A genus of gram-negative, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacteria isolated from water and associated with diarrhea in humans and animals.
A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
A plant family of the order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta (conifers). They are mainly resinous, aromatic evergreen trees.
A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
Beaches, both natural and man-made, used for bathing and other activities.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.

Rapid identification of Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter isolates by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. (1/62)

A rapid two-step identification scheme based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene was developed in order to differentiate isolates belonging to the Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter genera. For 158 isolates (26 reference cultures and 132 clinical isolates), specific RFLP patterns were obtained and species were successfully identified by this assay.  (+info)

Prevalence of Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter, and Sutterella spp. in human fecal samples as estimated by a reevaluation of isolation methods for Campylobacters. (2/62)

The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of campylobacteria including Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (C. jejuni) and Campylobacter coli in human clinical samples and in samples from healthy individuals and to reevaluate the efficacies of conventional selective methods for isolation of Campylobacter spp. Two charcoal-based selective media, modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) and cefoperazone-amphotericin-teicoplanin (CAT) agar, were compared with Skirrow's blood-based medium and with a filter method (filter) applied to a yeast-enriched blood agar. A total of 1,376 specimens were tested on all four media, and the percentages of thermophilic Campylobacter-positive specimens isolated on Skirrow's medium, filters, CAT agar, and mCCDA were 82, 83, 85, and 95%, respectively. When additional samples were processed with the three selective media, mCCDA recovered significantly more thermophilic Campylobacter spp. than Skirrow's medium (P = 0.0034). No significant difference between Skirrow's medium and CAT agar was observed in this study. Another six taxa were identified, namely, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter curvus-like bacteria, Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, Helicobacter cinaedi, and Sutterella wadsworthensis. Most of these strains were isolated after 5 to 6 days of incubation by use of the filter technique. This paper provides evidence for the existence of S. wadsworthensis in human feces from clinical cases of gastrointestinal disorders and in feces from a healthy individual. Furthermore, C. concisus was isolated from a large number of diarrheal cases, particularly those at the extremes of age, but was additionally isolated from the feces of healthy people. Further investigations to establish the role of C. concisus and S. wadsworthensis in enteric disease is needed. We conclude that a range of campylobacteria may cause infections in Denmark.  (+info)

Identification of Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, C. upsaliensis, arcobacter butzleri, and A. butzleri-like species based on the glyA gene. (3/62)

Currently, the detection and identification of Campylobacter and Arcobacter species remains arduous, largely due to cross-species phenotypic similarities and a relatively narrow spectrum of biochemical reactivity. We have developed a PCR-hybridization strategy, wherein degenerate primers are used to amplify glyA fragments from samples, which are then subjected to species-specific oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe hybridizations, to identify and distinguish between Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, C. upsaliensis, Arcobacter butzleri, and an A. butzleri-like species. Evaluation of this strategy with genomic DNA from different type strains suggests that this approach is both specific and sensitive and thus may be applicable in a diagnostic assay to identify and differentiate these highly related species.  (+info)

Fecal shedding of Campylobacter and Arcobacter spp. in dairy cattle. (4/62)

Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Arcobacter spp. were detected in feces of healthy dairy cows by highly specific multiplex-PCR assays. For C. jejuni, at this one-time sampling, cows from 80.6% of farm operations (n = 31) and 37.7% of individual dairy cattle fecal samples (n = 2,085) were positive. Farm management factors were correlated with prevalence in herds in which >25% of cows were positive for C. jejuni. Statistical significance was set at a P of 0.20. Using these criteria, application of manure with broadcast spreaders (P = 0.17), feeding of whole cottonseed or hulls (P = 0.17) or alfalfa (P = 0.15), and accessibility of feed to birds (P = 0.17) were identified as possible risk factors for C. jejuni infection. C. coli was detected in at least one animal in 19.4% of operations and 1.8% of individual cows (n = 2,085). At the herd level, use of broadcaster spreaders was not a risk factor for C. coli infection. For Arcobacter, cows from 71% of dairy operations (n = 31) and 14.3% of individual dairy cattle fecal samples (n = 1,682) were positive. At the herd level, for Arcobacter spp., feeding of alfalfa (P = 0.11) and use of individual waterers (P = 0.19) were protective. This is the first description of Arcobacter spp. in clinically healthy dairy cattle and the first attempt to correlate their presence with C. jejuni.  (+info)

Susceptibility of Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii to antimicrobial agents used in selective media. (5/62)

Several antimicrobial agents used in selective media for the isolation of Arcobacter were found to be inhibitory to strains belonging to this genus. All three species tested were susceptible to colistin and rifampin at concentrations used in selective media. Arcobacter skirrowii was the most susceptible species. 5-Fluorouracil, novobiocin, trimethoprim, and teicoplanin or vancomycin were found to be without any inhibitory effect on the strains tested at concentrations described for the isolation of Arcobacter species.  (+info)

