdens, reserve component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2021 Army 1st Lt. Nicholas Wankum, a ... This annual estimate of illness- and injury-related morbidity and health care burdens on the U.S. Armed Forces and MHS updates ... Surveillance Snapshot: Illness and Injury Burdens Among Reserve Component Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2022 ... Surveillance snapshot: Illness and injury burdens, reserve component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2021 ...
2,500 Settlement for Failure to Treat Broken Arm and Shoulder Injury Loaded on Oct. 4, 2020 Filed under: Pain, Skeletal Injury ... Norman saw an orthopedic surgeon in August 2015 concerning a rotator cuff injury, and it was determined that his arm was broken ... Systemic Medical Neglect, Failure to Treat, Settlements, Death/Bodily Injury. * $2.125 Million Paid So Far for Virginia ... The attack resulted in a broken arm. Norman reported to medical but was told by a guard, "Youre not bleeding to death. Go back ...
Kouzmanoff explains his arm injury when he jammed it diving on a ball ... Share All sharing options for: Kouzmanoff wanted to hide his arm injury ... Kouz tested his arm this off season by throwing a pebble at the beach. This reminds me of when a friend tested if he was sober ... Kouz didnt want to come out of the game even though he could barely move his arm let alone throw the ball to first ...
Acute Upper Arm Injury In An Adolescent Tennis Player ... Quite The Racquet: Acute Upper Arm Injury In An Adolescent ...
In this short video, learn how to strengthen your back without pain or risk of injury. ... Strengthen Your Back Without Pain or Injury. A well-executed one arm dumbbell row builds a strong back. It all strengthens your ... 4. One Arm Dumbbell Row: This exercise builds a strong back. It also strengthens your shoulders, upper arms, and core. Youll ... The One Arm Dumbbell Row exercise builds a strong back. It also strengthens your shoulders, upper arms, and core. Youll be ...
A member of our team will be in touch as soon as possible. If you need immediate assistance, please give us a call at (800) 749-2184.. ...
Female Figure with Brain Injury, and Cervical, Lumbar, Arm, and Leg Fractures - Image ...
Tim Tszyus title defence bout against Mexican Carlos Ocampo in doubt after shock arm injury forces emergency surgery. ... Tszyu was reported to have been bitten by a dog on his right arm on Sunday before he was rushed to hospital and underwent ... The interim WBO super welterweight champion is set to defend his title against Mexican Carlos Ocampo on June 18 and the injury ... Australian boxing champion Tim Tszyus first title defence fight is in doubt after he suffered a shock injury just three weeks ...
... including a fracture in the humerus and an anterior ligamentous labrum injury. Although Oliveira and his doctors have decided ... Miguel Oliveira will miss the French Grand Prix due to arm injuries he suffered when he was knocked down by Fabio Quartararo at ... Teams Miguel Oliveira has unfortunately been forced to withdraw from the upcoming French Grand Prix due to a shoulder injury ... further assessments revealed a more severe injury, including a fracture in the humerus and an anterior ligamentous labrum ...
BATHS Wales international number eight Taulupe Faletau is set to miss the Six Nations with a broken arm. ... Baths Wales international number eight Taulupe Faletau set to miss Six Nations with arm injury. ... BATHS Wales international number eight Taulupe Faletau is set to miss the Six Nations with a broken arm. ... That match marked Faletaus return from another broken arm sustained in October. ...
Two walking wounded; one with arm injury and one child with v. small cut.. by officialwmas. March 11, 2013. Leave a comment ...
STandard versus Accelerated initiation of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury (STARRT-AKI): UK arm of a multi- ...
A doctor can diagnose a broken arm with a physical exam and X-rays. Typically, the injury is treated with a cast to stabilize ... Treating a Broken Arm After a Car Accident. There are three major bones in the arm: the humerus, the radius, and the ulna. ... After a car accident, signs that indicate a broken arm include swelling, pain when moving the arm, decreased sensation, and/or ... It can take three to six months for a broken arm to heal, with a cast being worn for four to six weeks. Children and young ...
Police in Leyland are looking for a man and his dog after a young girl was hospitalised with arm injuries. ... Here, a young girl was left with injuries to her arm that saw her need hospital treatment. ... Leyland girl left with arm injuries after incident with dog and its owner. ... Passers-by bravely tried to save Andrew Courtney Parkers life but he had suffered catastrophic injuries including a crushed ...
