A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.
Lectin purified from peanuts (ARACHIS HYPOGAEA). It binds to poorly differentiated cells and terminally differentiated cells and is used in cell separation techniques.
A major class of water-soluble seed storage proteins. Many proteins from this class are major PLANT ALLERGENS.
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
The parts of plants, including SEEDS.
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
Carbohydrates covalently linked to a nonsugar moiety (lipids or proteins). The major glycoconjugates are glycoproteins, glycopeptides, peptidoglycans, glycolipids, and lipopolysaccharides. (From Biochemical Nomenclature and Related Documents, 2d ed; From Principles of Biochemistry, 2d ed)
Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
Serine proteinase inhibitors which inhibit trypsin. They may be endogenous or exogenous compounds.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)

Molecular cloning and epitope analysis of the peanut allergen Ara h 3. (1/491)

Peanut allergy is a significant IgE-mediated health problem because of the increased prevalence, potential severity, and chronicity of the reaction. Following our characterization of the two peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, we have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a third peanut allergen, Ara h 3. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ara h 3 shows homology to 11S seed-storage proteins. The recombinant form of this protein was expressed in a bacterial system and was recognized by serum IgE from approximately 45% of our peanut-allergic patient population. Serum IgE from these patients and overlapping, synthetic peptides were used to map the linear, IgE-binding epitopes of Ara h 3. Four epitopes, between 10 and 15 amino acids in length, were found within the primary sequence, with no obvious sequence motif shared by the peptides. One epitope is recognized by all Ara h 3-allergic patients. Mutational analysis of the epitopes revealed that single amino acid changes within these peptides could lead to a reduction or loss of IgE binding. By determining which amino acids are critical for IgE binding, it might be possible to alter the Ara h 3 cDNA to encode a protein with a reduced IgE-binding capacity. These results will enable the design of improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for food-hypersensitivity reactions.  (+info)

Strain-dependent induction of allergic sensitization caused by peanut allergen DNA immunization in mice. (2/491)

To investigate the potential application of allergen gene immunization in the modulation of food allergy, C3H/HeSn (C3H) mice received i.m. injections of pAra h2 plasmid DNA encoding one of the major peanut allergens, Ara h2. Three weeks following pDNA immunization, serum Ara h2-specific IgG2a, IgG1, but not IgE, were increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. IgG1 was 30-fold higher in multiply compared with singly immunized mice. Ara h2 or peanut protein injection of immunized mice induced anaphylactic reactions, which were more severe in multiply immunized mice. Heat-inactivated immune serum induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, suggesting that anaphylaxis in C3H mice was mediated by IgG1. IgG1 responses were also induced by intradermal injection of pAra h2, and by i.m. injection of pOMC, the plasmid DNA encoding the major egg allergen protein, ovomucoid. To elucidate whether the pDNA immunization-induced anaphylaxis was a strain-dependent phenomenon, AKR/J and BALB/c mice also received multiple i.m. pAra h2 immunizations. Injection of peanut protein into these strains at weeks 3 or 5 following immunization did not induce reactions. Although IgG2a was increased significantly from week 2 in AKR/J mice and from week 4 in BALB/c mice and remained elevated for at least 6 wk, no IgG1 or IgE was detected. These results indicate that the type of immune responses to pDNA immunization in mice is strain dependent. Consequently, models for studying human allergen gene immunization require careful selection of suitable strains. In addition, this suggests that similar interindividual variation is likely in humans.  (+info)

Regional differences in production of aflatoxin B1 and cyclopiazonic acid by soil isolates of aspergillus flavus along a transect within the United States. (3/491)

Soil isolates of Aspergillus flavus from a transect extending from eastern New Mexico through Georgia to eastern Virginia were examined for production of aflatoxin B1 and cyclopiazonic acid in a liquid medium. Peanut fields from major peanut-growing regions (western Texas; central Texas; Georgia and Alabama; and Virginia and North Carolina) were sampled, and fields with other crops were sampled in regions where peanuts are not commonly grown. The A. flavus isolates were identified as members of either the L strain (n = 774), which produces sclerotia that are >400 micrometer in diameter, or the S strain (n = 309), which produces numerous small sclerotia that are <400 micrometer in diameter. The S-strain isolates generally produced high levels of aflatoxin B1, whereas the L-strain isolates were more variable in aflatoxin production; variation in cyclopiazonic acid production also was greater in the L strain than in the S strain. There was a positive correlation between aflatoxin B1 production and cyclopiazonic acid production in both strains, although 12% of the L-strain isolates produced only cyclopiazonic acid. Significant differences in production of aflatoxin B1 and cyclopiazonic acid by the L-strain isolates were detected among regions. In the western half of Texas and the peanut-growing region of Georgia and Alabama, 62 to 94% of the isolates produced >10 microgram of aflatoxin B1 per ml. The percentages of isolates producing >10 microgram of aflatoxin B1 per ml ranged from 0 to 52% in the remaining regions of the transect; other isolates were often nonaflatoxigenic. A total of 53 of the 126 L-strain isolates that did not produce aflatoxin B1 or cyclopiazonic acid were placed in 17 vegetative compatibility groups. Several of these groups contained isolates from widely separated regions of the transect.  (+info)

Definitive diagnosis of nut allergy. (4/491)