Characterization of an autotrophic sulfide-oxidizing marine Arcobacter sp. that produces filamentous sulfur. (6/62)

A coastal marine sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium produces hydrophilic filamentous sulfur as a novel metabolic end product. Phylogenetic analysis placed the organism in the genus Arcobacter in the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This motile vibrioid organism can be considered difficult to grow, preferring to grow under microaerophilic conditions in flowing systems in which a sulfide-oxygen gradient has been established. Purified cell cultures were maintained by using this approach. Essentially all 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride-stained cells in a flowing reactor system hybridized with Arcobacter-specific probes as well as with a probe specific for the sequence obtained from reactor-grown cells. The proposed provisional name for the coastal isolate is "Candidatus Arcobacter sulfidicus." For cells cultured in a flowing reactor system, the sulfide optimum was higher than and the CO(2) fixation activity was as high as or higher than those reported for other sulfur oxidizers, such as Thiomicrospira spp. Cells associated with filamentous sulfur material demonstrated nitrogen fixation capability. No ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase could be detected on the basis of radioisotopic activity or by Western blotting techniques, suggesting an alternative pathway of CO(2) fixation. The process of microbial filamentous sulfur formation has been documented in a number of marine environments where both sulfide and oxygen are available. Filamentous sulfur formation by "Candidatus Arcobacter sulfidicus" or similar strains may be an ecologically important process, contributing significantly to primary production in such environments.  (+info)

Assessment of the genetic diversity among arcobacters isolated from poultry products by using two PCR-based typing methods. (7/62)

In this study, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) were optimized for characterization of Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii. In addition, a simple and rapid DNA extraction method was tested for use in both typing procedures. Both methods had satisfactory typeability and discriminatory power, but the fingerprints generated with ERIC-PCR were more reproducible and complex than those obtained with RAPD-PCR. The use of nondiluted boiled cell suspensions as DNA templates was found to be very useful in ERIC-PCR. Characterization of large numbers of Arcobacter isolates is therefore preferably performed by the ERIC-PCR procedure. Isolates for which almost identical ERIC fingerprints are generated may subsequently be characterized by RAPD-PCR, although adjustment and standardization of the amount of the DNA template are necessary. In the second part of this study, the genotypic diversity of arcobacters present on broiler carcasses was assessed by using both typing methods. A total of 228 cultures from 24 samples were examined after direct isolation and enrichment. The isolates were identified by using a multiplex PCR as A. butzleri (n = 182) and A. cryaerophilus (n = 46). A total of 131 types (91 A. butzleri types and 40 A. cryaerophilus types) were discerned without discordance between the two typing techniques. The analysis of the poultry isolates showed that poultry products may harbor not only more than one species but also multiple genotypes. All genotypes were confined to one poultry sample, and only three genotypes were found after simultaneous enrichment and direct isolation. These results demonstrate that different outcomes can be obtained in epidemiological studies depending on the isolation procedure used and the number of isolates characterized.  (+info)

Partitioning of bacterial communities between seawater and healthy, black band diseased, and dead coral surfaces. (8/62)

Distinct partitioning has been observed in the composition and diversity of bacterial communities inhabiting the surface and overlying seawater of three coral species infected with black band disease (BBD) on the southern Caribbean island of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. PCR amplification and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) with universally conserved primers have identified over 524 unique bacterial sequences affiliated with 12 bacterial divisions. The molecular sequences exhibited less than 5% similarity in bacterial community composition between seawater and the healthy, black band diseased, and dead coral surfaces. The BBD bacterial mat rapidly migrates across and kills the coral tissue. Clone libraries constructed from the BBD mat were comprised of eight bacterial divisions and 13% unknowns. Several sequences representing bacteria previously found in other marine and terrestrial organisms (including humans) were isolated from the infected coral surfaces, including Clostridium spp., Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue.  (+info)

Arcobacter is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in various environments, including water, soil, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. These bacteria are microaerophilic, meaning they require a reduced oxygen environment for growth. Some species of Arcobacter have been associated with gastrointestinal illnesses in humans, although the significance of these associations is not fully understood.

Here is a medical definition of Arcobacter from StatPearls:

"Arcobacter are gram-negative, curved or spiral-shaped rods that are microaerophilic and oxidase positive. They can be found in various environments, including water, soil, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Some species have been associated with diarrheal illnesses in humans, but their significance as human pathogens is not well established."

Source: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-. Campylobacter and Arcobacter Infections.

