A nucleus located in the middle hypothalamus in the most ventral part of the third ventricle near the entrance of the infundibular recess. Its small cells are in close contact with the ependyma.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
A 30-kDa protein synthesized primarily in the ANTERIOR PITUITARY GLAND and the HYPOTHALAMUS. It is also found in the skin and other peripheral tissues. Depending on species and tissues, POMC is cleaved by PROHORMONE CONVERTASES yielding various active peptides including ACTH; BETA-LIPOTROPIN; ENDORPHINS; MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING HORMONES; and others (GAMMA-LPH; CORTICOTROPIN-LIKE INTERMEDIATE LOBE PEPTIDE; N-terminal peptide of POMC or NPP).
Ventral part of the DIENCEPHALON extending from the region of the OPTIC CHIASM to the caudal border of the MAMMILLARY BODIES and forming the inferior and lateral walls of the THIRD VENTRICLE.
A 36-amino acid peptide present in many organs and in many sympathetic noradrenergic neurons. It has vasoconstrictor and natriuretic activity and regulates local blood flow, glandular secretion, and smooth muscle activity. The peptide also stimulates feeding and drinking behavior and influences secretion of pituitary hormones.
Intercellular signaling peptides that were originally characterized by their ability to suppress NEOPLASM METASTASIS. Kisspeptins have since been found to play an important role in the neuroendocrine regulation of REPRODUCTION.
A secreted protein of approximately 131 amino acids that is related to AGOUTI SIGNALING PROTEIN and is also an antagonist of MELANOCORTIN RECEPTOR activity. It is expressed primarily in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the ADRENAL GLAND. As a paracrine signaling molecule, AGRP is known to regulate food intake and body weight. Elevated AGRP has been associated with OBESITY.
A mammalian neuropeptide of 10 amino acids that belongs to the tachykinin family. It is similar in structure and action to SUBSTANCE P and NEUROKININ A with the ability to excite neurons, dilate blood vessels, and contract smooth muscles, such as those in the URINARY BLADDER and UTERUS.
Nucleus in the anterior part of the HYPOTHALAMUS.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A nucleus of the middle hypothalamus, the largest cell group of the tuberal region with small-to-medium size cells.
Middle portion of the hypothalamus containing the arcuate, dorsomedial, ventromedial nuclei, the TUBER CINEREUM and the PITUITARY GLAND.
Physiologic mechanisms which regulate or control the appetite and food intake.
The consumption of edible substances.
A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.
GRAY MATTER located in the dorsomedial part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA associated with the solitary tract. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from most organ systems including the terminations of the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves. It is a major coordinator of AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM regulation of cardiovascular, respiratory, gustatory, gastrointestinal, and chemoreceptive aspects of HOMEOSTASIS. The solitary nucleus is also notable for the large number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS which are found therein.
The lack or loss of APPETITE accompanied by an aversion to food and the inability to eat. It is the defining characteristic of the disorder ANOREXIA NERVOSA.
Ingestion of a greater than optimal quantity of food.
Cell surface receptors for obesity factor (LEPTIN), a hormone secreted by the WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Upon leptin-receptor interaction, the signal is mediated through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway to regulate food intake, energy balance and fat storage.
A 13-amino acid peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE, the N-terminal segment of ACTH. ACTH (1-13) is amidated at the C-terminal to form ACTH (1-13)NH2 which in turn is acetylated to form alpha-MSH in the secretory granules. Alpha-MSH stimulates the synthesis and distribution of MELANIN in MELANOCYTES in mammals and MELANOPHORES in lower vertebrates.
An aggregation of cells in the middle hypothalamus dorsal to the ventromedial nucleus and bordering the THIRD VENTRICLE.
Peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) which can stimulate MELANOCYTES or CORTICOTROPHS. Melanocortins include ACTH; ALPHA-MSH; and other peptides such as BETA-MSH and GAMMA-MSH, derived from other fragments of POMC. These peptides act through a variety of MELANOCORTIN RECEPTORS to control different functions including steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis, feeding, and skin pigmentation.
Region of hypothalamus between the ANTERIOR COMMISSURE and OPTIC CHIASM.
Collection of pleomorphic cells in the caudal part of the anterior horn of the LATERAL VENTRICLE, in the region of the OLFACTORY TUBERCLE, lying between the head of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE. It is part of the so-called VENTRAL STRIATUM, a composite structure considered part of the BASAL GANGLIA.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Cell surface proteins that bind neuropeptide Y with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells.
One of the FLAVORING AGENTS used to impart a meat-like flavor.
Area in the hypothalamus bounded medially by the mammillothalamic tract and the anterior column of the FORNIX (BRAIN). The medial edge of the INTERNAL CAPSULE and the subthalamic region form its lateral boundary. It contains the lateral hypothalamic nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus, lateral tuberal nuclei, and fibers of the MEDIAL FOREBRAIN BUNDLE.
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
A class of opioid peptides including dynorphin A, dynorphin B, and smaller fragments of these peptides. Dynorphins prefer kappa-opioid receptors (RECEPTORS, OPIOID, KAPPA) and have been shown to play a role as central nervous system transmitters.
Methods used to label and follow the course of NEURAL PATHWAYS by AXONAL TRANSPORT of injected NEURONAL TRACT-TRACERS.
Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the c-fos genes (GENES, FOS). They are involved in growth-related transcriptional control. c-fos combines with c-jun (PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-JUN) to form a c-fos/c-jun heterodimer (TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR AP-1) that binds to the TRE (TPA-responsive element) in promoters of certain genes.
Several groups of nuclei in the thalamus that serve as the major relay centers for sensory impulses in the brain.
Raised area at the infundibular region of the HYPOTHALAMUS at the floor of the BRAIN, ventral to the THIRD VENTRICLE and adjacent to the ARCUATE NUCLEUS OF HYPOTHALAMUS. It contains the terminals of hypothalamic neurons and the capillary network of hypophyseal portal system, thus serving as a neuroendocrine link between the brain and the PITUITARY GLAND.
Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.
Peptides with the ability to stimulate pigmented cells MELANOCYTES in mammals and MELANOPHORES in lower vertebrates. By stimulating the synthesis and distribution of MELANIN in these pigmented cells, they increase coloration of skin and other tissue. MSHs, derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), are produced by MELANOTROPHS in the INTERMEDIATE LOBE OF PITUITARY; CORTICOTROPHS in the ANTERIOR LOBE OF PITUITARY, and the hypothalamic neurons in the ARCUATE NUCLEUS OF HYPOTHALAMUS.
Injections into the cerebral ventricles.
A melanocortin receptor subtype found primarily in BRAIN. It shows specificity for ALPHA-MSH; BETA-MSH; GAMMA-MSH and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE.
A 31-amino acid peptide that is the C-terminal fragment of BETA-LIPOTROPIN. It acts on OPIOID RECEPTORS and is an analgesic. Its first four amino acids at the N-terminal are identical to the tetrapeptide sequence of METHIONINE ENKEPHALIN and LEUCINE ENKEPHALIN.
The brain stem nucleus that receives the central input from the cochlear nerve. The cochlear nucleus is located lateral and dorsolateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncles and is functionally divided into dorsal and ventral parts. It is tonotopically organized, performs the first stage of central auditory processing, and projects (directly or indirectly) to higher auditory areas including the superior olivary nuclei, the medial geniculi, the inferior colliculi, and the auditory cortex.
A 28-amino acid, acylated, orexigenic peptide that is a ligand for GROWTH HORMONE SECRETAGOGUE RECEPTORS. Ghrelin is widely expressed but primarily in the stomach in the adults. Ghrelin acts centrally to stimulate growth hormone secretion and food intake, and peripherally to regulate energy homeostasis. Its large precursor protein, known as appetite-regulating hormone or motilin-related peptide, contains ghrelin and obestatin.
A neuropeptide that is highly homologous to GALANIN. It is produced by proteolytic processing of a larger protein that is unrelated to prepro-galanin and preferentially binds to GALANIN-2 RECEPTOR.
Substances used to identify the location and to characterize the types of NEURAL PATHWAYS.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Collections of small neurons centrally scattered among many fibers from the level of the TROCHLEAR NUCLEUS in the midbrain to the hypoglossal area in the MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
A class of cell surface receptors for tachykinins that prefers neurokinin B (neurokinin beta, neuromedin K) over other tachykinins. Neurokinin-3 (NK-3) receptors have been cloned and are members of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. They have been found in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues.
A neuropeptide of 29-30 amino acids depending on the species. Galanin is widely distributed throughout the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and INTESTINES. There are various subtypes of GALANIN RECEPTORS implicating roles of galanin in regulating FOOD INTAKE; pain perception; memory; and other neuroendocrine functions.
A decapeptide that stimulates the synthesis and secretion of both pituitary gonadotropins, LUTEINIZING HORMONE and FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE. GnRH is produced by neurons in the septum PREOPTIC AREA of the HYPOTHALAMUS and released into the pituitary portal blood, leading to stimulation of GONADOTROPHS in the ANTERIOR PITUITARY GLAND.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
Four clusters of neurons located deep within the WHITE MATTER of the CEREBELLUM, which are the nucleus dentatus, nucleus emboliformis, nucleus globosus, and nucleus fastigii.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
Neural nuclei situated in the septal region. They have afferent and cholinergic efferent connections with a variety of FOREBRAIN and BRAIN STEM areas including the HIPPOCAMPAL FORMATION, the LATERAL HYPOTHALAMUS, the tegmentum, and the AMYGDALA. Included are the dorsal, lateral, medial, and triangular septal nuclei, septofimbrial nucleus, nucleus of diagonal band, nucleus of anterior commissure, and the nucleus of stria terminalis.
Gated transport mechanisms by which proteins or RNA are moved across the NUCLEAR MEMBRANE.
Elongated gray mass of the neostriatum located adjacent to the lateral ventricle of the brain.
Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.
A narrow cleft inferior to the CORPUS CALLOSUM, within the DIENCEPHALON, between the paired thalami. Its floor is formed by the HYPOTHALAMUS, its anterior wall by the lamina terminalis, and its roof by EPENDYMA. It communicates with the FOURTH VENTRICLE by the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT, and with the LATERAL VENTRICLES by the interventricular foramina.
The surgical removal of one or both ovaries.
A melanocortin receptor subtype found primarily in BRAIN. It shows specificity for ALPHA-MSH; BETA-MSH and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE.
Transmembrane proteins that recognize and bind GHRELIN, a potent stimulator of GROWTH HORMONE secretion and food intake in mammals. Ghrelin receptors are found in the pituitary and HYPOTHALAMUS. They belong to the family of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.
A 36-amino acid peptide produced by the L cells of the distal small intestine and colon. Peptide YY inhibits gastric and pancreatic secretion.
A genus of hamsters characterized by small size, very short tail, and short, broad feet with hairy soles.
Congenital structural abnormalities of the respiratory system.
The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.
A family of G-protein-coupled receptors that have specificity for MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING HORMONES and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. There are several subtypes of melanocortin receptors, each having a distinct ligand specificity profile and tissue localization.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine, tetrahydrobiopterin, and oxygen to 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine, dihydrobiopterin, and water. EC 1.14.16.2.
Peptide hormones produced by NEURONS of various regions in the HYPOTHALAMUS. They are released into the pituitary portal circulation to stimulate or inhibit PITUITARY GLAND functions. VASOPRESSIN and OXYTOCIN, though produced in the hypothalamus, are not included here for they are transported down the AXONS to the POSTERIOR LOBE OF PITUITARY before being released into the portal circulation.
A form of acupuncture with electrical impulses passing through the needles to stimulate NERVE TISSUE. It can be used for ANALGESIA; ANESTHESIA; REHABILITATION; and treatment for diseases.
An ovoid densely packed collection of small cells of the anterior hypothalamus lying close to the midline in a shallow impression of the OPTIC CHIASM.
The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.
STILBENES with AMIDINES attached.
A pinkish-yellow portion of the midbrain situated in the rostral mesencephalic tegmentum. It receives a large projection from the contralateral half of the CEREBELLUM via the superior cerebellar peduncle and a projection from the ipsilateral MOTOR CORTEX.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Nuclei of the trigeminal nerve situated in the brain stem. They include the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), the principal sensory nucleus, the mesencephalic nucleus, and the motor nucleus.
Hormones synthesized from amino acids. They are distinguished from INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS in that their actions are systemic.
An irregularly shaped cavity in the RHOMBENCEPHALON, located between the MEDULLA OBLONGATA; the PONS; and the isthmus in front, and the CEREBELLUM behind. It is continuous with the central canal of the cord below and with the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT above, and through its lateral and median apertures it communicates with the SUBARACHNOID SPACE.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
Lens-shaped structure on the inner aspect of the INTERNAL CAPSULE. The SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS and pathways traversing this region are concerned with the integration of somatic motor function.
Agents that are used to suppress appetite.
A system of NEURONS that has the specialized function to produce and secrete HORMONES, and that constitutes, in whole or in part, an ENDOCRINE SYSTEM or organ.
The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.
A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Luteinizing hormone regulates steroid production by the interstitial cells of the TESTIS and the OVARY. The preovulatory LUTEINIZING HORMONE surge in females induces OVULATION, and subsequent LUTEINIZATION of the follicle. LUTEINIZING HORMONE consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.
Hypothalamic nucleus overlying the beginning of the OPTIC TRACT.
Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.
A pyridoxal-phosphate protein that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of L-glutamic acid to form gamma-aminobutyric acid and carbon dioxide. The enzyme is found in bacteria and in invertebrate and vertebrate nervous systems. It is the rate-limiting enzyme in determining GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID levels in normal nervous tissues. The brain enzyme also acts on L-cysteate, L-cysteine sulfinate, and L-aspartate. EC 4.1.1.15.
The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Behavioral response associated with the achieving of gratification.
A peptide of about 41 amino acids that stimulates the release of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. CRH is synthesized by neurons in the PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS of the HYPOTHALAMUS. After being released into the pituitary portal circulation, CRH stimulates the release of ACTH from the PITUITARY GLAND. CRH can also be synthesized in other tissues, such as PLACENTA; ADRENAL MEDULLA; and TESTIS.
Small, nonspecific nerve cells scattered in the periventricular GRAY MATTER, separating the medial part of the thalamus from the EPENDYMA of the THIRD VENTRICLE. The group includes the paraventricular nucleus, paratenial nucleus, reuniens nucleus, rhomboidal nucleus, and subfascular nucleus.
Central gray matter surrounding the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT in the MESENCEPHALON. Physiologically it is probably involved in RAGE reactions, the LORDOSIS REFLEX; FEEDING responses, bladder tonus, and pain.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Abstaining from all food.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is SEROTONIN.
An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.
The period of cyclic physiological and behavior changes in non-primate female mammals that exhibit ESTRUS. The estrous cycle generally consists of 4 or 5 distinct periods corresponding to the endocrine status (PROESTRUS; ESTRUS; METESTRUS; DIESTRUS; and ANESTRUS).
The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
The major nerves supplying sympathetic innervation to the abdomen. The greater, lesser, and lowest (or smallest) splanchnic nerves are formed by preganglionic fibers from the spinal cord which pass through the paravertebral ganglia and then to the celiac ganglia and plexuses. The lumbar splanchnic nerves carry fibers which pass through the lumbar paravertebral ganglia to the mesenteric and hypogastric ganglia.
A genus of bioluminescent marine invertebrates in the family Renillidae, order Pennatulacea, class ANTHOZOA. It contains Renilla LUCIFERASE which oxidizes coelenterazine resulting in LUMINESCENCE.
A mechanism of communication with a physiological system for homeostasis, adaptation, etc. Physiological feedback is mediated through extensive feedback mechanisms that use physiological cues as feedback loop signals to control other systems.
Substances used for their pharmacological actions on GABAergic systems. GABAergic agents include agonists, antagonists, degradation or uptake inhibitors, depleters, precursors, and modulators of receptor function.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
Hormones secreted by the PITUITARY GLAND including those from the anterior lobe (adenohypophysis), the posterior lobe (neurohypophysis), and the ill-defined intermediate lobe. Structurally, they include small peptides, proteins, and glycoproteins. They are under the regulation of neural signals (NEUROTRANSMITTERS) or neuroendocrine signals (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) from the hypothalamus as well as feedback from their targets such as ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES; ANDROGENS; ESTROGENS.
Neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is ACETYLCHOLINE.
One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.
Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.
The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.
A part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA situated in the olivary body. It is involved with motor control and is a major source of sensory input to the CEREBELLUM.
A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A group of related plant alkaloids that contain the BERBERINE heterocyclic ring structure.
One of the three major families of endogenous opioid peptides. The enkephalins are pentapeptides that are widespread in the central and peripheral nervous systems and in the adrenal medulla.
'Nerve tissue proteins' are specialized proteins found within the nervous system's biological tissue, including neurofilaments, neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, and neural cell adhesion molecules, which facilitate structural support, intracellular communication, and synaptic connectivity essential for proper neurological function.
The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.
Natural recurring desire for food. Alterations may be induced by APPETITE DEPRESSANTS or APPETITE STIMULANTS.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
Two populations of Zucker rats have been cited in research--the "fatty" or obese and the lean. The "fatty" rat (Rattus norvegicus) appeared as a spontaneous mutant. The obese condition appears to be due to a single recessive gene.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The surgical removal of one or both testicles.
Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.
A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.
The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.
The delivery of a drug into a fluid-filled cavity of the brain.
A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).
A peptide of 44 amino acids in most species that stimulates the release and synthesis of GROWTH HORMONE. GHRF (or GRF) is synthesized by neurons in the ARCUATE NUCLEUS of the HYPOTHALAMUS. After being released into the pituitary portal circulation, GHRF stimulates GH release by the SOMATOTROPHS in the PITUITARY GLAND.

