Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Neck Pain: Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Pain, Intractable: Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.Pelvic Pain: Pain in the pelvic region of genital and non-genital origin and of organic or psychogenic etiology. Frequent causes of pain are distension or contraction of hollow viscera, rapid stretching of the capsule of a solid organ, chemical irritation, tissue ischemia, and neuritis secondary to inflammatory, neoplastic, or fibrotic processes in adjacent organs. (Kase, Weingold & Gershenson: Principles and Practice of Clinical Gynecology, 2d ed, pp479-508)Pain Perception: The process by which PAIN is recognized and interpreted by the brain.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Acute Pain: Intensely discomforting, distressful, or agonizing sensation associated with trauma or disease, with well-defined location, character, and timing.Pain, Referred: A type of pain that is perceived in an area away from the site where the pain arises, such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Spinal DiseasesShoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Musculoskeletal Pain: Discomfort stemming from muscles, LIGAMENTS, tendons, and bones.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Dendrites: Extensions of the nerve cell body. They are short and branched and receive stimuli from other NEURONS.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Neuralgia: Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Nociceptive Pain: Dull or sharp aching pain caused by stimulated NOCICEPTORS due to tissue injury, inflammation or diseases. It can be divided into somatic or tissue pain and VISCERAL PAIN.Spinal NeoplasmsAnalgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Intervertebral Disc: Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Zygapophyseal Joint: The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Myofascial Pain Syndromes: Muscular pain in numerous body regions that can be reproduced by pressure on TRIGGER POINTS, localized hardenings in skeletal muscle tissue. Pain is referred to a location distant from the trigger points. A prime example is the TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME.Complex Regional Pain Syndromes: Conditions characterized by pain involving an extremity or other body region, HYPERESTHESIA, and localized autonomic dysfunction following injury to soft tissue or nerve. The pain is usually associated with ERYTHEMA; SKIN TEMPERATURE changes, abnormal sudomotor activity (i.e., changes in sweating due to altered sympathetic innervation) or edema. The degree of pain and other manifestations is out of proportion to that expected from the inciting event. Two subtypes of this condition have been described: type I; (REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY) and type II; (CAUSALGIA). (From Pain 1995 Oct;63(1):127-33)Visceral Pain: Pain originating from internal organs (VISCERA) associated with autonomic phenomena (PALLOR; SWEATING; NAUSEA; and VOMITING). It often becomes a REFERRED PAIN.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Radiculopathy: Disease involving a spinal nerve root (see SPINAL NERVE ROOTS) which may result from compression related to INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; SPINAL CORD INJURIES; SPINAL DISEASES; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include radicular pain, weakness, and sensory loss referable to structures innervated by the involved nerve root.Analgesia: Methods of PAIN relief that may be used with or in place of ANALGESICS.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Labor Pain: Pain associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR in CHILDBIRTH. It is caused primarily by UTERINE CONTRACTION as well as pressure on the CERVIX; BLADDER; and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Labor pain mostly occurs in the ABDOMEN; the GROIN; and the BACK.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Spinal Curvatures: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by abnormal bending or flexure in the vertebral column. They may be bending forward (KYPHOSIS), backward (LORDOSIS), or sideway (SCOLIOSIS).Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Diskectomy: Excision, in part or whole, of an INTERVERTEBRAL DISC. The most common indication is disk displacement or herniation. In addition to standard surgical removal, it can be performed by percutaneous diskectomy (DISKECTOMY, PERCUTANEOUS) or by laparoscopic diskectomy, the former being the more common.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nociceptors: Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Sacrum: Five fused VERTEBRAE forming a triangle-shaped structure at the back of the PELVIS. It articulates superiorly with the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, inferiorly with the COCCYX, and anteriorly with the ILIUM of the PELVIS. The sacrum strengthens and stabilizes the PELVIS.Spondylolisthesis: Forward displacement of a superior vertebral body over the vertebral body below.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Pyramidal Cells: Projection neurons in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and the HIPPOCAMPUS. Pyramidal cells have a pyramid-shaped soma with the apex and an apical dendrite pointed toward the pial surface and other dendrites and an axon emerging from the base. The axons may have local collaterals but also project outside their cortical region.Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the INTERVERTEBRAL DISC due to aging or structural damage, especially to the vertebral end-plates.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Tuberculosis, Spinal: Osteitis or caries of the vertebrae, usually occurring as a complication of tuberculosis of the lungs.Lordosis: The anterior concavity in the curvature of the lumbar and cervical spine as viewed from the side. The term usually refers to abnormally increased curvature (hollow back, saddle back, swayback). It does not include lordosis as normal mating posture in certain animals ( = POSTURE + SEX BEHAVIOR, ANIMAL).Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Fibromyalgia: A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Spinal Osteophytosis: Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.Sciatica: A condition characterized by pain radiating from the back into the buttock and posterior/lateral aspects of the leg. Sciatica may be a manifestation of SCIATIC NEUROPATHY; RADICULOPATHY (involving the SPINAL NERVE ROOTS; L4, L5, S1, or S2, often associated with INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT); or lesions of the CAUDA EQUINA.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Catastrophization: Cognitive and emotional processes encompassing magnification of pain-related stimuli, feelings of helplessness, and a generally pessimistic orientation.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Spondylitis: Inflammation of the SPINE. This includes both arthritic and non-arthritic conditions.DislocationsEye Pain: A dull or sharp painful sensation associated with the outer or inner structures of the eyeball, having different causes.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Flank Pain: Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Spondylosis: A degenerative spinal disease that can involve any part of the VERTEBRA, the INTERVERTEBRAL DISK, and the surrounding soft tissue.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Manipulation, Spinal: Adjustment and manipulation of the vertebral column.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Silver Staining: The use of silver, usually silver nitrate, as a reagent for producing contrast or coloration in tissue specimens.Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.AxisRadiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Analgesics, Non-Narcotic: A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.Discitis: Inflammation of an INTERVERTEBRAL DISC or disk space which may lead to disk erosion. Until recently, discitis has been defined as a nonbacterial inflammation and has been attributed to aseptic processes (e.g., chemical reaction to an injected substance). However, recent studies provide evidence that infection may be the initial cause, but perhaps not the promoter, of most cases of discitis. Discitis has been diagnosed in patients following discography, myelography, lumbar puncture, paravertebral injection, and obstetrical epidural anesthesia. Discitis following chemonucleolysis (especially with chymopapain) is attributed to chemical reaction by some and to introduction of microorganisms by others.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Sacroiliac Joint: The immovable joint formed by the lateral surfaces of the SACRUM and ILIUM.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Atlanto-Axial Joint: The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Total Disc Replacement: The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Injections, Epidural: The injection of drugs, most often analgesics, into the spinal canal without puncturing the dura mater.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Receptors, AMPA: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by their affinity for the agonist AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid).Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Nociception: Sensing of noxious mechanical, thermal or chemical stimuli by NOCICEPTORS. It is the sensory component of visceral and tissue pain (NOCICEPTIVE PAIN).Vertebroplasty: Procedures to repair or stabilize vertebral fractures, especially compression fractures accomplished by injecting BONE CEMENTS into the fractured VERTEBRAE.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Phantom Limb: Perception of painful and nonpainful phantom sensations that occur following the complete or partial loss of a limb. The majority of individuals with an amputated extremity will experience the impression that the limb is still present, and in many cases, painful. (From Neurol Clin 1998 Nov;16(4):919-36; Brain 1998 Sep;121(Pt 9):1603-30)Ligamentum Flavum: The paired bands of yellow elastic tissue that connect adjoining laminae of the vertebrae. With the laminae, it forms the posterior wall of the spinal canal and helps hold the body erect.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Long-Term Potentiation: A persistent increase in synaptic efficacy, usually induced by appropriate activation of the same synapses. The phenomenological properties of long-term potentiation suggest that it may be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)CA1 Region, Hippocampal: One of four subsections of the hippocampus described by Lorente de No, located furthest from the DENTATE GYRUS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: A calcification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spinal column, usually at the level of the cervical spine. It is often associated with anterior ankylosing hyperostosis.Bone Diseases, MetabolicPeripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation: The use of specifically placed small electrodes to deliver electrical impulses across the SKIN to relieve PAIN. It is used less frequently to produce ANESTHESIA.