Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Clinical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel to improve the quality of patient care and outcomes. The clinical audit was formally introduced in 1993 into the United Kingdom's National Health Service.Nursing Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of nursing care.Dental Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.Management Audit: Management review designed to evaluate efficiency and to identify areas in need of management improvement within the institution in order to ensure effectiveness in meeting organizational goals.Financial Audit: An examination, review and verification of all financial accounts.EnglandCommission on Professional and Hospital Activities: The non-profit, non-governmental organization which collects, processes, and distributes data on hospital use. Two programs of the Commission are the Professional Activity Study and the Medical Audit Program.Professional Staff Committees: Committees of professional personnel who have responsibility for determining policies, procedures, and controls related to professional matters in health facilities.Great BritainState Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.WalesPractice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.ScotlandPathology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers and provides pathology services.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Northern IrelandQuality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.LondonForms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Laboratories, Hospital: Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Peer Review, Health Care: The concurrent or retrospective review by practicing physicians or other health professionals of the quality and efficiency of patient care practices or services ordered or performed by other physicians or other health professionals (From The Facts On File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988).Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Psychology, Clinical: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.Medical Waste: Blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special disposal procedures.Professional Review Organizations: Organizations representing designated geographic areas which have contracts under the PRO program to review the medical necessity, appropriateness, quality, and cost-effectiveness of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. Peer Review Improvement Act, PL 97-248, 1982.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Partnership Practice: A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Drug Utilization Review: Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Capital Financing: Institutional funding for facilities and for equipment which becomes a part of the assets of the institution.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Organization and Administration: The planning and managing of programs, services, and resources.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Consultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Perinatal Mortality: Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Physician-Nurse Relations: The reciprocal interaction of physicians and nurses.Unnecessary Procedures: Diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative procedures prescribed and performed by health professionals, the results of which do not justify the benefits or hazards and costs to the patient.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Ethical Review: A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
  • The Senior IT Auditor will be responsible for completing primary information technology and at times operational and compliance audits in accordance with Touro. (indeed.com)
  • Vice President, Sr . The Vice President, Sr . Internal Auditor will be expected to perform all aspects of the audit to which he/she is assigned on some. (indeed.com)
  • Furthermore, the Board Audit and Risk Management Committee's proposal for the auditor will be published in a similar manner. (cargotec.com)
  • As the point person for our regulatory and health plan audits, this RN auditor/manager will ensure our policies, procedures, documents and reports all continue. (simplyhired.com)
  • In order to assess risk, the auditor must understand what roll the area that's being audited plays in the business. (bartleby.com)
  • Being an auditor, to identify specific audit procedures that might have let to the detection of the following accounting irregularities perpetrated by Crazy Eddie personnel: 1) Visit the stores without prior acknowledgement of it and check the inventory in place to detect the falsification of inventory count sheets. (bartleby.com)
  • His former roles including Deputy Auditor-General of the Audit Office of New South Wales for seven years, Assistant Director General for the Department of Local Government and probity adviser to the Director General at the New South Wales Department of Transport. (aemc.gov.au)
  • If you are audited, we'll review your IRS tax audit notice with you and walk you through the documentation you should provide to the auditor. (hrblock.com)