Antagonistic effects of extract from leaves of ginkgo biloba on glutamate neurotoxicity. (1/497)

AIM: To determine whether the extract of leaves of Ginkgo biloba L (EGb) and several active constituents of EGb have protective effects against glutamate (Glu)-induced neuronal damage. METHODS: Microscopy and image analysis of nucleus areas in the arcuate nuclei (AN) of mice were made. The neuronal viability in primary cultures from mouse cerebral cortex was assessed using MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] staining and the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) of single neuron was measured using Fura-2. RESULTS: EGb (2.5 mg.L-1) and its constituent ginkgolide B (Gin B, 2 mg.L-1) protected the neuronal viability against Glu-induced injury, and prevented the Glu-induced elevation in [Ca2+]i. EGb (3-10 mg.kg-1) attenuated the decrease of nucleus areas in arcuate nuclei induced by Glu (1 g.kg-1, s.c.). CONCLUSION: EGb and Gin B prevent neurons from Glu neurotoxicity through reduction of the rise in [Ca2+]i.  (+info)

Multiple neuropeptide Y receptors regulate K+ and Ca2+ channels in acutely isolated neurons from the rat arcuate nucleus. (2/497)

We examined the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and related peptides on Ca2+ and K+ currents in acutely isolated neurons from the arcuate nucleus of the rat. NPY analogues that activated all of the known NPY receptors (Y1-Y5), produced voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca2+ currents and activation of inwardly rectifying K+ currents in arcuate neurons. Both of these effects could occur simultaneously in the same cells. In some cells, activation of Y4 NPY receptors also caused oscillations in [Ca2+]i. NPY hyperpolarized arcuate neurons through the activation of a K+ conductance and increased the spike threshold. Molecular biological studies indicated that arcuate neurons possessed all of the previously cloned NPY receptor types (Y1, Y2, Y4, and Y5). Thus activation of multiple types NPY receptors on arcuate neurons can regulate both Ca2+ and K+ conductances leading to a reduction in neuronal excitability and a suppression of neurotransmitter release.  (+info)

Analgesia-producing mechanism of processed Aconiti tuber: role of dynorphin, an endogenous kappa-opioid ligand, in the rodent spinal cord. (3/497)

The analgesia-producing mechanism of processed Aconiti tuber was examined using rodents whose nociceptive threshold was decreased by loading repeated cold stress (RCS). The antinociceptive effect of processed Aconiti tuber (0.3 g/kg, p.o.) in RCS-loaded mice was antagonized by pretreatment with a kappa-opioid antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (10 mg/kg, s.c.), and was abolished by an intrathecal injection of anti-dynorphin antiserum (5 microg). The Aconiti tuber-induced antinociception was inhibited by both dexamethasone (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) and a dopamine D2 antagonist, sulpiride (10 mg/kg, i.p.), in RCS-loaded mice, and it was eliminated by both an electric lesion of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (HARN) and a highly selective dopamine D2 antagonist, eticlopride (0.05 microg), administered into the HARN in RCS-loaded rats. These results suggest that the analgesic effect of processed Aconiti tuber was produced via the stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors by dynorphin released in the spinal cord. It was also shown that dopamine D2 receptors in the HARN were involved in the expression of the analgesic activity of processed Aconiti tuber.  (+info)

STZ-induced diabetes decreases and insulin normalizes POMC mRNA in arcuate nucleus and pituitary in rats. (4/497)

Effects of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and insulin on opioid peptide gene expression were examined in rats. In experiment 1, three groups were administered STZ (75 mg/kg ip single injection). Two groups were killed at either 2 or 4 wk. In the third group, insulin treatment (7.0 IU/kg x 1 day for 3 wk) was initiated 1 wk after STZ injection. STZ induced hyperphagia and reduced weight gain. Insulin decreased food intake and increased body weight relative to diabetes. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA in arcuate nucleus (Arc) and pituitary decreased in diabetes and normalized after insulin treatment. Prodynorphin (proDyn) mRNA increased in diabetes and normalized in the pituitary after insulin but not in the Arc. Diabetes did not alter proenkephalin (proEnk) expression in the Arc or pituitary, nor dynorphin A1-17 or beta-endorphin in paraventricular nucleus (PVN). alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) peptide levels were decreased in the PVN and normalized following insulin treatment. Diabetes increased Arc neuropeptide Y mRNA, and insulin suppressed this increase. In experiment 2, insulin (2.5 IU/kg sc) daily for 1 wk in normal rats increased Arc POMC mRNA, but not proDyn and proEnk mRNA. These results suggest that Arc POMC expression and PVN alpha-MSH peptide levels decrease in diabetes. Also, insulin may influence Arc and pituitary POMC activity in neurons that regulate energy metabolism.  (+info)

Expression of preproopiomelanocortin mRNA and preprodynorphin mRNA in brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats. (5/497)

AIM: To compare the expressions of prepropiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA and preprodynorphin (PPD) mRNA between 16-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). METHODS: The expression of POMC mRNA and PPD mRNA were detected with nonradioactive in situ hybridization by digoxigenin-labeled RNA probe. RESULTS: POMC mRNA mainly was expressed in arcuate nucleus, compared with WKY, SHR had higher level of POMC mRNA (542). PPD mRNA was found in hippocampus, hypothalamus, central gray, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and thoracic spinal cord (T4-T6). Compared with WKY, PPD mRNA level of SHR decreased in dentate gyrus (2342), NTS (381), and medial preoptic area (467); no difference was observed in arcuate nucleus (263), thoracic spinal cord (750-1800) and CA1, CA2, CA3 of hippocampus (1674, 2014, 2626). CONCLUSION: Increase of POMC mRNA in arcuate nucleus and decrease of PPD mRNA in dentate gyrus of SHR may be associated with the genesis of spontaneous hypertension.  (+info)

Distribution of estrogen receptor-beta messenger ribonucleic acid in the male sheep hypothalamus. (6/497)

As a first step in determining possible influences of the newly discovered estrogen receptor (ER)-beta on reproduction, we have localized mRNA for ER-beta within the male sheep hypothalamus using in situ hybridization and a rat ER-beta cRNA probe. Highest amounts of hybridization signal were observed in the preoptic area (POA), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and supraoptic nucleus. Relatively moderate amounts of hybridization signal were observed in the retrochiasmatic area (RCH), anterior hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamus, and lateral hypothalamus. Only a low level of hybridization signal was observed in the ventromedial hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and arcuate nucleus. The presence of ER-beta mRNA in several areas of the male sheep hypothalamus suggests multiple functions for this receptor. The distribution of ER-beta in the ovine hypothalamus was similar to that described for the rat, suggesting a high degree of functional conservation across species. A role for ER-beta in influencing reproduction is suggested by its presence in the POA and RCH, regions of the hypothalamus that control reproduction.  (+info)

Pre- and postsynaptic actions of opioid and orphan opioid agonists in the rat arcuate nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamus in vitro. (7/497)

1. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording from neurones in an in vitro slice preparation, we have examined opioid- and orphanin FQ (OFQ)-mediated modulation of synaptic transmission in the rat arcuate nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). 2. Application of OFQ activated a Ba2+-sensitive and inwardly rectifying K+ conductance in approximately 50 % of arcuate nucleus neurones and approximately 95 % of VMH neurones. The OFQ-activated current was blocked by the nociceptin antagonist [Phe1Psi(CH2NH)Gly2]-nociceptin(1-13) NH2 (NCA), a peptide that on its own exhibited only weak agonist activity at high concentrations (> 1 microM). Similar current activation was observed with the mu agonist DAMGO but not delta (DPDPE) or kappa (U69593) agonists. 3. In arcuate nucleus neurones, DAMGO (1 microM), U69593 (1 microM) and OFQ (100 nM to 1 microM) but not DPDPE (1 microM) were found to depress the amplitude of electrically evoked glutamatergic postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decrease the magnitude of paired-pulse depression, indicating that opioid receptors were located presynaptically. 4. In VMH neurones, DAMGO strongly depressed the EPSC amplitude in all cells examined. DAMGO decreased the magnitude of paired-pulse depression, indicating that mu receptors were located presynaptically. U69593 weakly depressed the EPSC while OFQ and DPDPE had no effect. 5. In VMH neurones, DAMGO depressed the frequency of miniature EPSCs (-58 %) in the presence of tetrodotoxin and Cd2+ (100 microM), suggesting that the actions of mu receptors could be mediated by an inhibition of the synaptic vesicle release process downstream of Ca2+ entry. 6. The data presented show that presynaptic modulation of excitatory neurotransmission in the arcuate nucleus occurs through mu, kappa and the orphan opioid ORL-1 receptors while in the VMH presynaptic modulation only occurs through mu opioid receptors. Additionally, postsynaptic mu and ORL-1 receptors in both the arcuate nucleus and VMH modulate neuronal excitability through activation of a K+ conductance.  (+info)

Expression of the Huntington's disease gene is regulated in astrocytes in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus of postpartum rats. (8/497)

Huntington's disease (HD) is one of a number of neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG repeats within specific genes. Huntingtin, the protein product of the HD gene, is widely expressed in neural and nonneural human and rodent tissue. The function of the wild-type or mutated form of huntingtin is currently unknown. We have observed that relative to naive and male animals, huntingtin protein was significantly increased in the arcuate nucleus of postpartum rats. Using an oligonucleotide probe, in situ and Northern blot hybridization confirmed the expression of huntingtin mRNA. Quantification of the in situ hybridization signal in the arcuate nucleus revealed an approximate sevenfold increase in the expression of huntingtin mRNA in postpartum, lactating animals compared with naive female or male animals. Emulsion autoradiography and immunohistochemistry revealed that the cells with elevated huntingtin expression had a stellate conformation that morphologically resembled astrocytes. Dual label immunofluorescence immunohistochemistry demonstrated the colocalization of huntingtin and glial fibrillary acidic protein in these cells, confirming that they were astrocytes. Astrocytes expressing huntingtin were consistently found in close apposition to neuronal soma, suggesting interactions between these cell types. During the perinatal and postnatal period, the hypothalamus undergoes alterations in metabolic function. Our results support the idea of glia-induced metabolic changes in the hypothalamus. These results provide the first demonstration of naturally occurring changes in the expression of the Huntington's disease gene in the brain and suggest that huntingtin may play an important role in the processes that regulate neuroendocrine function.  (+info)

The arcuate nucleus is a part of the hypothalamus in the brain. It is involved in the regulation of various physiological functions, including appetite, satiety, and reproductive hormones. The arcuate nucleus contains two main types of neurons: those that produce neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein, which stimulate feeding and reduce energy expenditure; and those that produce pro-opiomelanocortin and cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript, which suppress appetite and increase energy expenditure. These neurons communicate with other parts of the brain to help maintain energy balance and reproductive function.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is a precursor protein that gets cleaved into several biologically active peptides in the body. These peptides include adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), beta-lipotropin, and multiple opioid peptides such as beta-endorphin, met-enkephalin, and leu-enkephalin.

ACTH stimulates the release of cortisol from the adrenal gland, while beta-lipotropin has various metabolic functions. The opioid peptides derived from POMC have pain-relieving (analgesic) and rewarding effects in the brain. Dysregulation of the POMC system has been implicated in several medical conditions, including obesity, addiction, and certain types of hormone deficiencies.

The hypothalamus is a small, vital region of the brain that lies just below the thalamus and forms part of the limbic system. It plays a crucial role in many important functions including:

1. Regulation of body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue, sleep, and circadian rhythms.
2. Production and regulation of hormones through its connection with the pituitary gland (the hypophysis). It controls the release of various hormones by producing releasing and inhibiting factors that regulate the anterior pituitary's function.
3. Emotional responses, behavior, and memory formation through its connections with the limbic system structures like the amygdala and hippocampus.
4. Autonomic nervous system regulation, which controls involuntary physiological functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and digestion.
5. Regulation of the immune system by interacting with the autonomic nervous system.

Damage to the hypothalamus can lead to various disorders like diabetes insipidus, growth hormone deficiency, altered temperature regulation, sleep disturbances, and emotional or behavioral changes.

Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a neurotransmitter and neuropeptide that is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family, which includes peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide. NPY plays important roles in various physiological functions such as energy balance, feeding behavior, stress response, anxiety, memory, and cardiovascular regulation. It is involved in the modulation of neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and neural development. NPY is synthesized from a larger precursor protein called prepro-NPY, which is post-translationally processed to generate the mature NPY peptide. The NPY system has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as obesity, depression, anxiety disorders, hypertension, and drug addiction.

Kisspeptins are a family of peptides that are derived from the preproprotein kisspeptin. The most well-known member of this family is kisspeptin-54, which is also known as metastin. Kisspeptins play important roles in several physiological processes, including the regulation of growth, inflammation, and energy homeostasis. However, they are perhaps best known for their role in the reproductive system.

In the reproductive system, kisspeptins act as key regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which is responsible for controlling reproductive function. Kisspeptins are produced by neurons in the hypothalamus and bind to receptors on other neurons that release gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). GnRH then stimulates the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), which act on the gonads to promote the production of sex steroids and eggs or sperm.

Dysregulation of the HPG axis, including abnormal kisspeptin signaling, has been implicated in a number of reproductive disorders, such as precocious puberty, delayed puberty, and infertility. As such, there is significant interest in understanding the role of kisspeptins in reproductive function and developing therapies that target this pathway.

Agouti-related protein (AGRP) is a neuropeptide that functions as an endogenous antagonist of melanocortin receptors, specifically MC3R and MC4R. It is expressed in the hypothalamus and plays a crucial role in regulating energy balance, body weight, and glucose homeostasis. AGRP increases food intake and decreases energy expenditure by inhibiting melanocortin signaling in the hypothalamus. Dysregulation of AGRP has been implicated in various metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Neurokinin B is a neuropeptide belonging to the tachykinin family, which also includes substance P and neurokinin A. It is encoded by the TAC3 gene in humans and is widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurokinin B exerts its effects by binding to the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) and plays a role in various physiological processes, including the regulation of feeding behavior, reproduction, and nociception (pain perception). It has also been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as inflammatory diseases, chronic pain, and certain types of cancer.

The Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus (PVN) is a nucleus in the hypothalamus, which is a part of the brain that regulates various autonomic functions and homeostatic processes. The PVN plays a crucial role in the regulation of neuroendocrine and autonomic responses to stress, as well as the control of fluid and electrolyte balance, cardiovascular function, and energy balance.

The PVN is composed of several subdivisions, including the magnocellular and parvocellular divisions. The magnocellular neurons produce and release two neuropeptides, oxytocin and vasopressin (also known as antidiuretic hormone), into the circulation via the posterior pituitary gland. These neuropeptides play important roles in social behavior, reproduction, and fluid balance.

The parvocellular neurons, on the other hand, project to various brain regions and the pituitary gland, where they release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is responsible for the stress response. The PVN also contains neurons that produce corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a key neurotransmitter involved in the regulation of the HPA axis and the stress response.