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Acupuncture Analgesia: Analgesia produced by the insertion of ACUPUNCTURE needles at certain ACUPUNCTURE POINTS on the body. This activates small myelinated nerve fibers in the muscle which transmit impulses to the spinal cord and then activate three centers - the spinal cord, midbrain and pituitary/hypothalamus - to produce analgesia.Joint DiseasesExcitatory Postsynaptic Potentials: Depolarization of membrane potentials at the SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES of target neurons during neurotransmission. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials can singly or in summation reach the trigger threshold for ACTION POTENTIALS.Ligaments: Shiny, flexible bands of fibrous tissue connecting together articular extremities of bones. They are pliant, tough, and inextensile.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Tramadol: A narcotic analgesic proposed for severe pain. It may be habituating.Nerve Tissue ProteinsBraces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Oxycodone: A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Cyclohexanecarboxylic AcidsCohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Orthotic Devices: Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Spondylolysis: Deficient development or degeneration of a portion of the VERTEBRA, usually in the pars interarticularis (the bone bridge between the superior and inferior facet joints of the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE) leading to SPONDYLOLISTHESIS.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Cell Surface Extensions: Specialized structures of the cell that extend the cell membrane and project out from the cell surface.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The first symptoms were spine and leg pain. However, as the disease progresses symptoms include: debilitating pain bone ... In specific areas where the prevalence of that disease has increased. Three years of residence within the specified area. Today ... This set forth that all people in the Yokkaichi area who met the following criteria were paid by the program: Specific diseases ... Residents of the surrounding area that were harmed by this disease filed a lawsuit against Mitsui Mining & Smelting Company in ...
The lumbar spine is often the site of back pain. The area is susceptible because of its flexibility and the amount of body ... NSAIDs are suggested to be more effective for persistent pain than for acute pain. If pain remains intolerable while taking ... "AO spine injury classification system: a revision proposal for the thoracic and lumbar spine". European Spine Journal. 22 (10 ... It is estimated that low-back pain may affect as much as 80 to 90 percent of the general population in the United States. ...
The most common areas of the spine affected by whiplash are the neck and middle of the spine. "Neck" pain is very common ... which provides an axial load on the lumbar spine and cervical spine. This forces the cervical spine to deform into an S-shape ... The symptoms from the potential injury to the cervical spine may be debilitating, and pain was reported to be one of the ... Early mobilization is important for preventing chronic pain, but pain experienced from these exercises might cause ...
Injuries and pain caused by poor posture span a wide variety of people. All areas of the spine are equally important when it ... gradually the spine will start to develop a more exaggerated forward curve of the thoracic spine. Sullivan comments on poor ... This position places stress on the spine between the top of the neck and skull and the base of the neck and upper shoulders. ... Any distress in the spine, as well as other parts of the body can be increased due to prolonged periods of poor posture. Poor ...
... serrated head spines, a large pelvic spine, and coloration only in the pelvic fins. Larvae hatch 36 hours after fertilization. ... A common treatment is soaking the afflicted area in hot water, as very few hospitals carry specific treatments. However, ... Envenomed humans will experience extreme pain, and possibly headaches, vomiting, and breathing difficulties. ... Lionfish venomous dorsal spines are used purely for defense. When threatened, the fish often faces its attacker in an upside- ...
Therefore, the signs and symptoms depend on the area of spine involved. Back pain can occur at the level of any inflamed ... In his description, he coined the term transverse myelitis to reflect the band-like thoracic area of altered sensation that ... below which sensation to pain or light touch is impaired. Motor weakness occurs due to involvement of the pyramidal tracts and ... Peak of this condition can occur anytime between 4 hours to 21 days after onset Exclusion criteria Irradiation of the spine (e. ...
If the abdomen or spine is irradiated, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dysphagia can occur. If the pelvis is irradiated, ... depending on the area being irradiated, may have other side effects. For instance, radiotherapy to the brain can cause memory ... prostatitis, proctitis, dysuria, metritis, diarrhea, and abdominal pain can occur. Adjuvant hormonal therapy for prostate ...