'Campylobacter' is a genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the intestinal tracts of animals, including birds and mammals. These bacteria are a leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness worldwide, with Campylobacter jejuni being the most frequently identified species associated with human infection.

Campylobacter infection, also known as campylobacteriosis, typically causes symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. The infection is usually acquired through the consumption of contaminated food or water, particularly undercooked poultry, raw milk, and contaminated produce. It can also be transmitted through contact with infected animals or their feces.

While most cases of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting and resolve within a week without specific treatment, severe or prolonged infections may require antibiotic therapy. In rare cases, Campylobacter infection can lead to serious complications such as bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection), meningitis, or Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis.

Preventive measures include proper food handling and cooking techniques, thorough handwashing, and avoiding cross-contamination between raw and cooked foods.

Gram-negative bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that do not retain crystal violet dye during the Gram staining procedure used in microbiology. This characteristic is due to the structure of their cell walls, which contain a thin layer of peptidoglycan and an outer membrane composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), proteins, and phospholipids.

The LPS component of the outer membrane is responsible for the endotoxic properties of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the host. Common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Proteus mirabilis, among others.

Gram-negative bacterial infections can cause a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. The severity of these infections can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the patient's immune status, the site of infection, and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

Effective antibiotic therapy is crucial for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, but the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern. Therefore, accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship are essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes and prevent further spread of resistance.

Cupressaceae is a family of coniferous plants, also known as the cypress family. It includes a variety of genera such as *Cupressus* (cypress), *Juniperus* (juniper), *Thuja* (arborvitae or cedar), and *Chamaecyparis* (false cypress or Port Orford cedar). These plants are characterized by their small, scale-like leaves, and many produce cones that contain seeds. Some species in this family have economic importance as timber, ornamental plants, or for their essential oils.

Mustelidae is not a medical term, but a biological term referring to a family of mammals that includes weasels, badgers, otters, ferrets, and wolverines. These animals are characterized by their elongated bodies, short legs, and specialized scent glands used for marking territory and communication. While the study of these animals is not typically within the scope of medical science, understanding the biology and behavior of various species can have implications for public health, conservation efforts, and ecological research.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "bathing beaches." The term "bathing beach" is commonly used to refer to a public shoreline area, such as on a lake or ocean, that is designated for swimming or bathing. However, in a public health context, the term might be used to describe a body of water where people are more likely to swim and therefore where water quality and safety need to be closely monitored.

Public health agencies may test the water at bathing beaches for contaminants such as bacteria or chemicals that could pose a risk to swimmers' health. If high levels of these contaminants are detected, the agency may issue an advisory or closure of the beach to protect public health. For example, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets standards for water quality at bathing beaches and provides guidance to states and localities on monitoring and managing beach water quality.

Campylobacter infections are illnesses caused by the bacterium *Campylobacter jejuni* or other species of the genus *Campylobacter*. These bacteria are commonly found in the intestines of animals, particularly birds, and can be transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, or contact with infected animals.

The most common symptom of Campylobacter infection is diarrhea, which can range from mild to severe and may be bloody. Other symptoms may include abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and vomiting. The illness usually lasts about a week, but in some cases, it can lead to serious complications such as bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream), meningitis, or Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis.

Campylobacter infections are typically treated with antibiotics, but in mild cases, they may resolve on their own without treatment. Prevention measures include cooking meat thoroughly, washing hands and surfaces that come into contact with raw meat, avoiding unpasteurized dairy products and untreated water, and handling pets, particularly birds and reptiles, with care.

