Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Heel Spur: A bony outgrowth on the lower surface of the CALCANEUS. Though often presenting along with plantar fasciitis (FASCIITIS, PLANTAR), they are not considered causally related.Fasciitis, Plantar: Inflammation of the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot (plantar fascia) causing HEEL pain. The plantar fascia (also called plantar aponeurosis) are bands of fibrous tissue extending from the calcaneal tuberosity to the TOES. The etiology of plantar fasciitis remains controversial but is likely to involve a biomechanical imbalance. Though often presenting along with HEEL SPUR, they do not appear to be causally related.Foot Diseases: Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.ShoesBlood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Fasciitis: Inflammation of the fascia. There are three major types: 1, Eosinophilic fasciitis, an inflammatory reaction with eosinophilia, producing hard thickened skin with an orange-peel configuration suggestive of scleroderma and considered by some a variant of scleroderma; 2, Necrotizing fasciitis (FASCIITIS, NECROTIZING), a serious fulminating infection (usually by a beta hemolytic streptococcus) causing extensive necrosis of superficial fascia; 3, Nodular/Pseudosarcomatous /Proliferative fasciitis, characterized by a rapid growth of fibroblasts with mononuclear inflammatory cells and proliferating capillaries in soft tissue, often the forearm; it is not malignant but is sometimes mistaken for fibrosarcoma.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Forefoot, Human: The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.Foot Ulcer: Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.Crying: To utter an inarticulate, characteristic sound in order to communicate or express a feeling, or desire for attention.Neonatal Nursing: The nursing specialty that deals with the care of newborn infants during the first four weeks after birth.Superstitions: A belief or practice which lacks adequate basis for proof; an embodiment of fear of the unknown, magic, and ignorance.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Schools: Educational institutions.Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Strikes, Employee: Work-related situations in which the employees as a group refuse to work until certain conditions of employment are granted by the employer.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Rib FracturesPain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Podiatry: A specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders and injuries and anatomic defects of the foot.San FranciscoLiterature, ModernTriploidy: Polyploidy with three sets of chromosomes. Triploidy in humans are 69XXX, 69XXY, and 69XYY. It is associated with HOLOPROSENCEPHALY; ABNORMALITIES, MULTIPLE; PARTIAL HYDATIDIFORM MOLE; and MISCARRAGES.Hydrology: Science dealing with the properties, distribution, and circulation of water on and below the earth's surface, and atmosphere.Water Resources: Environmental reservoirs of water related to natural WATER CYCLE by which water is obtained for various purposes. This includes but is not limited to watersheds, aquifers and springs.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Seaweed: Multicellular marine macroalgae including some members of red (RHODOPHYTA), green (CHLOROPHYTA), and brown (PHAEOPHYTA) algae. They are widely distributed in the ocean, occurring from the tide level to considerable depths, free-floating (planktonic) or anchored to the substratum (benthic). They lack a specialized vascular system but take up fluids, nutrients, and gases directly from the water. They contain CHLOROPHYLL and are photosynthetic, but some also contain other light-absorbing pigments. Many are of economic importance as FOOD, fertilizer, AGAR, potash, or source of IODINE.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)JordanPierre Robin Syndrome: Congenital malformation characterized by MICROGNATHIA or RETROGNATHIA; GLOSSOPTOSIS and CLEFT PALATE. The mandibular abnormalities often result in difficulties in sucking and swallowing. The syndrome may be isolated or associated with other syndromes (e.g., ANDERSEN SYNDROME; CAMPOMELIC DYSPLASIA). Developmental mis-expression of SOX9 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR gene on chromosome 17q and its surrounding region is associated with the syndrome.Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Rare cutaneous eruption characterized by extensive KERATINOCYTE apoptosis resulting in skin detachment with mucosal involvement. It is often provoked by the use of drugs (e.g., antibiotics and anticonvulsants) or associated with PNEUMONIA, MYCOPLASMA. It is considered a continuum of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Muscle Strength Dynamometer: A device that measures MUSCLE STRENGTH during muscle contraction, such as gripping, pushing, and pulling. It is used to evaluate the health status of muscle in sports medicine or physical therapy.Isometric Contraction: Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: A form of phagocyte bactericidal dysfunction characterized by unusual oculocutaneous albinism, high incidence of lymphoreticular neoplasms, and recurrent pyogenic infections. In many cell types, abnormal lysosomes are present leading to defective pigment distribution and abnormal neutrophil functions. The disease is transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance and a similar disorder occurs in the beige mouse, the Aleutian mink, and albino Hereford cattle.Orthotic Devices: Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Foot Deformities, Acquired: Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.