She often baby-sat young children in the area, as a favour for neighbors. Bunford had a close friend named Emma, who was a ... She hated the attention her size brought her, and her spine developed a severe curvature. Because of this, Bunford could not ... By the end of her life, Bunford was also in pain because of joint problems and other ailments. ...
... additional areas of expertise include spine surgery, rehabilitation medicine, and pain management. Its spine center has long- ... and spine specialists treat patients with congenital or acute spinal disorders and with chronic back pain. For specialized ... In 1996, the clinic was renamed as Bumin Hospital and opened Spine Health Research Center and Joint Medical Science Research ... Medical Centers Joint Center Spine Center Trauma Center Rehabilitation Center Digestive Organ Center Hand & Foot Center ...
In addition, people may experience referred pain, that is, pain in an area of the body away from the injured or otherwise ... Back patients with ligamentous laxity in the area of the spine may also experience osteoarthritis and disc degeneration. In the ... Referred pain is created by ligamentous laxity around a joint, but is felt at some distance from the injury. (Pain will not ... Pain will usually occur in the feet and lower legs, but can also spread to the back due to abnormal standing and walking habits ...
Its dorsal area is lined with 13 spines, each of which has two venom sacs. The spines are sharp and stiff and have been known ... A local anesthetic can reduce the pain. First aid includes immersion of the affected limb in hot water; this is thought to help ... It is a carnivorous ray-finned fish with venomous spines. It lives on reef bottoms camouflaged as a rock. It is the most ... This stonefish is usually brown or gray, and it may have areas of yellow, orange or red. This species reaches 30 to 40 ...
A spine is a sharp, needle-like structure used to inflict pain on predators. An example of this seen in nature is in the Sohal ... The area around the spines is often brightly colored to advertise the defensive capability;[36] predators often avoid the Sohal ... Porcupine spines are long, stiff, break at the tip, and are barbed to stick into a would-be predator. In contrast, the hedgehog ... A domain of danger is the area within the group in which the individual is more likely to be attacked by a predator. The center ...
When these areas are pressed, it causes pain either in that muscle (localized pain), or in another area (referred pain). A ... Limited range of motion in the jaw and cervical (neck) spine. Painful or sore head and/or neck muscles with very sensitive ... and controlling the way the body feels pain in the head and neck areas, long lasting pain relief can be achieved. Once the ... There is a concentrated nerve center in this area called the trigeminal nucleus. This major pathway of nerves controls pain ...
For immediate relief of pain associated with the sting of a bullrout, immerse the affected area in hot water. "Scorpaeniformes ... Its spines are venomous. It is the only member of the genus Notesthes. The bullrout has a large head, and seven spines on the ... The dorsal, anal, and pelvic spines on a bullrout have venom glands on them, and should be handled with extreme care . A ... puncture wound from one of these spines can be excruciatingly painful. ...
... spine injuries, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain and Parkinson's disease. The Saint Thomas Brain & Spine Tumor Center is a ... The Saint Thomas Health Neurosciences Institute is among the Nashville area's most comprehensive brain, back, nervous system ... The Chest Pain Network includes 15 hospitals in Tennessee and Kentucky, all accredited by the Society of Chest Pain Centers. ... "Saint Thomas Chest Pain Network Expands to Include More Community Hospitals". Nashville Medical News. "Freezing Procedure at ...
... applying isopropanol to the area may help alleviate the pain. The transcriptome of the bearded fireworm was sequenced and ... In a case of accidental contact, application and removal of adhesive tape will help remove the spines; ... This sensation lasts up to a few hours, but a painful tingling can continue to be felt around the area of contact. ... injecting a powerful neurotoxin and producing intense irritation and a painful burning sensation around the area of contact. ...
Examples include somatic dysfunction of the spine or viral infection. Referred pain usually involves a specific, "referred" ... A similar area innervated by peripheral nerves is called a peripheral nerve field. A dermatome is an area of skin supplied by ... S3 - Over the tuberosity of the ischium or infragluteal fold S4 and S5 - In the perianal area, less than one cm lateral to the ... A dermatome is an area of skin that is mainly supplied by a single spinal nerve. There are 8 cervical nerves (C1 being an ...