Overall, the Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus is an essential component of the brain's regulatory systems that help maintain homeostasis and respond to stressors. Dysfunction of the PVN has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including hypertension, obesity, and mood disorders.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

The ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) is a collection of neurons located in the ventromedial region of the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that regulates various autonomic and endocrine functions. The VMN plays an essential role in regulating several physiological processes, including feeding behavior, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. It contains neurons that are sensitive to changes in nutrient status, such as leptin and insulin levels, and helps to integrate this information with other signals to modulate food intake and energy expenditure. Additionally, the VMN has been implicated in the regulation of various emotional and motivational states, including anxiety, fear, and reward processing.

I believe you may be referring to the "ventral" part of the hypothalamus, as there isn't a widely recognized anatomical division called the "middle" hypothalamus. The ventral hypothalamus is a region that contains several critical structures, including:

1. The infundibular stem: This is a funnel-shaped structure that extends downward from the hypothalamus and forms the beginning of the pituitary stalk. It contains tuber cinereum and the median eminence.
2. Tuber cinereum: A region with several nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, which plays a role in regulating feeding behavior, growth hormone release, and sexual function.
3. Median eminence: A crucial area where the hypothalamus interacts with the pituitary gland. It contains nerve terminals that release neurohormones into the portal capillaries, which then carry these substances to the anterior pituitary to regulate hormone secretion.

The ventral hypothalamus is essential for various functions, such as releasing and inhibiting hormones, regulating body temperature, hunger, thirst, sleep, emotional behavior, and parental behaviors.

Appetite regulation refers to the physiological and psychological processes that control and influence the desire to eat food. This complex system involves a variety of hormones, neurotransmitters, and neural pathways that work together to help maintain energy balance and regulate body weight. The hypothalamus in the brain plays a key role in appetite regulation by integrating signals from the digestive system, fat cells, and other organs to adjust feelings of hunger and fullness.

The hormones leptin and ghrelin are also important regulators of appetite. Leptin is released from fat cells and acts on the hypothalamus to suppress appetite and promote weight loss, while ghrelin is produced in the stomach and stimulates appetite and promotes weight gain. Other factors that can influence appetite regulation include stress, emotions, sleep patterns, and cultural influences.

Abnormalities in appetite regulation can contribute to the development of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder, as well as obesity and other health problems. Understanding the mechanisms of appetite regulation is an important area of research for developing effective treatments for these conditions.

The medical definition of "eating" refers to the process of consuming and ingesting food or nutrients into the body. This process typically involves several steps, including:

1. Food preparation: This may involve cleaning, chopping, cooking, or combining ingredients to make them ready for consumption.
2. Ingestion: The act of taking food or nutrients into the mouth and swallowing it.
3. Digestion: Once food is ingested, it travels down the esophagus and enters the stomach, where it is broken down by enzymes and acids to facilitate absorption of nutrients.
4. Absorption: Nutrients are absorbed through the walls of the small intestine and transported to cells throughout the body for use as energy or building blocks for growth and repair.
5. Elimination: Undigested food and waste products are eliminated from the body through the large intestine (colon) and rectum.

Eating is an essential function that provides the body with the nutrients it needs to maintain health, grow, and repair itself. Disorders of eating, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, can have serious consequences for physical and mental health.

Leptin is a hormone primarily produced and released by adipocytes, which are the fat cells in our body. It plays a crucial role in regulating energy balance and appetite by sending signals to the brain when the body has had enough food. This helps control body weight by suppressing hunger and increasing energy expenditure. Leptin also influences various metabolic processes, including glucose homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, and immune response. Defects in leptin signaling can lead to obesity and other metabolic disorders.

The solitary nucleus, also known as the nucleus solitarius, is a collection of neurons located in the medulla oblongata region of the brainstem. It plays a crucial role in the processing and integration of sensory information, particularly taste and visceral afferent fibers from internal organs. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from various cranial nerves, including the glossopharyngeal (cranial nerve IX) and vagus nerves (cranial nerve X), and is involved in reflex responses related to swallowing, vomiting, and cardiovascular regulation.

Anorexia is a medical condition defined as a loss of appetite or aversion to food, leading to significant weight loss. It can be a symptom of various underlying causes, such as mental health disorders (most commonly an eating disorder called anorexia nervosa), gastrointestinal issues, cancer, infections, or side effects of medication. In this definition, we are primarily referring to anorexia as a symptom rather than the specific eating disorder anorexia nervosa.

Anorexia nervosa is a psychological eating disorder characterized by:

1. Restriction of energy intake leading to significantly low body weight (in context of age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health)
2. Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain
3. Disturbed body image, such as overvaluation of self-worth regarding shape or weight, or denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Anorexia nervosa has two subtypes: restricting type and binge eating/purging type. The restricting type involves limiting food intake without engaging in binge eating or purging behaviors (such as self-induced vomiting or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas). In contrast, the binge eating/purging type includes recurrent episodes of binge eating and compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain.

It is essential to differentiate between anorexia as a symptom and anorexia nervosa as a distinct psychological disorder when discussing medical definitions.

Hyperphagia is a medical term that describes excessive eating or increased appetite, often to the point of compulsive overeating. It's more than just a simple increase in hunger or appetite; it's characterized by consuming large amounts of food beyond what is needed for normal growth and health.

This condition can be associated with several medical conditions. For instance, it's a common symptom in Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects appetite, growth, and cognitive development. It can also occur in certain types of brain injuries or disorders affecting the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that regulates hunger and fullness signals.

However, it's important to note that hyperphagia should not be confused with binge eating disorder, another eating disorder characterized by consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time, but without the feeling of loss of control that is typical of binge eating.

As always, if you or someone else is experiencing symptoms of hyperphagia, it's important to seek medical advice to identify and treat any underlying conditions.

Leptin receptors are cell surface receptors that bind to and respond to the hormone leptin. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the hypothalamus in the brain, which plays a crucial role in regulating energy balance and appetite. Leptin is a hormone produced by adipose (fat) tissue that signals information about the size of fat stores to the brain. When leptin binds to its receptors, it activates signaling pathways that help regulate energy intake and expenditure, body weight, and glucose metabolism.

There are several subtypes of leptin receptors (LEPR), including LEPRa, LEPRb, LEPC, and LEPD. Among these, the LEPRb isoform is the most widely expressed and functionally important form. Mutations in the gene encoding the leptin receptor can lead to obesity, hyperphagia (excessive hunger), and impaired energy metabolism, highlighting the importance of this receptor in maintaining energy balance and overall health.

Alpha-MSH (α-MSH) stands for alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. It is a peptide hormone that is produced in the pituitary gland and other tissues in the body. Alpha-MSH plays a role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Melanin production: Alpha-MSH stimulates melanin production in the skin, which leads to skin tanning.
2. Appetite regulation: Alpha-MSH acts as a appetite suppressant by signaling to the brain that the stomach is full.
3. Inflammation and immune response: Alpha-MSH has anti-inflammatory effects and helps regulate the immune response.
4. Energy balance and metabolism: Alpha-MSH helps regulate energy balance and metabolism by signaling to the brain to increase or decrease food intake and energy expenditure.

Alpha-MSH exerts its effects by binding to melanocortin receptors, specifically MC1R, MC3R, MC4R, and MC5R. Dysregulation of alpha-MSH signaling has been implicated in various medical conditions, including obesity, anorexia nervosa, and certain skin disorders.

The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) is a collection of neurons located in the dorsomedial region of the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that regulates various autonomic and endocrine functions. The DMH plays a critical role in regulating several physiological processes, including feeding behavior, energy balance, body temperature, and circadian rhythms.

The neurons in the DMH release different neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, and neuropeptides, that modulate its functions. The DMH receives inputs from various brain regions, including the limbic system, which is involved in emotional processing, and the brainstem, which regulates autonomic functions.

The DMH also projects to several brain areas, such as the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), lateral hypothalamus, and other regions of the brainstem, forming a complex neural network that controls energy balance and feeding behavior. Dysfunction in the DMH has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including obesity, diabetes, and mood disorders.

Melanocortins are a group of peptides that are derived from the post-translational processing of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene. This gene is expressed in various tissues, including the pituitary gland, hypothalamus, and skin. The POMC precursor protein is cleaved into several active peptides, including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), γ-MSH, and α-MSH. These melanocortins exert their effects through binding to melanocortin receptors (MCRs), which are G protein-coupled receptors.

The different melanocortins have distinct physiological roles, but they all share some common functions, such as modulating pigmentation, energy homeostasis, and immune responses. For instance, α-MSH and β-MSH bind to MCRs in the skin and increase melanin production, leading to skin tanning. Additionally, α-MSH can act on MCRs in the hypothalamus to regulate appetite and energy expenditure. ACTH, on the other hand, primarily stimulates the release of cortisol from the adrenal gland, but it can also bind to MCRs and influence pigmentation and sexual behavior.

Overall, melanocortins are crucial signaling molecules that play a significant role in various physiological processes, and dysregulation of melanocortin signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including obesity, depression, and skin disorders.

The preoptic area (POA) is a region within the anterior hypothalamus of the brain. It is named for its location near the optic chiasm, where the optic nerves cross. The preoptic area is involved in various functions, including body temperature regulation, sexual behavior, and sleep-wake regulation.

The preoptic area contains several groups of neurons that are sensitive to changes in temperature and are responsible for generating heat through shivering or non-shivering thermogenesis. It also contains neurons that release inhibitory neurotransmitters such as GABA and galanin, which help regulate arousal and sleep.

Additionally, the preoptic area has been implicated in the regulation of sexual behavior, particularly in males. Certain populations of neurons within the preoptic area are involved in the expression of male sexual behavior, such as mounting and intromission.

Overall, the preoptic area is a critical region for the regulation of various physiological and behavioral functions, making it an important area of study in neuroscience research.

The nucleus accumbens is a part of the brain that is located in the ventral striatum, which is a key region of the reward circuitry. It is made up of two subregions: the shell and the core. The nucleus accumbens receives inputs from various sources, including the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus, and sends outputs to the ventral pallidum and other areas.

The nucleus accumbens is involved in reward processing, motivation, reinforcement learning, and addiction. It plays a crucial role in the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is associated with pleasure and reinforcement. Dysfunction in the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric conditions, including substance use disorders, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors are a class of G protein-coupled receptors that bind to and are activated by the neuropeptide Y neurotransmitter. NPY is a 36-amino acid peptide that plays important roles in various physiological functions, including appetite regulation, energy homeostasis, anxiety, depression, memory, and cardiovascular function.

There are five different subtypes of NPY receptors, namely Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, and Y6 (also known as Y6-like). These receptors have distinct tissue distributions and signaling properties. The Y1, Y2, Y4, and Y5 receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, while the Y6 receptor is primarily found in the brainstem.

The activation of NPY receptors leads to a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, including the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and modulation of ion channel activity. Dysregulation of NPY receptor function has been implicated in several diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, anxiety disorders, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, NPY receptors are considered promising targets for the development of therapeutic agents for these conditions.

Sodium glutamate, also known as monosodium glutamate (MSG), is the sodium salt of glutamic acid, which is a naturally occurring amino acid that is widely present in various foods. It is commonly used as a flavor enhancer in the food industry to intensify the savory or umami taste of certain dishes.

Medically speaking, sodium glutamate is generally considered safe for consumption in moderate amounts by the majority of the population. However, some individuals may experience adverse reactions after consuming foods containing MSG, a condition known as "MSG symptom complex." Symptoms can include headache, flushing, sweating, facial pressure or tightness, numbness, tingling or burning in the face, neck and other areas, rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations), chest pain, nausea, and weakness.

It is important to note that these symptoms are usually mild and short-term, and not everyone who consumes MSG will experience them. If you suspect that you have an intolerance or sensitivity to MSG, it is best to consult with a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and guidance.

The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is a region in the hypothalamus, which is a part of the brain that plays a crucial role in regulating various autonomic functions and maintaining homeostasis. The LHA is located laterally to the third ventricle and contains several neuronal populations that are involved in diverse physiological processes such as feeding behavior, energy balance, sleep-wake regulation, and neuroendocrine function.

Some of the key neurons found in the LHA include orexin/hypocretin neurons, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, and agouti-related protein (AGRP) neurons. These neurons release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that modulate various physiological functions, including appetite regulation, energy expenditure, and arousal. Dysfunction in the LHA has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as narcolepsy, obesity, and depression.

Feeding behavior refers to the various actions and mechanisms involved in the intake of food and nutrition for the purpose of sustaining life, growth, and health. This complex process encompasses a coordinated series of activities, including:

1. Food selection: The identification, pursuit, and acquisition of appropriate food sources based on sensory cues (smell, taste, appearance) and individual preferences.
2. Preparation: The manipulation and processing of food to make it suitable for consumption, such as chewing, grinding, or chopping.
3. Ingestion: The act of transferring food from the oral cavity into the digestive system through swallowing.
4. Digestion: The mechanical and chemical breakdown of food within the gastrointestinal tract to facilitate nutrient absorption and eliminate waste products.
5. Assimilation: The uptake and utilization of absorbed nutrients by cells and tissues for energy production, growth, repair, and maintenance.
6. Elimination: The removal of undigested material and waste products from the body through defecation.

Feeding behavior is regulated by a complex interplay between neural, hormonal, and psychological factors that help maintain energy balance and ensure adequate nutrient intake. Disruptions in feeding behavior can lead to various medical conditions, such as malnutrition, obesity, eating disorders, and gastrointestinal motility disorders.

Dynorphins are a type of opioid peptide that is naturally produced in the body. They bind to specific receptors in the brain, known as kappa-opioid receptors, and play a role in modulating pain perception, emotional response, and reward processing. Dynorphins are derived from a larger precursor protein called prodynorphin and are found throughout the nervous system, including in the spinal cord, brainstem, and limbic system. They have been implicated in various physiological processes, as well as in the development of certain neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as chronic pain, depression, and substance use disorders.

Neuroanatomical tract-tracing techniques are a set of neuroanatomical methods used to map the connections and pathways between different neurons, neural nuclei, or brain regions. These techniques involve introducing a tracer substance into a specific population of neurons, which is then transported through the axons and dendrites to other connected cells. The distribution of the tracer can be visualized and analyzed to determine the pattern of connectivity between different brain areas.

There are two main types of neuroanatomical tract-tracing techniques: anterograde and retrograde. Anterograde tracing involves introducing a tracer into the cell body or dendrites of a neuron, which is then transported to the axon terminals in target areas. Retrograde tracing, on the other hand, involves introducing a tracer into the axon terminals of a neuron, which is then transported back to the cell body and dendrites.

Examples of neuroanatomical tract-tracing techniques include the use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), fluorescent tracers, radioactive tracers, and viral vectors. These techniques have been instrumental in advancing our understanding of brain circuitry and function, and continue to be an important tool in neuroscience research.

Proto-oncogene proteins, such as c-Fos, are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various biological processes including cell growth, differentiation, and survival. They can be activated or overexpressed due to genetic alterations, leading to the formation of cancerous cells. The c-Fos protein is a nuclear phosphoprotein involved in signal transduction pathways and forms a heterodimer with c-Jun to create the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex. This complex binds to specific DNA sequences, thereby regulating the expression of target genes that contribute to various cellular responses, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of c-Fos can result in uncontrolled cell growth and malignant transformation, contributing to tumor development and progression.

Thalamic nuclei refer to specific groupings of neurons within the thalamus, a key relay station in the brain that receives sensory information from various parts of the body and transmits it to the cerebral cortex for processing. The thalamus is divided into several distinct nuclei, each with its own unique functions and connections. These nuclei can be broadly categorized into three groups:

1. Sensory relay nuclei: These nuclei receive sensory information from different modalities such as vision, audition, touch, and taste, and project this information to specific areas of the cerebral cortex for further processing. Examples include the lateral geniculate nucleus (vision), medial geniculate nucleus (audition), and ventral posterior nucleus (touch and taste).
2. Association nuclei: These nuclei are involved in higher-order cognitive functions, such as attention, memory, and executive control. They receive inputs from various cortical areas and project back to those same areas, forming closed loops that facilitate information processing and integration. Examples include the mediodorsal nucleus and pulvinar.
3. Motor relay nuclei: These nuclei are involved in motor control and coordination. They receive inputs from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia and project to the brainstem and spinal cord, helping to regulate movement and posture. Examples include the ventral anterior and ventral lateral nuclei.

Overall, thalamic nuclei play a crucial role in integrating sensory, motor, and cognitive information, allowing for adaptive behavior and conscious experience.

