An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
Arachidonic acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids, specifically a type of omega-6 fatty acid, that are essential for human nutrition and play crucial roles in various biological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cell signaling. They serve as precursors to eicosanoids, which are hormone-like substances that mediate a wide range of physiological responses.
Phospholipases that hydrolyze the acyl group attached to the 2-position of PHOSPHOGLYCERIDES.
Phospholipases that hydrolyze one of the acyl groups of phosphoglycerides or glycerophosphatidates.
Eicosatetraenoic acids substituted in any position by one or more hydroxy groups. They are important intermediates in a series of biosynthetic processes leading from arachidonic acid to a number of biologically active compounds such as prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class primarily found in PLANTS. It catalyzes reactions between linoleate and other fatty acids and oxygen to form hydroperoxy-fatty acid derivatives.
A lipoxygenase metabolite of ARACHIDONIC ACID. It is a highly selective ligand used to label mu-opioid receptors in both membranes and tissue sections. The 12-S-HETE analog has been reported to augment tumor cell metastatic potential through activation of protein kinase C. (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1995; 274(3):1545-51; J Natl Cancer Inst 1994; 86(15):1145-51)
A potent lipoxygenase inhibitor that interferes with arachidonic acid metabolism. The compound also inhibits formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, carboxylesterase, and cyclooxygenase to a lesser extent. It also serves as an antioxidant in fats and oils.
A 20-carbon unsaturated fatty acid containing 4 alkyne bonds. It inhibits the enzymatic conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins E(2) and F(2a).
A 20-carbon-chain fatty acid, unsaturated at positions 8, 11, and 14. It differs from arachidonic acid, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid, only at position 5.
Compounds that bind to and inhibit that enzymatic activity of LIPOXYGENASES. Included under this category are inhibitors that are specific for lipoxygenase subtypes and act to reduce the production of LEUKOTRIENES.
A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.
A class of compounds named after and generally derived from C20 fatty acids (EICOSANOIC ACIDS) that includes PROSTAGLANDINS; LEUKOTRIENES; THROMBOXANES, and HYDROXYEICOSATETRAENOIC ACIDS. They have hormone-like effects mediated by specialized receptors (RECEPTORS, EICOSANOID).
Enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of arachidonic acid to hydroperoxyarachidonates. These products are then rapidly converted by a peroxidase to hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. The positional specificity of the enzyme reaction varies from tissue to tissue. The final lipoxygenase pathway leads to the leukotrienes. EC 1.13.11.- .
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 5-hydroperoxyarachidonate (5-HPETE) which is rapidly converted by a peroxidase to 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoate (5-HETE). The 5-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in leukocytes.
Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor.
A family of biologically active compounds derived from arachidonic acid by oxidative metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. They participate in host defense reactions and pathophysiological conditions such as immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation. They have potent actions on many essential organs and systems, including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and central nervous system as well as the gastrointestinal tract and the immune system.
A cytosolic phospholipase A2 group that plays an important role in the release of free ARACHIDONIC ACID, which in turn is metabolized to PROSTAGLANDINS by the CYCLOOXYGENASE pathway and to LEUKOTRIENES by the 5-LIPOXYGENASE pathway.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.
An acridine derivative formerly widely used as an antimalarial but superseded by chloroquine in recent years. It has also been used as an anthelmintic and in the treatment of giardiasis and malignant effusions. It is used in cell biological experiments as an inhibitor of phospholipase A2.
The most common and most biologically active of the mammalian prostaglandins. It exhibits most biological activities characteristic of prostaglandins and has been used extensively as an oxytocic agent. The compound also displays a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa.
An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.
The major metabolite in neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It stimulates polymorphonuclear cell function (degranulation, formation of oxygen-centered free radicals, arachidonic acid release, and metabolism). (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
A stable, physiologically active compound formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides. It is important in the platelet-release reaction (release of ADP and serotonin).
A dual inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. It exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the formation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The drug also enhances pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction and has a protective effect after myocardial ischemia.
Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.
(11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-Dihydroxy-9-oxoprost-13-en-1-oic acid (PGE(1)); (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (PGE(2)); and (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S,17Z)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13,17-trien-1-oic acid (PGE(3)). Three of the six naturally occurring prostaglandins. They are considered primary in that no one is derived from another in living organisms. Originally isolated from sheep seminal fluid and vesicles, they are found in many organs and tissues and play a major role in mediating various physiological activities.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 12-hydroperoxyarachidonate (12-HPETE) which is itself rapidly converted by a peroxidase to 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoate (12-HETE). The 12-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in PLATELETS.
20-carbon saturated monocarboxylic acids.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
C22-unsaturated fatty acids found predominantly in FISH OILS.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A doubly unsaturated fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycosides. It is an essential fatty acid in mammalian nutrition and is used in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and cell membranes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
An inducibly-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes and INFLAMMATION. It is the target of COX2 INHIBITORS.
A constitutively-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes.
Important polyunsaturated fatty acid found in fish oils. It serves as the precursor for the prostaglandin-3 and thromboxane-3 families. A diet rich in eicosapentaenoic acid lowers serum lipid concentration, reduces incidence of cardiovascular disorders, prevents platelet aggregation, and inhibits arachidonic acid conversion into the thromboxane-2 and prostaglandin-2 families.
A group of LEUKOTRIENES; (LTC4; LTD4; and LTE4) that is the major mediator of BRONCHOCONSTRICTION; HYPERSENSITIVITY; and other allergic reactions. Earlier studies described a "slow-reacting substance of ANAPHYLAXIS" released from lung by cobra venom or after anaphylactic shock. The relationship between SRS-A leukotrienes was established by UV which showed the presence of the conjugated triene. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).
The physiologically active and stable hydrolysis product of EPOPROSTENOL. Found in nearly all mammalian tissue.
Eighteen-carbon essential fatty acids that contain two double bonds.
A superfamily of hundreds of closely related HEMEPROTEINS found throughout the phylogenetic spectrum, from animals, plants, fungi, to bacteria. They include numerous complex monooxygenases (MIXED FUNCTION OXYGENASES). In animals, these P-450 enzymes serve two major functions: (1) biosynthesis of steroids, fatty acids, and bile acids; (2) metabolism of endogenous and a wide variety of exogenous substrates, such as toxins and drugs (BIOTRANSFORMATION). They are classified, according to their sequence similarities rather than functions, into CYP gene families (>40% homology) and subfamilies (>59% homology). For example, enzymes from the CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 gene families are responsible for most drug metabolism.
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 15-hydroperoxyarachidonate (15-HPETE) which is rapidly converted to 15-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoate (15-HETE). The 15-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in NEUTROPHILS and LYMPHOCYTES.
A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoglycerides or glycerophosphatidates. EC 3.1.-.
The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.
A calcium-independent phospholipase A2 group that may play a role in membrane phospholipid remodeling and homeostasis by controling the levels of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE in mammalian cell membranes.
(9 alpha,11 alpha,13E,15S)-9,11,15-Trihydroxyprost-13-en-1-oic acid (PGF(1 alpha)); (5Z,9 alpha,11,alpha,13E,15S)-9,11,15-trihydroxyprosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (PGF(2 alpha)); (5Z,9 alpha,11 alpha,13E,15S,17Z)-9,11,15-trihydroxyprosta-5,13,17-trien-1-oic acid (PGF(3 alpha)). A family of prostaglandins that includes three of the six naturally occurring prostaglandins. All naturally occurring PGF have an alpha configuration at the 9-carbon position. They stimulate uterine and bronchial smooth muscle and are often used as oxytocics.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
FATTY ACIDS which have the first unsaturated bond in the sixth position from the omega carbon. A typical American diet tends to contain substantially more omega-6 than OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A subcategory of phospholipases A2 that occur in the CYTOSOL.
A group of physiologically active prostaglandin endoperoxides. They are precursors in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes. The most frequently encountered member of this group is the prostaglandin H2.
Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.
Precursors in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes from arachidonic acid. They are physiologically active compounds, having effect on vascular and airway smooth muscles, platelet aggregation, etc.
A cyclic endoperoxide intermediate produced by the action of CYCLOOXYGENASE on ARACHIDONIC ACID. It is further converted by a series of specific enzymes to the series 2 prostaglandins.
A group of physiologically active prostaglandin endoperoxides. They are precursors in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes. Most frequently encountered member of this group is the prostaglandin G2.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).
A P450 oxidoreductase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of the terminal carbon of linear hydrocarbons such as octane and FATTY ACIDS in the omega position. The enzyme may also play a role in the oxidation of a variety of structurally unrelated compounds such as XENOBIOTICS, and STEROIDS.
Zymosan is a polysaccharide derived from the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly used in research as an immunostimulant to induce inflammation and study phagocytosis, complement activation, and oxidative burst in neutrophils and macrophages.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
Keto-pyrans.
(2S-(2 alpha,3 beta(1E,3E,5Z,8Z)))-3-(1,3,5,8-Tetradecatetraenyl)oxiranebutanoic acid. An unstable allylic epoxide, formed from the immediate precursor 5-HPETE via the stereospecific removal of a proton at C-10 and dehydration. Its biological actions are determined primarily by its metabolites, i.e., LEUKOTRIENE B4 and cysteinyl-leukotrienes. Alternatively, leukotriene A4 is converted into LEUKOTRIENE C4 by glutathione-S-transferase or into 5,6-di-HETE by the epoxide-hydrolase. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
Compounds that inhibit or block the activity of a PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 enzyme.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
An enzyme found predominantly in platelet microsomes. It catalyzes the conversion of PGG(2) and PGH(2) (prostaglandin endoperoxides) to thromboxane A2. EC 5.3.99.5.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.
Long chain organic acid molecules that must be obtained from the diet. Examples are LINOLEIC ACIDS and LINOLENIC ACIDS.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
A naturally occurring prostaglandin that has oxytocic, luteolytic, and abortifacient activities. Due to its vasocontractile properties, the compound has a variety of other biological actions.
A group of fatty acids, often of marine origin, which have the first unsaturated bond in the third position from the omega carbon. These fatty acids are believed to reduce serum triglycerides, prevent insulin resistance, improve lipid profile, prolong bleeding times, reduce platelet counts, and decrease platelet adhesiveness.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Diglycerides are a type of glyceride, specifically a form of lipid, that contains two fatty acid chains linked to a glycerol molecule by ester bonds.
Artifactual vesicles formed from the endoplasmic reticulum when cells are disrupted. They are isolated by differential centrifugation and are composed of three structural features: rough vesicles, smooth vesicles, and ribosomes. Numerous enzyme activities are associated with the microsomal fraction. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
Physiologically active prostaglandins found in many tissues and organs. They show pressor activity, are mediators of inflammation, and have potential antithrombotic effects.
A subcategory of secreted phospholipases A2 that includes enzymes isolated from a variety of sources. The creation of this group is based upon similarities in the structural determinants of the enzymes including a negatively charged carboxy-terminal segment.
A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to the hexahydroxy alcohol, myo-inositol. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid, myo-inositol, and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Peroxides produced in the presence of a free radical by the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell in the presence of molecular oxygen. The formation of lipid peroxides results in the destruction of the original lipid leading to the loss of integrity of the membranes. They therefore cause a variety of toxic effects in vivo and their formation is considered a pathological process in biological systems. Their formation can be inhibited by antioxidants, such as vitamin E, structural separation or low oxygen tension.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.
A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.
An omega-6 fatty acid produced in the body as the delta 6-desaturase metabolite of linoleic acid. It is converted to dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, a biosynthetic precursor of monoenoic prostaglandins such as PGE1. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A family of enzymes that catalyze the stereoselective, regioselective, or chemoselective syn-dehydrogenation reactions. They function by a mechanism that is linked directly to reduction of molecular OXYGEN.