OBJECTIVE: To compare findings of tests for nut allergy in children. DESIGN: Retrospective survey of a clinical practice protocol. SETTING: Children's hospital paediatric outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS: 96 children referred by general practitioners and accident and emergency doctors over 27 months (1994-96). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Allergic manifestations (generalised urticarial rash, facial swelling, bronchospasm, anaphylactic shock, vomiting on three occasions) related to specific nut IgE concentrations and following touch, skin prick, or oral ingestion of nuts. RESULTS: 16 children from a sample of 51 who were tested for nut allergy had no reaction to an oral challenge. Positive IgE against peanuts was found in nine of these 16 children. CONCLUSIONS: Skin prick testing and IgE measured by radioallergosorbent testing are inadequate tests for nut allergy. The definitive diagnostic test for nut allergy in the hospital setting is direct oral challenge.  (+info)

Optical imaging of odorant representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb. (5/491)

We adapted the technique of intrinsic signal imaging to visualize how odorant concentration and structure are represented spatially in the rat olfactory bulb. Most odorants activated one or more glomeruli in the imaged region of the bulb; these optically imaged responses reflected the excitation of underlying neurons. Odorant-evoked patterns were similar across animals and symmetrical in the two bulbs of the same animal. The variable sensitivity of individual glomeruli produced distinct maps for different odorant concentrations. Using a series of homologous aldehydes, we found that glomeruli were tuned to detect particular molecular features and that maps of similar molecules were highly correlated. These characteristics suggest that odorants and their concentrations can be encoded by distinct spatial patterns of glomerular activation.  (+info)

The first triple gene block protein of peanut clump virus localizes to the plasmodesmata during virus infection. (6/491)

The subcellular localization of the first triple gene block protein (TGBp1) of peanut clump pecluvirus (PCV) was studied by subcellular fractionation and immunogold cytochemistry using TGBp1-specific antibodies raised against a fusion protein expressed in and purified from bacteria. In the inoculated and apical leaves of virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana, TGBp1 localized to the cell wall and P30 fractions. Electron microscopy of immunogold-decorated ultrathin sections of the infected leaf tissue revealed TGBp1-specific labeling of the plasmodesmata joining mesophyll cells. In longitudinal sections of the plasmodesmata, the TGBp1-specific labeling was most commonly associated with the plasmodesmal collar region. In transgenic N. benthamiana, which constitutively expressed TGBp1, no TGBp1-specific immunogold labeling of plasmodesmata was observed, but plasmodesmata were gold decorated when the transgenic plants were infected with a TGBp1-defective PCV mutant, indicating that factors induced by the virus infection target and/or anchor the transgene TGBp1 to the plasmodesmata.  (+info)

Response to influenza vaccine in adjuvant 65-4. (7/491)

A comparison was made of the antibody response and subjective reactions to zonally-purified influenza vaccine in aqueous suspension and in peanut oil adjuvant 65-4. Both preparations contained 700 CCA units of A/Aichi/2/68, and 300 CCA units of B/Mass/1/71. Subjective reactions were recorded by asking the volunteers to complete a record daily for 5 days. Pain at the injection site was recorded by 64 per cent of the recipients of the oil adjuvant vaccine compared with 35 per cent of the aqueous recipients, but local redness was more frequent after aqueous vaccine. Systemic symptoms was recorded a little more frequently after aqueous than oil adjuvant vaccine. When measured 71/2 weeks after a single dose of vaccine, the HAI geometric mean antibody titre (G.M.T) to the A/Hong Kong/1/68 antigen (antigenically similar to the A/Aichi/2/68 antigen in the vaccine) increased 2-7 fold after aqueous and 16-4 fold after adjuvant vaccine. Sixty-two weeks after vaccination the antibody titres remained higher in those given adjuvant vaccine. The G.M.T. to B/Mass/1/71 increased 1-9 fold 71/2 weeks after aqueous vaccine and 3-7 fold after adjuvant vaccine. The antibody response to both influenza A and B antigens was broader in the recipients of adjuvant vaccine. The G.M.T. to A/England/42/72 increased 2-8-fold after aqueous and 13-fold after adjuvant vaccine; and to B/England/847/73 it increased 1-3-fold after aqueous and 1-9-fold after adjuvant vaccine.  (+info)

Cross-reaction of chalcone synthase and stilbene synthase overexpressed in Escherichia coli. (8/491)

Chalcone synthase (CHS) and stilbene synthase (STS) are related plant polyketide synthases belonging to the CHS superfamily. CHS and STS catalyze common condensation reactions of p-coumaroyl-CoA and three C(2)-units from malonyl-CoA but different cyclization reactions to produce naringenin chalcone and resveratrol, respectively. Using purified Pueraria lobata CHS and Arachis hypogaea STS overexpressed in Escherichia coli, bisnoryangonin (BNY, the derailed lactone after two condensations) and p-coumaroyltriacetic acid lactone (the derailed lactone after three condensations) were detected from the reaction products. More importantly, we found a cross-reaction between CHS and STS, i.e. resveratrol production by CHS (2.7-4.2% of naringenin) and naringenin production by STS (1.4-2.3% of resveratrol), possibly due to the conformational flexibility of their active sites.  (+info)

'Arachis hypogaea' is the scientific name for the peanut plant. It is a legume crop that grows underground, which is why it is also known as a groundnut. The peanut plant produces flowers above ground, and when the flowers are pollinated, the ovary of the flower elongates and grows downwards into the soil where the peanut eventually forms and matures.

The peanut is not only an important food crop worldwide but also has various industrial uses, including the production of biodiesel, plastics, and animal feed. The plant is native to South America and was domesticated by indigenous peoples in what is now Brazil and Peru thousands of years ago. Today, peanuts are grown in many countries around the world, with China, India, and the United States being the largest producers.

Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a lectin, a type of carbohydrate-binding protein, found in peanuts. It is known to bind specifically to Galβ1-3GalNAc, a disaccharide present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of various cells. PNA has been used in research as a tool for identifying and isolating specific cell types, such as immature red blood cells (reticulocytes) and certain types of cancer cells, due to its affinity for these structures. However, it's important to note that peanut agglutinin may also have potential implications in the development of allergies to peanuts.

2S albumins are a type of protein found in plants. They are part of the larger family of storage proteins, which are abundant in seeds and provide nutrients to the developing plant embryo. 2S albumins are characterized by their small size, stable structure, and ability to resist digestion in the gut, making them important allergens in some plants.

The name "2S albumins" refers to their sedimentation coefficient, which is a measure of their size and shape in an ultracentrifuge. These proteins typically have a molecular weight of around 8-16 kDa and consist of two subunits held together by disulfide bonds. They are found in a wide variety of plant species, including legumes, cereals, and nuts.

In addition to their role as allergens, 2S albumins have been studied for their potential health benefits. Some studies suggest that they may have antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties, although more research is needed to confirm these effects and understand their mechanisms of action.

Lectins are a type of proteins that bind specifically to carbohydrates and have been found in various plant and animal sources. They play important roles in biological recognition events, such as cell-cell adhesion, and can also be involved in the immune response. Some lectins can agglutinate certain types of cells or precipitate glycoproteins, while others may have a more direct effect on cellular processes. In some cases, lectins from plants can cause adverse effects in humans if ingested, such as digestive discomfort or allergic reactions.

Plant lectins are proteins or glycoproteins that are abundantly found in various plant parts such as seeds, leaves, stems, and roots. They have the ability to bind specifically to carbohydrate structures present on cell membranes, known as glycoconjugates. This binding property of lectins is reversible and non-catalytic, meaning it does not involve any enzymatic activity.

Lectins play several roles in plants, including defense against predators, pathogens, and herbivores. They can agglutinate red blood cells, stimulate the immune system, and have been implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some lectins also exhibit mitogenic activity, which means they can stimulate the proliferation of certain types of cells.

In the medical field, plant lectins have gained attention due to their potential therapeutic applications. For instance, some lectins have been shown to possess anti-cancer properties and are being investigated as potential cancer treatments. However, it is important to note that some lectins can be toxic or allergenic to humans and animals, so they must be used with caution.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic material present in the cells of all living organisms, including plants. In plants, DNA is located in the nucleus of a cell, as well as in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plant DNA contains the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the plant, and is passed down from one generation to the next through the process of reproduction.

The structure of DNA is a double helix, formed by two strands of nucleotides that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. Each nucleotide contains a sugar molecule (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. There are four types of nitrogenous bases in DNA: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, forming the rungs of the ladder that make up the double helix.

The genetic information in DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nitrogenous bases. Large sequences of bases form genes, which provide the instructions for the production of proteins. The process of gene expression involves transcribing the DNA sequence into a complementary RNA molecule, which is then translated into a protein.

Plant DNA is similar to animal DNA in many ways, but there are also some differences. For example, plant DNA contains a higher proportion of repetitive sequences and transposable elements, which are mobile genetic elements that can move around the genome and cause mutations. Additionally, plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, which are not present in animal cells, and these structures contain their own DNA.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Structures" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of botany to refer to the different parts of a plant, such as roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Each of these structures has specific functions that contribute to the overall growth, reproduction, and survival of the plant. If you have any questions related to biology or botany, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

A plant genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in the cells of a plant. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the development and functioning of the plant, including its structural and functional characteristics. The plant genome includes both coding regions that contain instructions for producing proteins and non-coding regions that have various regulatory functions.

The plant genome is composed of several types of DNA molecules, including chromosomes, which are located in the nucleus of the cell. Each chromosome contains one or more genes, which are segments of DNA that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Plants typically have multiple sets of chromosomes, with each set containing a complete copy of the genome.

The study of plant genomes is an active area of research in modern biology, with important applications in areas such as crop improvement, evolutionary biology, and medical research. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to determine the complete sequences of many plant genomes, providing valuable insights into their structure, function, and evolution.

In medical terms, "seeds" are often referred to as a small amount of a substance, such as a radioactive material or drug, that is inserted into a tissue or placed inside a capsule for the purpose of treating a medical condition. This can include procedures like brachytherapy, where seeds containing radioactive materials are used in the treatment of cancer to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Similarly, in some forms of drug delivery, seeds containing medication can be used to gradually release the drug into the body over an extended period of time.

It's important to note that "seeds" have different meanings and applications depending on the medical context. In other cases, "seeds" may simply refer to small particles or structures found in the body, such as those present in the eye's retina.

Microsatellite repeats, also known as short tandem repeats (STRs), are repetitive DNA sequences made up of units of 1-6 base pairs that are repeated in a head-to-tail manner. These repeats are spread throughout the human genome and are highly polymorphic, meaning they can have different numbers of repeat units in different individuals.

Microsatellites are useful as genetic markers because of their high degree of variability. They are commonly used in forensic science to identify individuals, in genealogy to trace ancestry, and in medical research to study genetic diseases and disorders. Mutations in microsatellite repeats have been associated with various neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome.

Glycoconjugates are a type of complex molecule that form when a carbohydrate (sugar) becomes chemically linked to a protein or lipid (fat) molecule. This linkage, known as a glycosidic bond, results in the formation of a new molecule that combines the properties and functions of both the carbohydrate and the protein or lipid component.