The median eminence is a small, elevated region located at the base of the hypothalamus in the brain. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of the endocrine system by controlling the release of hormones from the pituitary gland. The median eminence contains numerous specialized blood vessels called portal capillaries that carry hormones and neurotransmitters from the hypothalamus to the anterior pituitary gland.

The median eminence is also the site where several releasing and inhibiting hormones produced in the hypothalamus are secreted into the portal blood vessels, which then transport them to the anterior pituitary gland. These hormones include thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) releasing hormone, growth hormone-releasing hormone, prolactin-inhibiting hormone, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone, among others.

Once these hormones reach the anterior pituitary gland, they bind to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that ultimately lead to the synthesis and release of various pituitary hormones. In this way, the median eminence serves as an essential link between the nervous system and the endocrine system, allowing for precise regulation of hormone secretion and overall homeostasis in the body.

Neuropeptides are small protein-like molecules that are used by neurons to communicate with each other and with other cells in the body. They are produced in the cell body of a neuron, processed from larger precursor proteins, and then transported to the nerve terminal where they are stored in secretory vesicles. When the neuron is stimulated, the vesicles fuse with the cell membrane and release their contents into the extracellular space.

Neuropeptides can act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators, depending on their target receptors and the duration of their effects. They play important roles in a variety of physiological processes, including pain perception, appetite regulation, stress response, and social behavior. Some neuropeptides also have hormonal functions, such as oxytocin and vasopressin, which are produced in the hypothalamus and released into the bloodstream to regulate reproductive and cardiovascular function, respectively.

There are hundreds of different neuropeptides that have been identified in the nervous system, and many of them have multiple functions and interact with other signaling molecules to modulate neural activity. Dysregulation of neuropeptide systems has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as chronic pain, addiction, depression, and anxiety.

Melanocyte-stimulating hormones (MSH) are a group of peptide hormones that originate from the precursor protein proopiomelanocortin (POMC). They play crucial roles in various physiological processes, including pigmentation, energy balance, and appetite regulation.

There are several types of MSH, but the most well-known ones include α-MSH, β-MSH, and γ-MSH. These hormones bind to melanocortin receptors (MCRs), which are found in various tissues throughout the body. The binding of MSH to MCRs triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in cell behavior.

In the context of skin physiology, α-MSH and β-MSH bind to melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) on melanocytes, which are the cells responsible for producing pigment (melanin). This binding stimulates the production and release of eumelanin, a type of melanin that is brown or black in color. As a result, increased levels of MSH can lead to darkening of the skin, also known as hyperpigmentation.

Apart from their role in pigmentation, MSH hormones have been implicated in several other physiological processes. For instance, α-MSH has been shown to suppress appetite and promote weight loss by binding to melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) in the hypothalamus, a region of the brain that regulates energy balance. Additionally, MSH hormones have been implicated in inflammation, immune response, and sexual function.

Overall, melanocyte-stimulating hormones are a diverse group of peptide hormones that play important roles in various physiological processes, including pigmentation, energy balance, and appetite regulation.

Intraventricular injections are a type of medical procedure where medication is administered directly into the cerebral ventricles of the brain. The cerebral ventricles are fluid-filled spaces within the brain that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This procedure is typically used to deliver drugs that target conditions affecting the central nervous system, such as infections or tumors.

Intraventricular injections are usually performed using a thin, hollow needle that is inserted through a small hole drilled into the skull. The medication is then injected directly into the ventricles, allowing it to circulate throughout the CSF and reach the brain tissue more efficiently than other routes of administration.

This type of injection is typically reserved for situations where other methods of drug delivery are not effective or feasible. It carries a higher risk of complications, such as bleeding, infection, or damage to surrounding tissues, compared to other routes of administration. Therefore, it is usually performed by trained medical professionals in a controlled clinical setting.

A melanocortin receptor (MCR) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds melanocortin peptides. The melanocortin system plays crucial roles in various biological processes such as pigmentation, energy homeostasis, sexual function, and inflammation.

The melanocortin receptor type 3 (MC3R) is one of the five subtypes of MCRs (MC1R to MC5R). It is widely expressed in the central nervous system, including the hypothalamus, and is involved in the regulation of energy balance, feeding behavior, and body weight.

The endogenous ligands for MC3R include α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which are derived from the precursor protein proopiomelanocortin (POMC). Activation of MC3R by these ligands leads to a decrease in food intake and an increase in energy expenditure, contributing to weight loss. However, the exact mechanisms through which MC3R modulates these physiological functions are not yet fully understood.

Beta-endorphins are naturally occurring opioid peptides that are produced in the brain and other parts of the body. They are synthesized from a larger precursor protein called proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and consist of 31 amino acids. Beta-endorphins have potent analgesic effects, which means they can reduce the perception of pain. They also play a role in regulating mood, emotions, and various physiological processes such as immune function and hormonal regulation.

Beta-endorphins bind to opioid receptors in the brain and other tissues, leading to a range of effects including pain relief, sedation, euphoria, and reduced anxiety. They are released in response to stress, physical activity, and certain physiological conditions such as pregnancy and lactation. Beta-endorphins have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses in the treatment of pain, addiction, and mood disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential side effects.

The cochlear nucleus is the first relay station in the auditory pathway within the central nervous system. It is a structure located in the lower pons region of the brainstem and receives sensory information from the cochlea, which is the spiral-shaped organ of hearing in the inner ear.

The cochlear nucleus consists of several subdivisions, each with distinct neuronal populations that process different aspects of auditory information. These subdivisions include the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), and the granule cell domain.

Neurons in these subdivisions perform various computations on the incoming auditory signals, such as frequency analysis, intensity coding, and sound localization. The output of the cochlear nucleus is then sent via several pathways to higher brain regions for further processing and interpretation, including the inferior colliculus, medial geniculate body, and eventually the auditory cortex.

Damage or dysfunction in the cochlear nucleus can lead to hearing impairments and other auditory processing disorders.

Ghrelin is a hormone primarily produced and released by the stomach with some production in the small intestine, pancreas, and brain. It is often referred to as the "hunger hormone" because it stimulates appetite, promotes food intake, and contributes to the regulation of energy balance.

Ghrelin levels increase before meals and decrease after eating. In addition to its role in regulating appetite and meal initiation, ghrelin also has other functions, such as modulating glucose metabolism, insulin secretion, gastric motility, and cardiovascular function. Its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is found in various tissues throughout the body, indicating its wide range of physiological roles.

Galanin-like peptide (GLP) is a neuropeptide belonging to the galanin family, which also includes galanin and galanin message-associated peptide (GMAP). GLP shares structural similarity with galanin but has distinct biological activities. It is encoded by the GALP gene and is primarily expressed in the hypothalamus, specifically in the arcuate nucleus.

GLP plays a role in various physiological functions, including energy balance, feeding behavior, and reproductive processes. It acts through specific G protein-coupled receptors, such as GalR1, GalR2, and GalR3, which are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system and peripheral tissues.

GLP has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including obesity, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, its precise role and therapeutic potential in these diseases remain to be fully elucidated.

Neuronal tract-tracers are specialized tools used in neuroscience to map the connections and pathways between neurons (nerve cells) in the brain or other parts of the nervous system. These tracers are typically injected into a specific region of the brain, where they are taken up by nearby nerve terminals. The tracers then travel along the length of the neuron's axon, allowing researchers to visualize and track the connections between different brain regions.

There are several types of tract-tracers available, including radioactive tracers, fluorescent tracers, and biotinylated tracers. Each type has its own advantages and limitations, depending on the specific research question being addressed. For example, radioactive tracers can provide high-resolution images of neuronal connections, but they require specialized equipment to detect and may have safety concerns due to their radioactivity. Fluorescent tracers, on the other hand, are safer and easier to use, but they may not provide as high a resolution as radioactive tracers.

Tract-tracing is an important tool in neuroscience research, as it allows researchers to understand the complex circuitry of the brain and how different regions communicate with each other. This knowledge can help shed light on the neural basis of various cognitive processes, emotions, and behaviors, as well as neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

The Raphe Nuclei are clusters of neurons located in the brainstem, specifically in the midline of the pons, medulla oblongata, and mesencephalon (midbrain). These neurons are characterized by their ability to synthesize and release serotonin, a neurotransmitter that plays a crucial role in regulating various functions such as mood, appetite, sleep, and pain perception.

The Raphe Nuclei project axons widely throughout the central nervous system, allowing serotonin to modulate the activity of other neurons. There are several subdivisions within the Raphe Nuclei, each with distinct connections and functions. Dysfunction in the Raphe Nuclei has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and chronic pain.

Neurokinin-3 (NK-3) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds the neuropeptide neurokinin B, which is a member of the tachykinin family. These receptors are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and play important roles in various physiological functions, including the regulation of nociception (pain perception), inflammation, and reproduction.

NK-3 receptors have been identified as key mediators of female reproductive function, particularly in the hypothalamus where they are involved in the control of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. Dysregulation of NK-3 receptor signaling has been implicated in several reproductive disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome and endometriosis.

In addition to their role in reproduction, NK-3 receptors have also been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. As a result, NK-3 receptor antagonists have emerged as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of these disorders.

Galanin is a neuropeptide, which is a type of small protein molecule that functions as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the nervous system. It is widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems of vertebrates and plays important roles in various physiological functions, including modulation of pain perception, regulation of feeding behavior, control of circadian rhythms, and cognitive processes such as learning and memory.

Galanin is synthesized from a larger precursor protein called preprogalanin, which is cleaved into several smaller peptides, including galanin itself, galanin message-associated peptide (GMAP), and alarin. Galanin exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors, known as the galanin receptor family, which includes three subtypes: GalR1, GalR2, and GalR3. These receptors are widely expressed in various tissues and organs, including the brain, spinal cord, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and cardiovascular system.

Galanin has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as chronic pain, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. As a result, there is ongoing research into the development of galanin-based therapies for these conditions.

Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), also known as Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH), is a hormonal peptide consisting of 10 amino acids. It is produced and released by the hypothalamus, an area in the brain that links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland.

GnRH plays a crucial role in regulating reproduction and sexual development through its control of two gonadotropins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). These gonadotropins, in turn, stimulate the gonads (ovaries or testes) to produce sex steroids and eggs or sperm.

GnRH acts on the anterior pituitary gland by binding to its specific receptors, leading to the release of FSH and LH. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is under negative feedback control, meaning that when sex steroid levels are high, they inhibit the release of GnRH, which subsequently decreases FSH and LH secretion.

GnRH agonists and antagonists have clinical applications in various medical conditions, such as infertility treatments, precocious puberty, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, prostate cancer, and hormone-responsive breast cancer.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Energy metabolism is the process by which living organisms produce and consume energy to maintain life. It involves a series of chemical reactions that convert nutrients from food, such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, into energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

The process of energy metabolism can be divided into two main categories: catabolism and anabolism. Catabolism is the breakdown of nutrients to release energy, while anabolism is the synthesis of complex molecules from simpler ones using energy.

There are three main stages of energy metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and oxidative phosphorylation. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of the cell and involves the breakdown of glucose into pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The citric acid cycle takes place in the mitochondria and involves the further breakdown of pyruvate to produce more ATP, NADH, and carbon dioxide. Oxidative phosphorylation is the final stage of energy metabolism and occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It involves the transfer of electrons from NADH and other electron carriers to oxygen, which generates a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, producing the majority of the cell's energy.

Overall, energy metabolism is a complex and essential process that allows organisms to grow, reproduce, and maintain their bodily functions. Disruptions in energy metabolism can lead to various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders.

The cerebellar nuclei are clusters of neurons located within the white matter of the cerebellum, a region of the brain responsible for motor coordination, balance, and fine movement regulation. There are four main pairs of cerebellar nuclei: the fastigial, interpositus, dentate, and vestibular nuclei. These nuclei receive input from various parts of the cerebellar cortex and project to different areas of the brainstem and thalamus, contributing to the regulation of muscle tone, posture, and movement.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

The septal nuclei are a collection of gray matter structures located in the basal forebrain, specifically in the septum pellucidum. They consist of several interconnected subnuclei that play important roles in various functions such as reward and reinforcement, emotional processing, learning, and memory.

The septal nuclei are primarily composed of GABAergic neurons (neurons that release the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid or GABA) and receive inputs from several brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, and prefrontal cortex. They also send projections to various areas, including the thalamus, hypothalamus, and other limbic structures.

Stimulation of the septal nuclei has been associated with feelings of pleasure and reward, while damage or lesions can lead to changes in emotional behavior and cognitive functions. The septal nuclei are also involved in neuroendocrine regulation, particularly in relation to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the release of stress hormones.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Active Transport, Cell Nucleus" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. Active transport typically refers to the energy-dependent process by which cells move molecules across their membranes against their concentration gradient. This process is facilitated by transport proteins and requires ATP as an energy source. However, this process primarily occurs in the cell membrane and not in the cell nucleus.

The cell nucleus, on the other hand, contains genetic material (DNA) and is responsible for controlling various cellular activities such as gene expression, replication, and repair. While there are transport processes that occur within the nucleus, they do not typically involve active transport in the same way that it occurs at the cell membrane.

Therefore, a medical definition of "Active Transport, Cell Nucleus" would not be applicable or informative in this context.

The caudate nucleus is a part of the brain located within the basal ganglia, a group of structures that are important for movement control and cognition. It has a distinctive C-shaped appearance and plays a role in various functions such as learning, memory, emotion, and motivation. The caudate nucleus receives inputs from several areas of the cerebral cortex and sends outputs to other basal ganglia structures, contributing to the regulation of motor behavior and higher cognitive processes.

Neural pathways, also known as nerve tracts or fasciculi, refer to the highly organized and specialized routes through which nerve impulses travel within the nervous system. These pathways are formed by groups of neurons (nerve cells) that are connected in a series, creating a continuous communication network for electrical signals to transmit information between different regions of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.

Neural pathways can be classified into two main types: sensory (afferent) and motor (efferent). Sensory neural pathways carry sensory information from various receptors in the body (such as those for touch, temperature, pain, and vision) to the brain for processing. Motor neural pathways, on the other hand, transmit signals from the brain to the muscles and glands, controlling movements and other effector functions.

The formation of these neural pathways is crucial for normal nervous system function, as it enables efficient communication between different parts of the body and allows for complex behaviors, cognitive processes, and adaptive responses to internal and external stimuli.

The third ventricle is a narrow, fluid-filled cavity in the brain that is located between the thalamus and hypothalamus. It is one of the four ventricles in the ventricular system of the brain, which produces and circulates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) around the brain and spinal cord.

The third ventricle is shaped like a slit and communicates with the lateral ventricles through the interventricular foramen (also known as the foramen of Monro), and with the fourth ventricle through the cerebral aqueduct (also known as the aqueduct of Sylvius).

The third ventricle contains choroid plexus tissue, which produces CSF. The fluid flows from the lateral ventricles into the third ventricle, then through the cerebral aqueduct and into the fourth ventricle, where it can circulate around the brainstem and spinal cord before being absorbed back into the bloodstream.

Abnormalities in the third ventricle, such as enlargement or obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct, can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition characterized by an accumulation of CSF in the brain.

Ovariectomy is a surgical procedure in which one or both ovaries are removed. It is also known as "ovary removal" or "oophorectomy." This procedure is often performed as a treatment for various medical conditions, including ovarian cancer, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and pelvic pain. Ovariectomy can also be part of a larger surgical procedure called an hysterectomy, in which the uterus is also removed.

In some cases, an ovariectomy may be performed as a preventative measure for individuals at high risk of developing ovarian cancer. This is known as a prophylactic ovariectomy. After an ovariectomy, a person will no longer have menstrual periods and will be unable to become pregnant naturally. Hormone replacement therapy may be recommended in some cases to help manage symptoms associated with the loss of hormones produced by the ovaries.

A melanocortin receptor (MCR) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds melanocortin peptides. The melanocortin system plays crucial roles in various biological processes such as pigmentation, energy homeostasis, sexual function, and inflammation.

The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is one of the five subtypes of MCRs, which is widely expressed in the central nervous system, including the hypothalamus, and some peripheral tissues. MC4R is a key component in the regulation of energy balance, appetite, and body weight. Activation of MC4R by melanocortin peptides, such as α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), leads to decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure, while antagonism or deficiency of MC4R results in obesity.

In summary, the medical definition of 'Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4' is a G protein-coupled receptor that binds melanocortin peptides and plays a critical role in regulating energy balance, appetite, and body weight.