Derivatives of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES obtained by their partial hydrolysis which removes one of the fatty acid moieties.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Enzymes that catalyze reversibly the formation of an epoxide or arene oxide from a glycol or aromatic diol, respectively.
Scaffolding proteins that play an important role in the localization and activation of 5-LIPOXYGENASE.
Fatty acid derivatives of glycerophosphates. They are composed of glycerol bound in ester linkage with 1 mole of phosphoric acid at the terminal 3-hydroxyl group and with 2 moles of fatty acids at the other two hydroxyl groups.
Cyclohexane ring substituted by one or more ketones in any position.
Basic polypeptide from the venom of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). It contains 26 amino acids, has cytolytic properties, causes contracture of muscle, releases histamine, and disrupts surface tension, probably due to lysis of cell and mitochondrial membranes.
GLYCEROL esterified with FATTY ACIDS.
Eighteen-carbon essential fatty acids that contain three double bonds.
Trihydroxy derivatives of eicosanoic acids. They are primarily derived from arachidonic acid, however eicosapentaenoic acid derivatives also exist. Many of them are naturally occurring mediators of immune regulation.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A fatty acid that is found in plants and involved in the formation of prostaglandins.
A subclass of phospholipases that hydrolyze the phosphoester bond found in the third position of GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS. Although the singular term phospholipase C specifically refers to an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE (EC 3.1.4.3), it is commonly used in the literature to refer to broad variety of enzymes that specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of biological or artificial lipid membranes to specific ions. Most ionophores are relatively small organic molecules that act as mobile carriers within membranes or coalesce to form ion permeable channels across membranes. Many are antibiotics, and many act as uncoupling agents by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.
An enzyme that catalyzes the syn-dehydrogenation of linoleol-CoA gamma-linolenoyl-CoA. It was formerly characterized as EC 1.14.99.25.
Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.
Enzymes of the isomerase class that catalyze the oxidation of one part of a molecule with a corresponding reduction of another part of the same molecule. They include enzymes converting aldoses to ketoses (ALDOSE-KETOSE ISOMERASES), enzymes shifting a carbon-carbon double bond (CARBON-CARBON DOUBLE BOND ISOMERASES), and enzymes transposing S-S bonds (SULFUR-SULFUR BOND ISOMERASES). (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 5.3.
Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.
A subclass of cyclooxygenase inhibitors with specificity for CYCLOOXYGENASE-2.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.
Two-ring crystalline hydrocarbons isolated from coal tar. They are used as intermediates in chemical synthesis, as insect repellents, fungicides, lubricants, preservatives, and, formerly, as topical antiseptics.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.
Fatty acid derivatives that have specificity for CANNABINOID RECEPTORS. They are structurally distinct from CANNABINOIDS and were originally discovered as a group of endogenous CANNABINOID RECEPTOR AGONISTS.
A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)
Oils high in unsaturated fats extracted from the bodies of fish or fish parts, especially the LIVER. Those from the liver are usually high in VITAMIN A. The oils are used as DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. They are also used in soaps and detergents and as protective coatings.
Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.
A formylated tripeptide originally isolated from bacterial filtrates that is positively chemotactic to polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and causes them to release lysosomal enzymes and become metabolically activated.
Dioxygenases that catalyze the peroxidation of methylene-interrupted UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to an ethanolamine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and ethanolamine and 2 moles of fatty acids.
A saclike, glandular diverticulum on each ductus deferens in male vertebrates. It is united with the excretory duct and serves for temporary storage of semen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The principal cyclooxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid. It is released upon activation of mast cells and is also synthesized by alveolar macrophages. Among its many biological actions, the most important are its bronchoconstrictor, platelet-activating-factor-inhibitory, and cytotoxic effects.
An anthracene derivative that disrupts MITOCHONDRIA function and structure and is used for the treatment of DERMATOSES, especially PSORIASIS. It may cause FOLLICULITIS.
An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic properties used in the therapy of rheumatism and arthritis.
Compounds that inhibit the action of prostaglandins.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A series of prostaglandin-like compounds that are produced by the attack of free-radical species on unsaturated fatty acids, especially ARACHIDONIC ACID, of cellular MEMBRANES. Once cleaved from the lipid membrane by the action of phospholipases they can circulate into various bodily fluids and eventually be excreted. Although these compounds resemble enzymatically synthesized prostaglandins their stereoisometric arrangement is usually different than the "naturally occurring" compounds.
Fractionation of a vaporized sample as a consequence of partition between a mobile gaseous phase and a stationary phase held in a column. Two types are gas-solid chromatography, where the fixed phase is a solid, and gas-liquid, in which the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid supported on an inert solid matrix.
'Nitrobenzenes' are organic compounds characterized by the presence of a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring, with the molecular formula C6H5NO2, which can be hazardous and toxic, and have various applications in industry, such as solvents, dyes, and explosives.
Phosphoric acid esters of inositol. They include mono- and polyphosphoric acid esters, with the exception of inositol hexaphosphate which is PHYTIC ACID.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.
Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.
Amides composed of unsaturated aliphatic FATTY ACIDS linked with AMINES by an amide bond. They are most prominent in ASTERACEAE; PIPERACEAE; and RUTACEAE; and also found in ARISTOLOCHIACEAE; BRASSICACEAE; CONVOLVULACEAE; EUPHORBIACEAE; MENISPERMACEAE; POACEAE; and SOLANACEAE. They are recognized by their pungent taste and for causing numbing and salivation.
A group of compounds that contain a bivalent O-O group, i.e., the oxygen atoms are univalent. They can either be inorganic or organic in nature. Such compounds release atomic (nascent) oxygen readily. Thus they are strong oxidizing agents and fire hazards when in contact with combustible materials, especially under high-temperature conditions. The chief industrial uses of peroxides are as oxidizing agents, bleaching agents, and initiators of polymerization. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)
cis-13-Docosenoic Acids. 22-Carbon monounsaturated, monocarboxylic acids.
A genus of zygomycetous fungi of the family Mortierellaceae, order MUCORALES. Its species are abundant in soil and can cause rare infections in humans and animals. Mortierella alpinais is used for production of arachidonic acid.
GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS in which one of the two acyl chains is attached to glycerol with an ether alkenyl linkage instead of an ester as with the other glycerophospholipids.
Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.
Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The conjugation product of LEUKOTRIENE A4 and glutathione. It is the major arachidonic acid metabolite in macrophages and human mast cells as well as in antigen-sensitized lung tissue. It stimulates mucus secretion in the lung, and produces contractions of nonvascular and some VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.
A class of compounds composed of repeating 5-carbon units of HEMITERPENES.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
An enzyme localized predominantly within the plasma membrane of lymphocytes. It catalyzes the transfer of long-chain fatty acids, preferentially unsaturated fatty acids, to lysophosphatides with the formation of 1,2-diacylglycero-3-phosphocholine and CoA. EC 2.3.1.23.
A group of compounds that are derivatives of octadecanoic acid which is one of the most abundant fatty acids found in animal lipids. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
An inhibitor of drug metabolism and CYTOCHROME P-450 ENZYME SYSTEM activity.
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
A set of BACTERIAL ADHESINS and TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL produced by BORDETELLA organisms that determine the pathogenesis of BORDETELLA INFECTIONS, such as WHOOPING COUGH. They include filamentous hemagglutinin; FIMBRIAE PROTEINS; pertactin; PERTUSSIS TOXIN; ADENYLATE CYCLASE TOXIN; dermonecrotic toxin; tracheal cytotoxin; Bordetella LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES; and tracheal colonization factor.
Acetophenones are organic compounds that contain a ketone functional group (carbonyl, >C=O) attached to a phenyl ring, making them a subclass of aromatic ketones with the general formula C6H5COCH3.
Isoprostanes derived from the free radical oxidation of ARACHIDONIC ACID. Although similar in structure to enzymatically synthesized prostaglandin F2alpha (DINOPROST), they occur through non-enzymatic oxidation of cell membrane lipids.
A group of 1,2-benzenediols that contain the general formula R-C6H5O2.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
One of the virulence factors produced by BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS. It is a multimeric protein composed of five subunits S1 - S5. S1 contains mono ADPribose transferase activity.
Systems in which an intracellular signal is generated in response to an intercellular primary messenger such as a hormone or neurotransmitter. They are intermediate signals in cellular processes such as metabolism, secretion, contraction, phototransduction, and cell growth. Examples of second messenger systems are the adenyl cyclase-cyclic AMP system, the phosphatidylinositol diphosphate-inositol triphosphate system, and the cyclic GMP system.
Organic nitrogenous bases. Many alkaloids of medical importance occur in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and some have been synthesized. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.
Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.
Highly reactive compounds produced when oxygen is reduced by a single electron. In biological systems, they may be generated during the normal catalytic function of a number of enzymes and during the oxidation of hemoglobin to METHEMOGLOBIN. In living organisms, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE protects the cell from the deleterious effects of superoxides.
A chelating agent relatively more specific for calcium and less toxic than EDETIC ACID.
A subcategory of secreted phospholipases A2 that contains both a negatively charged carboxy-terminal segment and interfacial-binding region specific for PHOSPHATIDYL CHOLINE-containing membranes. This enzyme group may play a role in the release of ARACHIDONIC ACID from phospholipid membranes.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.
A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
Nitro-phenanthrenes occurring in ARISTOLOCHIACEAE and other plants. They derive from stephanine (APORPHINES) by oxidative ring cleavage. The nitro group is a reactive alkylator (ALKYLATING AGENTS) that binds to biological macromolecules. Ingestion by humans is associated with nephropathy (NEPHRITIS). There is no relationship to the similar named aristolochene (SESQUITERPENES).
Cell surface receptors that bind prostaglandins with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Prostaglandin receptor subtypes have been tentatively named according to their relative affinities for the endogenous prostaglandins. They include those which prefer prostaglandin D2 (DP receptors), prostaglandin E2 (EP1, EP2, and EP3 receptors), prostaglandin F2-alpha (FP receptors), and prostacyclin (IP receptors).
An increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme due to the presence of an inducer which acts to derepress the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Compounds obtained by chemical synthesis that are analogs or derivatives of naturally occurring prostaglandins and that have similar activity.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Endogenously-synthesized compounds that influence biological processes not otherwise classified under ENZYMES; HORMONES or HORMONE ANTAGONISTS.
A secreted phospholipase A2 subtype that contains a interfacial-binding region with specificity for PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE. This enzyme group may play a role in eliciting ARACHIDONIC ACID release from intact cellular membranes and from LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. Members of this group bind specifically to PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 RECEPTORS.
FATTY ACIDS found in the plasma that are complexed with SERUM ALBUMIN for transport. These fatty acids are not in glycerol ester form.
Potassium channels that contain two pores in tandem. They are responsible for baseline or leak currents and may be the most numerous of all K channels.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent with antipyretic and antigranulation activities. It also inhibits prostaglandin biosynthesis.
The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
Cell surface proteins that bind eicosanoids with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Among the eicosanoid receptors are receptors for the prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
A subcategory of phospholipases A2 that are secreted from cells. They are 14 kDa proteins containing multiple disulfide-bonds and access their substrate via an interfacial binding site that interacts with phospholipid membranes. In addition specific PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 RECEPTORS can bind to and internalize the enzymes.
An enzyme found mostly in plant tissue. It hydrolyzes glycerophosphatidates with the formation of a phosphatidic acid and a nitrogenous base such as choline. This enzyme also catalyzes transphosphatidylation reactions. EC 3.1.4.4.
A chemically diverse group of substances produced by various tissues in the body that cause slow contraction of smooth muscle; they have other intense but varied pharmacologic activities.
An anti-inflammatory analgesic and antipyretic of the phenylalkynoic acid series. It has been shown to reduce bone resorption in periodontal disease by inhibiting CARBONIC ANHYDRASE.
Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.
Oils derived from plants or plant products.
The phenomenon whereby certain chemical compounds have structures that are different although the compounds possess the same elemental composition. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.