The genus Arcobacter, in fact, was created as recently as 1992. Although they are similar to this other genus, Arcobacter ... Donachie, Stuart (2005). "Arcobacter halophilus sp. nov., the first obligate halophile in the genus Arcobacter". International ... This is a reference to the characteristic curved shaped that most Arcobacter cells possess. Arcobacter species have been ... The name Arcobacter is derived from the Latin arcus meaning "bow" and the Greek bacter meaning "rod", and should be understood ...
LPSN "Arcobacter halophilus" at the Encyclopedia of Life Type strain of Arcobacter halophilus at BacDive - the Bacterial ... Arcobacter halophilus is a species of obligate halophilic bacteria. It is Gram-negative, and its type strain is LA31BT(=ATCC ... nov., the first obligate halophile in the genus Arcobacter". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology ... Collado, L.; Figueras, M. J. (2011). "Taxonomy, Epidemiology, and Clinical Relevance of the Genus Arcobacter". Clinical ...
Arcobacter cryaerophilus, Arcobacter skirrowii, and Arcobacter cibarius in chicken meat". Journal of Food Protection. 72 (7): ... "Polyphasic Taxonomic Study of the Emended Genus Arcobacter with Arcobacter butzleri comb. nov. and Arcobacter skirrowii sp. nov ... "Arcobacter skirrowii" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Arcobacter skirrowii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Arcobacter skirrowii is a species of bacteria. It can be pathogenic. Vandamme, P.; Vancanneyt, M.; Pot, B.; Mels, L.; Hoste, B ...
LPSN "Arcobacter cibarius" at the Encyclopedia of Life Type strain of Arcobacter cibarius at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Arcobacter cibarius is a species of Gram-negative, rod-shaped, slightly curved, non-spore-forming bacteria. LMG 21996T (=CCUG ... Houf, K. (2005). "Arcobacter cibarius sp. nov., isolated from broiler carcasses". International Journal of Systematic and ... Collado, L.; Figueras, M. J. (2011). "Taxonomy, Epidemiology, and Clinical Relevance of the Genus Arcobacter". Clinical ...
"Arcobacter ebronensis sp. nov. and Arcobacter aquimarinus sp. nov., two new species isolated from marine environment". ... Arcobacter ebronensis is a species of bacteria first recovered from mussels, with type strain F128-2T (=CECT 8441T = LMG 27922T ... "Bacteremia caused by Arcobacter butzleri in an immunocompromised host." Journal of Clinical Microbiology 53.4 (2015): 1448-1451 ... "Characterization of Arcobacter suis isolated from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) milk." Food microbiology 51 (2015): 186-191. ...
... is a Gram-negative and non-motile bacterium from the genus of Arcobacter which has been isolated from ... "Arcobacter". LPSN. "Arcobacter anaerophilus Taxon Passport - StrainInfo". www.straininfo.net. Archived from the original on ... "Arcobacter anaerophilus sp. nov., isolated from an estuarine sediment and emended description of the genus Arcobacter". ... "Arcobacter anaerophilus". www.uniprot.org. Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (31 October 2018). Parker, Charles Thomas ...
"Arcobacter ebronensis sp. nov. and Arcobacter aquimarinus sp. nov., two new species isolated from marine environment". ... Arcobacter aquimarinus is a species of bacteria first recovered from mussels, with type strain W63T (= CECT 8442T = LMG 27923T ... "Arcobacter lanthieri sp. nov., isolated from pig and dairy cattle manure." International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary ... "Characterization of Arcobacter suis isolated from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) milk." Food microbiology 51 (2015): 186-191. ...
"Arcobacter anaerophilus sp. nov., isolated from an estuarine sediment and emended description of the genus Arcobacter." ... "Arcobacter bivalviorum sp. nov. and Arcobacter venerupis sp. nov., new species isolated from shellfish". Systematic and Applied ... LPSN "Arcobacter bivalviorum" at the Encyclopedia of Life v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches ... Arcobacter bivalviorum is a species of Gram-negative, slightly curved, motile, rod-shaped bacteria first recovered from mussels ...
"Arcobacter ebronensis sp. nov. and Arcobacter aquimarinus sp. nov., two new species isolated from marine environment." ... "Population dynamics and ecology of Arcobacter in sewage." Frontiers in microbiology 5 (2014). LPSN "Arcobacter suis" at the ... Arcobacter suis is a species of bacteria first isolated from pork meat. Its type strain is F41T (=CECT 7833T = LMG 26152T). ... Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Figueras, María José (2013). "Arcobacter cloacae sp. nov. and Arcobacter suis sp. nov., two new ...
"Arcobacter ebronensis sp. nov. and Arcobacter aquimarinus sp. nov., two new species isolated from marine environment." ... "Population dynamics and ecology of Arcobacter in sewage." Frontiers in microbiology 5 (2014). LPSN "Arcobacter cloacae" at the ... "Arcobacter cloacae sp. nov. and Arcobacter suis sp. nov., two new species isolated from food and sewage". Systematic and ... Arcobacter cloacae is a species of bacteria first isolated from sewage. Its type strain is SW28-13T (=CECT 7834T = LMG 26153T ...
... is a bacterium from the genus of Arcobacter. "Arcobacter". LPSN. "Arcobacter canalis". www.uniprot.org. ... "Arcobacter canalis sp. nov., isolated from a water canal contaminated with urban sewage". International Journal of Systematic ...