As injuries due to firearms are common in most areas of the United States, skill in the interpretation of these injuries is ... Modern Small Arms. Modern small arms may be classified generally into handguns, rifles, and shotguns. [2] Automatic weapons ( ... 1] As injuries due to firearms are common in most areas of the United States, skill in the interpretation of these injuries is ... Type and extent of the injuries inflicted by the projectile(s). The types of injuries caused by firearm wounds have ...
Upper Arm Fractures - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Symptoms of Upper Arm Fractures The shoulder and upper arm are painful and swollen. People cannot easily raise their arm. ... Fracturing the Upper Arm. Fractures that occur in the upper part of the upper arm bone (humerus) cause pain in the shoulder ... Upper arm fractures usually result from a fall on an outstretched arm. Sometimes they result from a direct blow. Usually, the ...
Evidence-based orthopedic app with 450 tests, 120 manual techniques, and 1300 references to help you improve treatments, techniques, and results!. Get iOrtho+® Premium App ...
Contact Block Sports Physical Therapy in Hauppauge for throwing arm injuries. Our expert team will help you recover. ... Throwing Arm Injuries For Athletes. Whether youre an amateur or professional athlete, you put your body through tremendous ... If you are dealing with a throwing arm injury, Block Sports Chiropractic & Physical Therapy is here to help! Our treatment ... Block Sports Chiropractic & Physical Therapy would like to discuss common throwing arm injuries for athletes and how we can ...
Home / Media / Throwing Arm Injuries In Young Adults Throwing Arm Injuries in Young Adults. ... Learn more by viewing the complete article, Throwing Arm Injuries in Young Athletes in the January, 2018, issue of Chapel Hill ... Parents have a responsibility to understand these issues as prevention is the main factor in maintaining the arm health of ... Throwing athletes, baseball pitchers, specifically, risk injuries to the shoulder and elbow with this early specialization. ...
Notice-To municipality-Claim for injuries-Gate arm projecting onto roadway, Secondary Sources ... Notice-To municipality-Claim for injuries-Gate arm projecting onto roadway. AMJUR PP HIGHWAYS § 22American Jurisprudence ... Notice-To municipality-Claim for injuries-Gate arm projecting onto roadway. AMJUR PP HIGHWAYS § 22American Jurisprudence ... Notice-To municipality-Claim for injuries-Gate arm projecting onto roadway, Secondary Sources ...
  • You may suffered broken bones, an elbow injury, a broken wrist, soft tissue injuries or even an amputation. (claims.co.uk)
  • ALL ABOUT COMFORT: We know it could be unpleasant with a shoulder or elbow injury. (braceup.com)
  • The number of cold injuries associated with overseas deployments during the 2021-2022 cold season (n=13) was similar to the two previous cold seasons (10 in 2019-2020 and 11 in 2020-2021). (health.mil)
  • The crude overall incidence rate of cold injury for all active component service members in 2020-2021 (35.4 per 100,000 person-years [p-yrs]) was higher than the rate for the 2019-2020 cold season (27.5 per 100,000 p-yrs). (health.mil)
  • Dalton Everhart made in his range of motion since the recruiter came to the emergency department after an injury nearly a month before this September 2019 visit (U.S. Army photo). (health.mil)
  • From July 2018 through June 2019, a total of 513 members of the active (n=446) and reserve (n=67) components had at least 1 medical encounter with a primary diagnosis of cold injury. (health.mil)
  • The crude overall incidence rate of cold injury for all active component service members in 2018-2019 (36.5 per 100,000 person-years [p-yrs]) was slightly higher than the rate for the 2017-2018 cold season (35.8 per 100,000 p-yrs) and was the highest rate during the 5-year surveillance period. (health.mil)
  • The number of cold injuries associated with overseas deployments during the 2018-2019 cold season (n=24) was the highest count during the 5-year surveillance period. (health.mil)
  • For all active component service members, the rate of cold weather injuries in 2018-2019 was the highest of the last 5 seasons. (health.mil)
  • The study found that, over a 27-year period (1992 to 2019), 17,865 persons were killed in a workplace homicide, according to data from BLS's Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. (cdc.gov)
  • About 529,000 nonfatal injuries from workplace violence were treated in hospital emergency departments (EDs) for the combined 2015 to 2019 period, based on data from NIOSH's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-Occupational Supplement. (cdc.gov)
  • Serving in the armed forces is, by its very nature, a dangerous job and it's generally accepted that accidents and injuries will happen in the line of duty. (irwinmitchell.com)