Stimulation of renin release from rabbit renal cortex by arachidonic acid and prostaglandin endoperoxides. (1/3254)

The mechanism by which renal prostaglandins stimulate renin secretion in vivo is unknown. In this in vitro study we measured the effects of activation of the prostaglandin (PG) system on renin release from slices of rabbit renal cortex. The PG precursor arachidonic acid (C20:4), a natural PG endoperoxide (PGG2), two stable synthetic PG endoperoxide analogues (EPA I and II), PGE2, PGF2alpha, and two different PG synthesis inhibitors [indomethacin and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETA)] were used to evaluate the possibility of a direct action of the cortical PG system on renin secretion. Renin release increased significantly with time after addition of C20:4, PGG2, EPA I, and EPA II to the incubation medium. Stimulation of renin release was se-related for C20:4 in concentrations of 0.6 to 4.5 X 10(-6) M, for EPA I in concentrations of 0.7 to 2.8 X 10(-6) M, and for EPA II in concentrations of 1.4 to 14.0 X 10(-6) M. Indomethacin (10(-4) M) and ETA (10(-4) M) significantly decreased basal renin release as well as the renin release stimulated by C20:4 and EPA I. PGE2(10(-12) to 10(-6) M) had no effect on renin release, whereas PGF2alpha (10(-12) to 10(-6) M) decreased renin release in a dose-dependent manner. These data raise the possibility of a direct action of the renal cortical PG system on renin secretion. The results further indicate that stimulation of renin release by C20:4 may depend more specifically on the action of PG endoperoxides than on the primary prostaglandins.  (+info)

Cytosolic phospholipase A2 in rat decidual cells: evidence for its role in decidualization. (2/3254)

We investigated the existence and possible role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in rat decidualized uteri. PLA2 activity in the cytosol of a decidualized uterine horn, induced by intraluminal oil infusion, was significantly higher than that in contralateral intact horn. The activity was almost completely depressed by cPLA2 inhibitors including arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (ATK). The immunoreactive signals for cPLA2 were intense in decidua and glandular epithelial cells. In vivo administration of ATK (0.1-100 microg) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of decidualization. These results show the presence of cPLA2 and its probable implication in decidualization in rat uterus.  (+info)

Recent progress in the neurotoxicology of natural drugs associated with dependence or addiction, their endogenous agonists and receptors. (3/3254)

Nicotine in tobacco, tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) in marijuana and morphine in opium are well known as drugs associated with dependence or addiction. Endogenous active substances that mimic the effects of the natural drugs and their respective receptors have been found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Such active substances and receptors include acetylcholine (ACh) and the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) for nicotine, anandamide and CB1 for delta 9-THC, and endomorphins (1 and 2) and the mu (OP3) opioid receptor for morphine, respectively. Considerable progress has been made in studies on neurotoxicity, in terms of the habituation, dependence and withdrawal phenomena associated with these drugs and with respect to correlations with endogenous active substances and their receptors. In this article we shall review recent findings related to the neurotoxicity of tobacco, marijuana and opium, and their toxic ingredients, nicotine, delta 9-THC and morphine in relation to their respective endogenous agents and receptors in the CNS.  (+info)

Stage-specific excitation of cannabinoid receptor exhibits differential effects on mouse embryonic development. (4/3254)

Anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine), an arachidonic acid derivative, is an endogenous ligand for both the brain-type (CB1-R) and spleen-type (CB2-R) cannabinoid receptors. We have previously demonstrated that preimplantation mouse embryos express mRNA for these receptors and that the periimplantation uterus contains the highest level of anandamide yet discovered in a mammalian tissue. We further demonstrated that 2-cell mouse embryos exposed to low levels of anandamide (7 nM) or other known cannabinoid agonists in culture exhibit markedly compromised embryonic development to blastocysts and that this effect is mediated by CB1-R. In contrast, the present study demonstrates that blastocysts exposed in culture to the same low levels of cannabinoid agonists exhibited accelerated trophoblast differentiation with respect to fibronectin-binding activity and trophoblast outgrowth. Again, these effects resulted from activation of embryonic CB1-R. There was a differential concentration-dependent effect of cannabinoids on the trophoblast, with an observed inhibition of differentiation at higher doses. These results provide evidence for the first time that cannabinoid effects are differentially executed depending on the embryonic stage and cannabinoid levels in the environment. Since uterine anandamide levels are lowest at the sites of implantation and highest at the interimplantation sites, the new findings imply that site-specific levels of anandamide and/or other endogenous ligands in the uterus may regulate implantation spatially by promoting trophoblast differentiation at the sites of blastocyst implantation.  (+info)

A role for N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) as the mediator of sensory nerve-dependent Ca2+-induced relaxation. (5/3254)