Arcobacter butzlerei is a common Campylobacter-like organism. Its clinical and microbial features are similar to the food ... Type strain of Arcobacter butzleri at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase (Articles with short description, Short ... Parker, Charles Thomas; Wigley, Sarah; Garrity, George M. "Nomenclature Abstract for Arcobacter butzleri (Kiehlbauch et al. ...
"Arcobacter anaerophilus sp. nov., isolated from an estuarine sediment and emended description of the genus Arcobacter." ... "Arcobacter bivalviorum sp. nov. and Arcobacter venerupis sp. nov., new species isolated from shellfish". Systematic and Applied ... Arcobacter venerupis is a species of Gram-negative, slightly curved motile rod-shaped bacteria. It was first recovered from ... LPSN "Arcobacter venerupis" at the Encyclopedia of Life v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches ...
2016-06-09). "Environmental Breviatea harbor mutualistic Arcobacter epibionts". Nature. 534 (7606): 254-258. Bibcode:2016Natur. ...
... and Arcobacter butzleri from Local and Imported Poultry Meat in Kumasi, Ghana". Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. 16 (5): 352- ...
"Physiological and genetic description of dissimilatory perchlorate reduction by the novel marine bacterium Arcobacter sp. ... perchlorate reductase enzymes include genetically similar versions of pcrABCD except for the Campylobacterota Arcobacter strain ...
... emendation of generic descriptions and proposal of Arcobacter gen-nov". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 41 (1 ...
... emendation of generic descriptions and proposal of Arcobacter gen. nov". Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 41 (1): 88-103. doi:10.1099/ ...
Arcobacter sulfidicus" Wirsen et al. 2002 "Ca. Arsenophonus arthropodicus" Dale et al. 2002 "Ca. Arsenophonus phytopathogenicus ...
... anaerobic strains that can perform a similar process were identified as similar to Thiomicrospira denitrificans and Arcobacter ...
Thiomicrospira denitrificans, Candidatus Arcobacter, and Chlorobaculum tepidum have been shown to utilize the rTCA cycle to ...
Helicobacter pylori and Arcobacter species in stool samples from the Venda region, Limpopo, South Africa: studies using ...
Arcobacter MeSH B03.660.150.100 - Campylobacter MeSH B03.660.150.100.100 - Campylobacter coli MeSH B03.660.150.100.220 - ...
The genus Arcobacter, in fact, was created as recently as 1992. Although they are similar to this other genus, Arcobacter ... Donachie, Stuart (2005). "Arcobacter halophilus sp. nov., the first obligate halophile in the genus Arcobacter". International ... This is a reference to the characteristic curved shaped that most Arcobacter cells possess. Arcobacter species have been ... The name Arcobacter is derived from the Latin arcus meaning "bow" and the Greek bacter meaning "rod", and should be understood ...
Mapping of the genome of Arcobacter butzleri by scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service is a first step in control ... Arcobacter: Genome of Foodborne Pathogen Exposed Mapping of the genome of Arcobacter butzleri by scientists at the USDA ... Later, A. butzleri was reclassified to the Arcobacter genus. Now, by comparing A. butzleris genetic make-up to that of other ... A little-known microbe called Arcobacter butzleri may make you sick if the water you drink or food you eat is contaminated with ...
Polyphasic taxonomic study of the emended genus Arcobacter with Arcobacter butzleri comb. nov. and Arcobacter skirrowii sp. nov ... Vandenberg O, Dediste A, Houf K, Ibekwem S, Souayah H, Cadranel S, Arcobacter species in humans. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10:1863 ... Isolation of Arcobacter butzleri from a neonate with bacteraemia. J Infect. 1995;31:225-7. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Arcobacter butzleri bacteremia in a patient with liver cirrhosis. J Formos Med Assoc. 2000;99:166-9.PubMedGoogle Scholar ...
CCUG17807 - Arcobacter cryaerophilus, Deposit Date: 1985-07-29
Parent taxon: Arcobacter Vandamme et al. 1991 Assigned by: Collado L, Cleenwerck I, Van Trappen S, De Vos P, Figueras MJ. ... Arcobacter mytili sp. nov., an indoxyl acetate-hydrolysis-negative bacterium isolated from mussels. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol ... Arcobacter mytili sp. nov., an indoxyl acetate-hydrolysis-negative bacterium isolated from mussels. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol ... Linking: To permanently link to this page, use https://lpsn.dsmz.de/species/arcobacter-mytili. Copy to clipboard. Link copied ...
"Заказать Recombinant Arcobacter butzleri Sulfate adenylyltransferase subunit 1 (cysN), Yeast по выгодным ценам ...
Continue Reading Scientists expand knowledge on Arcobacter risk to health Food aid incident was largest known outbreak from ... A study has added to the evidence of Arcobacter being detected in food products but the significance of the findings are still ... Scientists expand knowledge on Arcobacter risk to health. By News Desk on August 14, 2022. ... Several species of Arcobacter are seen as emerging foodborne pathogens and may… ...