Ghrelin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in the central nervous system and other tissues throughout the body. They are also known as growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) because they were initially identified as being activated by synthetic ligands called growth hormone secretagogues, which stimulate the release of growth hormone.

However, it was later discovered that ghrelin, a hormone produced in the stomach, is the natural endogenous ligand for these receptors. Ghrelin is often referred to as the "hunger hormone" because its levels rise before meals and decrease after eating, signaling to the brain that it's time to eat.

Activation of ghrelin receptors has been shown to have a variety of effects on the body, including stimulating appetite, increasing growth hormone secretion, promoting fat storage, and modulating glucose metabolism. Dysregulation of the ghrelin system has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as obesity, anorexia nervosa, and type 2 diabetes.

The brainstem is the lower part of the brain that connects to the spinal cord. It consists of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brainstem controls many vital functions such as heart rate, breathing, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory and motor information between the cerebral cortex and the rest of the body. Additionally, several cranial nerves originate from the brainstem, including those that control eye movements, facial movements, and hearing.

Microinjection is a medical technique that involves the use of a fine, precise needle to inject small amounts of liquid or chemicals into microscopic structures, cells, or tissues. This procedure is often used in research settings to introduce specific substances into individual cells for study purposes, such as introducing DNA or RNA into cell nuclei to manipulate gene expression.

In clinical settings, microinjections may be used in various medical and cosmetic procedures, including:

1. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI): A type of assisted reproductive technology where a single sperm is injected directly into an egg to increase the chances of fertilization during in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.
2. Botulinum Toxin Injections: Microinjections of botulinum toxin (Botox, Dysport, or Xeomin) are used for cosmetic purposes to reduce wrinkles and fine lines by temporarily paralyzing the muscles responsible for their formation. They can also be used medically to treat various neuromuscular disorders, such as migraines, muscle spasticity, and excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis).
3. Drug Delivery: Microinjections may be used to deliver drugs directly into specific tissues or organs, bypassing the systemic circulation and potentially reducing side effects. This technique can be particularly useful in treating localized pain, delivering growth factors for tissue regeneration, or administering chemotherapy agents directly into tumors.
4. Gene Therapy: Microinjections of genetic material (DNA or RNA) can be used to introduce therapeutic genes into cells to treat various genetic disorders or diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, or cancer.

Overall, microinjection is a highly specialized and precise technique that allows for the targeted delivery of substances into small structures, cells, or tissues, with potential applications in research, medical diagnostics, and therapeutic interventions.

Peptide YY (PYY) is a small peptide hormone consisting of 36 amino acids, that is released by the L cells in the intestinal epithelium in response to feeding. It is a member of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family and plays a crucial role in regulating appetite and energy balance.

After eating, PYY is released into the circulation and acts on specific receptors in the hypothalamus to inhibit food intake. This anorexigenic effect of PYY is mediated by its ability to decrease gastric emptying, reduce intestinal motility, and increase satiety.

PYY has also been shown to have effects on glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion, and inflammation, making it a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic disorders.

"Phodopus" is not a medical term, but a taxonomic genus that includes several species of small rodents commonly known as hamsters. The most common species within this genus are the Campbell's dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) and the Djungarian or Russian winter white hamster (Phodopus sungorus). These hamsters are often kept as pets and may be involved in biomedical research. However, they are not typically associated with medical conditions or treatments.

Respiratory system abnormalities refer to any conditions or structures that do not function properly or are outside the normal range in the respiratory system. The respiratory system is responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of breathing. It includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, and muscles and nerves that support breathing.

Respiratory system abnormalities can be congenital or acquired. Congenital abnormalities are present at birth and may include conditions such as cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypoplasia, and congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Acquired abnormalities can develop at any time throughout a person's life due to various factors such as infections, injuries, environmental exposures, or aging. Examples of acquired respiratory system abnormalities include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, pneumonia, lung cancer, and sleep apnea.

Respiratory system abnormalities can cause a range of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and fatigue. Treatment for respiratory system abnormalities depends on the specific condition and severity and may include medications, breathing treatments, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Food deprivation is not a medical term per se, but it is used in the field of nutrition and psychology. It generally refers to the deliberate withholding of food for a prolonged period, leading to a state of undernutrition or malnutrition. This can occur due to various reasons such as famine, starvation, anorexia nervosa, or as a result of certain medical treatments or conditions. Prolonged food deprivation can have serious consequences on physical health, including weight loss, muscle wasting, organ damage, and decreased immune function, as well as psychological effects such as depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairment.

Melanocortin receptors (MCRs) are a group of G protein-coupled receptors that bind melanocortin peptides, which include α-, β-, and γ-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). These receptors are involved in a variety of physiological processes, including pigmentation, energy homeostasis, sexual function, and inflammation. There are five subtypes of melanocortin receptors (MCR1-5) that are expressed in different tissues and have distinct functions.

MCR1 is primarily expressed in melanocytes and plays a crucial role in skin and hair pigmentation. Activation of MCR1 by α-MSH leads to the production and distribution of eumelanin, which results in darker skin and hair.

MCR2 is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues, including the adrenal gland, testis, and ovary. It is involved in various functions such as sexual function, feeding behavior, and energy homeostasis.

MCR3 is primarily expressed in the adrenal gland and plays a critical role in the regulation of steroid hormone production and release. Activation of MCR3 by ACTH leads to the synthesis and secretion of cortisol and other steroid hormones.

MCR4 is widely expressed in the CNS, peripheral tissues, and immune cells. It is involved in various functions such as energy homeostasis, feeding behavior, sexual function, and inflammation.

MCR5 is primarily expressed in the testis and plays a role in spermatogenesis and fertility.

Overall, melanocortin receptors are important regulators of various physiological processes, and dysregulation of these receptors has been implicated in several diseases, including obesity, metabolic disorders, and skin disorders.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase (also known as Tyrosinase or Tyrosine hydroxylase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of catecholamines, which are neurotransmitters and hormones in the body. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the amino acid L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) by adding a hydroxyl group to the 3rd carbon atom of the tyrosine molecule.

The reaction is as follows:

L-Tyrosine + O2 + pterin (co-factor) -> L-DOPA + pterin (oxidized) + H2O

This enzyme requires molecular oxygen and a co-factor such as tetrahydrobiopterin to carry out the reaction. Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase is found in various tissues, including the brain and adrenal glands, where it helps regulate the production of catecholamines like dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Dysregulation of this enzyme has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

Hypothalamic hormones are a group of hormones that are produced and released by the hypothalamus, a small region at the base of the brain. These hormones play a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions, including temperature, hunger, thirst, sleep, and emotional behavior.

The hypothalamus produces two main types of hormones: releasing hormones and inhibiting hormones. Releasing hormones stimulate the pituitary gland to release its own hormones, while inhibiting hormones prevent the pituitary gland from releasing hormones.

Some examples of hypothalamic hormones include:

* Thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH), which stimulates the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pituitary gland.
* Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin, which regulate the release of growth hormone (GH) from the pituitary gland.
* Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland, which in turn regulate reproductive function.
* Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which stimulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland, which regulates the stress response.
* Prolactin-inhibiting hormone (PIH) and prolactin-releasing hormone (PRH), which regulate the release of prolactin from the pituitary gland, which is involved in lactation.

Overall, hypothalamic hormones play a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in the body by regulating various physiological processes.

Electroacupuncture is a form of acupuncture where a small electric current is passed between pairs of acupuncture needles. This technique is used to stimulate the acupoints more strongly and consistently than with manual acupuncture. The intensity of the electrical impulses can be adjusted depending on the patient's comfort level and the desired therapeutic effect. Electroacupuncture is often used to treat conditions such as chronic pain, muscle spasms, and paralysis. It may also be used in the treatment of addiction, weight loss, and stroke rehabilitation.

The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a small region located in the hypothalamus of the brain, just above the optic chiasm where the optic nerves from each eye cross. It is considered to be the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals, responsible for generating and maintaining the body's internal circadian rhythm, which is a roughly 24-hour cycle that regulates various physiological processes such as sleep-wake cycles, hormone release, and metabolism.

The SCN receives direct input from retinal ganglion cells, which are sensitive to light and dark signals. This information helps the SCN synchronize the internal circadian rhythm with the external environment, allowing it to adjust to changes in day length and other environmental cues. The SCN then sends signals to other parts of the brain and body to regulate various functions according to the time of day.

Disruption of the SCN's function can lead to a variety of circadian rhythm disorders, such as jet lag, shift work disorder, and advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome.

Estradiol is a type of estrogen, which is a female sex hormone. It is the most potent and dominant form of estrogen in humans. Estradiol plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics in women, such as breast development and regulation of the menstrual cycle. It also helps maintain bone density, protect the lining of the uterus, and is involved in cognition and mood regulation.

Estradiol is produced primarily by the ovaries, but it can also be synthesized in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands and fat cells. In men, estradiol is produced from testosterone through a process called aromatization. Abnormal levels of estradiol can contribute to various health issues, such as hormonal imbalances, infertility, osteoporosis, and certain types of cancer.

Stilbamidines are a class of chemical compounds that are primarily used as veterinary medicines, specifically as parasiticides for the treatment and prevention of ectoparasites such as ticks and lice in livestock animals. Stilbamidines belong to the family of chemicals known as formamidines, which are known to have insecticidal and acaricidal properties.

The most common stilbamidine compound is chlorphentermine, which has been used as an appetite suppressant in human medicine. However, its use as a weight loss drug was discontinued due to its addictive properties and potential for serious side effects.

It's important to note that Stilbamidines are not approved for use in humans and should only be used under the supervision of a veterinarian for the intended purpose of treating and preventing ectoparasites in animals.

The red nucleus is a round-shaped collection of neurons located in the midbrain, specifically in the rostral part of the mesencephalon. It is called "red" due to its deep red color, which comes from the rich vascularization and numerous iron-containing red blood cells present in the region.

The red nucleus plays a crucial role in the motor system, primarily involved in controlling and coordinating movements, particularly on the contralateral side of the body. It is part of the rubrospinal tract, which descends from the red nucleus to the spinal cord and helps regulate fine motor movements and muscle tone.

There are two main types of neurons present in the red nucleus: magnocellular (large cells) and parvocellular (small cells). Magnocellular neurons form the rubrospinal tract, while parvocellular neurons project to the inferior olivary nucleus, which is part of the cerebellum. The connections between the red nucleus, cerebellum, and spinal cord allow for the integration and coordination of motor information and the execution of smooth movements.

Damage to the red nucleus can result in various motor impairments, such as ataxia (lack of muscle coordination), tremors, and weakness on the contralateral side of the body.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

The trigeminal nuclei are a collection of sensory nerve cell bodies (nuclei) located in the brainstem that receive and process sensory information from the face and head, including pain, temperature, touch, and proprioception. There are four main trigeminal nuclei: the ophthalmic, maxillary, mandibular, and mesencephalic nuclei. Each nucleus is responsible for processing sensory information from specific areas of the face and head. The trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V) carries these sensory signals to the brainstem, where they synapse with neurons in the trigeminal nuclei before being relayed to higher brain centers for further processing.

Peptide hormones are a type of hormone consisting of short chains of amino acids known as peptides. They are produced and released by various endocrine glands and play crucial roles in regulating many physiological processes in the body, including growth and development, metabolism, stress response, and reproductive functions.

Peptide hormones exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in cell behavior or function. Some examples of peptide hormones include insulin, glucagon, growth hormone, prolactin, oxytocin, and vasopressin.

Peptide hormones are synthesized as larger precursor proteins called prohormones, which are cleaved by enzymes to release the active peptide hormone. They are water-soluble and cannot pass through the cell membrane, so they exert their effects through autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine mechanisms. Autocrine signaling occurs when a cell releases a hormone that binds to receptors on the same cell, while paracrine signaling involves the release of a hormone that acts on nearby cells. Endocrine signaling, on the other hand, involves the release of a hormone into the bloodstream, which then travels to distant target cells to exert its effects.

The fourth ventricle is a part of the cerebrospinal fluid-filled system in the brain, located in the posterior cranial fossa and continuous with the central canal of the medulla oblongata and the cerebral aqueduct. It is shaped like a cavity with a roof, floor, and lateral walls, and it communicates rostrally with the third ventricle through the cerebral aqueduct and caudally with the subarachnoid space through the median and lateral apertures (foramina of Luschka and Magendie). The fourth ventricle contains choroid plexus tissue, which produces cerebrospinal fluid. Its roof is formed by the cerebellar vermis and the superior medullary velum, while its floor is composed of the rhomboid fossa, which includes several important structures such as the vagal trigone, hypoglossal trigone, and striae medullares.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a small, lens-shaped structure located in the basal ganglia of the brain. It plays a crucial role in motor control and has been identified as a key target for deep brain stimulation surgery in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders.

The STN is involved in the regulation of movement, balance, and posture, and helps to filter and coordinate signals that are sent from the cerebral cortex to the thalamus and then on to the motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. In Parkinson's disease, abnormal activity in the STN can contribute to symptoms such as tremors, rigidity, and difficulty initiating movements.

Deep brain stimulation of the STN involves implanting electrodes into the nucleus and delivering electrical impulses that help to regulate its activity. This can lead to significant improvements in motor function and quality of life for some people with Parkinson's disease.

Appetite depressants are medications or substances that reduce or suppress feelings of hunger and appetite. They can be prescribed to treat various medical conditions, such as obesity or binge eating disorder, where weight loss is a recommended treatment goal. Some common appetite depressants include:

1. Phentermine: This medication works by stimulating the release of certain neurotransmitters in the brain that help suppress appetite and increase metabolism. It is often prescribed for short-term use (up to 12 weeks) as part of a comprehensive weight loss plan.

2. Diethylpropion: Similar to phentermine, diethylpropion stimulates the release of neurotransmitters that suppress appetite and increase metabolism. It is also prescribed for short-term use in treating obesity.

3. Naltrexone-bupropion (Contrave): This combination medication helps manage weight by reducing appetite and increasing feelings of fullness. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that blocks the rewarding effects of food, while bupropion is an antidepressant that can help reduce cravings for high-calorie foods.

4. Lorcaserin (Belviq): This medication works by selectively activating serotonin receptors in the brain, which helps promote satiety and reduce appetite. It was withdrawn from the US market in 2020 due to concerns about its potential link to an increased risk of cancer.

5. Topiramate (Topamax): Although primarily used as an anticonvulsant, topiramate has also been found to have appetite-suppressing effects. It is often combined with phentermine in a single formulation (Qsymia) for the treatment of obesity.

6. Cannabis: Some studies suggest that cannabinoids, the active compounds in marijuana, may help reduce hunger and promote weight loss by interacting with the endocannabinoid system in the body. However, more research is needed to fully understand its potential as an appetite depressant.

It's important to note that appetite suppressants should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional and as part of a comprehensive weight management plan. These medications can have side effects and potential risks, so it's crucial to discuss their use with your doctor before starting any new treatment regimen.

Neurosecretory systems are specialized components of the nervous system that produce and release chemical messengers called neurohormones. These neurohormones are released into the bloodstream and can have endocrine effects on various target organs in the body. The cells that make up neurosecretory systems, known as neurosecretory cells, are found in specific regions of the brain, such as the hypothalamus, and in peripheral nerves.

Neurosecretory systems play a critical role in regulating many physiological processes, including fluid and electrolyte balance, stress responses, growth and development, reproductive functions, and behavior. The neurohormones released by these systems can act synergistically or antagonistically to maintain homeostasis and coordinate the body's response to internal and external stimuli.

Neurosecretory cells are characterized by their ability to synthesize and store neurohormones in secretory granules, which are released upon stimulation. The release of neurohormones can be triggered by a variety of signals, including neural impulses, hormonal changes, and other physiological cues. Once released into the bloodstream, neurohormones can travel to distant target organs, where they bind to specific receptors and elicit a range of responses.

Overall, neurosecretory systems are an essential component of the neuroendocrine system, which plays a critical role in regulating many aspects of human physiology and behavior.

The medulla oblongata is a part of the brainstem that is located in the posterior portion of the brainstem and continues with the spinal cord. It plays a vital role in controlling several critical bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. The medulla oblongata also contains nerve pathways that transmit sensory information from the body to the brain and motor commands from the brain to the muscles. Additionally, it is responsible for reflexes such as vomiting, swallowing, coughing, and sneezing.