  • Car accidents and other traumatic injuries can compress the thoracic outlet as well as the vessels and nerves in this area. (healthline.com)
  • At least, we think we do - even at low speed, car accidents can cause injuries that take some time to appear. (completechiropractic.co.uk)
  • Our attorneys will always fight diligently for clients, particularly if they or their loved ones were involved in serious auto accidents that caused life-changing or fatal injuries . (zucker-regev.com)
  • In major accidents, it is possible for a motorcyclist to experience some sort of spinal cord injury. (zucker-regev.com)
  • While immediate medical attention successfully repositioned his dislocated left shoulder, further assessments revealed a more severe injury, including a fracture in the humerus and an anterior ligamentous labrum injury. (roadracingworld.com)
  • There are three major bones in the arm: the humerus, the radius, and the ulna. (nbalawfirm.com)
  • Upper arm fractures occur at the upper end of the upper arm bone (humerus), affecting the shoulder joint. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Fractures that occur in the upper part of the upper arm bone (humerus) cause pain in the shoulder because the upper arm bone is part of the shoulder joint. (msdmanuals.com)
  • If you have experienced a work-related injury, you can talk with one of our experienced Schenectady workers' compensation lawyers. (thesilvermanfirm.com)
  • For more information about you legal options following a serious motorcycle accident or any type of motor vehicle collision, be sure to contact our personal injury lawyers today. (zucker-regev.com)
  • Whatever the circumstances of the accident, a good starting point is to speak to someone from our team during a free case evaluation to learn how our personal injury lawyers can help. (loncarlyonjenkins.com)
  • Our personal injury lawyers have many years of experience in evaluating the financial impact of an accident. (loncarlyonjenkins.com)
  • These fracture cause pain and swelling in the shoulder and upper arm and limit movement of the arm. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The upper arm bone may fracture in different places. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Upper arm fractures usually result from a fall on an outstretched arm. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Doctors diagnose upper arm fractures based on x-rays and sometimes computed tomography. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Fractures usually result from injuries or overuse. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Upper arm fractures are common among older people. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Common elbow injuries may include elbow sprain, nerve injury, soft tissue injury, and extremity fractures. (360relief.co.uk)
  • Or you may have slowly developed a condition such as repetitive strain injury. (claims.co.uk)
  • A method for characterizing repetitive upper arm motions in apple harvesting and a comparison between working with ladders and mobile platforms. (cdc.gov)
  • If you've been injured, or if a loved one has died, because of a military accident where safety measures have not been followed, then our solicitors could help you claim military injury compensation. (irwinmitchell.com)
  • We've helped hundreds of injured personnel from all parts of the armed forces claim compensation. (irwinmitchell.com)
  • If you've suffered a broken arm in an accident caused by another driver's negligence, you are entitled to compensation for the damages you've incurred. (nbalawfirm.com)
  • If you or a loved one have an arm or hand injury, due to another person's carelessness or negligence, a California personal injury lawyer from Johnson Attorneys Group can work with you to help ensure your rights are fully protected and that you obtain fair compensation. (californiainjuryaccidentlawyer.com)
  • What Kinds of Compensation Are Available for a Hand or Arm Injury? (californiainjuryaccidentlawyer.com)
  • Thankfully, the law allows you to make an arm injury claim for compensation for arm injuries if it was someone else's fault. (claims.co.uk)
  • We'll partner you with a specialist personal injury solicitor for a free initial consultation about claiming arm injury compensation on a no win no fee basis. (claims.co.uk)
  • It's only fair that your compensation reflects the full extent of how serious the injury is and its effect. (claims.co.uk)
  • It's possible that you have severe injuries and are experiencing permanent and substantial disablement - which must be reflected in your compensation amount. (claims.co.uk)
  • Call 518-631-4521 or contact us online for a free initial consultation with a New York work injury compensation attorney. (thesilvermanfirm.com)
  • A personal injury lawyer can help you pursue compensation if you were injured or became ill and someone else was responsible. (loncarlyonjenkins.com)