We tested the hypothesis that an endogenous cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonist, such as N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide), is the transmitter that mediates perivascular sensory nerve-dependent Ca2+-induced relaxation. Rat mesenteric branch arteries were studied using wire myography; relaxation was determined after inducing contraction with norepinephrine. Cumulative addition of Ca2+ caused dose-dependent relaxation (ED50 = 2.2 +/- 0.09 mM). The relaxation was inhibited by 10 mM TEA and 100 nM iberiotoxin, a blocker of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, but not by 5 microM glibenclamide, 1 mM 4-aminopyridine, or 30 nM apamin. Ca2+-induced relaxation was also blocked by the selective CB receptor antagonist SR141716A and was enhanced by pretreatment with 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (pefabloc; 30 microM), an inhibitor of anandamide metabolism. Anandamide also caused dose-dependent relaxation (ED50 =.72 +/- 0.3 microM). The relaxation was not inhibited by endothelial denudation, 10 microM indomethacin, or 1 microM miconazole, but was blocked by 3 microM SR141716A, 10 mM TEA, precontraction with 100 mM K+, and 100 nM iberiotoxin, and was enhanced by treatment with 30 microM pefabloc. Mesenteric branch arteries were 200-fold more sensitive to the relaxing action of anandamide than arachidonic acid (ED50 = 160 +/- 7 microM). These data show that: 1) Ca2+ and anandamide cause hyperpolarization-mediated relaxation of mesenteric branch arteries, which is dependent on an iberiotoxin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ channel, 2) relaxation induced by both Ca2+ and anandamide is inhibited by CB receptor blockade, and 3) relaxation induced by anandamide is not dependent on its breakdown to arachidonic acid and subsequent metabolism. These findings support the hypothesis that anandamide, or a similar cannabinoid receptor agonist, mediates nerve-dependent Ca2+-induced relaxation in the rat.  (+info)

Inhibition of the production of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by cannabinoid receptor agonists. (6/3254)

1. The endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, has been reported to induce an 'endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like' relaxation in vitro. We therefore investigated the effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists; HU 210, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and anandamide, and a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist, SR 141716A, on nitric oxide (NO) and EDHF-mediated relaxation in precontracted rings of porcine coronary, rabbit carotid and mesenteric arteries. 2. In rings of mesenteric artery HU 210 and delta9-THC induced endothelium- and cyclo-oxygenase-independent relaxations which were sensitive to SR 141716A. Anandamide (0.03-30 microM) induced a slowly developing, endothelium-independent relaxation which was abolished by diclofenac and was therefore mediated by cyclo-oxygenase product(s). None of the CB1 agonists tested affected the tone of precontracted rings of rabbit carotid or porcine coronary artery. 3. In endothelium-intact segments, HU 210, delta9-THC and anandamide did not affect NO-mediated responses but under conditions of continuous NO synthase/cyclo-oxygenase blockade, significantly inhibited acetylcholine and bradykinin-induced relaxations which are attributed to the production of EDHF. The effects of HU 210 and delta9-THC were not observed when experiments were performed in the presence of SR 141716A suggesting the involvement of the CB1 receptor. 4. In a patch clamp bioassay of EDHF production, HU 210 decreased the EDHF-mediated hyperpolarization of detector smooth muscle cells when applied to the donor segment but was without effect on the membrane potential of detector cells. The inhibition of EDHF production was unrelated to alterations in Ca2+ -signalling or cytochrome P450 activity. 5. These results suggest that the activation of endothelial CB1 receptors appears to be negatively coupled to the production of EDHF.  (+info)

Insulin but not growth hormone stimulates protein anabolism in skin wound and muscle. (7/3254)

We have measured protein kinetics in the scalded skin and normal muscle in anesthetized rabbits. On the 7th day after ear scald, L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine was infused as a tracer, and the ear and hindlimb were used as arteriovenous units to reflect skin and muscle protein kinetics. Insulin was infused at 0.6 or 2.3-3.4 mU. kg-1. min-1 in the low-dose and high-dose insulin groups. In the growth hormone group, recombinant human growth hormone was administered at 2 mg. kg-1. day-1 after the ear was scalded. The results were compared with a control group in which the ear was scalded but otherwise was not treated. In the control group, net protein loss in the scalded skin and muscle was 23.1 +/- 21.4 and 3.9 +/- 1.5 micromol. 100 g-1. h-1, respectively. Insulin infusion at either high or low dose reduced net protein loss to near zero by inhibiting proteolysis. In contrast, growth hormone treatment had no anabolic effect on either tissue. In conclusion, insulin but not growth hormone has an anabolic effect on scalded skin and normal muscle; low-dose insulin is as effective in achieving an anabolic effect on both tissues, with less hypoglycemic response than high-dose insulin.  (+info)

Fatty-acid amide hydrolase is expressed in the mouse uterus and embryo during the periimplantation period. (8/3254)

Arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) is an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors. We demonstrated previously that the periimplantation mouse uterus has high levels of anandamide and can synthesize and hydrolyse anandamide. In the present investigation, we examined the expression of the recently identified fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) gene, which is involved in hydrolyzing anandamide to arachidonic acid and ethanolamine, in the periimplantation mouse embryo and uterus. As previously reported, Northern blot hybridization detected a transcript of approximately 2.5 kilobases of FAAH mRNA in whole uterine poly(A)+ RNA samples. The levels of this mRNA were higher in the liver and brain than in the uterus. In the uterus, higher accumulation of FAAH mRNA occurred on Days 1-4 followed by declines on later days (Days 5-8) of pregnancy. In situ hybridization detected this mRNA primarily in uterine luminal and glandular epithelial cells on Days 1-4 of pregnancy. With the progression of implantation (Days 5-8), accumulation of this mRNA was retained in the luminal and glandular epithelia. In addition, implanting blastocysts showed accumulation of this mRNA. FAAH mRNA accumulation was absent or minimal in the myometrium during this period. Western blotting detected an approximately 60-kDa protein in uterine membrane preparations. In preimplantation embryos, FAAH mRNA was present in one-cell and two-cell embryos but was absent in embryos at the eight-cell/morula stage. However, this mRNA was again detected in Day 4 blastocysts. The presence of FAAH mRNA in one- and two-cell embryos reflects accumulation of maternal message, while its presence in blastocysts reflects embryonic gene activation. Collectively, our present and previous results provide evidence that FAAH is expressed in the mouse uterus and embryo during early pregnancy to modulate local levels of anandamide that could be important for embryo development and implantation.  (+info)

Arachidonic acid is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found naturally in the body and in certain foods. It is an essential fatty acid, meaning that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Arachidonic acid is a key component of cell membranes and plays a role in various physiological processes, including inflammation and blood clotting.

In the body, arachidonic acid is released from cell membranes in response to various stimuli, such as injury or infection. Once released, it can be converted into a variety of bioactive compounds, including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes, which mediate various physiological responses, including inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting.

Arachidonic acid is found in high concentrations in animal products such as meat, poultry, fish, and eggs, as well as in some plant sources such as certain nuts and seeds. It is also available as a dietary supplement. However, it is important to note that excessive intake of arachidonic acid can contribute to the development of inflammation and other health problems, so it is recommended to consume this fatty acid in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Arachidonic acids are a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is primarily found in the phospholipids of cell membranes. They contain 20 carbon atoms and four double bonds (20:4n-6), with the first double bond located at the sixth carbon atom from the methyl end.

Arachidonic acids are derived from linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources such as meat, fish, and eggs. Once ingested, linoleic acid is converted to arachidonic acid in a series of enzymatic reactions.

Arachidonic acids play an important role in various physiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cell signaling. They serve as precursors for the synthesis of eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These eicosanoids have diverse biological activities, such as modulating blood flow, platelet aggregation, and pain perception, among others.

However, excessive production of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including inflammation, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Therefore, the regulation of arachidonic acid metabolism is an important area of research for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a type of enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester bond in glycerophospholipids, releasing free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and lysophospholipids. These products are important precursors for the biosynthesis of various signaling molecules, including eicosanoids, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and lipoxins, which play crucial roles in inflammation, immunity, and other cellular processes.

Phospholipases A2 are classified into several groups based on their structure, mechanism of action, and cellular localization. The secreted PLA2s (sPLA2s) are found in extracellular fluids and are characterized by a low molecular weight, while the calcium-dependent cytosolic PLA2s (cPLA2s) are larger proteins that reside within cells.

Abnormal regulation or activity of Phospholipase A2 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the biology and function of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these disorders.

Phospholipases A are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze phospholipids into fatty acids and lysophospholipids by cleaving the ester bond at the sn-1 or sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. There are three main types of Phospholipases A:

* Phospholipase A1 (PLA1): This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-1 position, releasing a free fatty acid and a lysophospholipid.
* Phospholipase A2 (PLA2): This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position, releasing a free fatty acid (often arachidonic acid, which is a precursor for eicosanoids) and a lysophospholipid.
* Phospholipase A/B (PLA/B): This enzyme has both PLA1 and PLA2 activity and can hydrolyze the ester bond at either the sn-1 or sn-2 position.

Phospholipases A play important roles in various biological processes, including cell signaling, membrane remodeling, and host defense. They are also involved in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer.

Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) are a type of metabolite produced by the oxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found in the membranes of cells in the human body. This oxidation process is catalyzed by enzymes called lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP450).

HETEs are biologically active compounds that play a role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cancer. They can act as signaling molecules, modulating the activity of various cell types, such as leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells.