... bone spurs on the spine can impinge on nerves that leave the spine for other parts of the body. This impingement can cause pain ... Osteophytes form because of the increase in a damaged joint's surface area. This is most common from the onset of arthritis. ... Osteophytes usually limit joint movement and typically cause pain. Osteophytes form naturally on the back of the spine as a ... person ages and are a sign of degeneration in the spine. In this case, the spurs are not the source of back pains, but instead ...
If the skin is punctured, pain and swelling will ensue, and infection may set in. The spine is barbed, which makes withdrawal ... It is one of the thirty most recreationally harvested species in the 5-county area (Volusia, Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie, ... The dorsal and pectoral fins each are supported by a sharp, slime-covered barbed spine. The dorsal spine is normally erect when ... Also, grinding of the pharyngeal teeth and rubbing of the pectoral spines against the pectoral girdle can produce sound. These ...
Patients may experience pain of varying severity in areas around the effected bone. When the disease occurs in the bones of the ... Lymphangiomatosis of the spine: two cases requiring surgical intervention. Spine. 2003 Feb 1;28(3):E45-50. Jea A, McNeil A, ... The pain that accompanies bone involvement may be attributed to "growing pains" in younger children. With bone involvement the ... When the disease affects the kidneys the symptoms include flank pain, abdominal distension, blood in the urine, and, possibly, ...
This type of pain is usually felt in the lower extremities or groin area. Radiating nerve pain caused by a prolapsed disc can ... A possible element in the pathogenesis of low-back pain". Spine. 12 (8): 760-4. doi:10.1097/00007632-198710000-00009. PMID ... Unlike a pulsating pain or pain that comes and goes, which can be caused by muscle spasm, pain from a herniated disc is usually ... Waddell G, McCulloch JA, Kummel E, Venner RM (1980). "Nonorganic physical signs in low-back pain". Spine. 5 (2): 117-25. doi: ...
The most commonly location seen is the mid-back area, but it may occur anywhere along the spine. Cases that do not result in ... The dog can appear hunched up with an arched back, and in the very worst cases may wince with pain when moving its hindlegs. ... Once the cord is compressed, the dog experiences symptoms ranging from mild back/neck pain to leg paralysis, loss of sensation ... and this can be accompanied by medication for the pain. Surgery can restore sensation to a dog's legs following paralysis but ...
The caterpillar is regarded as a dangerous insect because of its venomous spines. Exposure to the caterpillar's fur-like spines ... "grid-like hemorrhagic papular eruption with severe radiating pain". The pain has been described by patients as similar to a ... The reactions are sometimes localized to the affected area but are often very severe, radiating up a limb and causing burning, ... It is best if the venom from the spines is treated within hours of first contact. For first aid, it is recommended that the ...
Symptoms may include pain in a specific bone with overlying redness, fever, and weakness. The long bones of the arms and legs ... The area usually affected when the infection is contracted through the bloodstream is the metaphysis of the bone. Once the bone ... 2004). "Diagnosis and management of adult pyogenic osteomyelitis of the cervical spine" (PDF). Neurosurg Focus. 17 (6): E2. doi ... Symptom may include pain in a specific bone with overlying redness, fever, and weakness. Onset may be sudden or gradual. In ...
... resulting in inflammation of tissues and pain. A number of different conditions can cause pain in the general area of the ... SPINE, 25(23), 3072-3079. Foye P, Buttaci C, Stitik T, Yonclas P (2006). "Successful injection for coccyx pain". Am J Phys Med ... A simple test to determine whether the coccyx is involved is injection of local anesthetic into the area. If the pain relates ... Coccydynia is a medical term meaning pain in the coccyx or tailbone area, usually brought on by sitting too abruptly. ...
"Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 46 (6): 887-96. doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2013.02.010. ISSN 1873-6513. PMID 23707384.. ... Chiropractic was developed in the belief that manipulating the spine affects the flow of a supernatural vital energy and ... of the hospitals offering CAM were in urban areas.[145] ... "reduce pain and concomitant mood disturbance and increase ... Complementary therapies are often used in palliative care or by practitioners attempting to manage chronic pain in patients. ...