  • Claiming compensation for an accident caused by someone else may seem like a daunting experience for many people, especially while recovering from their injuries. (loncarlyonjenkins.com)
  • If you want to take legal action to claim compensation for a personal injury, it is beneficial to get advice from a lawyer specializing in these cases. (loncarlyonjenkins.com)
  • The purpose of these case studies is solely to establish the importance of each client's experience with Phoenix Accident and Injury Law Firm and our ability to fight on their behalf for optimal personal injury compensation. (classactioninjurylaw.com)
  • Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a no-cost-to-workers, slip-resistant footwear (SRF) program in preventing workers' compensation injury claims caused by slipping on wet or greasy floors. (cdc.gov)
  • Logistic regression was used to analyze dichotomous response data (injured based on workers' compensation injury claims data, or not injured, for each month worked). (cdc.gov)
  • Conclusions: This study provides evidence for the effectiveness of a no-cost-to-workers SRF program in reducing slipping-related workers' compensation injury claims in food service workers. (cdc.gov)
  • Among active component members during the 2017-2022 cold seasons, overall rates of cold injuries were generally highest among male service members, non-Hispanic Black service members, the youngest (less than 20 years old), and those who were enlisted. (health.mil)
  • Frostbite accounted for more than half (n=9) of the cold injuries identified in service members deployed outside of the U.S. during the 2021-2022 cold season. (health.mil)
  • For all active component service members, the rate of cold injuries in 2021-2022 decreased slightly compared to the previous cold year. (health.mil)
  • The number of cold injuries associated with deployment during 2021-2022 was similar to the two preceding cold years. (health.mil)
  • Cold injuries are of significant military concern because of their adverse impact on operations and the high financial costs of treatment and disability. (health.mil)
  • 3-8 Although these measures are highly effective, cold injuries have continued to affect hundreds of service members each year because of exposure to cold and wet environments. (health.mil)
  • The term cold injuries is used to describe injuries that have a central effect, such as hypothermia, as well as injuries that primarily affect the peripheries of the body, such as frostbite and immersion injuries. (health.mil)
  • The number of cold injuries associated with deploy-ment during 2020-2021 was the same as last cold year and lower than the preceding cold years. (health.mil)
  • As noted in prior MSMR updates, the rate of all cold injuries among active component Army members was higher in women than in men because of a much higher rate of frostbite among female soldiers. (health.mil)
  • The commonplace occurrence of arm surgery amongst professional pitchers reflects the cumulative wear and tear caused by repeatedly throwing a small white ball at high speeds. (espn.com)
  • In the AJSM study, reconstructed pitchers were followed for seven consecutive seasons and demonstrated no significant change in mean ERA or WHIP when compared to their pre-injury numbers. (espn.com)
  • By and large, though, pitchers keep blowing out their arms at an alarming rate. (jaegersports.com)
  • Although hockey-related injuries can occur from a number of incidents, there has been increased encouragement for young players to be aggressive on the ice. (ibtimes.com)
  • What types of arm injuries occur? (claims.co.uk)
  • CryptoDATA RNF MotoGP Team's Miguel Oliveira has unfortunately been forced to withdraw from the upcoming French Grand Prix due to a shoulder injury sustained during the Spanish Grand Prix. (roadracingworld.com)
  • These kinds of injuries need to be taken very seriously as major spinal cord injuries can cause paraplegia or quadriplegia. (zucker-regev.com)
  • Descriptive analysis was performed us- injuries leading to paraplegia and quadriple- ing SPSS software, version 10.0 for Win- gia. (who.int)
  • However, most of the injuries are soft tissue injuries, including sprains in elbow joints. (360relief.co.uk)
  • From July 2021 through June 2022, a total of 482 members of the active (n=435) and reserve (n=47) components had at least 1 cold injury. (health.mil)
  • The crude overall incidence rate of cold injury for all active component service members in 2021-2022 (33.1 per 100,000 person-years [p-yrs]) was slightly lower than the rate for the 2020-2021 cold season (35.5 per 100,000 p-yrs). (health.mil)
  • In 2021-2022, frostbite was the most common type of cold injury among active component service members in all 4 services. (health.mil)