There are several different types of HETEs, depending on the position of the hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to the arachidonic acid molecule. For example, 5-HETE, 12-HETE, and 15-HETE are produced by 5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX, respectively, while CYP450 can produce 20-HETE.

It's worth noting that HETEs have been implicated in various diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cancer, making them potential targets for therapeutic intervention. However, further research is needed to fully understand their roles and develop effective treatments.

Lipoxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids containing a cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene structure, forming hydroperoxides. This reaction is important in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes and lipoxins, which are involved in various inflammatory responses and immune functions. There are several isoforms of lipoxygenase found in different tissues and organisms, including arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase, arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase, and arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase.

12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) is a type of fatty acid that is produced in the body as a result of the metabolism of arachidonic acid, which is an omega-6 fatty acid that is found in the membranes of cells throughout the body.

12-HETE is synthesized by the enzyme 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX), which adds a hydroxyl group (-OH) to the twelfth carbon atom of arachidonic acid. This lipid mediator plays a role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cancer development.

Increased levels of 12-HETE have been found in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and cancer, suggesting that it may contribute to the development and progression of these conditions. However, further research is needed to fully understand the role of 12-HETE in human health and disease.

Masoprocol is not a medication that has an established or widely accepted medical definition in the field of pharmacology or clinical medicine. It may refer to a chemical compound with the name 5-n-butyl-2-benzoxazolinone, which has been studied for its potential anti-cancer properties. However, it is not currently approved by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in medical treatments.

Therefore, it's important to consult with healthcare professionals or reliable medical sources for information regarding medications and their uses, rather than relying on unverified or obscure sources.

5,8,11,14-Eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that contains four double bonds in its chemical structure. It is a non-methylene interrupted fatty acid, which means that the double bonds are separated by three methylene bridges. ETYA is not a naturally occurring fatty acid and is typically synthesized in the laboratory for research purposes.

ETYA has been used as a tool to study the biochemical mechanisms of inflammation and cancer. It can inhibit the activity of enzymes called lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, which are involved in the production of inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. ETYA can also induce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which can contribute to cell damage and death.

While ETYA has been used in research to better understand the biochemical pathways involved in inflammation and cancer, it is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and lack of specificity for targeting disease processes.

8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic acid is a type of fatty acid that contains 20 carbon atoms and three double bonds. The locations of these double bonds are at the 8th, 11th, and 14th carbon atoms, hence the name of the fatty acid. It is an omega-3 fatty acid, which means that the first double bond is located between the third and fourth carbon atoms from the methyl end of the molecule.

This particular fatty acid is not considered to be essential for human health, as it can be synthesized in the body from other fatty acids. It is a component of certain types of lipids found in animal tissues, including beef and lamb. It has been studied for its potential role in various physiological processes, such as inflammation and immune function, but its specific functions and effects on human health are not well understood.

Lipoxygenase inhibitors are a class of compounds that block the activity of lipoxygenase enzymes. These enzymes are involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, leading to the production of leukotrienes and other inflammatory mediators. By inhibiting lipoxygenase, these compounds can help reduce inflammation and may have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of various diseases, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Some examples of lipoxygenase inhibitors include nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), zileuton, and baicalein.

Prostaglandins are naturally occurring, lipid-derived hormones that play various important roles in the human body. They are produced in nearly every tissue in response to injury or infection, and they have diverse effects depending on the site of release and the type of prostaglandin. Some of their functions include:

1. Regulation of inflammation: Prostaglandins contribute to the inflammatory response by increasing vasodilation, promoting fluid accumulation, and sensitizing pain receptors, which can lead to symptoms such as redness, heat, swelling, and pain.
2. Modulation of gastrointestinal functions: Prostaglandins protect the stomach lining from acid secretion and promote mucus production, maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa. They also regulate intestinal motility and secretion.
3. Control of renal function: Prostaglandins help regulate blood flow to the kidneys, maintain sodium balance, and control renin release, which affects blood pressure and fluid balance.
4. Regulation of smooth muscle contraction: Prostaglandins can cause both relaxation and contraction of smooth muscles in various tissues, such as the uterus, bronchioles, and vascular system.
5. Modulation of platelet aggregation: Some prostaglandins inhibit platelet aggregation, preventing blood clots from forming too quickly or becoming too large.
6. Reproductive system regulation: Prostaglandins are involved in the menstrual cycle, ovulation, and labor induction by promoting uterine contractions.
7. Neurotransmission: Prostaglandins can modulate neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability, affecting pain perception, mood, and cognition.

Prostaglandins exert their effects through specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of target cells. There are several distinct types of prostaglandins (PGs), including PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2 (prostacyclin), and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). Each type has unique functions and acts through specific receptors. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid derived from membrane phospholipids, by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, inhibit COX activity, reducing prostaglandin synthesis and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects.

Eicosanoids are a group of signaling molecules made by the enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids with 20 carbon atoms. They include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, and lipoxins, which are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, immune response, blood clotting, and smooth muscle contraction. Eicosanoids act as local hormones or autacoids, affecting the function of cells near where they are produced. They are synthesized by various cell types, including immune cells, endothelial cells, and neurons, in response to different stimuli, such as injury, infection, or stress. The balance between different eicosanoids can have significant effects on health and disease.

Arachidonate lipoxygenases (ALOXs or ALOXE's) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, to form hydroperoxides. These enzymes play a crucial role in the biosynthesis of various eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules involved in inflammation, immunity, and other physiological processes.

There are several isoforms of ALOXs, including 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX), and 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which differ in their substrate specificity and the position of the hydroperoxide group they introduce into the fatty acid. These enzymes are widely distributed in various tissues, including the lungs, liver, and brain, and have been implicated in a variety of diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Inhibition of ALOXs has been explored as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these diseases, although the development of selective and safe inhibitors has proven to be challenging.

Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase (also known as ALOX5 or 5-LO) is a type of enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are important inflammatory mediators. It catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE), which is then converted to leukotriene A4 (LTA4). LTA4 is a precursor for the synthesis of other leukotrienes, such as LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These lipid mediators play key roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and allergic reactions.

The gene encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase is located on human chromosome 10 (10q11.2). Mutations in this gene have been associated with several diseases, such as severe congenital neutropenia, recurrent infections, and increased risk of developing asthma and other allergic disorders. Inhibitors of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase are used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, including asthma and rheumatoid arthritis.

Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases (PTGS), also known as Cyclooxygenases (COX), are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin G2 and H2, which are further metabolized to produce various prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These lipid mediators play crucial roles in several physiological processes such as inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting. There are two major isoforms of PTGS: PTGS-1 (COX-1) and PTGS-2 (COX-2). While COX-1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues and involved in homeostatic functions, COX-2 is usually induced during inflammation and tissue injury. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exert their therapeutic effects by inhibiting these enzymes, thereby reducing the production of prostaglandins and thromboxanes.

Leukotrienes are a type of lipid mediator derived from arachidonic acid, which is a fatty acid found in the cell membranes of various cells in the body. They are produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway and play an essential role in the inflammatory response. Leukotrienes are involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes, including bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of injury or infection.

There are four main types of leukotrienes: LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These molecules differ from each other based on the presence or absence of specific chemical groups attached to their core structure. Leukotrienes exert their effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of various cells.

LTB4 is primarily involved in neutrophil chemotaxis and activation, while LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 are collectively known as cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). CysLTs cause bronchoconstriction, increased mucus production, and vascular permeability in the airways, contributing to the pathogenesis of asthma and other respiratory diseases.

In summary, leukotrienes are potent lipid mediators that play a crucial role in inflammation and immune responses. Their dysregulation has been implicated in several disease states, making them an important target for therapeutic intervention.

Group IV Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a subclass of the PLA2 family, which are enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 acyl bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group IV PLA2s are calcium-dependent enzymes that are primarily located in the cytoplasm of cells and are involved in various cellular processes such as membrane remodeling, signal transduction, and inflammation.

Group IV PLA2s can be further divided into several subgroups, including Group IVA (also known as cPLA2s) and Group IVB (also known as iPLA2s). These enzymes have distinct structural features and play different roles in cellular physiology. For example, cPLA2s are involved in the production of eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that mediate inflammation and other responses to injury or infection. On the other hand, iPLA2s are involved in maintaining membrane homeostasis and regulating cellular energy metabolism.

Abnormal regulation of Group IV PLA2 activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Unsaturated fatty acids are a type of fatty acid that contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain. These double bonds can be either cis or trans configurations, although the cis configuration is more common in nature. The presence of these double bonds makes unsaturated fatty acids more liquid at room temperature and less prone to spoilage than saturated fatty acids, which do not have any double bonds.

Unsaturated fatty acids can be further classified into two main categories: monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). MUFAs contain one double bond in their carbon chain, while PUFAs contain two or more.

Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (a MUFA found in olive oil), linoleic acid (a PUFA found in vegetable oils), and alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 PUFA found in flaxseed and fish). Unsaturated fatty acids are essential nutrients for the human body, as they play important roles in various physiological processes such as membrane structure, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is recommended to consume a balanced diet that includes both MUFAs and PUFAs to maintain good health.

Quinacrine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs called antimalarials. It is primarily used in the treatment and prevention of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax parasites. Quinacrine works by inhibiting the growth of the malarial parasites in the red blood cells.

In addition to its antimalarial properties, quinacrine has been used off-label for various other medical conditions, including the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), a type of skin lupus. However, its use in these conditions is not approved by regulatory authorities such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to limited evidence and potential side effects.