Failure to open spine surgery. You shall learn the tricks of what makes the Nepalese trick relieve you of muscle pains, tendons ... Nettle against sciaticaMake a dip in the affected area with a nettle infusion prepared with a liter of water. There are ... Sciatica is the most acute form of back pain. A high body mass may make one weaker to sciatic problems. Sciatica refers to pain ... This part of the system holds the information about different types of back pains. As a result of the overexertion, the pain ...
Presentation In myofascial pain syndrome, the patient, who is generally 25 to 50 years of age, will be troubled by the gradual ... onset of localized or regional unilateral fibromuscular pain that at times can be immobilizing. There may be a history of acute ... The pain pattern is noted by stippled area.(Adapted from Rachlin E, Rachlin I: Myofascial pain and fibromyalgia: trigger point ... above the scapular spine near the medial border; 5 = second rib, at the costochondral junction; 6 = lateral epicondyle, 2 cm ...
Whiplash injury causes immense pain in the spine and neck of the person. It is not that easy to recover from the pain. In many ... person will not be able to move his neck quite often or look on either side of his without feeling immense pain in that area. ... Taking pain killers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen, however, if these do not help you can get stronger pain killers to get ... The bone structure and the soft tissues of the neck are damaged, and it causes a lot of pain for that person to suffer. ...
You dont have to live with the pain all the time. Contact the pain specialists at Omega and take control of the pain. ... The pain specialists at Omega Pain Clinic can perform a variety of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome treatments. ... Do you suffer from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? ... is type I and involves persistent pain and swelling in areas ... Infusion Techniques- A small catheter is placed through a needle into the epidural space next to the spine. Local anesthetic ...
... followed by cervical and midback pain syndromes. Some predictive factors associated with spine-area pain are similar to those ... RESULTS: Spine-area pain is the most common injury or complaint "in garrison" and appears to increase during training and ... CONCLUSIONS: Spine-area pain syndromes comprise a major source of unit attrition and are often the result of duty-related ... Spine-area pain is a common disabling injury in service members associated with a very low return-to-duty (RTD) rate. ...
Scivoletti responded: Back pain. I would have you rest from physical activity. Use otc analgesics ie acteomeniphen, ,a href="/ ... For past 3 days I have severe back pain. My spine doesnt hurt by back area above right hip hurts bad and the pain usually ... Mid low back pain right of spine & right side of back, hip pain with right abd and pelvic pain knee gives out at times better ... Mid low back pain right of spine & right side of back, hip pain with right abd and pelvic pain knee gives out at times better ...
Gentle Cox Technic Flexion Distraction and Decompression at Chiropractic Care may relieve the pain. ... Thoracic spine area pain can make you short of breath. ... neck pain, headaches, shoulder pain, arm pain, leg pain, and ... abnormal thoracic spine and pain conditions Our diagnostic skills will determine the source of your pain -- with much input ... Chiropractic Care Explains the Thoracic Spine. If you have mid-back pain, pain that may even radiate around to your chest that ...
Johnson Chiropractic offers Cox Technic Flexion Distraction and Decompression to relieve the pain. ... Cervical spine area pain can extend into the neck and arm. ... pain or headache pain or shoulder pain or arm pain or even pain ... We provide comprehensive care for back pain, neck pain, headaches, shoulder pain, arm pain, leg pain, and injuries to the body ... We know the spine! We know what the normal cervical spine is and the cervical spine conditions that can make it cause you pain. ...
Satterwhite Chiropractic offers Cox Technic Flexion Distraction and Decompression to relieve pain. ... Sacral area of the spine, though small, may cause sacroliac joint pain. ... We administer in depth care for back pain, neck pain, headaches, shoulder pain, arm pain, leg pain, and injuries to the body ... Satterwhite Chiropractic Explains the Sacral Spine. If you have hip pain, buttock pain, sacral pain, we can help. We are here ...
Cox Technic at Aaron Chiropractic Clinic can help you control the pain non-surgically. ... If you have low back pain, leg pain, calf pain, buttock pain, even pain that extends into the foot and toes due to any number ... We provide comprehensive care for back pain, neck pain, headaches, shoulder pain, arm pain, leg pain, and injuries to the body ... Our practice at Aaron Chiropractic Clinic focuses on chiropractic wellness as well as relief of pain, particularly spine pain ...