  • This Surveillance Snapshot depicts, in two graphs, the health care burdens due to illness and injury among reserve component members of the U.S. Coast Guard in 2022. (health.mil)
  • While doctors claimed that Jack Jablonski would never walk again, the 16-year-old high school hockey player, who severely injured his spinal cord during a game, has made great strides in recovery and is already moving his arms. (ibtimes.com)
  • Jablonski's spinal cord was severed at the neck and he is unable to move his legs, but has slight movement in his hands, right arm and shoulders. (ibtimes.com)
  • A new technique in which working nerves are rerouted to paralyzed sites in patients with spinal cord injury provides patients with significant functional improvement in upper limb and hand function and is being described as "a game changer. (medscape.com)
  • The ability to use their hands for functions like this is what spinal cord injury patients want most - more so than being able to walk," she added. (medscape.com)
  • Many spinal cord injury patients still have the ability to move their shoulders, bend their elbows and expand their wrists - this means we have the nerves to these muscles at our disposal," she said. (medscape.com)
  • We have been doing this for peripheral nerve and brachial plexus injuries for many years, but its use in spinal cord injury only started recently, and before this publication there have only been single cases reported. (medscape.com)
  • I was doing a lot of brachial plexus nerve transfer surgeries and I thought it might work in spinal cord injury so we started doing it and found good results. (medscape.com)
  • She notes that tendon transfer is already an established technique for patients with spinal cord injury, but nerve transfer gives different benefits. (medscape.com)
  • The authors note that cervical spinal cord injury is a devastating, life-changing injury, which affects 250,000-500,000 people worldwide each year, with more than 50% of these injuries resulting in tetraplegia. (medscape.com)
  • 18 months post-injury) cervical spinal cord injury of motor level C5 and below who underwent single or multiple nerve transfers in one or both upper limbs, sometimes combined with tendon transfers, for restoration of elbow extension, grasp, pinch, and hand opening. (medscape.com)
  • 1,2 In response, the U.S. Armed Forces have developed and improved training, doctrine, procedures, and protective equipment and clothing to counter the threat from cold environments. (health.mil)
  • A number of the solicitors in our military injury team are former service personnel, giving us specialised insight into dealing with the MoD, as well as the concerns many members of the armed forces have when making a military accident claim. (irwinmitchell.com)
  • In particular, we understand the extent to which armed forces personnel rely on service benefits and earnings. (irwinmitchell.com)
  • The Medical Surveillance Monthly Report, a peer-reviewed journal launched in 1995, is the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division's flagship publication. (health.mil)
  • 1) Creating two separate screening questions for poison and injury forces the respondent to equally consider injuries and poisonings. (cdc.gov)
  • Eight days since the game, Jablonski has moved his arms, can flex his left elbow and can move his right arm away from his body, all movements doctors initially did not think he would be able to do following the accident. (ibtimes.com)
  • After a car accident, signs that indicate a broken arm include swelling, pain when moving the arm, decreased sensation, and/or an inability to move the limb. (nbalawfirm.com)
  • If you've injured your arm in an accident that was somebody else's fault, it can be particularly frustrating. (claims.co.uk)
  • However the accident occurred, an arm injury can really take its toll on your daily life so it's really important to get medical treatment as soon as it happens. (claims.co.uk)
  • Injuries to the arm can happen as a result of a fall, something falling on to it, an accident at work, trapping your arm, a sudden impact or as a result of other injuries that go on to cause pain in the arm. (ibbotsonbrady.co.uk)
  • Motorcyclists are exposed, and when involved in a single-vehicle accident or a collision with another vehicle, the possibility of major injuries with lasting repercussions is very high. (zucker-regev.com)
  • This basic safety gear can prevent or minimize the following injuries that motorcyclists often experience following an accident. (zucker-regev.com)
  • Keep in mind that even if you are wearing a helmet, you can still suffer a concussion or another kind of head injury if the accident is severe. (zucker-regev.com)
  • For the protection of our clients' identities, Phoenix Accident and Injury Law Firm uses initials to represent the victim in each case. (classactioninjurylaw.com)