Quinacrine has several known side effects, including gastrointestinal disturbances, skin rashes, headache, dizziness, and potential neuropsychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, or confusion. Long-term use of quinacrine may also lead to yellowing of the skin and eyes (known as quinacrine jaundice) and other eye-related issues. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional before starting quinacrine or any other medication for appropriate dosage, duration, and potential side effects.

Dinoprostone is a prostaglandin E2 analog used in medical practice for the induction of labor and ripening of the cervix in pregnant women. It is available in various forms, including vaginal suppositories, gel, and tablets. Dinoprostone works by stimulating the contraction of uterine muscles and promoting cervical dilation, which helps in facilitating a successful delivery.

It's important to note that dinoprostone should only be administered under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as its use is associated with certain risks and side effects, including uterine hyperstimulation, fetal distress, and maternal infection. The dosage and duration of treatment are carefully monitored to minimize these risks and ensure the safety of both the mother and the baby.

Calcimycin is a ionophore compound that is produced by the bacterium Streptomyces chartreusensis. It is also known as Calcineurin A inhibitor because it can bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase. In medical research, calcimycin is often used to study calcium signaling in cells.
It has been also used in laboratory studies for its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on certain types of cancer cells. However, it is not approved for use as a drug in humans.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a type of lipid mediator called eicosanoid, which is derived from arachidonic acid through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. It is primarily produced by neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and macrophages in response to various stimuli such as infection, inflammation, or injury. LTB4 acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of these immune cells, playing a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils during acute inflammatory responses. It also enhances the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, contributing to the development of tissue damage and edema. Dysregulation of LTB4 production has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) is a stable metabolite of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), which is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator synthesized by activated platelets. TXA2 has a very short half-life, quickly undergoing spontaneous conversion to the more stable TXB2.

TXB2 itself does not have significant biological activity but serves as a marker for TXA2 production in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as thrombosis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. It can be measured in blood or other bodily fluids to assess platelet activation and the status of hemostatic and inflammatory processes.

Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors are a class of drugs that work by blocking the activity of cyclooxygenase enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever.

There are two main types of COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is produced continuously in various tissues throughout the body and helps maintain the normal function of the stomach and kidneys, among other things. COX-2, on the other hand, is produced in response to inflammation and is involved in the production of prostaglandins that contribute to pain, fever, and inflammation.

COX inhibitors can be non-selective, meaning they block both COX-1 and COX-2, or selective, meaning they primarily block COX-2. Non-selective COX inhibitors include drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, while selective COX inhibitors are often referred to as coxibs and include celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx).

COX inhibitors are commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. However, long-term use of non-selective COX inhibitors can increase the risk of gastrointestinal side effects such as ulcers and bleeding, while selective COX inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke. It is important to talk to a healthcare provider about the potential risks and benefits of COX inhibitors before using them.

Prostaglandin E (PGE) is a type of prostaglandin, which is a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects. Prostaglandins are not actually hormones, but are similar to them in that they act as chemical messengers that have specific effects on certain cells.

Prostaglandin E is one of the most abundant prostaglandins in the body and has a variety of physiological functions. It is involved in the regulation of inflammation, pain perception, fever, and smooth muscle contraction. Prostaglandin E also plays a role in the regulation of blood flow, platelet aggregation, and gastric acid secretion.

Prostaglandin E is synthesized from arachidonic acid, which is released from cell membranes by the action of enzymes called phospholipases. Once formed, prostaglandin E binds to specific receptors on the surface of cells, leading to a variety of intracellular signaling events that ultimately result in changes in cell behavior.

Prostaglandin E is used medically in the treatment of several conditions, including dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation), postpartum hemorrhage, and patent ductus arteriosus (a congenital heart defect). It is also used as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of kidney function.

Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (also known as ALOX12 or 12S-lipoxygenase) is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to 12(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HPETE). This reaction is part of the lipoxygenase pathway, which contributes to the biosynthesis of eicosanoids, a group of signaling molecules that play important roles in inflammation and immune response.

The enzyme's function includes introducing molecular oxygen into arachidonic acid at position 12, creating a hydroperoxide group. The product, 12(S)-HPETE, can be further metabolized to various eicosanoids, such as 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and lipoxin A4, which have diverse biological activities in the body.

Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase is expressed in various tissues, including the vascular endothelium, platelets, and immune cells like monocytes and macrophages. Its activity can contribute to the development of certain diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, inhibiting this enzyme has been considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for treating these conditions.

Eicosanoic acids are a type of fatty acid that contains 20 carbon atoms. They can be further classified into subgroups based on the presence and location of double bonds in their chemical structure. The most well-known eicosanoic acids include arachidonic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid with four double bonds), eicosapentaenoic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid with five double bonds), and docosahexaenoic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid with six double bonds). These fatty acids play important roles in various physiological processes, including inflammation, blood clotting, and cell signaling. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fish, nuts, and seeds, and are also available as dietary supplements.

Phospholipids are a major class of lipids that consist of a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. The head is composed of a phosphate group, which is often bound to an organic molecule such as choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol. The tails are made up of two fatty acid chains.

Phospholipids are a key component of cell membranes and play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the cell. They form a lipid bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing outwards and the hydrophobic tails facing inwards, creating a barrier that separates the interior of the cell from the outside environment.

Phospholipids are also involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, and protein function regulation. Additionally, they serve as emulsifiers in the digestive system, helping to break down fats in the diet.

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a type of long-chain omega-3 fatty acid that is essential for human health. It is an important structural component of the phospholipid membranes in the brain and retina, and plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system. DHA is also involved in various physiological processes, including inflammation, blood pressure regulation, and immune response.

DHA is not produced in sufficient quantities by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources or supplements. The richest dietary sources of DHA are fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, as well as algae and other marine organisms. DHA can also be found in fortified foods such as eggs, milk, and juice.

Deficiency in DHA has been linked to various health issues, including cognitive decline, vision problems, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is recommended that individuals consume adequate amounts of DHA through diet or supplementation to maintain optimal health.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Linoleic acid is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid, specifically an omega-6 fatty acid. It is called "essential" because our bodies cannot produce it; therefore, it must be obtained through our diet. Linoleic acid is a crucial component of cell membranes and is involved in the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that regulate various bodily functions such as inflammation, blood pressure, and muscle contraction.

Foods rich in linoleic acid include vegetable oils (such as soybean, corn, and sunflower oil), nuts, seeds, and some fruits and vegetables. It is important to maintain a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet, as excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids can contribute to inflammation and other health issues.

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever. COX-2 is primarily expressed in response to stimuli such as cytokines and growth factors, and its expression is associated with the development of inflammation.

COX-2 inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that selectively block the activity of COX-2, reducing the production of prostaglandins and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects. These medications are often used to treat pain and inflammation associated with conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, and headaches.

It's important to note that while COX-2 inhibitors can be effective in managing pain and inflammation, they may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, particularly when used at high doses or for extended periods. Therefore, it's essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is a type of enzyme belonging to the cyclooxygenase family, which is responsible for the production of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and prostacyclins. These are important signaling molecules that play a role in various physiological processes such as inflammation, pain perception, blood clotting, and gastric acid secretion.

COX-1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, including the stomach, kidneys, and platelets, where it performs housekeeping functions. For example, in the stomach, COX-1 produces prostaglandins that protect the stomach lining from acid and digestive enzymes. In the kidneys, COX-1 helps regulate blood flow and sodium balance. In platelets, COX-1 produces thromboxane A2, which promotes blood clotting.

COX-1 is a target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. These medications work by inhibiting the activity of COX enzymes, reducing the production of prostaglandins and thromboxanes, and thereby alleviating pain, inflammation, and fever. However, long-term use of NSAIDs can lead to side effects such as stomach ulcers and bleeding due to the inhibition of COX-1 in the stomach lining.

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that is found in fish and some algae. It is a 20-carbon long polyunsaturated fatty acid with five double bonds, and has the chemical formula C20:5 n-3. EPA is an essential fatty acid, meaning that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet.

EPA is a precursor to a group of hormone-like substances called eicosanoids, which include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These compounds play important roles in regulating various physiological processes, such as inflammation, blood clotting, and immune function.

EPA has been studied for its potential health benefits, including reducing inflammation, lowering the risk of heart disease, and improving symptoms of depression. It is often taken as a dietary supplement in the form of fish oil or algal oil. However, it is important to note that while some studies have suggested potential health benefits of EPA, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish recommended dosages.

"SRS-A" is an older abbreviation for "Slow-Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis," which refers to a group of molecules called "leukotrienes." Leukotrienes are mediators of inflammation and play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. They are produced by mast cells and basophils upon activation, and cause bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and mucus production.

The term "SRS-A" is not commonly used in modern medical literature, as it has been largely replaced by the more specific names of its individual components: LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These leukotrienes are now collectively referred to as the "cysteinyl leukotrienes."

Epoprostenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called prostaglandins. It is a synthetic analog of a natural substance in the body called prostacyclin, which widens blood vessels and has anti-platelet effects. Epoprostenol is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries that supply blood to the lungs.

Epoprostenol works by relaxing the smooth muscle in the walls of the pulmonary arteries, which reduces the resistance to blood flow and lowers the pressure within these vessels. This helps improve symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and chest pain, and can also prolong survival in people with PAH.

Epoprostenol is administered continuously through a small pump that delivers the medication directly into the bloodstream. It is a potent vasodilator, which means it can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure if not given carefully. Therefore, it is usually started in a hospital setting under close medical supervision.