Cox Technic at Spinal Care Clinic can help you control the pain non-surgically. ... If you have low back pain, leg pain, calf pain, buttock pain, even pain that extends into the foot and toes due to any number ... We provide in depth care for back pain, neck pain, headaches, shoulder pain, arm pain, leg pain, and injuries to the body from ... Our method at Spinal Care Clinic centers on chiropractic wellness as well as relief of pain, especially spine pain and its ...
... followed by cervical and midback pain syndromes. Some predictive factors associated with spine-area pain are similar to those ... Spine-area Pain in Military Personnel: A Review of Epidemiology, Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. The Chiro.Org Blog ... RESULTS: Spine-area pain is the most common injury or complaint "in garrison" and appears to increase during training and ... Spine-area Pain in Military Personnel. By Frank M. Painter,May 29, 2018,Veterans, ...
Fremont and Morgan Hill to serve your pain psychology needs. ... Clinical pain psychologist treatment in the San Francisco Bay ... Clinical pain psychology can be a beneficial part of your treatment plan when dealing with pain and more specifically, chronic ... especially about the pain. Frankly, I was terrified. Fortunately, I had Dr. Navani on my team as pain management special... ... I have been going to Comprehensive Pain Management Center for some time now and the welcome one gets from the entire staff is ...
... suggests Spine-health. Look for a surgeon who is fellowship trained in spine... ... To find a high-quality spine surgeon, interview a few surgeons and ask them about their qualifications and experience, ... How Do You Find a Top-Rated Bunion Surgeon in Your Area?. A: Start your search for a top-rated bunion surgeon in your area with ... Pain & Symptoms * Q: What Should You Look for in a Spinal Fusion Surgeon?. A: Look for an experienced surgeon who specializes ...
Visit our website to book an appointment online: Advanced Spine and Pain ... At Advanced Spine and Pain, with offices throughout Fairfax County, VA, Stafford, VA & the Greater Baltimore, MD Area, the ... Advanced Spine and Pain. Orthopedic Specialists & Pain Management Specialists located in Stafford, VA & Fairfax, VA. ... Advanced Spine and Pain, Stafford, VA. Phone (appointments): 703-214-6149 , Phone (general inquiries): 703-522-2727 Address: ...
National Spine & Pain Centers hourly pay trends based on salaries posted anonymously by National Spine & Pain Centers employees ... Average salaries for National Spine & Pain Centers Medical Assistant: $17. ... Baltimore, MD Area. *- Hagerstown, MD Area. *- Raleigh-Durham, NC Area. *- Washington, DC Area ... The typical National Spine & Pain Centers Medical Assistant salary is $17. Medical Assistant salaries at National Spine & Pain ...
Visit our website to book an appointment online: Advanced Spine and Pain ... If you fear surgery on your spine but continue to suffer from spinal pain, the doctors at Advanced Spine and Pain in Fairfax ... Advanced Spine and Pain. Orthopedic Specialists & Pain Management Specialists located in Stafford, VA & Fairfax, VA. ... Advanced Spine and Pain, Stafford, VA. Phone (appointments): 703-214-6149 , Phone (general inquiries): 703-522-2727 Address: ...
Delivering optimal pain management solutions to chronic pain patients. ... Specialized pain management clinic serving Wake County, Apex, Cary, Raleigh, Durham, Morrisville, Sanford, North Carolina. ... Sacroiliac Joint Pain (SI Pain). Failed Back Surgery Syndrome. Diabetic Neuropathic Pain. Arthritis (Joint Pain). And More!. ... It is the leading Interventional Spine and Pain Clinic in Raleigh, North Carolina and surrounding areas, providing expertise in ...
Their Autologous Stem Cell Procedure is suitable for arthritis of spine, chronic neck pain, back pain, etc. All procedures are ... Advantages of Stem Cell Therapy for Spine in Roatan, Caribbean Isl ... Caribbean Islands by GARM ClinicGARM Clinic brings the best stem cell therapy for spine treatment. ... Focus Area: Stem Cell Therapy for Spine , Spine Arthritis Treatment , Stem Cell Therapy ,, Chronic Back Pain , Spine , Neck ...