  • The top injury attorneys at Phoenix Accident and Injury Law Firm near you have more than 15 years of experience in helping clients who need medical treatment after a bicycle accident. (classactioninjurylaw.com)
  • 9 Moreover, the response includes constriction of the peripheral (superficial) vascular system, which may result in non-freezing injuries or hasten the onset of actual freezing of tissues (frostbite). (health.mil)
  • frostbite accounted for most such injuries. (health.mil)
  • TEMPLE, Texas - The Temple Police Department is asking for the public's help in locating an armed robbery aspect. (kxxv.com)
  • Around 10:45 p.m. Saturday, officers were dispatched to the 2000 block of South 57th Street in response to a report of an armed robbery. (kxxv.com)
  • These exercises are done even if the arm is in a sling or in a sling and swathe (as it usually is). (msdmanuals.com)
  • 360 Relief Arm Sling is a great support to treat lower arm injuries and discomfort. (360relief.co.uk)
  • Recover in comfort with the arm sling from BraceUP. (braceup.com)
  • Our arm sling features a wide, cushioned shoulder strap for maximum comfort. (braceup.com)
  • EASILY ADJUST: The arm sling can be easily adjusted with one hand, so you can achieve a customized fit even after putting on the sling. (braceup.com)
  • Depending on the circumstances, there is a wide range of arm and wrist injuries and conditions which can affect your lower or upper arm. (claims.co.uk)
  • E.K. sustained injuries primarily to his back and wrist when his bicycle was struck by the at-fault driver. (classactioninjurylaw.com)
  • Now, we can explain away the arm injury epidemic any number of ways. (jaegersports.com)
  • The two-time Wimbledon champion received stab wounds in her left arm and the 26-year-old had to undergo surgery on December 21. (mangalorean.com)
  • Surgery was recommended for the rotator cuff injury, but upon the filing of the complaint on February 29, 2016, that surgery had not been approved or conducted by FDC. (prisonlegalnews.org)
  • Tszyu was reported to have been bitten by a dog on his right arm on Sunday before he was rushed to hospital and underwent surgery that evening, Fox Sports reported. (skynews.com.au)
  • Australian boxer Tim Tszyu has undergone emergency surgery on his arm just weeks out from his bout against Carlos Ocampo. (skynews.com.au)
  • No pitcher wants to hear he needs surgery on his throwing arm, but if the damage is severe enough, it may be unavoidable. (espn.com)
  • It was just the second time Kluber, 33, threw off the mound since being struck on the right arm by a line drive off the bat of Marlins outfielder Brian Anderson in a game May 1. (sportingnews.com)
  • I've been so busy with work (and am still struggling with pain in my right arm/shoulder) that I've not managed to blog as much as I'd hoped this week. (fatgirltoironman.co.uk)
  • Occasionally, a nerve is damaged, causing numbness in the upper arm. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Arm wrestling seems harmless, but it can cause various injuries such as connective tissue, muscles, joints, and nerve injuries. (360relief.co.uk)
  • We often do tendon transfer in one arm and nerve transfer in the other. (medscape.com)
  • The aims were to, in a clinical setting, assess the concordance between the SWS and the ICC neurosensory severity grading of vibration injury, and to present the clinical picture according to symptoms, type of affected nerve fibres and the relation between vascular and neurosensory manifestations. (lu.se)
  • From minor to fatal injuries, we stand by our clients during difficult times. (thesilvermanfirm.com)
  • It all strengthens your shoulders, upper arms, and core. (pritikin.com)
  • The increased pressure on the blood vessels and nerves may cause pain in your shoulders, neck, and arms. (healthline.com)
  • You might also have a limited range of motion in your shoulders and arms. (healthline.com)
  • Your doctor will ask you to move your neck, shoulders, and arms in different positions. (healthline.com)
  • If you or a loved one has sustained this kind of injury due to another person's carelessness or negligence, remember that there is limited time to make a personal injury claim in the California civil court. (californiainjuryaccidentlawyer.com)
  • At the Law Firm of Zucker & Regev in Brooklyn, NY , we represent victims of negligence, medical malpractice , wrongful death , and other personal injury cases with dozens of verdicts worth over $1 million. (zucker-regev.com)
  • For all active component service mem-bers, the rate of cold weather injuries in 2020-2021 increased compared to the previous cold year. (health.mil)
  • Because based on the apparent severity of Lloris' injury, Gazzaniga figures to be be wearing the gloves for Tottenham for the next couple of months. (yahoo.com)
  • Due to the severity of this type of injury, especially among the young, effective preventive efforts may be necessary. (who.int)