Glycoconjugates can be classified into several categories based on the type of linkage and the nature of the components involved. For example, glycoproteins are glycoconjugates that consist of a protein backbone with one or more carbohydrate chains attached to it. Similarly, glycolipids are molecules that contain a lipid anchor linked to one or more carbohydrate residues.

Glycoconjugates play important roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, signaling, and communication. They are also involved in the immune response, inflammation, and the development of certain diseases such as cancer and infectious disorders. As a result, understanding the structure and function of glycoconjugates is an active area of research in biochemistry, cell biology, and medical science.

Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short, single-pass DNA sequences that are derived from cDNA libraries. They represent a quick and cost-effective method for large-scale sequencing of gene transcripts and provide an unbiased view of the genes being actively expressed in a particular tissue or developmental stage. ESTs can be used to identify and study new genes, to analyze patterns of gene expression, and to develop molecular markers for genetic mapping and genome analysis.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

Trypsin inhibitors are substances that inhibit the activity of trypsin, an enzyme that helps digest proteins in the small intestine. Trypsin inhibitors can be found in various foods such as soybeans, corn, and raw egg whites. In the case of soybeans, trypsin inhibitors are denatured and inactivated during cooking and processing.

In a medical context, trypsin inhibitors may be used therapeutically to regulate excessive trypsin activity in certain conditions such as pancreatitis, where there is inflammation of the pancreas leading to the release of activated digestive enzymes, including trypsin, into the pancreas and surrounding tissues. By inhibiting trypsin activity, these inhibitors can help reduce tissue damage and inflammation.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