Pain in lumbar area of the spine and prostate cancer over a year ago. ...
Cerv-Align® Orthopedic Pillow Provides Proper Alignment of the Spine. The uniquely curved neck lobe of the Cerv-Align Pillow ... Shop by Pain Area/Head, Neck & Shoulder. JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.. You must have JavaScript enabled in ... InStock /Shop by Pain Area/Head, Neck & Shoulder /Shop by Product/Cervical Pillows/Fiber Pillows /Best of Core Products ,p,The ... This pillow is wonderful for a side sleeper and for someone who has problems in the neck area. It is comfortable and aligns the ...
I am an interventional pain medicine specialist and practice in the United Kingdom. I am the lead clinician of an integrated ... Pain Management, Robert jh. baylis MD, located in Portsmouth. ... Area of Focus. *Degenerative Spine. *Spinal Deformity. ... I am an interventional pain medicine specialist and practice in the United Kingdom. I am the lead clinician of an integrated ... Sign Up for FREE to spineadvisor, SpineUniverses monthly eNewsletter and receive back and neck pain news, treatment updates, ...
Pain Management, Physiatrist, Peter H. Schmaus MD, located in Paramus, NJ. We are a multispecialty practice within the field of ... medicine and pain medicine I treat primarily nonsurgical conditions of the spine and extremities, including carpal tunnel ... Sign Up for FREE to spineadvisor, SpineUniverses monthly eNewsletter and receive back and neck pain news, treatment updates, ... Join Our Back Pain Community. Share your story. Ask questions. Get help! ...
Pleurisy, Any pain in the chest area with each breath Podagra, Gout Poliomyelitis, Polio Potters asthma, Fibroid pthisis ... Myelitis, Inflammation of the spine Myocarditis, Inflammation of heart muscles Necrosis, Mortification of bones or tissue ... Lumbago, Back pain Lung fever, Pneumonia Lung sickness, Tuberculosis Lying in, Time of delivery of infant Malignant sore throat ... Intestinal colic, Abdominal pain due to improper diet Jail fever, Typhus Jaundice, Condition caused by blockage of intestines ...
Sharp pain in c-spine area between shoulders and up neck!. over a year ago. ... Burning, radiating pain in the left bicep area with some pain on the left side of the neck. over a year ago. ... Back pains, neck pain, sickness, head aches.... over a year ago. Pain during sex in right arm and right side of neck. over a ... Neck Pain, Throat Pain, Tonsil pain, Sinus infection, bad immune system. over a year ago. ...
  • Sciatica is the most acute form of back pain. (nyscopa.org)
  • Does It Really Work?Pole Tricks Handbook Review - Does it really work?14 day perfect booty Review - Does It Work Or Another Scam?Pure Natural Healing Review - Does It Really Work?Anabolic Running ReviewPrimal Palate Review - Does it really work?Sciatica is a relatively common form of back pain that radiates along the sciatic nerve. (nyscopa.org)
  • At a consensus workshop in Orlando, Florida in 1994, the International Association for the Study of Pain Criteria coined the term "complex regional pain syndrome" and gave a new diagnostic criterion, but publication was sporadic and several doctors still diagnosed based on their own clinical experience. (omegapainclinic.com)
  • Sciatica refers to pain that radiates along the path of the sciatic nerve, which branches from your sciatica sos book download lower back through your hips and buttocks and down each leg. (nyscopa.org)
  • The guide instructs the users prevent Sciatica pain but also a wide selection of straightforward activities to not remove. (nyscopa.org)
  • Between the mind and the body, by means of the exercise of many not otherwise find the pain of sciatica. (nyscopa.org)
  • The patient with fibromyalgia, on the other hand, has widespread, bilateral symmetric musculoskeletal pain that is associated with multiple "tender points" on palpation and that do not cause any radiation of pain. (aneskey.com)
  • What natural labor inducing methods worked for you?Why you need Joint Pain Relief Codes?Joint pain can be painful and unbearable. (nyscopa.org)
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