  • Kouzmanoff can now throw a ball to first base with "pretty close" the same velocity he could before the injury. (gaslampball.com)
  • Part 4 of 4 This is the fourth and final part of a four-part series covering the potential impact of velocity and arm injuries. (joeldbradley.com)
  • Part 3 of 4 Part three of a four-part series looking at the potential impact of velocity and arm injuries "OLD HOSS" The historical time line of baseball has incredible value when trying to piece together answers as to current conditions within the game. (joeldbradley.com)
  • Tommy's Got A Gun: Does Velocity Influence Arm Injuries? (joeldbradley.com)
  • Part 2 of 4 Part two of a four-part series looking at the potential impact of velocity and arm injuries. (joeldbradley.com)
  • Galicich claims the injuries suffered are more common that one might think. (ibtimes.com)
  • Decades of experience in personal injury claims. (claims.co.uk)
  • To find out about the no win no fee personal injury claims process, get in touch with our advisors for free legal advice on 0800 234 6438 , or use our contact form and request a call back. (claims.co.uk)
  • When exploring injury claims, our goal is to help get you the support you need to overcome the injury itself, and then to rebuild your life in its aftermath. (ibbotsonbrady.co.uk)
  • The offender was armed in 16% of nonfatal workplace violence. (cdc.gov)
  • Offenders were armed in about 24% of nonfatal workplace violence against workers in retail sales and in 24% of nonfatal workplace violence against those in transportation occupations. (cdc.gov)
  • Overall, 12% of nonfatal workplace violence involved injury to the victim. (cdc.gov)
  • However, nearly a quarter (23%) of nonfatal workplace violence against workers in medical occupations resulted in victim injury. (cdc.gov)
  • Our law firm will provide you an experienced and aggressive lawyer in a personal injury case, to stand up to the insurance companies and win every dollar that you deserve for your injuries. (californiainjuryaccidentlawyer.com)
  • Sports physical therapy in Hauppauge can help throwing athletes both prevent and recover from these common injuries. (blockchiropt.com)
  • The purpose of cognitive testing was to 1) provide insight as to why NHIS estimates of poisonings and injuries appear to be dropping while other estimates (such as emergency room visits) are holding steady and propose changes that would likely improve estimates, and 2) identify questions that contribute to inefficient use of interview time and propose changes that would likely reduce overall burden. (cdc.gov)
  • DSN: CC37.NHIS90.HPDPCHLD ABSTRACT 1990 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP) Injury Control and Child Safety and Health File (ICCSH) 1. (cdc.gov)
  • The 1990 Injury Control and Child Safety and Health (ICCSH) file contains the portions of the 1990 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP) that were related to child health and safety. (cdc.gov)
  • 5. The response rate for the Injury Control and Child Safety and Health portion of the NHIS-HPDP was 82.7 percent. (cdc.gov)
  • Block Sports Chiropractic & Physical Therapy would like to discuss common throwing arm injuries for athletes and how we can help! (blockchiropt.com)
  • If you are dealing with a throwing arm injury, Block Sports Chiropractic & Physical Therapy is here to help! (blockchiropt.com)
  • From exercise physiologists Ivan Ferran, Jamie Costello, and Jackie Gavino at the Pritikin Longevity Center, get tips on how to strengthen your back without pain or risk of injury. (pritikin.com)
  • A well-executed one arm dumbbell row builds a strong back. (pritikin.com)
  • Blood vessels, nerves, and muscles that extend from the back to the arms pass through this area. (healthline.com)
  • Furthermore, we can openly wonder whether year-round baseball at the youth level is compounding the problem, putting undue duress on young arms that can come back to haunt them eventually, if not immediately. (jaegersports.com)
  • He had head and back injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Military training and combat operations will require continued emphasis on effective cold injury prevention strategies and adherence to the policies and procedures in place to protect service members against such injuries. (health.mil)
  • Elliott has worked with athletes in the Olympic Training Center and the Australian Institute of Sport, he's served as a physiologist and injury prevention specialist to the New England Patriots, he's been a consultant for the Utah Jazz and, more pointedly, he's served as baseball's first Director of Sports Science and Performance, for the Seattle Mariners. (jaegersports.com)
  • During arm-wrestling, muscles, tendons, and elbow ligaments are at higher risk of injuries. (360relief.co.uk)