The peanut (Arachis hypogaea), also known as the groundnut, goober (US), pindar (US) or monkey nut (UK), is a legume crop grown ... Roasted Peanuts with shell A warning sign for the presence of peanuts and peanut dust Arachis hypogaea flower Peanut pegs ... Ozcan MM (2010). "Some nutritional characteristics of kernel and oil of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)". J Oleo Sci. 59 (1): 1-5 ... January 1, 2013). "A study of the relationships of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its most closely related wild ...
His PhD thesis in 1928 was on "Inheritance studies in Arachis hypogaea (the groundnut)." He travelled around Europe and met ... Badami, V. K. (1935). "Arachis hypogaea, Linn. Groundnut or Peanut, Original Habitat and its distribution in the world". ...
... on Arachis hypogaea". Journal of Ecotoxicology and Environmental Monitoring. 9: 73-76. Sijmons, P. C.; Grundler, F. M. W.; von ...
Arachis hypogaea). Animal life include cats, deer, collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), squirrels, cuinique (Notocitellus adocetus ...
... helodes Mart. ex Krapov. & Rigoni Arachis herzogii Krapov. et al. Arachis hoehnei Krapov. & W.C. Greg. Arachis hypogaea ... Arachis pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Greg. Arachis repens Handro Arachis archeri Krapov. & W.C. Greg. Arachis benthamii Handro Arachis ... hypogaea L. var. hirsuta J. Kohler var. hypogaea L. Arachis ipaensis Krapov. & W.C. Greg. Arachis kempff-mercadoi Krapov. et al ... Arachis hermannii Krapov. & W.C. Greg. Arachis major Krapov. & W.C. Greg. Arachis martii Handro Arachis oteroi Krapov. & W.C. ...
1999). "Effect of "Juglone" on Development of the plant parasitic nematode (Meloidogyne Spp.) on Arachis hypogaea L". J. ...
"Plants Profile for Arachis hypogaea (peanut)". plants.usda.gov. Retrieved 2016-12-01. "Peanut Country, U.S.A. , National Peanut ... As seen by the name, it affects Arachis hypogaea or peanuts. Peanuts are grown in warm areas, which determines where this ...
... bicolor feeds on grapevine (Vitis spp.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and rose (Rosa spp.). It occurs in India. Adoretus ...
The larvae are a pest on Arachis hypogaea. They feed on the foliage of their host plant. mothphotographersgroup Bug Guide Life ...
It is a major pest of Arachis hypogaea. Grubs fed on the nodules, rootlets and immature pods whereas adults damage leaves. ... "White grub species attacking groundnut in the Saurashtra Region in Gujarat, India". International Arachis Newsletter 2006 No.26 ...
"Crystal structure of stilbene synthase from Arachis hypogaea". Proteins. 60 (4): 803-6. doi:10.1002/prot.20584. PMID 16028220. ...
Wilcut, John W (1991). "Tropic Croton (Croton glandulosus) Control in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea)". Weed Technology. 5 (4): 795- ...
The best-known example is the peanut, Arachis hypogaea. J. D. Skinner; Christian T. Chimimba (2005). "Order Tubulidentata". The ...
lanatus) - Bitter apple (Citrullus colocynthis) Peanut (Arachis hypogaea subsp. hypogaea) - Arachis duranensis Sunflower ( ...
"Palforzia, defatted powder of Arachis hypogaea L., semen (peanuts)". www.ema.europa.eu. European Medicines Agency. 13 October ...
The larvae feed on Arachis hypogaea (peanuts), Acacia sp., Cajanus cajan, Glycine max, Mangifera indica, Mimosa rubicaulis, ...
Its wild progenitor is thought to be Arachis pietrarellii. Although it is related to the common peanut, Arachis hypogaea, it ... USDA Plants Profile: Arachis villosulicarpa (in Portuguese) EMBRAPA: Arachis villosulicarpa Data related to Arachis ... Wynne, J. C.; Beute, M. K.; Nigam, S. N. (1991). "Breeding for Disease Resistance in Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea L.)" (PDF). ... International Legume Database & Information Service: Arachis villosulicarpa "Arachis villosulicarpa". Integrated Taxonomic ...
Bays, DC; Demski, JW (1986). "Bean yellow mosaic virus isolate that infects peanut (Arachis hypogaea)". Plant Disease. 70 (7): ... Arachis hypogaea), soybeans (Glycine max), Faba beans (Vicia faba), several species of clover (Trifolium hybridum, T. ...
2019). "The genome sequence of segmental allotetraploid peanut Arachis hypogaea". Nature Genetics. 51 (5): 877-884. doi:10.1038 ... 2016). "The genome sequences of Arachis duranensis and Arachis ipaensis, the diploid ancestors of cultivated peanut". Nature ... "Arachis hypogaea gene expression atlas for fastigiata subspecies of cultivated groundnut to accelerate functional and ... 2016). "Draft genome of the peanut A-genome progenitor ( Arachis duranensis ) provides insights into geocarpy, oil biosynthesis ...
Arachis hypogaea L. Argemone mexicana L. Argyreia nervosa (Burm.f.) Bojer Aristida adscensionis L. Aristida funiculata Trin. & ...
Arachis hypogaea Bidens pilosa Calophyllum inophyllum Cassia tora Dahlia sp. Eucalyptus sp. Eugenia jambos Ficus sp. Flemingia ...
... is plant lectin protein derived from the fruits of Arachis hypogaea. Peanut agglutinin may also be referred to as Arachis ... hypogaea lectin. Lectins recognise and bind particular sugar sequences in carbohydrates; peanut agglutinin binds the ...
It is a basidiomycete fungus that infects peanut plants (Arachis hypogaea). It is currently only found in South America, more ... Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes to smut (Thecaphora frezii) in the peanut growing region of Argentina". Peanut Science. 48: 61- ...
It was first isolated from Arachis hypogaea root nodules in China. Its type strain is CCBAU 051107T (=CGMCC 1.12100T = HAMBI ... nov., isolated from effective nodules of Arachis hypogaea grown in China". Systematic and Applied Microbiology. 36 (2): 101-105 ...
nov., isolated from effective nodules of Lablab purpureus and Arachis hypogaea". International Journal of Systematic and ...
Found on the leaves of Arachis hypogaea (the peanut) in India. R.L. Kulk., Curr. Sci. 43(17): 561 (1974) "Species Fungorum - ...
This article is a list of diseases of peanuts (Arachis hypogaea). Common Names of Diseases, The American Phytopathological ...
Molecular detection of Thecaphora frezii in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) seeds. Journal of Plant Pathology http://dx.doi.org/ ...
... is a close relative of the domesticated peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Besides the peanut, it is the only other ... Arachis hypogaea, Leguminosae) and its close relatives revealed by double GISH". Am. J. Bot. 94 (12): 1963-1971. doi:10.3732/ ... Pattee, H. E.; H. T. Stalker; F. G. Giesbrecht (1998). "Reproductive Efficiency in Reciprocal Crosses of Arachis monticola with ... A. hypogaea Subspecies". Peanut Science. 25 (1): 7-12. doi:10.3146/i0095-3679-25-1-3. ISSN 0095-3679. v t e (Articles with ...
I. Biologische waarnemingen bij Arachis hypogaea L. II Bloembestuiving in West Java. III. Bewaring en verzending van zaden en ...
Arachis hypogaea hypogaea « ...
TSA: Arachis hypogaea CL1Contig11779.Arhy mRNA sequence TSA: Arachis hypogaea CL1Contig11779.Arhy mRNA sequence. gi,298125022, ...
Arachis hypogaea DNA, clone: SACT13A02, genomic survey sequence Arachis hypogaea DNA, clone: SACT13A02, genomic survey sequence ...