Luteinizing Hormone (LH) is a glycoprotein hormone, which is primarily produced and released by the anterior pituitary gland. In women, a surge of LH triggers ovulation, the release of an egg from the ovaries during the menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, LH stimulates the corpus luteum to produce progesterone. In men, LH stimulates the testes to produce testosterone. It plays a crucial role in sexual development, reproduction, and maintaining the reproductive system.

The supraoptic nucleus (SON) is a collection of neurons located in the hypothalamus, near the optic chiasm, in the brain. It plays a crucial role in regulating osmoregulation and fluid balance within the body through the production and release of vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH).

Vasopressin is released into the bloodstream and acts on the kidneys to promote water reabsorption, thereby helping to maintain normal blood pressure and osmolarity. The supraoptic nucleus receives input from osmoreceptors in the circumventricular organs of the brain, which detect changes in the concentration of solutes in the extracellular fluid. When the osmolarity increases, such as during dehydration, the supraoptic nucleus is activated to release vasopressin and help restore normal fluid balance.

Additionally, the supraoptic nucleus also contains oxytocin-producing neurons, which play a role in social bonding, maternal behavior, and childbirth. Oxytocin is released into the bloodstream and acts on various tissues, including the uterus and mammary glands, to promote contraction and milk ejection.

Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is not a medical term per se, but a scientific term used in the field of molecular biology. GFP is a protein that exhibits bright green fluorescence when exposed to light, particularly blue or ultraviolet light. It was originally discovered in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.

In medical and biological research, scientists often use recombinant DNA technology to introduce the gene for GFP into other organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals, including humans. This allows them to track the expression and localization of specific genes or proteins of interest in living cells, tissues, or even whole organisms.

The ability to visualize specific cellular structures or processes in real-time has proven invaluable for a wide range of research areas, from studying the development and function of organs and organ systems to understanding the mechanisms of diseases and the effects of therapeutic interventions.

Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps to balance the excitatory effects of glutamate, another neurotransmitter.

Glutamate decarboxylase catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA by removing a carboxyl group from the glutamate molecule. This reaction occurs in two steps, with the enzyme first converting glutamate to glutamic acid semialdehyde and then converting that intermediate product to GABA.

There are two major isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase, GAD65 and GAD67, which differ in their molecular weight, subcellular localization, and function. GAD65 is primarily responsible for the synthesis of GABA in neuronal synapses, while GAD67 is responsible for the synthesis of GABA in the cell body and dendrites of neurons.

Glutamate decarboxylase is an important target for research in neurology and psychiatry because dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia.

Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. It plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability and preventing excessive neuronal firing, which helps to maintain neural homeostasis and reduce the risk of seizures. GABA functions by binding to specific receptors (GABA-A, GABA-B, and GABA-C) on the postsynaptic membrane, leading to hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane and reduced neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals.

In addition to its role in the central nervous system, GABA has also been identified as a neurotransmitter in the peripheral nervous system, where it is involved in regulating various physiological processes such as muscle relaxation, hormone secretion, and immune function.

GABA can be synthesized in neurons from glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, through the action of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Once synthesized, GABA is stored in synaptic vesicles and released into the synapse upon neuronal activation. After release, GABA can be taken up by surrounding glial cells or degraded by the enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T) into succinic semialdehyde, which is further metabolized to form succinate and enter the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances. Therefore, modulating GABAergic signaling through pharmacological interventions or other therapeutic approaches may offer potential benefits for the treatment of these conditions.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Satiety response is a term used in the field of nutrition and physiology to describe the feeling of fullness or satisfaction that follows food consumption. It is a complex process regulated by several factors, including the mechanical and chemical signals generated during digestion, hormonal responses, and psychological factors. The satiety response helps control food intake and energy balance by inhibiting further eating until the body has had enough time to metabolize and absorb the nutrients from the meal.

The satiety response can be influenced by various factors such as the type, volume, and texture of food consumed, as well as individual differences in appetite regulation and metabolism. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the satiety response is important for developing strategies to promote healthy eating behaviors and prevent overeating, which can contribute to obesity and other health problems.

Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) is a hormone that is produced and released by the hypothalamus, a small gland located in the brain. CRH plays a critical role in the body's stress response system.

When the body experiences stress, the hypothalamus releases CRH, which then travels to the pituitary gland, another small gland located at the base of the brain. Once there, CRH stimulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland.

ACTH then travels through the bloodstream to the adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys. ACTH stimulates the adrenal glands to produce and release cortisol, a hormone that helps the body respond to stress by regulating metabolism, immune function, and blood pressure, among other things.

Overall, CRH is an important part of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which regulates many bodily functions related to stress response, mood, and cognition. Dysregulation of the HPA axis and abnormal levels of CRH have been implicated in various psychiatric and medical conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and Cushing's syndrome.

The midline thalamic nuclei are a group of nuclei located in the thalamus, which is a part of the diencephalon in the brain. The thalamus serves as a relay station for sensory and motor signals to the cerebral cortex. The midline thalamic nuclei are situated in the most medial portion of the thalamus, along the midline. They include several distinct nuclei, such as the paraventricular nucleus, the reuniens nucleus, the rhomboid nucleus, and the central medial nucleus. These nuclei have complex connections with various brain regions, including the hypothalamus, the hippocampus, and the prefrontal cortex. They are involved in a variety of functions, such as memory, emotion, and sleep regulation.

The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a region in the midbrain, surrounding the cerebral aqueduct (a narrow channel connecting the third and fourth ventricles within the brain). It is a column of neurons that plays a crucial role in the modulation of pain perception, cardiorespiratory regulation, and defensive behaviors. The PAG is involved in the descending pain modulatory system, where it receives input from various emotional and cognitive areas and sends output to the rostral ventromedial medulla, which in turn regulates nociceptive processing at the spinal cord level. Additionally, the PAG is implicated in the regulation of fear, anxiety, and stress responses, as well as sexual behavior and reward processing.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Fasting is defined in medical terms as the abstinence from food or drink for a period of time. This practice is often recommended before certain medical tests or procedures, as it helps to ensure that the results are not affected by recent eating or drinking.

In some cases, fasting may also be used as a therapeutic intervention, such as in the management of seizures or other neurological conditions. Fasting can help to lower blood sugar and insulin levels, which can have a variety of health benefits. However, it is important to note that prolonged fasting can also have negative effects on the body, including malnutrition, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalances.

Fasting is also a spiritual practice in many religions, including Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. In these contexts, fasting is often seen as a way to purify the mind and body, to focus on spiritual practices, or to express devotion or mourning.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

Serotonergic neurons are specialized types of nerve cells (neurons) that produce, synthesize, and release the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT). These neurons have their cell bodies located in specific brainstem nuclei, such as the dorsal raphe nucleus and median raphe nucleus. They project and innervate various regions of the central nervous system, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and other brain areas. Serotonergic neurons play crucial roles in regulating numerous physiological functions, such as mood, appetite, sleep, memory, cognition, and sensorimotor activities. Alterations in serotonergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and neurodevelopmental conditions.

"Long-Evans" is a strain of laboratory rats commonly used in scientific research. They are named after their developers, the scientists Long and Evans. This strain is albino, with a brownish-black hood over their eyes and ears, and they have an agouti (salt-and-pepper) color on their backs. They are often used as a model organism due to their size, ease of handling, and genetic similarity to humans. However, I couldn't find any specific medical definition related to "Long-Evans rats" as they are not a medical condition or disease.

The estrous cycle is the reproductive cycle in certain mammals, characterized by regular changes in the reproductive tract and behavior, which are regulated by hormonal fluctuations. It is most commonly observed in non-primate mammals such as dogs, cats, cows, pigs, and horses.

The estrous cycle consists of several stages:

1. Proestrus: This stage lasts for a few days and is characterized by the development of follicles in the ovaries and an increase in estrogen levels. During this time, the female may show signs of sexual receptivity, but will not allow mating to occur.
2. Estrus: This is the period of sexual receptivity, during which the female allows mating to take place. It typically lasts for a few days and is marked by a surge in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which triggers ovulation.
3. Metestrus: This stage follows ovulation and is characterized by the formation of a corpus luteum, a structure that produces progesterone to support pregnancy. If fertilization does not occur, the corpus luteum will eventually regress, leading to the next phase.
4. Diestrus: This is the final stage of the estrous cycle and can last for several weeks or months. During this time, the female's reproductive tract returns to its resting state, and she is not sexually receptive. If pregnancy has occurred, the corpus luteum will continue to produce progesterone until the placenta takes over this function later in pregnancy.

It's important to note that the human menstrual cycle is different from the estrous cycle. While both cycles involve hormonal fluctuations and changes in the reproductive tract, the menstrual cycle includes a shedding of the uterine lining (menstruation) if fertilization does not occur, which is not a feature of the estrous cycle.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

The splanchnic nerves are a set of nerve fibers that originate from the thoracic and lumbar regions of the spinal cord and innervate various internal organs. They are responsible for carrying both sensory information, such as pain and temperature, from the organs to the brain, and motor signals, which control the function of the organs, from the brain to the organs.

There are several splanchnic nerves, including the greater, lesser, and least splanchnic nerves, as well as the lumbar splanchnic nerves. These nerves primarily innervate the autonomic nervous system, which controls the involuntary functions of the body, such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

The greater splanchnic nerve arises from the fifth to the ninth thoracic ganglia and passes through the diaphragm to reach the abdomen. It innervates the stomach, esophagus, liver, pancreas, and adrenal glands.

The lesser splanchnic nerve arises from the tenth and eleventh thoracic ganglia and innervates the upper part of the small intestine, the pancreas, and the adrenal glands.

The least splanchnic nerve arises from the twelfth thoracic ganglion and innervates the lower part of the small intestine and the colon.

The lumbar splanchnic nerves arise from the first three or four lumbar ganglia and innervate the lower parts of the colon, the rectum, and the reproductive organs.

"Renilla" is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a genus of bioluminescent marine organisms called sea pansies. These organisms produce a greenish-blue light through a chemical reaction that involves a protein called "Renilla reniformis luciferase." This enzyme can be used in medical research as a reporter gene, allowing the detection and measurement of gene expression or protein interaction within cells.

Therefore, when you see "Renilla" mentioned in a medical context, it is likely referring to this specific luciferase enzyme or its use in scientific experiments.

Physiological feedback, also known as biofeedback, is a technique used to train an individual to become more aware of and gain voluntary control over certain physiological processes that are normally involuntary, such as heart rate, blood pressure, skin temperature, muscle tension, and brain activity. This is done by using specialized equipment to measure these processes and provide real-time feedback to the individual, allowing them to see the effects of their thoughts and actions on their body. Over time, with practice and reinforcement, the individual can learn to regulate these processes without the need for external feedback.

Physiological feedback has been found to be effective in treating a variety of medical conditions, including stress-related disorders, headaches, high blood pressure, chronic pain, and anxiety disorders. It is also used as a performance enhancement technique in sports and other activities that require focused attention and physical control.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agents are pharmaceutical drugs that act as agonists at the GABA receptors in the brain. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and it plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability.

GABA agents can enhance the activity of GABA by increasing the frequency or duration of GABA-mediated chloride currents at the GABA receptors. These drugs are often used as anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, muscle relaxants, and sedatives due to their ability to reduce neuronal excitability and promote relaxation.

Examples of GABA agents include benzodiazepines, barbiturates, non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, and certain anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentin and pregabalin. It is important to note that while these drugs can be effective in treating various medical conditions, they also carry the risk of dependence, tolerance, and adverse effects, particularly when used at high doses or for prolonged periods.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

Pituitary hormones are chemical messengers produced and released by the pituitary gland, a small endocrine gland located at the base of the brain. The pituitary gland is often referred to as the "master gland" because it controls several other endocrine glands and regulates various bodily functions.

There are two main types of pituitary hormones: anterior pituitary hormones and posterior pituitary hormones, which are produced in different parts of the pituitary gland and have distinct functions.

Anterior pituitary hormones include:

1. Growth hormone (GH): regulates growth and metabolism.
2. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH): stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones.
3. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH): stimulates the adrenal glands to produce cortisol and other steroid hormones.
4. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH): regulate reproductive function in both males and females.
5. Prolactin: stimulates milk production in lactating women.
6. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH): regulates skin pigmentation and appetite.

Posterior pituitary hormones include:

1. Oxytocin: stimulates uterine contractions during childbirth and milk ejection during lactation.
2. Vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone, ADH): regulates water balance in the body by controlling urine production in the kidneys.

Overall, pituitary hormones play crucial roles in regulating growth, development, metabolism, reproductive function, and various other bodily functions. Abnormalities in pituitary hormone levels can lead to a range of medical conditions, such as dwarfism, acromegaly, Cushing's disease, infertility, and diabetes insipidus.

Cholinergic neurons are specialized types of nerve cells (neurons) that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to transmit signals to other neurons or effector cells, such as muscle cells. These neurons play important roles in various physiological functions, including modulation of motor control, cognition, memory, arousal, and sensory perception. Cholinergic neurons are widely distributed throughout the nervous system, with significant concentrations found in the basal forebrain, brainstem, and spinal cord. Dysfunction or degeneration of cholinergic neurons has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and various forms of dementia.

Dopamine is a type of neurotransmitter, which is a chemical messenger that transmits signals in the brain and nervous system. It plays several important roles in the body, including:

* Regulation of movement and coordination
* Modulation of mood and motivation
* Control of the reward and pleasure centers of the brain
* Regulation of muscle tone
* Involvement in memory and attention

Dopamine is produced in several areas of the brain, including the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. It is released by neurons (nerve cells) and binds to specific receptors on other neurons, where it can either excite or inhibit their activity.

Abnormalities in dopamine signaling have been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric conditions, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and addiction.

Afferent pathways, also known as sensory pathways, refer to the neural connections that transmit sensory information from the peripheral nervous system to the central nervous system (CNS), specifically to the brain and spinal cord. These pathways are responsible for carrying various types of sensory information, such as touch, temperature, pain, pressure, vibration, hearing, vision, and taste, to the CNS for processing and interpretation.

The afferent pathways begin with sensory receptors located throughout the body, which detect changes in the environment and convert them into electrical signals. These signals are then transmitted via afferent neurons, also known as sensory neurons, to the spinal cord or brainstem. Within the CNS, the information is further processed and integrated with other neural inputs before being relayed to higher cognitive centers for conscious awareness and response.

Understanding the anatomy and physiology of afferent pathways is essential for diagnosing and treating various neurological conditions that affect sensory function, such as neuropathies, spinal cord injuries, and brain disorders.

Synaptic transmission is the process by which a neuron communicates with another cell, such as another neuron or a muscle cell, across a junction called a synapse. It involves the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic terminal of the neuron, which then cross the synaptic cleft and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, leading to changes in the electrical or chemical properties of the target cell. This process is critical for the transmission of signals within the nervous system and for controlling various physiological functions in the body.

The olivary nucleus is a structure located in the medulla oblongata, which is a part of the brainstem. It consists of two main parts: the inferior olive and the accessory olive. The inferior olive is further divided into several subnuclei.

The olivary nucleus plays an important role in the coordination of movements, particularly in the regulation of fine motor control and rhythmic movements. It receives input from various sources, including the cerebellum, spinal cord, and other brainstem nuclei, and sends output to the cerebellum via the climbing fibers.

Damage to the olivary nucleus can result in a variety of neurological symptoms, including ataxia (loss of coordination), tremors, and dysarthria (speech difficulties). Certain neurodegenerative disorders, such as multiple system atrophy, may also affect the olivary nucleus and contribute to its degeneration.

Glutamic acid is an alpha-amino acid, which is one of the 20 standard amino acids in the genetic code. The systematic name for this amino acid is (2S)-2-Aminopentanedioic acid. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH2CH2CO2H.

Glutamic acid is a crucial excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain, and it plays an essential role in learning and memory. It's also involved in the metabolism of sugars and amino acids, the synthesis of proteins, and the removal of waste nitrogen from the body.

Glutamic acid can be found in various foods such as meat, fish, beans, eggs, dairy products, and vegetables. In the human body, glutamic acid can be converted into gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), another important neurotransmitter that has a calming effect on the nervous system.

Berberine alkaloids are a type of natural compound found in several plants, including the Berberis species (such as barberry and tree turmeric), goldenseal, Oregon grape, and phellodendron. The most well-known and researched berberine alkaloid is berberine itself, which has a yellow color and is commonly used in traditional medicine for various purposes, such as treating diarrhea, reducing inflammation, and combating bacterial and fungal infections.