Common side effects of epoprostenol include headache, flushing, jaw pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle or joint pain. More serious side effects can include bleeding, infection at the site of the catheter, and an allergic reaction to the medication.

6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, also known as prostaglandin H1A, is a stable metabolite of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). It is a type of eicosanoid, which is a signaling molecule made by the enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid or other polyunsaturated fatty acids. Prostaglandins are a subclass of eicosanoids and have diverse hormone-like effects in various tissues, including smooth muscle contraction, vasodilation, and modulation of inflammation.

6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha is formed by the oxidation of PGF2alpha by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), an enzyme that metabolizes prostaglandins and thromboxanes. It has been used as a biomarker for the measurement of PGF2alpha production in research settings, but it does not have any known physiological activity.

Linoleic acid is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that is essential for human health. It is one of the two essential fatty acids, meaning that it cannot be produced by the body and must be obtained through diet.

Linoleic acid is a member of the omega-6 fatty acid family and has a chemical structure with two double bonds at the sixth and ninth carbon atoms from the methyl end of the molecule. It is found in various plant sources, such as vegetable oils (e.g., soybean, corn, safflower, and sunflower oils), nuts, seeds, and whole grains.

Linoleic acid plays a crucial role in maintaining the fluidity and function of cell membranes, producing eicosanoids (hormone-like substances that regulate various bodily functions), and supporting skin health. However, excessive intake of linoleic acid can lead to an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, which may contribute to inflammation and chronic diseases. Therefore, it is recommended to maintain a balanced diet with appropriate amounts of both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.

The Cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) enzyme system is a group of enzymes found primarily in the liver, but also in other organs such as the intestines, lungs, and skin. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism and biotransformation of various substances, including drugs, environmental toxins, and endogenous compounds like hormones and fatty acids.

The name "Cytochrome P-450" refers to the unique property of these enzymes to bind to carbon monoxide (CO) and form a complex that absorbs light at a wavelength of 450 nm, which can be detected spectrophotometrically.

The CYP450 enzyme system is involved in Phase I metabolism of xenobiotics, where it catalyzes oxidation reactions such as hydroxylation, dealkylation, and epoxidation. These reactions introduce functional groups into the substrate molecule, which can then undergo further modifications by other enzymes during Phase II metabolism.

There are several families and subfamilies of CYP450 enzymes, each with distinct substrate specificities and functions. Some of the most important CYP450 enzymes include:

1. CYP3A4: This is the most abundant CYP450 enzyme in the human liver and is involved in the metabolism of approximately 50% of all drugs. It also metabolizes various endogenous compounds like steroids, bile acids, and vitamin D.
2. CYP2D6: This enzyme is responsible for the metabolism of many psychotropic drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, and beta-blockers. It also metabolizes some endogenous compounds like dopamine and serotonin.
3. CYP2C9: This enzyme plays a significant role in the metabolism of warfarin, phenytoin, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. CYP2C19: This enzyme is involved in the metabolism of proton pump inhibitors, antidepressants, and clopidogrel.
5. CYP2E1: This enzyme metabolizes various xenobiotics like alcohol, acetaminophen, and carbon tetrachloride, as well as some endogenous compounds like fatty acids and prostaglandins.

Genetic polymorphisms in CYP450 enzymes can significantly affect drug metabolism and response, leading to interindividual variability in drug efficacy and toxicity. Understanding the role of CYP450 enzymes in drug metabolism is crucial for optimizing pharmacotherapy and minimizing adverse effects.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

Arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HPETE). This enzyme plays a role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid, which is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is released from membrane phospholipids and is a precursor for eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that play a role in inflammation and other physiological processes.

15-lipoxygenase is one of several lipoxygenases that are found in various tissues throughout the body. These enzymes are involved in the production of leukotrienes, which are signaling molecules that play a role in inflammation and allergic responses. 15-lipoxygenase has also been implicated in the development and progression of certain diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Inhibitors of 15-lipoxygenase have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of this enzyme in health and disease and to determine the safety and efficacy of inhibiting its activity.

Phospholipases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phospholipids, which are major components of cell membranes. Phospholipases cleave specific ester bonds in phospholipids, releasing free fatty acids and other lipophilic molecules. Based on the site of action, phospholipases are classified into four types:

1. Phospholipase A1 (PLA1): This enzyme hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-1 position of a glycerophospholipid, releasing a free fatty acid and a lysophospholipid.
2. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2): PLA2 cleaves the ester bond at the sn-2 position of a glycerophospholipid, releasing a free fatty acid (often arachidonic acid) and a lysophospholipid. Arachidonic acid is a precursor for eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules involved in inflammation and other physiological processes.
3. Phospholipase C (PLC): PLC hydrolyzes the phosphodiester bond in the headgroup of a glycerophospholipid, releasing diacylglycerol (DAG) and a soluble head group, such as inositol trisphosphate (IP3). DAG acts as a secondary messenger in intracellular signaling pathways, while IP3 mediates the release of calcium ions from intracellular stores.
4. Phospholipase D (PLD): PLD cleaves the phosphoester bond between the headgroup and the glycerol moiety of a glycerophospholipid, releasing phosphatidic acid (PA) and a free head group. PA is an important signaling molecule involved in various cellular processes, including membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell survival.

Phospholipases have diverse roles in normal physiology and pathophysiological conditions, such as inflammation, immunity, and neurotransmission. Dysregulation of phospholipase activity can contribute to the development of various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

Platelet aggregation is the clumping together of platelets (thrombocytes) in the blood, which is an essential step in the process of hemostasis (the stopping of bleeding) after injury to a blood vessel. When the inner lining of a blood vessel is damaged, exposure of subendothelial collagen and tissue factor triggers platelet activation. Activated platelets change shape, become sticky, and release the contents of their granules, which include ADP (adenosine diphosphate).

ADP then acts as a chemical mediator to attract and bind additional platelets to the site of injury, leading to platelet aggregation. This forms a plug that seals the damaged vessel and prevents further blood loss. Platelet aggregation is also a crucial component in the formation of blood clots (thrombosis) within blood vessels, which can have pathological consequences such as heart attacks and strokes if they obstruct blood flow to vital organs.

Group VI Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a subclass of the PLA2 family, which are enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group VI PLA2s are calcium-dependent enzymes that have been identified in various tissues, including the brain and testis. They play important roles in several biological processes, such as cell signaling, inflammation, and lipid metabolism.

Group VI PLA2s are further divided into two subgroups: Group VI A and Group VI B. The Group VI A subgroup includes the iPLA2-VIA (also known as PLA2G6) enzyme, which has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases and hereditary spastic paraplegia. On the other hand, the Group VI B subgroup includes the pancreatic-type PLA2 (also known as PLA2G1B) enzyme, which is primarily involved in digestion.

It's worth noting that while Group VI PLA2s have important physiological functions, they can also contribute to pathological conditions when their activity is dysregulated. For example, excessive activation of these enzymes has been linked to the development and progression of various inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and asthma.

Prostaglandin F (PGF) is a type of prostaglandin, which is a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects. Prostaglandin F is a naturally occurring compound that is produced in various tissues throughout the body, including the uterus, lungs, and kidneys.

There are two major types of prostaglandin F: PGF1α and PGF2α. These compounds play important roles in a variety of physiological processes, including:

* Uterine contraction: Prostaglandin F helps to stimulate uterine contractions during labor and childbirth. It is also involved in the shedding of the uterine lining during menstruation.
* Bronchodilation: In the lungs, prostaglandin F can help to relax bronchial smooth muscle and promote bronchodilation.
* Renal function: Prostaglandin F helps to regulate blood flow and fluid balance in the kidneys.

Prostaglandin F is also used as a medication to induce labor, treat postpartum hemorrhage, and manage some types of glaucoma. It is available in various forms, including injections, tablets, and eye drops.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Omega-6 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fats that are essential for human health. The "omega-6" designation refers to the location of a double bond in the chemical structure of the fatty acid. Specifically, the double bond is located six carbons from the omega end of the molecule.

Omega-6 fatty acids play important roles in the body, including supporting brain function, stimulating skin and hair growth, regulating metabolism, and maintaining the reproductive system. They are also involved in the production of hormones that regulate inflammation and blood clotting.

The most common omega-6 fatty acids found in the Western diet include linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA). LA is found in vegetable oils such as soybean, corn, and sunflower oil, while AA is found in animal products such as meat, poultry, and eggs.

While omega-6 fatty acids are essential for human health, it's important to maintain a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. A diet that is too high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in omega-3 fatty acids can contribute to chronic inflammation and increase the risk of heart disease, cancer, and other health problems. Therefore, it's recommended to consume omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in a ratio of 2:1 to 4:1.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Phospholipases A2, Cytosolic are a group of enzymes that are responsible for hydrolyzing the ester bond at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids, releasing free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. They are classified as a subtype of phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) and are located in the cytosolic fraction of the cell. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes such as membrane remodeling, signal transduction, and host defense mechanisms. They can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including calcium ions, hormones, and growth factors. Dysregulation of cytosolic PLA2s has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Prostaglandins H" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. Prostaglandins are a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects in the body. They play roles in various physiological processes, including inflammation, blood flow regulation, and labor induction, among others.

Prostaglandin H is an intermediate in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins through the cyclooxygenase pathway. However, it's not a final product or a commonly used term in medical definitions. If you have any specific questions about prostaglandins or their role in the body, I would be happy to help further clarify those topics for you!