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Development of AhMITE1 markers through genome-wide analysis in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). *M. Gayathri1, ... Jung S, Powell G, Moore K, Abbott A. The high oleate trait in the cultivated peanut [Arachis hypogaea L.]. II. Molecular basis ... Development of late leaf spot and rust resistant backcross lines in JL 24 variety of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.). Electron ... High resolution trait mapping in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. 2n = 4x = 40) demands a considerably large number of evenly ...
mis1" and "mis2" in parenthesis indicate imperfect SSR motifs having 1- and 2-base mismatches in the SSR regions, respectively. Perfect SSR motifs have no descriptions ...
mis1" and "mis2" in parenthesis indicate imperfect SSR motifs having 1- and 2-base mismatches in the SSR regions, respectively. Perfect SSR motifs have no descriptions ...
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Nigerian Seed Portal makes it easy to get information about improved seed varieties of groundnut in Nigeria. You can get information on the outstanding characteristics, adaptability, origin, breeders and yield potential of each improved seed variety
The peanut is an annual herbaceous plant growing 12 to 20 tall. As a legume, it belongs to the botanical family Fabaceae, also known as Leguminosae, and commonly known as the legume, bean, or pea family. Peanuts grow best in light, sandy loam soil with a pH of 5.9-7. Adequate levels of phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and micronutrients are also necessary for good yields.Like most other legumes, peanuts harbor symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in their root nodules.Their capacity to fix nitrogen means that providing they nodulate properly, peanuts benefit little or not at all from nitrogen-containing fertilizer,and they improve soil fertility.Peanut fruits develop underground, an unusual feature known as geocarpy. After fertilization, a short stalk at the base of the ovary-often termed a gynophore, but which appears to be part of the ovary-elongates to form a thread-like structure known as a peg. This peg grows into the soil, allowing the fruit to develop underground.These pods, technically
Home › Arachis hypogaea Lectin (PNA) - Separopore® 4B MicroPass™ .selector-wrapper select, .product-variants select { margin- ...
The MSDS of Pure for Arachis is available from Karlan upon request. ... Pure Arachis hypogaea Lectin (Peanut) PNA - 5 mg - 1 kit est en rupture de stock et sera expédié dès quil sera de retour en ... The MSDS of Pure for Arachis is available from Karlan upon request. ... The MSDS of Pure for Arachis is available from Karlan upon request. ...
Arachis hypogaea L) under acid Alfisols of Odisha. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with seven treatments ... Arachis hypogaea L) under acid Alfisols of Odisha. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with seven treatments ... Yield, Nutrient Uptake and Economics of Rabi Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L) Crop As Influenced By Different Phosphorus Sources. ... Arachis hypogaea L) under acid Alfisols of Odisha. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with seven treatments ...
While working for ECHO in Haiti, I had the opportunity to evaluate about 30 lines of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) from ICRISAT ( ... Peanut (Arachis hypogaea): A major and versatile crop. ECHO Development Notes no. 105 ... Peanut Arachis hypogaea Peanuts Underutilized Crops Legume Seeds Collections. * Peanut - Arachis hypogaea ... Peanut Arachis hypogaea Peanuts Underutilized Crops Legume Seeds Collections. * Peanut - Arachis hypogaea ...
High level of natural variation in a groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) germplasm collection assayed by selected informative SSR ... Genetic variation among 189 groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) accessions comprising landraces, cultivars, a mutant, advanced ... Arachis hypogaea L.) germplasm collection assayed by selected informative SSR markers. Plant Breeding, 128 (5). pp. 486-494. ...
Arachis hypogaea L.).. EFECTO DE LA TEMPERATURA SOBRE LA GERMINACIÓN DE CUATRO GENOTIPOS DE MANÍ (Arachis hypogaea L.) ... Se evaluó el efecto de la temperatura sobre la germinación de cuatro genotipos de maní (Arachis hypogaea L.) identificados ... The effect of temperature on the germination of four genotypes of peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) was evaluated. Genotypes ... EFECTO DE LA TEMPERATURA SOBRE LA GERMINACIÓN DE CUATRO GENOTIPOS DE MANÍ (Arachis hypogaea L.). es-ES. ...
Arachis hypogaea) Untreated Seeds100 days. Arachis hypogaea. Plantproduces high yields of large ... Arachis hypogaea. Plant produces high yields of large plump peanuts. Delicious when roasted. High in protein. Try making your ... Peanut Seeds,Spanish Peanuts( Arachis hypogaea) Untreated Seeds 100 days. Arachis hypogaea. Plant produces high yields of large ... Spanish Peanut Seeds,( Arachis hypogaea) 100 Seeds - Organic Untreated Seeds by Arachis hypogaea ...
The peanut (Arachis hypogaea), also known as the groundnut, goober (US), pindar (US) or monkey nut (UK), is a legume crop grown ... Roasted Peanuts with shell A warning sign for the presence of peanuts and peanut dust Arachis hypogaea flower Peanut pegs ... Ozcan MM (2010). "Some nutritional characteristics of kernel and oil of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)". J Oleo Sci. 59 (1): 1-5 ... January 1, 2013). "A study of the relationships of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its most closely related wild ...
Download Agriculture project topic and material titled The Effects Of Spent Engine Oil Pollution On The Germination Of Arachis ... The Effects Of Spent Engine Oil Pollution On The Germination Of Arachis Hypogaea Seeds. Home Complete Research Project Topics ... The uses of Arachis hypogaea (Groundnut) in our time cannot be underestimated as it serves as alternative means for vegetable ... The Effects Of Spent Engine Oil Pollution On The Germination Of Arachis Hypogaea Seeds quantity. ...
Peanut oral allergen powder (Palforzia, Peanut Arachis hypogaea allergen powder-dnfp). *View full drug information ...
Low genetic diversity makes peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) very vuln... ... Identification of Expressed Resistance Gene Analogs from Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Expressed Sequence Tags Zhanji Liu1,2†, ... Low genetic diversity makes peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) very vulnerable to plant pathogens, causing severe yield loss and ... Identification of Expressed Resistance Gene Analogs from Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Expressed Sequence Tags[J]. J Integr ...
Cite article:- Bhuva H.M., Kumawat P.D., Mehta A.C., Chaudhari N.N., Patel P.R. (2017). Effect of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L ... Kumar, S.D., Reddy, D.S. and Yellamanda, R.T. (2010). Productivity of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) based intercropping ... Effect of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)-based intercropping systems on yield and economics under rainfed condition. ... Effect of different intercropping ratios on yield and economics of sesame (Sesamum indicum) + groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) ...