2017). Arcobacter: an emerging food-borne zoonotic pathogen, its public health concerns and advances in diagnosis and control-a ... The persistence of a greater number of opportunistic and potential pathogens (i.e., Vibrio, Photobacterium, Arcobacter) in ... For instance, members from the genera Ruegeria, Arcobacter, Ferrimonas, and the families Colwelliaceae and Clostridiaceae, ... Arcobacter (e.g., ASVs_1327, 1330), Photobacterium (e.g., ASVs_4493, 4501) and Vibrio (ASVs_4577, 4579). At T48, the number of ...
Campylobacter and Arcobacter. The genus Campylobacter includes 18 species and subspecies; 11 of these are considered pathogenic ... The family Campylobacteraceae includes 2 genera: Campylobacter and Arcobacter. The genus Campylobacter includes 18 species and ...
Arcobacter vandammei sp. nov., isolated from the rectal mucus of a healthy pig Pieter-Jan Kerkhof (UGent) , Stephen L. W. On ... Wild boars as reservoir for Campylobacter and Arcobacter Pieter-Jan Kerkhof (UGent) , Maria Francesca Peruzy, Nicoletta Murru ... identification, prevalence, diversity, butzleri, spp., escherichia-coli, arcobacter, campylobacter, contamination, salmonella, ... campylobacter-jejuni, pathogen arcobacter, poultry products, infection, carcasses, cattle, free-living protozoa, maldi-tof ms, ...
While the significance of Arcobacter in clinical settings grows, the ecological dynamics of potentially pathogenic Arcobacter ... While the significance of Arcobacter in clinical settings grows, the ecological dynamics of potentially pathogenic Arcobacter ... Notably, peaks in Arcobacter abundance were poorly correlated with enterococci plate counts, and remained elevated for one week ... Notably, peaks in Arcobacter abundance were poorly correlated with enterococci plate counts, and remained elevated for one week ...
Characterization of an Autotrophic Sulfide-Oxidizing Marine Arcobacter sp. That Produces Filamentous Sulfur  Wirsen, C. O.; ... Phylogenetic analysis placed the organism in the genus Arcobacter in the epsilon subdivision ... ...
The prevalence of Arcobacter detected by cloacal swab (6/298) and cecal contents (3/145) suggests that Arcobacter colonizes the ... There was also a shift in the species of Arcobacter during this time period. The prevalence levels of Arcobacter in the water ... Multiplex-PCR was used to identify all Arcobacter species and to differentiate Arcobacter butzleri. The two protocols were ... EMJH-P80 recovered Arcobacter more frequently, but the selectivity of the modified Arcobacter agar facilitated the ...
Campylobacterota, formerly Epsilonproteobacteria: Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter · Bacillota, formerly Firmicutes: ...
Prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in humans, animals and foods of animal origin including sea food from India. Transboundary Emerg ... Arcobacter, Staphyloccous, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas and opportunistic pathogens like mycoplasmas towards the ...
Arcobacter skirrowii. Lamb feces, 5-month-old, persistent scour(diarrhoea). M.B.Skirrow, WRI, Worcester, UK. 1980-11-21. ...
15b, c, d and e). Two of them (Vibrio and Arcobacter) were common to three out of four treatments (Supplementary Fig. 15b, c ... Some of these OTUs were assigned to the genera Vibrio and Arcobacter, which have been previously associated with oyster ...
19.01.2013 Arcobacter spp. from Clinically Healthy Cattle and Goats. *23.12.2012 Strategies in mastitis prevention. *14.12.2012 ...
The genus Arcobacter is composed of 17 species which have been isolated from various sources. Of particular interest are A. ... Adherence to and invasion of human intestinal cells by Arcobacter species and their virulence genotypes. ...
Complete genome sequences of Arcobacter butzleri ED-1 and Arcobacter sp.-L, isolated from a microbial fuel cell. J Bacteriol ... biofilm of exoelectrogenic Arcobacter butzleri ED-1 growing on the anode of a microbial fuel cell (right panel).. ... Quantitative proteomic analysis of the exoelectrogenic bacterium Arcobacter butzleri ED-1 reveals increased abundance of a ... A novel electrochemically active bacterium phylogenetically related to Arcobacter butzleri isolated from a microbial fuel cell ...
Arcobacter-pathogenic potential and role as zoonotic agent (Arcopath), funded by FMER ...
24. Phenotypic and ribosomal RNA characterization of Arcobacter species isolated from porcine aborted fetuses. 186-95页 作者:L, ...
... as Arcobacter genus and Vibrio aestuarianus. Overall, this study provides the first overview on the effects of Amyl salicylate ...
His current research includes using laser light scatter patterns to identify pathogens, identifying Arcobacter and genomics of ...
Arcobacter spp. in raw meat can trigger food-borne infections in humans (29.10 KB) ...
Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue. ... Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue.", ... Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue. ... Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue. ...
Trapeze acts balance above our heads and arcobacters clamber on top of one another. All eyes are up as clowns hang from the ...
Arcobacter RSV_genus1133 Bacteria;Proteobacteria;Epsilonproteobacteria;Campylobacterales;Campylobacteraceae;Campylobacter RSV_ ...
  • Although the microbiological and clinical features of Arcobacter are not yet well defined, initial studies of A. butzleri suggest that these bacteria display similar microbiological and clinical features as C. jejuni, but are more associated with a persistent, watery diarrhea than with the bloody diarrhea associated with C. jejuni. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mapping of the genome of Arcobacter butzleri by scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service is a first step in control of this foodborne pathogen. (thepigsite.com)