Berberine alkaloids have a complex chemical structure that includes a nitrogen atom, making them basic in nature. They are known to interact with several biological targets, including enzymes and receptors, which contributes to their diverse pharmacological activities. Some of the key mechanisms of action of berberine alkaloids include:

1. Inhibition of DNA gyrase: Berberine alkaloids can interfere with bacterial DNA replication by inhibiting the activity of DNA gyrase, an enzyme that helps to unwind and supercoil DNA during replication. This makes them effective against a wide range of bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE).
2. Interaction with cell membranes: Berberine alkaloids can interact with the lipid bilayer of cell membranes, disrupting their integrity and increasing permeability. This can lead to the death of bacteria, fungi, and cancer cells.
3. Modulation of gene expression: Berberine has been shown to regulate the expression of various genes involved in metabolic processes, inflammation, and cell growth. For example, it can activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key enzyme that regulates energy metabolism, which may contribute to its potential benefits in treating diabetes, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
4. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators: Berberine alkaloids can inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which are involved in the development of various inflammatory diseases.
5. Antioxidant activity: Berberine alkaloids have antioxidant properties, which can help protect cells from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). This may contribute to their potential benefits in treating neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

In summary, berberine alkaloids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and metabolic regulatory effects. These properties make them promising candidates for the development of new therapeutic agents to treat various diseases, such as infections, inflammation, diabetes, obesity, and cancer. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential side effects before they can be safely and effectively used in clinical settings.

Enkephalins are naturally occurring opioid peptides that bind to opiate receptors in the brain and other organs, producing pain-relieving and other effects. They are derived from the precursor protein proenkephalin and consist of two main types: Leu-enkephalin and Met-enkephalin. Enkephalins play a role in pain modulation, stress response, mood regulation, and addictive behaviors. They are also involved in the body's reward system and have been implicated in various physiological processes such as respiration, gastrointestinal motility, and hormone release.

Nerve tissue proteins are specialized proteins found in the nervous system that provide structural and functional support to nerve cells, also known as neurons. These proteins include:

1. Neurofilaments: These are type IV intermediate filaments that provide structural support to neurons and help maintain their shape and size. They are composed of three subunits - NFL (light), NFM (medium), and NFH (heavy).

2. Neuronal Cytoskeletal Proteins: These include tubulins, actins, and spectrins that provide structural support to the neuronal cytoskeleton and help maintain its integrity.

3. Neurotransmitter Receptors: These are specialized proteins located on the postsynaptic membrane of neurons that bind neurotransmitters released by presynaptic neurons, triggering a response in the target cell.

4. Ion Channels: These are transmembrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the neuronal membrane and play a crucial role in generating and transmitting electrical signals in neurons.

5. Signaling Proteins: These include enzymes, receptors, and adaptor proteins that mediate intracellular signaling pathways involved in neuronal development, differentiation, survival, and death.

6. Adhesion Proteins: These are cell surface proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, playing a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of neural circuits.

7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins: These include proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens that provide structural support to nerve tissue and regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and survival.

Homeostasis is a fundamental concept in the field of medicine and physiology, referring to the body's ability to maintain a stable internal environment, despite changes in external conditions. It is the process by which biological systems regulate their internal environment to remain in a state of dynamic equilibrium. This is achieved through various feedback mechanisms that involve sensors, control centers, and effectors, working together to detect, interpret, and respond to disturbances in the system.

For example, the body maintains homeostasis through mechanisms such as temperature regulation (through sweating or shivering), fluid balance (through kidney function and thirst), and blood glucose levels (through insulin and glucagon secretion). When homeostasis is disrupted, it can lead to disease or dysfunction in the body.

In summary, homeostasis is the maintenance of a stable internal environment within biological systems, through various regulatory mechanisms that respond to changes in external conditions.

Appetite is the desire to eat or drink something, which is often driven by feelings of hunger or thirst. It is a complex process that involves both physiological and psychological factors. Physiologically, appetite is influenced by the body's need for energy and nutrients, as well as various hormones and neurotransmitters that regulate hunger and satiety signals in the brain. Psychologically, appetite can be affected by emotions, mood, stress levels, and social factors such as the sight or smell of food.

In medical terms, a loss of appetite is often referred to as anorexia, which can be caused by various factors such as illness, medication, infection, or psychological conditions like depression. On the other hand, an excessive or abnormal appetite is known as polyphagia and can be a symptom of certain medical conditions such as diabetes or hyperthyroidism.

It's important to note that while "anorexia" is a medical term used to describe loss of appetite, it should not be confused with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, which is a serious mental health condition characterized by restrictive eating, distorted body image, and fear of gaining weight.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

The vagus nerve, also known as the 10th cranial nerve (CN X), is the longest of the cranial nerves and extends from the brainstem to the abdomen. It has both sensory and motor functions and plays a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, speech, and sweating, among others.

The vagus nerve is responsible for carrying sensory information from the internal organs to the brain, and it also sends motor signals from the brain to the muscles of the throat and voice box, as well as to the heart, lungs, and digestive tract. The vagus nerve helps regulate the body's involuntary responses, such as controlling heart rate and blood pressure, promoting relaxation, and reducing inflammation.

Dysfunction in the vagus nerve can lead to various medical conditions, including gastroparesis, chronic pain, and autonomic nervous system disorders. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a therapeutic intervention that involves delivering electrical impulses to the vagus nerve to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, and migraine headaches.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rats, Zucker" is not a standard medical term or abbreviation in human medicine. It seems to be an incorrect combination of two terms from the field of laboratory animal science.

1. "Rats" are commonly used laboratory animals.
2. "Zucker" is a surname and also refers to a strain of laboratory rats, specifically the Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rat, which is a model for studying type 2 diabetes mellitus.

If you have any questions related to human medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Orchiectomy is a surgical procedure where one or both of the testicles are removed. It is also known as castration. This procedure can be performed for various reasons, including the treatment of testicular cancer, prostate cancer, or other conditions that may affect the testicles. It can also be done to reduce levels of male hormones in the body, such as in the case of transgender women undergoing gender affirming surgery. The specific medical definition may vary slightly depending on the context and the extent of the procedure.

An action potential is a brief electrical signal that travels along the membrane of a nerve cell (neuron) or muscle cell. It is initiated by a rapid, localized change in the permeability of the cell membrane to specific ions, such as sodium and potassium, resulting in a rapid influx of sodium ions and a subsequent efflux of potassium ions. This ion movement causes a brief reversal of the electrical potential across the membrane, which is known as depolarization. The action potential then propagates along the cell membrane as a wave, allowing the electrical signal to be transmitted over long distances within the body. Action potentials play a crucial role in the communication and functioning of the nervous system and muscle tissue.

The Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal system, also known as the hypothalamic-pituitary system, is a crucial part of the endocrine system that regulates many bodily functions. It consists of two main components: the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland.

The hypothalamus is a region in the brain that receives information from various parts of the body and integrates them to regulate vital functions such as body temperature, hunger, thirst, sleep, and emotional behavior. It also produces and releases neurohormones that control the secretion of hormones from the pituitary gland.

The pituitary gland is a small gland located at the base of the brain, just below the hypothalamus. It consists of two parts: the anterior pituitary (also called adenohypophysis) and the posterior pituitary (also called neurohypophysis). The anterior pituitary produces and releases several hormones that regulate various bodily functions such as growth, metabolism, reproduction, and stress response. The posterior pituitary stores and releases hormones produced by the hypothalamus, including antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and oxytocin.

The hypothalamo-hypophyseal system works together to maintain homeostasis in the body by regulating various physiological processes through hormonal signaling. Dysfunction of this system can lead to several endocrine disorders, such as diabetes insipidus, pituitary tumors, and hypothalamic-pituitary axis disorders.

Neural inhibition is a process in the nervous system that decreases or prevents the activity of neurons (nerve cells) in order to regulate and control communication within the nervous system. It is a fundamental mechanism that allows for the balance of excitation and inhibition necessary for normal neural function. Inhibitory neurotransmitters, such as GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) and glycine, are released from the presynaptic neuron and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic neuron, reducing its likelihood of firing an action potential. This results in a decrease in neural activity and can have various effects depending on the specific neurons and brain regions involved. Neural inhibition is crucial for many functions including motor control, sensory processing, attention, memory, and emotional regulation.

Intraventricular infusion is a medical procedure where medication or fluid is delivered directly into the cerebral ventricles of the brain through a catheter. The cerebral ventricles are spaces in the brain that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This method is often used to administer drugs that need to bypass the blood-brain barrier, which can be difficult for certain medications to cross on their own. It is commonly used in the treatment of conditions such as meningitis, encephalitis, and brain tumors.

The process involves surgically implanting a catheter into one of the ventricles, which is then connected to an external or internal pump that delivers the medication or fluid. The infusion can be done continuously over a period of time or intermittently as needed. This method allows for precise control over the amount and rate of drug delivery to the brain, reducing the risk of systemic side effects and increasing the effectiveness of treatment.

However, it's important to note that intraventricular infusions carry risks such as infection, bleeding, and damage to surrounding tissues. Therefore, they are typically reserved for situations where other treatment options have been exhausted or are not effective.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreatic islets, primarily in response to elevated levels of glucose in the circulating blood. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood glucose levels and facilitating the uptake and utilization of glucose by peripheral tissues, such as muscle and adipose tissue, for energy production and storage. Insulin also inhibits glucose production in the liver and promotes the storage of excess glucose as glycogen or triglycerides.

Deficiency in insulin secretion or action leads to impaired glucose regulation and can result in conditions such as diabetes mellitus, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and associated complications. Exogenous insulin is used as a replacement therapy in individuals with diabetes to help manage their blood glucose levels and prevent long-term complications.

Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone (GHRH) is a hormone that is produced and released by the hypothalamus, a small gland located in the brain. Its primary function is to stimulate the anterior pituitary gland to release growth hormone (GH) into the bloodstream. GH plays a crucial role in growth and development, particularly during childhood and adolescence, by promoting the growth of bones and muscles.

GHRH is a 44-amino acid peptide that binds to specific receptors on the surface of pituitary cells, triggering a series of intracellular signals that ultimately lead to the release of GH. The production and release of GHRH are regulated by various factors, including sleep, stress, exercise, and nutrition.

Abnormalities in the production or function of GHRH can lead to growth disorders, such as dwarfism or gigantism, as well as other hormonal imbalances. Therefore, understanding the role of GHRH in regulating GH release is essential for diagnosing and treating these conditions.