Efficacy and Economics of Common Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) Control in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Author: John W. Wilcut ... Efficacy and Economics of Common Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) Control in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Author: John W. Wilcut ... Wilcut, J. (1991, 7 1). Efficacy and Economics of Common Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) Control in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea). ... Wilcut, J., (1991) "Efficacy and Economics of Common Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) Control in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea)", ...
Arachis hypogaea L.. (Groundnut, peanut) Rehm and Espig, 1991. Description. Cultivated annual approximately 30 cm long; obovate ...
Arachis hypogaea. Mutation(s): 0 Gene Names: PNC1. EC: 1.11.1.7. UniProt. ...
S., Chaudhari, D Jordan, T Grey, E Prostko, and K Jennings (2018). Weed control and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) response to ... J. W Wilcut, and C. W Swann (1990). Timing of paraquat applications for weed control in virginia-type peanuts (Arachis hypogaea ... Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Cultivar Response to Postemergence Paraquat Tank-Mixtures. Authors: K. ... Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Cultivar Response to Postemergence Paraquat Tank-Mixtures. Authors: K. ...
Changes in fungal population and aflatoxin levels and assessment of major aflatoxin types in stored peanuts (Arachis hypogaea ...
  • A field experiment was conducted during rabi seasons of 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16 study the effect of various sources of phosphorus on yield, nutrient uptake and economics of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L) under acid Alfisols of Odisha. (ijcmas.com)
  • Genetic variation among 189 groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) accessions comprising landraces, cultivars, a mutant, advanced breeding lines and others (unknown genetic background) representing 29 countries and 10 geographical regions was assessed at 25 microsatellite or simple sequence repeat loci. (icrisat.org)
  • The peanut (Arachis hypogaea), also known as the groundnut, goober (US), pindar (US) or monkey nut (UK), is a legume crop grown mainly for its edible seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The present study has been designed to assess the effects of spent engine oil pollution on the germination, growth and development of groundnut ( Arachis hypogeal ). (eduprojecttopics.com)
  • The uses of Arachis hypogaea ( Groundnut) in our time cannot be underestimated as it serves as alternative means for vegetable oil production which is heart friendly, has a wide range of health benefits, serves as food to both man and animals, moreover it generates fund to Nigeria as a country as well as to the commercial and substantial farmers. (eduprojecttopics.com)
  • A field experiment was conducted during the kharif season of 2010-11 to 2012-13 at Nana Kandhasar, Surendranagar, Gujarat to study the yield, economics and post harvest soil nutrient status of groundnut (Arachis hypogeae L ) - based intercropping systems under rainfed condition. (arccjournals.com)
  • Productivity of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) based intercropping systems under rainfed conditions. (arccjournals.com)
  • Effect of different intercropping ratios on yield and economics of sesame (Sesamum indicum) + groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) intercropping system. (arccjournals.com)
  • SSR markers associated to early leaf spot disease resistance through selective genotyping and single marker analysis in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. (tropicallegumeshub.com)
  • Groundnut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important oilseed and food crop of the world. (tropicallegumeshub.com)
  • ABSTRACT Groundnut (Arachis hypogeaa L.) productivity in Nigeria has remained low over the years due to the inherent low fertility status of the soils. (codemint.net)
  • The effect of temperature on the germination of four genotypes of peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) was evaluated. (uchile.cl)
  • Cultivated peanuts (A. hypogaea) arose from a hybrid between two wild species of peanut, thought to be A. duranensis and A. ipaensis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Groundnuts ( Arachis hypogeal) also known as peanuts are considered a very healthy snack. (eduprojecttopics.com)
  • control in peanuts ( Arachis hypogaea ). (peanutscience.com)
  • In 2017, Georgia producers harvested 333,865 hectares of peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.). This ranks Georgia as the leading producer of peanuts in the US ( USDA-NASS, 2018 ). (peanutscience.com)
  • Analysis of Crude Protein and Allergen Abundance in Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea cv. (qld.gov.au)
  • Coyotes exploited anthropogenic food sources, particularly waste peanuts Arachis hypogaea , during the fall and winter when native soft mast was not available. (bioone.org)
  • Peanuts ( Arachis hypogaea ) are legumes from a botanic perspective. (frontiersin.org)
  • The mechanisms responsible for stem growth in peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars with varying plant heights remain unclear, despite the significant impact of plant height on peanut yield. (bvsalud.org)
  • Pure Arachis hypogaea Lectin (Peanut) PNA - 5 mg - 1 kit est en rupture de stock et sera expédié dès qu'il sera de retour en stock. (karlan.com)
  • Se evaluó el efecto de la temperatura sobre la germinación de cuatro genotipos de maní (Arachis hypogaea L.) identificados como L3, L6, L18 y L20. (uchile.cl)
  • While working for ECHO in Haiti, I had the opportunity to evaluate about 30 lines of peanut ( Arachis hypogaea ) from ICRISAT (International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics) in Mali, West Africa. (echocommunity.org)
  • Low genetic diversity makes peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) very vulnerable to plant pathogens, causing severe yield loss and reduced seed quality. (jipb.net)
  • Identification of Expressed Resistance Gene Analogs from Peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) Expressed Sequence Tags[J]. J Integr Plant Biol. (jipb.net)
  • Diversity characterization and association analysis of agronomic traits in a Chinese peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) mini-core collection [J]. J Integr Plant Biol. (jipb.net)
  • The effects of plant growth conditions on concentrations of proteins, including allergens, in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) kernels are largely unknown. (qld.gov.au)
  • Uncovering mechanisms governing stem growth in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) with varying plant heights through integrated transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. (bvsalud.org)
  • Peanut oil is the oil from the seed (peanut) of the peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Download this complete Agriculture project topic and material titled The Effects Of Spent Engine Oil Pollution On The Germination Of Arachis Hypogaea Seeds. (eduprojecttopics.com)