  • 11. The Office maintains regular contact with the Organization's External Auditor in order to coordinate audit work and to avoid overlap in coverage. (who.int)
  • The Office provides the External Auditor with a copy of all internal audit and evaluation reports. (who.int)
  • As an auditor, you should assess both which risks are material to the process/area/system/risk subject being audited and what control principles would manage them. (accaglobal.com)
  • Only with a clear view of an organisation's business context and its implicit risks can an auditor effectively use these requirements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Christopher Wright is a former qualified accountant, Certified Information Systems Auditor and Certified ScrumMaster™ with over 30 years' experience providing financial and IT advisory and risk management services. (itgovernance.co.uk)
  • There are five components to the internal control system of a Audits that are done in accordance with the Generally Accepted company, Auditing Standards (GAAS) require the auditor to obtain an which are: understanding of the client's internal control system. (scribd.com)
  • The controls that an external auditor is interested in are those related to the financial statements and the risk of a material misstatement of them. (scribd.com)
  • The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) is the recognized international standard setting body for the internal audit profession and awards the Certified Internal Auditor designation internationally through rigorous written examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our study provided interesting and surprising results from the interaction effects, indicating that top management support is not always a guarantee for reducing deafness on risk warnings of the internal auditor. (eur.nl)
  • The findings of the second experiment indicate that nudging through descriptive social norm can be used by the internal auditor to increase IA effectiveness by overcoming the deaf effect response to their risk warnings to management. (eur.nl)
  • Including a descriptive social norm as part of the risk warning message of the internal auditor in our experiment appeared to be useful as it significantly reduced the deaf effect response by the message recipient. (eur.nl)
  • By applying Focus Groups interviews (Chapter 4) and Q methodological approach (Chapter 5), we identified what determines the right moment for the internal auditor to communicate the risk warning messages to management. (eur.nl)
  • By studying IA effectiveness through deaf effect our study aimed at not only identifying additional causal factors influencing IA effectiveness, but also finding out whether deaf effect for risk warning messages of the internal auditor can be studied by applying different approaches. (eur.nl)
  • However, if during 'operational-based' planning the IT auditor discovers an IAP framework is not deployed, the audit planner should consider utilizing the COBIT Deliver and Support -Ensure Systems Security framework domain process as a baseline for setting detail objectives. (techtarget.com)
  • LOS ANGELES-Risk managers, whose job once focused on a basic "bucket of risks," and making decisions about which risks are transferable and which ones the company should retain, have been "migrating along an evolutionary path which is allowing us to be more strategic," said Chris Mandel, senior vice president of strategic solutions at Sedgwick, at the RIMS ERM Conference 2017. (riskmanagementmonitor.com)
  • 1. Your Directors are pleased to present the 41st Annual Report covering the businessand operations along with the Audited Standalone and Consolidated Financial Statements ofthe Company for the financial year ended on March 31 2017. (business-standard.com)
  • Free In-person Audit Support is available only for clients who purchase and use H&R Block desktop software solutions to prepare and successfully file their 2017 individual income tax return (federal or state). (hrblock.com)
  • Beginning April 1, 2017, the Postal Service's Purchasing Shared Services Center (PSSC) performed weekly compliance audits of selected purchase card transactions. (uspsoig.gov)
  • As of July 17, 2017, they audited 3,175 purchase card transactions and found 64 percent compliant and 30 percent non-compliant (6 percent were pending). (uspsoig.gov)
  • The Swedish National Audit Office decided in January 2017 to start this audit, as at that time there were indications that neither the Government nor the Swedish Transport Administration had given priority to the work of coordinating and trying to meet the EU objectives in 2013-2016. (riksrevisionen.se)
  • Perform review and testing for the IT Sarbanes Oxley IT Controls and general IT Controls at each site identified for an IT audit. (indeed.com)
  • Perform site file reviews for property audit preparation. (simplyhired.com)
  • 4. In my opinion CBN failed to perform sufficient audit procedures in connection with the issuance of these audit reports in violation of PCAOB rules and auditing standards, and failed to appropriately supervise the work of audit assistants. (bartleby.com)