  • The arm is a complex structure of bone, ligaments and muscles starting at the top of the shoulder. (ibbotsonbrady.co.uk)
  • You need to stop playing further and avoid overhead activities, allowing your injuries to heal properly. (360relief.co.uk)
  • But many of us don't fully understand, or appreciate, the benefits of strength (also called resistance) exercises such as the one arm dumbbell row. (pritikin.com)
  • Sometimes, arm wrestlers also need physical therapy, helping improve the strength and the elbows' range of motion. (360relief.co.uk)
  • Strength and conditioning and nutrition are tied in when we begin to understand how to maximize power through good movement patterns (poor movements get exposed in the weight room) and how strength and muscle mass work to help stabilize your joints helping to minimize the risk of Baseball Arm Injury. (topvelocity.net)
  • [ 1 ] As injuries due to firearms are common in most areas of the United States, skill in the interpretation of these injuries is vitally important for the practitioner of forensic pathology. (medscape.com)
  • Through proper strengthening, stretching, and form instruction, sports physical therapy in Hauppauge can help prevent common injuries while helping you reach peak performance levels safely. (blockchiropt.com)
  • common, and so little is known about the length of hospital stay and source of reim- characteristics of this type of injury. (who.int)
  • An injured arm or hand can prevent the victim from doing virtually any work, and from performing even the most basic necessary daily tasks-even such as eating, or drinking fluids, or just holding an object, or tying a shoe-much less more involved activities, like driving or working to earn a living. (californiainjuryaccidentlawyer.com)
  • If you are the victim of a personal injury or medical malpractice case, we want to help you. (zucker-regev.com)
  • 360 Relief Elbow Support provides a snug, yet flexible fit which helps muscles and reduce the risk of injuries. (360relief.co.uk)
  • The results of an injury to the arm can include a number of problems, such as a break, to any one of the bones in the arm or the elbow, damage to the muscles or the tendons and many other conditions. (ibbotsonbrady.co.uk)
  • When the elbow has reached the height of the body and the scapula has moved as far as possible toward the spine, slowly lower the elbow until the arm is straight. (pritikin.com)
  • From this position, begin to slowly bring one arm directly toward your rib cage at a 90-degree angle. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Slowly bring one arm upward in a straight line, trying to keep your arm close to your ear throughout the movement. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • You will work in the garden, rearrange the furniture, or roughhouse with the kids with less likelihood of stiffness, pain, or injury. (pritikin.com)
  • This leaves you more susceptible to injuries that require the help of sports physical therapy in Hauppauge. (blockchiropt.com)
  • Legs, feet and arms have different values as far as the length of time benefits are received is concerned. (thesilvermanfirm.com)
  • This is why fully covering up your arms and legs with sturdy gear is so important. (zucker-regev.com)
  • Even mild arm injuries, such as a sprained muscle, can be very wearing and prevent you undertaking your usual hobbies or work activities. (claims.co.uk)
  • Once a percentage of loss is determined related to the work injury , the injured party is provided benefits for a set amount of weeks. (thesilvermanfirm.com)
  • Regardless, if you don't work to correct your deficiencies you will never maximize your performance and you will burn through your joints at an accelerated rate which will eventually lead to baseball arm injury. (topvelocity.net)
  • Corizon Health agreed to pay $2,500 to a prisoner for failing to treat his broken arm. (prisonlegalnews.org)
  • The attack resulted in a broken arm. (prisonlegalnews.org)
  • BATH'S Wales international number eight Taulupe Faletau is set to miss the Six Nations with a broken arm. (wiltshiretimes.co.uk)
  • That match marked Faletau's return from another broken arm sustained in October. (wiltshiretimes.co.uk)
  • A doctor can diagnose a broken arm with a physical exam and X-rays. (nbalawfirm.com)
  • It can take three to six months for a broken arm to heal, with a cast being worn for four to six weeks. (nbalawfirm.com)
  • Forida receiver Solomon Patton suffered a broken arm early against Georgia on Saturday. (sbnation.com)
  • When you feel any symptoms after arm wrestling, consult your GP immediately. (360relief.co.uk)
  • Sprains in elbow joints can heal within 2 to 3 weeks following an injury by wearing an elbow brace. (360relief.co.uk)
  • It's instinctual for people to hold out their arms to brace for impact and help break the fall, and in doing so, the sudden impact can do damage to the nerves in the arms. (zucker-regev.com)