  • Subspecies A. h. hypogaea types spread more on the ground and have longer crop cycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • High resolution trait mapping in peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L. 2n = 4x = 40) demands a considerably large number of evenly distributed genome-wide markers to identify marker-trait associations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • peanut Arachis hypogaea allergen allergenicity Ara h 1 Ara h 2 2D-DIGE growth conditions ara h 1 ige-binding epitopes major allergen short episodes heat-stress seed ara-h-2 pollen yield l. (qld.gov.au)
  • Genetic analysis suggests the hybridization may have occurred only once and gave rise to A. monticola, a wild form of peanut that occurs in a few limited locations in northwestern Argentina, or in southeastern Bolivia, where the peanut landraces with the most wild-like features are grown today, and by artificial selection to A. hypogaea. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process of domestication through artificial selection made A. hypogaea dramatically different from its wild relatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wilcut, J., (1991) "Efficacy and Economics of Common Bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) Control in Peanut ( Arachis hypogaea )", Peanut Science 18(2), p.106-109. (peanutscience.com)
  • QTL identification for seed weight and size based on a high-density SLAF-seq genetic map in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Development of AhMITE1 markers through genome-wide analysis in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.), an important source of edible oil and protein, is widely cultivated in more than 100 countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Improving productivity of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) by using water soluble fertilizer through drip irrigation. (arccjournals.com)
  • The peanut (Arachis hypogaea), also known as the groundnut, goober (US), pindar (US) or monkey nut (UK), is a legume crop grown mainly for its edible seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Background: Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is the world’s most important source of edible oil and vegetable protein. (haramayajournals.org)
  • Integrated weed management in Rabi groundnut Arachis hypogaea L. (journalcra.com)
  • A field experiment was conducted to study the integrated weed management practices in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) during rabi 2016 at college farm, college of agriculture, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, PJTSAU with 10 weed management practices in 3 replications.Weed free check (two hand weedings at 15 and 40 DAS) was found more effective to control weeds recorded highest pod yield and lowest nutrient removal by weeds. (journalcra.com)
  • Vaidya S, Vanaja M, Sathish P, Anitha Y, Jyothi Lakshmi N (2014) Impact of Elevated CO 2 on Growth and Physiological Parameters of Groundnut ( Arachis hypogaea L .) Genotypes. (scitechnol.com)
  • Five groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes- JL-24, ICGV 91114, Narayani, Abhaya, Dharani were evaluated at elevated (550 ppm) CO 2 in OTCs during 2013 kharif to assess the variability in growth , biomass and physiological parameters. (scitechnol.com)
  • Diversity pattern elucidating choice of parents for hybridization in varieties of groundnut, Arachis hypogaea L. (uwi.edu)
  • Valencia, Virginia bunch and Virginia runner, of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) was assessed by Mahalanobis's D2 statistic using a representative sample of 40 germplasm lines in each group. (uwi.edu)
  • Combined effects of sowing techniques and intercropping on productivity of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. (journalcra.com)
  • Thrips are major pests of peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) worldwide, and they serve as vectors of devastating orthotospoviruses such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV). (frontiersin.org)
  • Groundnut ( Arachis hypogaea ), cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata ) and soybean ( Vigna radiata ) are the main food legumes grown in Cote d ' Ivoire and the localities of Haut-Sassandra. (scirp.org)
  • Among these legumes, cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) walp), groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) and green soybean (Vigna radiata) are the most important in most African communities where they are grown [3]. (scirp.org)
  • Besides thrips non-preference, thrips larval survival to adulthood and median developmental time were negatively affected in some peanut cultivars and in a diploid peanut species Arachis diogoi (Hoehne) and its hybrids with a Virginia type cultivar, indicating that antibiosis (negative effects on biology) could also be a factor influencing thrips resistance in peanut. (frontiersin.org)
  • Objective: To determine the genetic variability and diversity of 43 accessions of A. hypogaea collected from different regions of Ethiopia using ISSR markers. (haramayajournals.org)
  • The UPGMA analysis grouped A. hypogaea accessions into five distinct clusters at 63.5% similarity coefficient, and the principal coordinate analysis revealed similar grouping. (haramayajournals.org)
  • In addition, the current study demonstrated the informativeness of ISSR markers in estimating the extent of genetic variation among A. hypogaea accessions. (haramayajournals.org)
  • Genetic analysis suggests the hybridization may have occurred only once and gave rise to A. monticola, a wild form of peanut that occurs in a few limited locations in northwestern Argentina, or in southeastern Bolivia, where the peanut landraces with the most wild-like features are grown today, and by artificial selection to A. hypogaea. (wikipedia.org)
  • To our knowledge, little is known about the genetic variability of cultivated Ethiopian A. hypogaea. (haramayajournals.org)
  • A SSR-based genetic linkage map of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. (usda.gov)
  • The oldest known archeological remains of pods have been dated at about 7,600 years old, possibly a wild species that was in cultivation, or A. hypogaea in the early phase of domestication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant species within the ARACHIS genus are shown below. (usf.edu)
  • For quick access to genus details, visit our ARACHIS genus page . (usf.edu)
  • Arachis hypogaea , the edible peanut, is closely related to the ornamental peanut, Arachis glabrata . (toptropicals.com)
  • Arachis hypogaea , also known as the peanut, is a native South American plant that grows to a height of 2-5 feet. (toptropicals.com)
  • Peanut oil is the oil from the seed (peanut) of the peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea). (medlineplus.gov)
  • The composite linkage maps consist of 22 composite linkage groups with 175 SSR markers (including 46 SSRs on the published AA genome maps), representing the 20 chromosomes of A. hypogaea. (usda.gov)
  • Cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important grain legume providing high‐quality cooking oil, rich proteins and other nutrients. (icrisat.org)
  • 16. Site-specific monoclonal antibodies against peanut agglutinin (PNA) from Arachis hypogaea. (nih.gov)
  • Discovery of genomic regions and candidate genes controlling shelling percentage using QTL ‐seq approach in cultivated peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L. (icrisat.org)