  • Stryker Corporation Audit Planning Memo Mark Bishop Walsh College Stryker Corporation Audit Planning Memo BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION Ernst & Young (EY) has been selected by the audit committee of Stryker Corporation to perform their annual company audit for 2016. (bartleby.com)
  • Perform/Oversee initial review of risk metrics aggregated by the Analysts and address inquiries regarding reporting/dashboards. (aftercollege.com)
  • Reconciliations of University accounts are one of the most effective methods available to meet this need, yet UK Internal Audit (UKIA) has recently noted a number of units that don't perform this essential process on a regular basis, if at all. (uky.edu)
  • Maximo has traditionally been a very powerful maintenance management tool, but with pressures from a new younger workforce and competing products, there are a lot of new and exciting investment areas coming up for 2016. (slideshare.net)
  • Healthcare data security and HIPAA compliance emerged as the top areas in a TechTarget survey of 2016 health IT buying intentions. (techtarget.com)
  • Managing risk and audit mitigation is a process that assesses a participant's exposure to potentially harmful situations and develops a plan to prevent such exposure and to address it quickly if it occurs. (sdmayer.com)
  • The starting point for the risk-based planning process is the audit universe which is comprised of NRCan's auditable entities. (gc.ca)
  • Prioritization of the audit universe is a two step process. (gc.ca)
  • Based on the results of this process, all potential moderate and high risk audit projects were discussed with NRCan senior management and the DAC, with particular emphasis on the projects planned for 2013-14 (first year of the three-year plan), given that future year projects are re-assessed on an annual basis. (gc.ca)
  • The following diagram highlights the four key phases used in the selection process for the development of a robust risk-based audit plan. (gc.ca)
  • Breaking through them is a nonstop process, no matter how a company tries to improve the situation-especially in the areas of risk management, continuity planning and strategy, which typically happen in very different parts of the company. (riskmanagementmonitor.com)
  • These firms may not be so familiar with our risk management examination process. (sec.gov)
  • While we can never predict the future with certainty, we can apply a simple and streamlined risk management process to predict the uncertainties in the projects and minimize the occurrence or impact of these uncertainties. (pmi.org)
  • This paper presents the structured Risk Management process followed at Nokia Siemens Networks that helps avoid crisis situations and incorporate learning from past mistakes. (pmi.org)
  • Exhibit 1 shows that risk management is an iterative process and each facet of risk management should be planned and followed during each phase of the project. (pmi.org)
  • More frequent engagement (vs. a point-in-time or annual process) provides IA with greater insights and the opportunity to respond in a more timely manner to current and emerging risks and challenges. (ey.com)
  • Our independent, holistic validation process helps control model risk, prevents losses associated with model risk and enhances key stakeholders' understanding of models. (protiviti.com)
  • It's the same process, but in a different area. (misti.com)
  • The audit process is then followed for each planned area. (gcsu.edu)
  • Understanding how risk management is introduced early in the onboarding process on the front end and back end, as well as directly into incentive compensation programs. (riskmanagementmonitor.com)
  • The audit process will be explained and at this time, any concerns or questions regarding the audit will also be discussed. (k-state.edu)
  • Without a complete and thorough reconciliation process in place, issues like accounting misclassifications, unsubstantiated expenditures, and missing documentation can put the unit - and the University - at risk. (uky.edu)
  • Take one of our favorite examples for understanding risk: employee retention against process maintenance. (misti.com)
  • As a result, the risk factors and scoring process are periodically evaluated and modified, if necessary, in order to improve the audit plan. (cabq.gov)
  • The development of an annual risk-based audit plan is a dynamic process. (cabq.gov)
  • Reduce audit fees and re-use process documentation. (softwareag.com)
  • An indication of resource requirements, in terms of start and end date to conduct the audits is provided. (gc.ca)
  • The team also should conduct periodic manual audits to confirm the output of any automated discovery tools and verify enterprise license entitlements. (baselinemag.com)
  • With the aim of continual improvement, we offer free online training to all suppliers in four areas: supplier code of conduct, anti-corruption, OHS for site services providers, and conflict minerals. (ericsson.com)
  • The Risk-Based Audit Plan (RBAP), also referred to as the "Plan", is prepared by the Audit Branch of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). (gc.ca)