  • But Northern Research Station scientists discovered that the fungus behind white-nose syndrome may have an Achilles' heel: ultraviolet light. (fed.us)
  • But it's like an Achilles heel," said Hopkins cancer geneticist Bert Vogelstein. (nbcbayarea.com)
  • An Achilles' heel is a weakness in spite of overall strength, which can lead to downfall. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of "Achilles heel" as an expression meaning "area of weakness, vulnerable spot" dates only to 1840, with implied use in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Ireland, that vulnerable heel of the British Achilles! (wikipedia.org)
  • I developed a wound on my achilles heel area. (webmd.com)
  • With safe and effective treatments in short supply, scientists report in PNAS Early Edition (Proceeding of the National Academy of Science) discovery of an experimental treatment that targets an Achilles heel of activated immune cells - killing them off and stopping autoimmune damage. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • Women who wear high heels and people who walk for exercise will often develop this problem because of the tightness that results in the calf muscle as a result of these activities. (bayareapodiatry.com)
  • In the light of the above considerations, the present study aimed to investigate whether parameters of the calf MTU relevant to contractile force production would be modified by long-term use of high-heeled shoes. (biologists.org)
  • You might hear a "pop" that seems to come from the back of your heel or calf. (rochester.edu)
  • Stretch and massage the calf area. (empowher.com)
  • For people in your age range, without knowing anything else about your medical history, my first thought as to the cause of your heel pain would be lack of fat on the bottom of the heel. (foot-pain-explained.com)
  • Your health care provider may recommend other treatments, depending on the cause of your heel pain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • SS-EN ISO 15223-1:2016 Medical devices - Symbols to be used with medical device labels, labelling and information to be supplied - Part 1: General requirements (ISO 15223-1:2016). (molnlycke.com)
  • The one part of the body where we actually want to be fat is the heel as the fat acts as a cushion, however, as we age, most people tend to lose fat on the bottom of the heel. (foot-pain-explained.com)
  • Don't put pressure on the heel. (webmd.com)
  • Ask your child's healthcare provider about activities that do not put pressure on the heel. (drugs.com)
  • Avoid heels more than two inches tall. (ameblo.jp)
  • If you suffer from shoulder impingement, do shoulder press with a neutral grip (palms facing each other) to avoid excessive pressure in this area. (foxnews.com)
  • Other causes of plantar heel pain include calcaneal stress fractures (progressively worsening pain after an increase in activity or change to a harder walking surface), nerve entrapment or neuroma (pain accompanied by burning, tingling, or numbness), heel pad syndrome (deep, bruise-like pain in the middle of the heel), and plantar warts. (aafp.org)
  • Sinus tarsi syndrome manifests as lateral midfoot heel pain and a feeling of instability, particularly with increased activity or walking on uneven surfaces. (aafp.org)
  • To meet our criteria for inclusion, subjects had to have worn stilettos with a minimum heel height of 5 cm at least five times a week for a minimum of 2 years. (biologists.org)
  • Heel height makes them look great, but not so high that my feet ache. (zappos.com)
  • The church is shaped like a high-heel shoe 17.76 meters in height, 11.91 meters in width, and 25.16 meters in length. (wikipedia.org)
  • Size: 40 Europe/9.5-10 US Women's Heel Height: 3 Platform: Shaft Height: Shaft Circumference: All of our products come from a smoke free environment! (ebay.ca)
  • Heel Height- 3 inches We ship in Flat Rate padded envelope to save on shipping cost. (ebay.ca)
  • SpA has also been subdivided into "axial" and "peripheral" SpA according to whether the involvement is mainly in the spine or outside the spine, such as in the knees and heels. (uptodate.com)
  • Pain, stiffness, and limited mobility outside the spine, such as in the knees and heels, also occur in some patients. (uptodate.com)
  • Later in the same year, the church received the Guinness World Records certification as the world's largest high-heel shoe-shaped structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In persistent cases, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) may be used to treat the heel pain. (fas-med.net)
  • Featuring soft Italian, veggie-tanned leathers, complete with 'f' pattern etchings, on a 1.5' 100% bamboo heel and a molded sole that extends to the heel for extra shock absorption, the lace-up Promise keeps the fire alight. (fluevog.com)