The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (also known as ARH, ARC, or infundibular nucleus) is an aggregation of neurons in the ... The arcuate nucleus also contains a population of specialized ependymal cells, called tanycytes. Astrocytes in the arcuate ... NPY/AgRP neurons and POMC/CART neurons make up two groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus that are centrally involved in the ... The arcuate nucleus includes several important and diverse populations of neurons that help mediate different neuroendocrine ...
... the arcuate nucleus is a group of neurons located on the anterior surface of the medullary pyramids. These nuclei are the ... Arcuate nuclei are capable of chemosensitivity and have a proven role in the respiratory center controlling the breathing rate ... Diagram showing the course of the arcuate fibers. The formatio reticularis of the medulla oblongata, shown by a transverse ... They receive fibers from the corticospinal tract and send their axons through the anterior external arcuate fibers and ...
The arcuate nucleus and the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus have dopamine neurons that form an important projection ... the arcuate nucleus (group 12); the zona incerta (group 13) and the periventricular nucleus (group 14). The substantia nigra is ... Dopamine produced by neurons in the arcuate nucleus is secreted into the hypophyseal portal system of the median eminence, ... The zona incerta, grouped between the arcuate and periventricular nuclei, projects to several areas of the hypothalamus, and ...
Both groups of arcuate nucleus neurons are regulated in part by leptin. Leptin inhibits the NPY/AgRP group while stimulating ... The arcuate nucleus contains two distinct groups of neurons. The first group coexpresses neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti- ... The circuit begins with an area of the hypothalamus, the arcuate nucleus, that has outputs to the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and ...
Nesfatin/NUCB2 is expressed in the appetite-control hypothalamic nuclei such as paraventricular nucleus (PVN), arcuate nucleus ... Nesfatin-1 immunopositive neurons are also located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in the ARC ... Price, Christopher J.; Samson, Willis K.; Ferguson, Alastair V. (2008). "Nesfatin-1 inhibits NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus ... Nesfatin-1 immunoreactivity was also found in the brainstem nuclei such as nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and Dorsal ...
The subregion of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus closest to the median eminence contains specialized permeable capillaries ... 499 The arcuate nucleus is a part of the tuber cinereum.: 497.e1 The lateral portions of tuber cinereum lodge the lateral ... tuberal nucleus, and tuberomammillary nucleus. The basolateral aspect of the tuber cinereum often presents slight elevations ... produced by the underlying lateral tuberal nucleus - the lateral eminence. The tuber cinereum is situated caudal to the optic ...
Leptin targets the receptors on the arcuate nucleus and suppresses the secretion of MCH and orexin. The arcuate nucleus also ...
Leptin increases proopimelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expression in the rostral arcuate nucleus. Diabetes. 46:2119-2123, 1997. Hahn T ...
FABP7+ astrocytes are in close contact with neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus that are responsive to a hormone ... Gömöri-positive astrocytes are much more abundant within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and in the hippocampus than in ... arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medulla, just beneath the area postrema. Gomori-positive cytoplasmic ... "Composition of Gomori-positive inclusions in astrocytes of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus: GOMORI-POSITIVE INCLUSIONS IN ...
... including in particular the arcuate nucleus and in both oxytocin and vasopressin neurons in the supraoptic nucleus. Endomorphin ... α-neo-endorphin is also expressed in POMC cells in the arcuate nucleus. met-enkephalin is widely distributed in the CNS and in ... cells in the arcuate nucleus, in the brainstem and in immune cells, and acts through μ-opioid receptors. β-endorphin has many ...
It has been found that in brain of females, the arcuate nucleus contains twice as many connections to NKB neurons than males. ... Neurokinin B is expressed along with the peptides kisspeptin and dynorphin A in the neuronal cells of the arcuate nucleus. Five ... NKB found mostly in the arcuate nucleus in humans, is found mostly in the monkey hypothalamus. By injecting NKB analogs ... Studies show that in postmenopausal woman there is an increased expression of tachykinin neurons in the arcuate nucleus. In ...
There is a sculpture on the nucleus containing oblique and arcuate radial plaits. The succeeding two whorls are distinctly ... The columella is very oblique, slightly arcuate, and shortly reflexed above. Umbilicus broad, perspective and deep. The width ...
... with de-inhibition of the pulse generator in the arcuate nucleus. This inhibition of the arcuate nucleus is an ongoing active ... The arcuate nucleus is affected and controlled by neuronal input from other areas of the brain and hormonal input from the ... The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is the driver of the reproductive system. It has neurons which generate and release ... Neurons of the arcuate nucleus secrete gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) into the blood of the pituitary portal system. An ...
Disinhibition of the GnRH pulse generator in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Secretion of estrogen by the ovaries in ...
... particularly in the pontine nuclei and the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Nuclei of cranial nerves, arcuate nuclei, and posterior ... The event of chromatolysis is also characterized by a prominent migration of the nucleus towards the periphery of the cell and ... The loss of staining begins near the nucleus and spreads toward the axon hillock. The basophilic rim is formed as chromatolysis ... In neurons receiving axonal transection, central chromatolysis is observed in the area between the nucleus and the axon hillock ...
Although not only the SCN but also the arcuate nucleus (ARC), are involved in the Tb setting through afferents to the ... The median preoptic nucleus is located dorsal to the other three nuclei of the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus. The ... Activation of the median preoptic nucleus leads to stimulation of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The afferents to this area ... When combined with lesions on other preoptic hypothalamic nuclei, however, damage to the median preoptic nucleus causes an ...
"Leptin activates anorexigenic POMC neurons through a neural network in the arcuate nucleus" (PDF). Nature. 411 (6836): 480-4. ... the anterior pituitary gland Melanotrope cells of the intermediate lobe of the pituitary gland Neurons in the arcuate nucleus ... α-MSH produced by neurons in the ventromedial nucleus has important roles in the regulation of appetite (POMC neuron ...
β1 and β2 tanycytes are found nearer the arcuate nucleus and the median eminence. List of distinct cell types in the adult ...
The internal arcuate fibers are composed of axons of nucleus gracilis and nucleus cuneatus. The axons of the nucleus gracilis ... Fibres from these nuclei will pass to the contralateral side of the brainstem, as the internal arcuate fibres. At the open ... The medial lemniscus carries axons from most of the body and synapses in the ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus, at ... The cuneate and gracile nuclei reside at the closed (lower) medulla, so the lemniscus is not formed at this level. ...
It is a 60-amino acid polypeptide produced in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the posterior pituitary gland. It is ... and dopamine-containing neurons in the rat arcuate nucleus". Regulatory Peptides. 145 (1-3): 165-8. doi:10.1016/j.regpep. ... "Galanin-like peptide stimulates food intake via activation of neuropeptide Y neurons in the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus of ...
February 2010). "Novel insight in distribution of nesfatin-1 and phospho-mTOR in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus of ... Hewson AK, Tung LY, Connell DW, Tookman L, Dickson SL (December 2002). "The rat arcuate nucleus integrates peripheral signals ... Ghrelin activates cells in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, including neuropeptide Y neurons that ... increase body weight and fat mass by triggering receptors in the arcuate nucleus that include neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti- ...
... specifically in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and dentate gyrus. The arcuate nucleus has been found to have one of the highest ... Minor RK, Chang JW, de Cabo R (February 2009). "Hungry for life: How the arcuate nucleus and neuropeptide Y may play a critical ... Furthermore, in situ hybridization results from the study showed the highest cellular levels of NPY mRNA in the arcuate nucleus ... Pomonis JD, Levine AS, Billington CJ (July 1997). "Interaction of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and central nucleus ...
This is named the arcuate nucleus, and is serially continuous above with the pontine nuclei in the pons; it contains small ... The anterior external arcuate fibers (ventral external arcuate fibers) vary as to their prominence: in some cases they form an ... As the fibers arch across the pyramid, they enclose a small nucleus which lies in front of and medial to the pyramid. ... fusiform (spindle-shaped) cells, around which some of the arcuate fibers end, and from which others arise. The reticular ...
Lau J, Farzi A, Qi Y, Heilbronn R, Mietzsch M, Shi YC, Herzog H (January 2018). "CART neurons in the arcuate nucleus and ... in the arcuate nucleus) Acetylcholine VIP Substance P Dopamine Cholecystokinin Neurotensin Glucagon-like peptide-1 (in the ... that act as hormones In one subpoplation of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, three anorectic peptides are co-expressed ... Vasopressin co-exists with dynorphin and galanin in magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus ...
It is a 44-amino acid peptide hormone produced in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. GHRH first appears in the human ... August 2020). "Insulin synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates pituitary growth hormone ... GHRH is released from neurosecretory nerve terminals of these arcuate neurons, and is carried by the hypothalamo-hypophyseal ... allowing the free catalytic subunits to translocate to the nucleus and phosphorylate the transcription factor cAMP response ...
"Kisspeptin immunoreactive cells of the ovine preoptic area and arcuate nucleus co-express estrogen receptor alpha". ...
It is synthesized in neuropeptide Y (NPY)-containing cell bodies located in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus in the ... This hormone acts in the arcuate nucleus and inhibits the AgRP/NPY neuron from releasing orexigenic peptides. Ghrelin has ... "Leptin modulates the intrinsic excitability of AgRP/NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus". The Journal of ... mRNA in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of hyperphagic and obese tub/tub mice". Brain Research. Molecular Brain Research. 125 ...
The only neurons known to release melanocortins are located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. However, melanocortins ...
Given that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus regulates many basic processes, including appetite, a link may well exist. In the ...
441 Some neurons in arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus make and secrete α-MSH in response to leptin;: 626 : 419 α-MSH is also ...
The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (also known as ARH, ARC, or infundibular nucleus) is an aggregation of neurons in the ... The arcuate nucleus also contains a population of specialized ependymal cells, called tanycytes. Astrocytes in the arcuate ... NPY/AgRP neurons and POMC/CART neurons make up two groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus that are centrally involved in the ... The arcuate nucleus includes several important and diverse populations of neurons that help mediate different neuroendocrine ...
JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to use BrainMaps.org. However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser. To view BrainMaps.org, enable JavaScript by changing your browser options, and then try again ...
Serotonin-mediated increases in the extracellular levels of β-endorphin in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus accumbens: A ... Serotonin-mediated increases in the extracellular levels of β-endorphin in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus accumbens: A ...
The arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus exhibits a lack of effective blood-brain barrier response to circulating factors ...
... in nuclei in the central nervous system (CNS). This thesis investigates the involvement of two sensory circumventricular organs ... Arcuate Nucleus ,. Obesity Abstract. Leptin is an adipokine that acts centrally to regulate feeding behaviour, energy ... expenditure and autonomic function via activation of its receptor (ObRb) in nuclei in the central nervous system (CNS). This ...
Regulation of agouti-related protein and pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression in the avian arcuate nucleus. Frontiers in ...
This structure is located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. This pulse generator requires appropriate positive ...
Our data indicate that 1,25D3-mediated changes in food intake occur through action within the arcuate nucleus. We found that ... that vitamin D regulates glucose homeostasis via the paraventricular nuclei and energy homeostasis via the arcuate nuclei. ... an effect that is dependent upon VDR within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, chronic central ... VDR colocalized with and activated key appetite-regulating neurons in the arcuate, namely proopiomelanocortin neurons. Together ...
Open the PDF for The LIM-homeobox transcription factor Isl1 plays crucial roles in the development of multiple arcuate nucleus ... The LIM-homeobox transcription factor Isl1 plays crucial roles in the development of multiple arcuate nucleus neurons ... The LIM-homeobox transcription factor Isl1 plays crucial roles in the development of multiple arcuate nucleus neurons ...
Effects of cannabinoids on neuropeptide Y and β-endorphin expression in the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Br. J. Nutr. 105 ... By contrast, physical stress has been shown to lead to an eCB-induced dopamine boost from the nucleus accumbens (young, well- ... This is likely a consequence of decreased serotonin transporter levels in the raphe nuclei following both acute and prolonged ...
Kisspeptins also increase gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release by stimulating the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus ...
Neurons containing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and GABA are found in the arcuate nucleus and are important in regulating appetite ... This is not surprising as the hypothalamus houses the arcuate nucleus that contains the neurons for stimulating and suppressing ...
"The rat arcuate nucleus integrates peripheral signals provided by leptin, insulin, and a ghrelin mimetic". Diabetes. 51 (12): ... "Novel insight in distribution of nesfatin-1 and phospho-mTOR in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus of rats". Peptides. 31 ... releasing factor neurons in the rat arcuate nucleus following systemic injection of the GH secretagogue, GH-releasing peptide-6 ... "Ghrelin induces feeding in the mesolimbic reward pathway between the ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens". ...
2022) Distinct Firing Activities of the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus Neurons to Appetite Hormones. International Journal of ...
2019). One-month of high-intensity exercise did not change the food intake and the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus ...
... nucleus were reported (32). Kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus are involved in the negative feedback of estradiol on the ... Activation of arcuate nucleus GABA neurons promotes luteinizing hormone secretion and reproductive dysfunction: Implications ... Hyperactive LH pulses and elevated kisspeptin and NKB gene expression in the arcuate nucleus of a PCOS mouse model. ... The kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) cell population of the arcuate nucleus: sex differences and effects of prenatal ...
... body weight gain and increased UCP-1 expression in brown adipose tissue and neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus. These ... which would act increasing CRF neuron activation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gonadal hormones also participate in the ...
The regulation of glucose-excited neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus by glucose and feeding-relevant peptides ... arcuate (ARC) + ventromedial nuclei (VMN)] neurons is attributable to the interaction of long-chain FA (LCFA) with FA ... Effects of maternal genotype and diet on offspring glucose and fatty acid-sensing ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus neurons ...
... protein in neurons of the arcuate nucleus that control weight homeostasis and effect of fasting on hypothalamic Dlk1 Mrna. ... Central melanin-concentrating hormone influences liver and adipose metabolism via specific hypothalamic nuclei and efferent ...
Underdevelopment of the arcuate nucleus has been noted in SIDS infants and is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of ... like an underdeveloped arcuate nucleus. (Cytokines are molecules released by various cells, especially in the immune system, ... likely had a defective or under-developed serotonin system in the arcuate nucleus or other area in the medulla oblongata of the ... by the vaccines in the initial innate immune response to the vaccines travel to their receptors in the arcuate nucleus and ...
The lateral hypothalamus integrates homeostatic information from other hypothalamic areas (such as the arcuate nucleus) and ... Theyre mostly in corticolimbic and midbrain areas-- such as the nucleus accumbens and the VTA, although the lateral ... Lesioning other hypothalamic areas such as the arcuate or the VMH can cause hypothalamic obesity. ...
... infant with bilateral hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus) could have been triggered by the hexavalent vaccination. This case is ...
Stereotaxic-guided deletion of ERα in the arcuate nucleus increases bone mass in intact and ovariectomized females, underlining ... "Estrogen signaling in arcuate Kiss1 neurons suppresses a sex-dependent female circuit promoting dense strong bones" by Herber ... Ingraham HA.Estrogen signaling in arcuate Kiss1 neurons suppresses a sex-dependent female circuit promoting dense strong bones ...
... cells were significantly decreased in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and lateral hypothalamic area, respectively. In contrast, the ... Ultrastructurally, epithelial cells of the mammary buds and ducts possessed an oval and lucent nucleus, and ribosomes increased ... whereas it increases α-MSH and ACTH immunoreactivities in rat hypothalamic nuclei.. ...
... including the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the spinal trigeminal nucleus (19). However, a previous study proposed ... dorsal raphe nucleus, amygdala, cerebellum and spinal cord (19,38-42). In the present study, a long-lasting increase in apelin ...
Though neonatal administration of MSG has been shown to affect fertility via arcuate nucleus ablation, the body of work ...
... arcuate nucleus; As; arsenic; AraC; cytosine β-D-arabinofuranoside; BDNF; brain derived neurotrophic factor; BPA; bisphenol A ...
These regions include the arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus ... These regions include the arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus ... These regions include the arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus ... These regions include the arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus ...
Arcuate Nucleus. Arcuate Nucleus of Hypothalamus. Mamillary Bodies. Mammillary Bodies. C - Diseases. Changed terms. Replaced-by ...
  • The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (also known as ARH, ARC, or infundibular nucleus) is an aggregation of neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus, adjacent to the third ventricle and the median eminence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The arcuate nucleus includes several important and diverse populations of neurons that help mediate different neuroendocrine and physiological functions, including neuroendocrine neurons, centrally projecting neurons, and astrocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The populations of neurons found in the arcuate nucleus are based on the hormones they secrete or interact with and are responsible for hypothalamic function, such as regulating hormones released from the pituitary gland or secreting their own hormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurons in this region are also responsible for integrating information and providing inputs to other nuclei in the hypothalamus or inputs to areas outside this region of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The function of the arcuate nucleus relies on its diversity of neurons, but its central role is involved in homeostasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dopaminergic neurons of the arcuate also inhibit the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, explaining in part why lactating (or otherwise hyperprolactinemic) women experience oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea (infrequency or absence of menses). (wikipedia.org)
  • Kisspeptin/NKB neurons within the arcuate nucleus form synaptic inputs with TIDA neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • NPY/AgRP neurons and POMC/CART neurons make up two groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus that are centrally involved in the neuroendocrine function of feeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other types of neurons have projection pathways from the arcuate nucleus to mediate different regions of the hypothalamus or to other regions outside of the hypothalamus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Projections of these neurons extend a long distance from the arcuate nucleus to the median eminence to influence the release of hormones from the pituitary gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurons of the arcuate nucleus have intrahypothalamic projections for neuroendocrine circuitry. (wikipedia.org)
  • We previously showed that at least 50% of the FA sensing in ventromedial hypothalamic [VMH = arcuate (ARC) + ventromedial nuclei (VMN)] neurons is attributable to the interaction of long-chain FA (LCFA) with FA translocase/CD36 (CD36) acting as a receptor, whereas only ∼20% is attributable to intracellular metabolism of FA ( 5 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Commentary on: 'Estrogen signaling in arcuate Kiss1 neurons suppresses a sex-dependent female circuit promoting dense strong bones' by Herber CB, et al. (imsociety.org)
  • such as neural projections that influence feeding behavior project to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Kisspeptins also increase gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release by stimulating the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus [5]. (scirp.org)
  • In addition, after capsaicin treatment, numbers of AgRP- and orexin-immunoreactive ( + ) cells were significantly decreased in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and lateral hypothalamic area, respectively. (go.jp)
  • These results indicate that capsaicin reduces food intake, not body weight, transiently, and decreases AgRP and orexin immunoreactivities, whereas it increases α-MSH and ACTH immunoreactivities in rat hypothalamic nuclei. (go.jp)
  • Leptin is an adipokine that acts centrally to regulate feeding behaviour, energy expenditure and autonomic function via activation of its receptor (ObRb) in nuclei in the central nervous system (CNS). (queensu.ca)
  • It was shown that CRF synthesis is influenced by leptin, which would act increasing CRF neuron activation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). (usp.br)
  • Control of energy homeostasis by insulin and leptin: targeting the arcuate nucleus and beyond. (bvsalud.org)
  • The arcuate nucleus provides many physiological roles involved in feeding, metabolism, fertility, and cardiovascular regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kisspeptin neurons within the arcuate nucleus (ARC), which co-express neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin A, are termed KNDy neurons. (humgen.org)
  • 1. Activation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus predicts the anorectic actions of ciliary neurotrophic factor and leptin in intact and gold thioglucose-lesioned mice. (nih.gov)
  • 3. Down-regulated STAT3 messenger ribonucleic acid and STAT3 protein in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of the obese leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mouse. (nih.gov)
  • 15. VGF is required for obesity induced by diet, gold thioglucose treatment, and agouti and is differentially regulated in pro-opiomelanocortin- and neuropeptide Y-containing arcuate neurons in response to fasting. (nih.gov)
  • Association study of arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y neuron receptor gene variation and serum NPY levels in clozapine treated patients with schizophrenia. (cdc.gov)
  • 2. GABAergic nature of hypothalamic leptin target neurones in the ventromedial arcuate nucleus. (nih.gov)
  • 16. Effects of leptin on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) synthesis and CRF neuron activation in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus of obese (ob/ob) mice. (nih.gov)
  • Control of energy homeostasis by insulin and leptin: targeting the arcuate nucleus and beyond. (bvsalud.org)
  • The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and other brain nuclei were micro-dissected, and the concentrations of aminergic neurotransmitters and their metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. (nih.gov)
  • Here we report controlled, efficient, and scalable differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into pure populations of POMC neurons with arcuate nucleus identity. (nih.gov)
  • In regards to fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, IV ghrelin increased the alcohol- and food-related BOLD signal, respectively in left amygdala (p=0.01) and left nucleus accumbens (p=0.08). (nih.gov)
  • Recent findings indicate that within the nucleus accumbens core, estradiol induces structural plasticity via membrane-localized estrogen receptor α, functionally coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5). (eneuro.org)
  • Developmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) alters reproduction and energy homeostasis, both of which are regulated by the arcuate nucleus (ARC). (nih.gov)
  • Many SIDS infants have abnormalities in the "arcuate nucleus," a portion of the brain that is likely to be involved in controlling breathing and waking during sleep. (infoplease.com)
  • One of the neuronal nuclei most strongly implicated in SIDS has been the raphe nucleus of the brain stem. (wikipathways.org)
  • In this nuclei there are ultrastructural, cellular and molecular changes associated with SIDS relative to controls (PMID:19342987, PMID: 20124538). (wikipathways.org)
  • SLC6A4 exhibits decreased expression in the raphe nucleus of the medulla oblongata and polymorphisms specifically associated with SIDS (PMID:19342987). (wikipathways.org)
  • Regulation of arcuate genes by developmental exposures to endocrine-disrupting compounds in female rats. (nih.gov)
  • Neuroendocrine dysfunction of hypothalamic neurons in the arcuate nucleus is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease. (nih.gov)
  • At E13 and other later ages examined, Kiss1 signal in individual cells within the arcuate nucleus (ARC) appeared stronger in females than males. (umassmed.edu)
  • These changes were accompanied by increases in markers of cell injury and reductions in active mitochondria in the olfactory bulb, gonadotropin releasing hormone cells and fibers and tyrosine hydroxylase immunolabeled fibers in the arcuate nucleus, and reductions in spermatogonium. (cdc.gov)
  • Autopsy revealed the absence of the external arcuate nucleus, which may be involved in the central chemocreception. (nih.gov)