  • Finally, the audit plan was reviewed by the DAC and approved by the Deputy Minister. (gc.ca)
  • The audit plan that was developed eliminated low-value rotational audits and instead included audits that were closely aligned to the top enterprise risks facing the company. (ey.com)
  • This is developed into the audit plan. (gcsu.edu)
  • The audit plan is submitted each fiscal year to the chief audit officer of the Board of Regents who grants final approval. (gcsu.edu)
  • The decision of what areas to audit is based in part on the audit plan which has input from university administration, Board of Regents, managers, and the Internal Audit staff. (k-state.edu)
  • The audit plan generally includes a scheduled audit in each college or organizational unit on a regular basis. (k-state.edu)
  • The audit plan also has provisions for special management requests and investigation of possible irregularities in areas. (k-state.edu)
  • For these risks, there are specific audits that should be added to the audit plan, like examining cloud vendor agreements, but there are also factors that can be integrated as a lens across different audits, such as data integrity and talent sufficiency. (corporatecomplianceinsights.com)
  • As part of these deliberations, the officials shall be invited to recommend areas for inclusion in the plan. (cabq.gov)
  • The annual audit plan shall be transmitted to the Council for final approval as a resolution. (cabq.gov)
  • Audits considered for the audit plan are compiled from suggestions by OIA staff, Administration staff, City Council members, as well as complaints and other sources of information. (cabq.gov)
  • The audit plan gives consideration of those audits which may be mandated by ordinance. (cabq.gov)
  • The audit plan is developed with the understanding that there are inherent risks and limitations associated with any method or system of prioritizing audits. (cabq.gov)
  • Use the latest OIG work plan to amp up your compliance plan and audit efforts. (aapc.com)
  • Based on the civil and criminal sanctions that can result from noncompliance, it behooves providers to pay particular attention to the risk areas outlined in the OIG work plan and to update their compliance programs accordingly. (aapc.com)
  • Outside counsel find and place coverage for insurable risks and advise the insurer on minimizing uninsurable risk exposure. (martindale.com)
  • This strategy fails to integrate the duration of The Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) is an exposure to risk factors which may be of particular rel- annual cross-sectional benchmarking activity including evance to younger people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes patients of all ages and diabetes types. (deepdyve.com)
  • Although exposure to elemental and inorganic mercury through occupational and accidental spills poses a recognized risk to human health, there is growing concern that insidious, chronic exposure to methylmercury poses a greater problem to public health. (cmaj.ca)
  • The software enables you to reduce exposure to liability, manage risk, monitor and maintain cyber security, and track continuous improvement. (riskwatch.com)
  • Like many other data centers, Capgemini uses tier ratings, which help to classify their exposure to disruptive risks such as these. (datacenterknowledge.com)
  • The DRAMBORA toolkit represents the latest development in an ongoing international effort to conceive criteria, means and methodologies for audit and certification of digital repositories. (wikipedia.org)
  • Where there were known issues plans were in place and steps had been taken to begin to address these issues and mitigate the risks. (cqc.org.uk)
  • Use the audit answers to determine the adequacy of the insurer's own coverage for fiduciary liability, property and casualty, and all other insurance risks. (martindale.com)
  • In each audit area, factors are used to determine the level of risk that area may pose to our campus. (gcsu.edu)
  • the audit and to determine the nature, timing and extent of tests to 5) The Control Environment. (scribd.com)
  • Background: Alcohol use is a serious public health concern among youth in South Africa and worldwide.Aim: To determine the factors contributing to alcohol use among high school learners in the rural areas of Limpopo province.Setting: The Greater Marble-Hall municipality, Sekhukhune district in Limpopo province.Method: A quantitative, cross-sectional study design was conducted on 314 learners from three high schools in a rural area in Limpopo. (who.int)
  • Diabetes specific cardiovascular risk stratification tools incorporating diabetes duration should be an important consideration in future guideline development. (deepdyve.com)
  • Methodical consideration of risk guides the Office's prioritization of activities and provides a basis for work planning during engagements. (who.int)
  • It's still all about: ü Reducing Unplanned Downtime ü Minimizing Asset Failures ü Maximizing use of Resources ü Increase Asset Reliability ü Reduce Inventory Costs ü Safety & Risk Management 7 With increased efficiency and improved ability to achieve these goals! (slideshare.net)