Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Peritoneal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Autografts: Transplant comprised of an individual's own tissue, transferred from one part of the body to another.Poland Syndrome: A syndrome which is characterized by symbrachydactyly and aplasia of the sternal head of pectoralis major.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Hemangiopericytoma: A tumor composed of spindle cells with a rich vascular network, which apparently arises from pericytes, cells of smooth muscle origin that lie around small vessels. Benign and malignant hemangiopericytomas exist, and the rarity of these lesions has led to considerable confusion in distinguishing between benign and malignant variants. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1364)Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Abdominal Cavity: The region in the abdomen extending from the thoracic DIAPHRAGM to the plane of the superior pelvic aperture (pelvic inlet). The abdominal cavity contains the PERITONEUM and abdominal VISCERA, as well as the extraperitoneal space which includes the RETROPERITONEAL SPACE.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.InkFacial Hemiatrophy: A syndrome characterized by slowly progressive unilateral atrophy of facial subcutaneous fat, muscle tissue, skin, cartilage, and bone. The condition typically progresses over a period of 2-10 years and then stabilizes.Gallbladder Diseases: Diseases of the GALLBLADDER. They generally involve the impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, neoplasms, or other diseases.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Gallbladder: A storage reservoir for BILE secretion. Gallbladder allows the delivery of bile acids at a high concentration and in a controlled manner, via the CYSTIC DUCT to the DUODENUM, for degradation of dietary lipid.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Liver Abscess: Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the liver as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Gallbladder Emptying: A process whereby bile is delivered from the gallbladder into the duodenum. The emptying is caused by both contraction of the gallbladder and relaxation of the sphincter mechanism at the choledochal terminus.Patient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tResearch Support, U.S. GovernmentCell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Research Support, American Recovery and Reinvestment ActResearch Support, N.I.H., ExtramuralNurse Clinicians: Registered nurses who hold Master's degrees in nursing with an emphasis in clinical nursing and who function independently in coordinating plans for patient care.United StatesSpecialties, Nursing: Various branches of nursing practice limited to specialized areas.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Oncology Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with the care provided to cancer patients. It includes aspects of family functioning through education of both patient and family.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Clinical Nursing Research: Research carried out by nurses in the clinical setting and designed to provide information that will help improve patient care. Other professional staff may also participate in the research.Operating Room Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of operating room services and facilities.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.
  • Primary tumors of the ovaries may arise from the epithelium (82%), sex cord and germ cell (20%) areas. (ispub.com)
  • Sometimes ovarian cancer spreads to the omentum. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The omentum is important in ovarian cancer because it has a lot of tiny blood vessels. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The omentum becomes very important in advanced ovarian cancer when debulking or cytoreduction surgeries are performed. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Understanding the structure of the omentum makes is easier to understand why this debulking surgery in ovarian cancer is so difficult. (verywellhealth.com)
  • STUDY DESIGN: In 29 cases of advanced ovarian cancer the mean nuclear area (MNA), volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (v̄(v)), volume percentage epithelium (VPE) and mitotic activity index (MAD were assessed in both the primary ovarian tumor and its metastatic deposits in the omentum. (elsevier.com)
  • Heavy periods are not a symptom of ovarian cancer,' Romero said, 'but Allison's exam revealed enlarged organs in her pelvic area, which raised concern and warranted evaluation with a transvaginal ultrasound. (uchospitals.edu)
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare quantitative pathologic variables assessed in primary ovarian tumors and metastatic tumor deposits in the omentum and compare their prognostic value. (elsevier.com)
  • Palliative radiation to the metastatic area did not curtail the relentless progression, leading to a pathological fracture requiring excision of a portion of the tumor with prosthetic replacement. (ispub.com)
  • Another name for these are ovarian clear-cell carcinomas, or OCCCs, and they have been described by the World Health Organization (WHO) as transparent cells growing in clusters in various parts of the pelvic area. (ucsb.edu)
  • A specimen was taken for histopathology, which demonstrated that the placenta and omentum contained focal areas of microinfarctions and necrotizing granulomas consistent with tuberculosis. (omicsonline.org)
  • This report describes 3 cases of alimentary lymphoma in horses characterised by focal areas of severe disruption of all layers of the small intestinal wall with the formation of pseudodiverticula. (wiley.com)
  • Postoperative histology report revealed mature teratoma with focal area of immature teratoma of the left ovary. (hindawi.com)
  • Differences were evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank sum test for paired observations, and coefficients of variation were calculated in each case over the values obtained from the tumor in the ovary and omentum. (elsevier.com)
  • Subcutaneous fat, particularly in the femorogluteal area, might provide a depot helping to prevent lipid deposition at intra-abdominal and visceral sites, where it might be more damaging. (cfp.ca)
  • There have even been cases in which pieces of omentum were used as patches during surgeries in other parts of the body, including the spinal cord, where it can share its blood vessels and healing powers. (ocregister.com)
  • The omentum is a two-layered structure that is like a parachute, covering and surrounding the organs of the abdominal cavity. (verywellhealth.com)
  • In diagnosis and treatment, the Hara is partitioned in areas, each of which is considered - on the basis of empirical evidence[citation needed] - to represent one of the (ten, eleven or twelve) vital organs AND their functional energy fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • The initial 12-mm camera trocar is placed at the umbilical area with Hasson technique. (sages.org)
  • Euglycemic clamp experiments were performed in the conscious state, and insulin was infused either directly into the omentum via the superior mesenteric artery, causing relative omental hyperinsulinemia, or into the portal vein on a separate occasion (control). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The omentum will wrap around a problem area like a police barricade," he says. (ocregister.com)
  • During a mean follow-up period of 21 months (range 9 to 32), there were two additional deaths in the no wrap group and four in the omentum group, one of which involved an anastomotic complication. (elsevier.com)
  • Actuarial survival at 1 year was 75%, 92%, and 80% in the omentum, internal mammary artery, and no wrap groups, respectively (p = 0.25). (elsevier.com)