  • A little-known microbe called Arcobacter butzleri may make you sick if the water you drink or food you eat is contaminated with it. (thepigsite.com)
  • To better understand a little-known microbe called Arcobacter butzleri , Miller and colleagues are comparing it to related microbes such as Campylobacter. (thepigsite.com)
  • Later, A. butzleri was reclassified to the Arcobacter genus. (thepigsite.com)
  • Molecular methods applied to 2,855 strains of Campylobacter -like organisms received from a surveillance network of Campylobacter infections in France identified 29 Arcobacter butzleri infections. (cdc.gov)
  • 1 ) originally described the species Arcobacter butzleri , previously named Campylobacter butzleri ( 1 ), after studying aerotolerant Campylobacter strains from human and veterinary sources. (cdc.gov)
  • from Belgium used an Arcobacter -selective medium for stool specimens and found that A. butzleri ranked fourth among Campylobacter spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Multiplex-PCR was used to identify all Arcobacter species and to differentiate Arcobacter butzleri. (usda.gov)
  • biofilm of exoelectrogenic Arcobacter butzleri ED-1 growing on the anode of a microbial fuel cell (right panel). (ed.ac.uk)
  • Two scientific posters showing the performance of the IR Biotyper in an outbreak analysis and for the detection of virulence factors in the zoonotic pathogen Arcobacter butzleri will be presented at this ASM Microbe meeting. (bruker.com)
  • General Information: Arcobacter butzleri RM4018 was isolated from a human patient with gastroenteritis. (up.ac.za)
  • Arcobacter butzleri is a member of the family Campylobacteraceae, related to the human pathogenic Campylobacter spp. (up.ac.za)
  • Arcobacter is a genus of Gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria in the phylum Campylobacterota. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species of the genus Arcobacter are found in both animal and environmental sources, making it unique among the Campylobacterota. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genus Arcobacter, in fact, was created as recently as 1992. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although they are similar to this other genus, Arcobacter species can grow at lower temperatures than Campylobacter, as well as in the air, which Campylobacter cannot. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preliminary characterization based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that LA31BT shared 94% identity with A. nitrofigilis, the type species of the genus, and taxonomic studies confirmed the phylogenetic affiliation of strain LA31BT to the genus Arcobacter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike most Arcobacter species, CAB was found to degrade carbohydrates, including fructose and catechol, and its cells often lacked the distinctive curvature typical of the genus Arcobacter. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genus Arcobacter was created in 1992 ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Arcobacter species have been discovered as both animal and human pathogens within the past decade, due to improvements in isolation techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • One interesting potential novel Arcobacter species, designated LA31BT, was isolated from water collected from a hypersaline lagoon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other analytical methods, however, showed that LA31BT was distinct from all recognized Arcobacter species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most notably and of interest, LA31BT was found to be an obligate halophile, a trait not found among recognized Arcobacter species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another unusual Arcobacter species, designated strain CAB, was isolated from marine sediment and found to have the capacity to grow via perchlorate reduction, the only member of the Campylobacterota in pure culture to possess this rare metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • There was also a shift in the species of Arcobacter during this time period. (usda.gov)
  • His current research includes using laser light scatter patterns to identify pathogens, identifying Arcobacter and genomics of foodborne Vibrio and Yersinia species. (lincoln.ac.nz)
  • Improved culture enrichment broth for isolation of Arcobacter-like species from the marine environment. (irta.cat)
  • All samples were examined for the presence of Arcobacter species using four different isolation methods. (academicjournals.org)
  • Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter and Wolinella spp. (canada.ca)
  • OPUS at UTS: Highly heterogeneous temporal dynamics in the abundance and diversity of the emerging pathogens Arcobacter at an urban beach. (edu.au)
  • Our findings highlight the diverse environmental drivers of Arcobacter abundance within coastal settings and point to a potentially important, yet overlooked exposure risk of these potential pathogens to humans. (edu.au)
  • Since no routine diagnostic of these bacteria has been performed, the global prevalence of Arcobacter infection is rather underestimated and the exact routes of transmission are unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • In times long past, highly evolved eukaryotes, for example biochemists, oc-ca-sio-nal-ly quipped that bacteria were nothing more than a bag of en-zymes. (asmblog.org)
  • Six Midwestern commercial turkey farms were selected for sampling in 2003 to determine the best protocol for the isolation as well as to estimate the prevalence of Arcobacter in live commercial turkeys. (usda.gov)
  • The best protocol was then used to evaluate the prevalence of Arcobacter in the same region during the early spring and summer of 2004. (usda.gov)
  • The prevalence of Arcobacter detected by cloacal swab (6/298) and cecal contents (3/145) suggests that Arcobacter colonizes the intestinal tract at very low levels. (usda.gov)
  • The overall prevalence of Arcobacter in the drinker water decreased from 63.04% (29/46) in the summer of 2003 to 24.66% (18/73) in the spring of 2004. (usda.gov)
  • The prevalence levels of Arcobacter in the water appears to be related to the chlorination level present in the drinker water. (usda.gov)
  • Prevalence and Antibiotic Resistance of Arcobacter spp. (actavet.org)
  • Up to now, little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity or potential virulence factors of Arcobacter spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence potential and sequence types associated with Arcobacter strains recovered from human faeces. (cdc.gov)
  • Notably, peaks in Arcobacter abundance were poorly correlated with enterococci plate counts, and remained elevated for one week following heavy rainfall. (edu.au)
  • Method I (MI) and Method II (MII) detected Arcobacter in 43.7 and 75%, respectively from beef, but were unable to detect microbe from milk and rectal swabs. (academicjournals.org)
  • We used molecular methods to identify Campylobacter -related organisms collected from a network of clinical laboratories that do not use specific Arcobacter -selective medium. (cdc.gov)
  • Some evidence indicates livestock animals may be a significant reservoir of Arcobacter, and over the last few years, the presence of these organisms in raw meat products, as well as in surface and ground water, has received increasing attention. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Campylobacter -like organisms ( 11 ), which stimulated interest to revisit the role of Arcobacter spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Many protocols have been developed to determine the incidence of Arcobacter in livestock and their products, none of which are clearly defined for use in turkeys. (usda.gov)
  • A study has added to the evidence of Arcobacter being detected in food products but the significance of the findings are still unclear. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • While the significance of Arcobacter in clinical settings grows, the ecological dynamics of potentially pathogenic Arcobacter in coastal marine environments remains unclear. (edu.au)
  • Using oligotyping we discriminated single nucleotide variants (SNVs) within the Arcobacter population, revealing 10 distinct clusters of SNVs that we defined as Arcobacter 'ecotypes', with each displaying distinct temporal dynamics. (edu.au)
  • EMJH-P80 recovered Arcobacter more frequently, but the selectivity of the modified Arcobacter agar facilitated the identification of Arcobacter colonies. (usda.gov)
  • Weekly monitoring of bacterial communities over 24 months using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed large, intermittent peaks in the relative abundance of Arcobacter. (edu.au)
  • Characterization of an Autotrophic Sulfide-Oxidizing Marine Arcobacter sp. (harvard.edu)
  • In this study, we monitored the temporal dynamics of Arcobacter at an urban beach subject to significant stormwater input and wet weather sewer overflows (WWSO). (edu.au)
  • Although they are similar to this other genus, Arcobacter species can grow at lower temperatures than Campylobacter, as well as in the air, which Campylobacter cannot. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Campylobacter -like organisms ( 11 ), which stimulated interest to revisit the role of Arcobacter spp. (cdc.gov)
  • We used molecular methods to identify Campylobacter -related organisms collected from a network of clinical laboratories that do not use specific Arcobacter -selective medium. (cdc.gov)
  • Molecular diagnosis of Arcobacter and Campylobacter in diarrhoeal samples among Portuguese patients. (nih.gov)
  • Campylobacter and Arcobacter . (medscape.com)
  • A survey was done on the prevalence of Campylobacter and Arcobacter species in ostriches. (sun.ac.za)
  • About 35 species have been described within the genus Helicobacter , and this genus is most closely related to Campylobacter , Arcobacter and Sulfurospirillum . (vetbact.org)
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus is an emerging enteropathogen and potential zoonotic agent transmitted by food and water. (ucr.ac.cr)
  • Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence potential and sequence types associated with Arcobacter strains recovered from human faeces. (cdc.gov)
  • Arcobacter - an underestimated zoonotic pathogen? (nih.gov)
  • This is a reference to the characteristic curved shaped that most Arcobacter cells possess. (wikipedia.org)