Thromboxanes are a type of lipid compound that is derived from arachidonic acid, a type of fatty acid found in the cell membranes of many organisms. They are synthesized in the body through the action of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX).

Thromboxanes are primarily produced by platelets, a type of blood cell that plays a key role in clotting. Once formed, thromboxanes act as powerful vasoconstrictors, causing blood vessels to narrow and blood flow to decrease. They also promote the aggregation of platelets, which can lead to the formation of blood clots.

Thromboxanes are involved in many physiological processes, including hemostasis (the process by which bleeding is stopped) and inflammation. However, excessive production of thromboxanes has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, such as heart attacks, strokes, and pulmonary hypertension.

There are several different types of thromboxanes, including thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2). TXA2 is the most biologically active form and has a very short half-life, while TXB2 is a more stable metabolite that can be measured in the blood to assess thromboxane production.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are short-lived, biologically active lipid compounds derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid. They are intermediate products in the conversion of arachidonic acid to various prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are crucial regulators of numerous physiological processes, including inflammation, blood clotting, and vascular constriction or dilation.

The two major prostaglandin endoperoxides are PGG2 (prostaglandin G2) and PGH2 (prostaglandin H2). They are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the action of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX), which has two isoforms: COX-1 and COX-2. These endoperoxides can then be further metabolized into various prostaglandins and thromboxanes by specific synthases.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are highly reactive and unstable, with a half-life of only a few seconds to minutes. Due to their instability, they cannot accumulate in tissues and must be rapidly converted into more stable downstream products for biological activity. Despite their short lifespan, prostaglandin endoperoxides play essential roles in mediating various physiological responses and are also implicated in several pathological conditions, such as pain, fever, and inflammation.

Prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) is not a medical condition, but rather a chemical compound that acts as a precursor in the synthesis of other prostaglandins and thromboxanes. It is produced from arachidonic acid by the action of the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). PGH2 is then converted into various downstream prostanoids, such as PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2 (prostacyclin), and TXA2 (thromboxane A2), by specific synthases. These prostanoids have diverse biological activities, including regulation of inflammation, pain, fever, blood flow, and platelet aggregation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there seems to be a mistake in your question. Prostaglandins are a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormonal-like effects in the body. They are not typically classified by a letter "G."

Prostaglandin G is an intermediate compound formed during the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins through the cyclooxygenase pathway. It is not a type or subclass of prostaglandins that has distinct medical relevance or definition. Therefore, I'm unable to provide a specific medical definition for 'Prostaglandins G.'

If you have any other questions or need clarification on a different topic, please let me know!

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a potent prostanoid, a type of lipid compound derived from arachidonic acid. It is primarily produced and released by platelets upon activation during the process of hemostasis (the body's response to stop bleeding). TXA2 acts as a powerful vasoconstrictor, causing blood vessels to narrow, which helps limit blood loss at the site of injury. Additionally, it promotes platelet aggregation, contributing to the formation of a stable clot and preventing further bleeding. However, uncontrolled or excessive production of TXA2 can lead to thrombotic events such as heart attacks and strokes. Its effects are balanced by prostacyclin (PGI2), which is produced by endothelial cells and has opposing actions, acting as a vasodilator and inhibiting platelet aggregation. The balance between TXA2 and PGI2 helps maintain vascular homeostasis.

Alkane 1-monooxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of one oxygen atom from molecular oxygen to a alkane, resulting in the formation of an alcohol. This reaction also requires the cofactor NADH or NADPH and generates water as a byproduct.

The general reaction catalyzed by alkane 1-monooxygenase can be represented as follows:

R-CH3 + O2 + NAD(P)H + H+ -> R-CH2OH + H2O + NAD(P)+

where R represents an alkyl group.

This enzyme is found in various microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, and plays a crucial role in their ability to degrade hydrocarbons, including alkanes, which are major components of fossil fuels. Alkane 1-monooxygenase has potential applications in bioremediation and the production of biofuels from renewable resources.

Zymosan is a type of substance that is derived from the cell walls of yeast and some types of fungi. It's often used in laboratory research as an agent to stimulate inflammation, because it can activate certain immune cells (such as neutrophils) and cause them to release pro-inflammatory chemicals.

In medical terms, Zymosan is sometimes used as a tool for studying the immune system and inflammation in experimental settings. It's important to note that Zymosan itself is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a research reagent with potential applications in understanding human health and disease.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Pyrones" is not a medical term, but rather a chemical term used to describe a class of organic compounds known as lactones with a characteristic eight-membered ring. These compounds are found in various natural sources such as plants and fungi, and some have been studied for their potential biological activities.

However, if you meant "pyrexia" instead of "pyrones," then I can provide the medical definition:

Pyrexia is a term used to describe an abnormally elevated body temperature, also known as fever. In adults, a core body temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) or higher is generally considered indicative of pyrexia. Fever is often a response to an infection or inflammation in the body and can be part of the immune system's effort to combat pathogens.

Leukotriene A4 (LTA4) is a lipid mediator derived from arachidonic acid, which is released from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2. LTA4 is synthesized in the cell through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway and serves as an intermediate in the production of other leukotrienes (LB4, LTC4, LTD4, LTE4) that are involved in inflammation, bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of leukocytes.

Leukotriene A4 is an unstable compound with a short half-life, which can be converted to Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) by the enzyme LTA4 hydrolase or to Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) by the addition of glutathione through the action of LTC4 synthase. These leukotrienes play a significant role in the pathophysiology of asthma, allergies, and other inflammatory diseases.

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitors are substances that inhibit or block the activity of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that plays a role in inflammation. Phospholipase A2 is responsible for the breakdown of certain types of fat molecules called phospholipids, which are found in cell membranes. This breakdown releases fatty acids, including arachidonic acid, which can be further metabolized to produce pro-inflammatory signaling molecules called eicosanoids.

By inhibiting the activity of phospholipase A2, PLA2 inhibitors can help reduce the production of these inflammatory mediators and potentially decrease inflammation in the body. These inhibitors have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits in a variety of conditions associated with inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis, pancreatitis, and atherosclerosis. However, more research is needed to fully understand their safety and efficacy.

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream where they circulate and are able to move quickly to sites of infection or inflammation in the body. Neutrophils are capable of engulfing and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances through a process called phagocytosis. They are also involved in the release of inflammatory mediators, which can contribute to tissue damage in some cases. Neutrophils are characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm, which contain enzymes and other proteins that help them carry out their immune functions.

Thromboxane-A Synthase (TXA2S) is a medical term referring to an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the blood coagulation process. It is found in platelets, and its primary function is to convert arachidonic acid into thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator.

Thromboxane A2 causes platelets to clump together, which is essential for the formation of blood clots that can help prevent excessive bleeding after an injury. However, an overproduction of thromboxane A2 can lead to the development of blood clots in blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Therefore, Thromboxane-A Synthase is a vital enzyme in hemostasis (the process that stops bleeding), but its dysregulation can contribute to various cardiovascular diseases.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that plays a significant role in various inflammatory and immune responses. It is a powerful lipid signaling molecule released mainly by activated platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial cells, and other cell types during inflammation or injury.

PAF has a molecular structure consisting of an alkyl chain linked to a glycerol moiety, a phosphate group, and an sn-2 acetyl group. This unique structure allows PAF to bind to its specific G protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) on the surface of target cells, triggering various intracellular signaling cascades that result in cell activation, degranulation, and aggregation.

The primary functions of PAF include:

1. Platelet activation and aggregation: PAF stimulates platelets to aggregate, release their granules, and activate the coagulation cascade, which can lead to thrombus formation.
2. Neutrophil and monocyte activation: PAF activates these immune cells, leading to increased adhesion, degranulation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
3. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability: PAF can cause vasodilation by acting on endothelial cells, leading to an increase in blood flow and facilitating the extravasation of immune cells into inflamed tissues.
4. Bronchoconstriction: In the respiratory system, PAF can induce bronchoconstriction and recruitment of inflammatory cells, contributing to asthma symptoms.
5. Neurotransmission modulation: PAF has been implicated in neuroinflammation and may play a role in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive functions.

Dysregulated PAF signaling has been associated with several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Therefore, targeting the PAF pathway may provide therapeutic benefits in these diseases.

Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are a type of fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through diet. There are two main types of essential fatty acids: linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3).

Linoleic acid is found in foods such as vegetable oils, nuts, and seeds, while alpha-linolenic acid is found in foods such as flaxseeds, walnuts, and fatty fish. These essential fatty acids play important roles in the body, including maintaining the fluidity and function of cell membranes, producing eicosanoids (hormone-like substances that regulate various bodily functions), and supporting the development and function of the brain and nervous system.

Deficiency in essential fatty acids can lead to a variety of health problems, including skin disorders, poor growth and development, and increased risk of heart disease. It is important to maintain a balanced intake of both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, as excessive consumption of omega-6 relative to omega-3 has been linked to inflammation and chronic diseases.

Aspirin is the common name for acetylsalicylic acid, which is a medication used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX), which is involved in the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances that cause inflammation and pain. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet effect, which means it can help prevent blood clots from forming. This makes it useful for preventing heart attacks and strokes.

Aspirin is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and chewable tablets. It is also available in prescription strengths for certain medical conditions. As with any medication, aspirin should be taken as directed by a healthcare provider, and its use should be avoided in children and teenagers with viral infections due to the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that can affect the liver and brain.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Dinoprost is a synthetic form of prostaglandin F2α, which is a naturally occurring hormone-like substance in the body. It is used in veterinary medicine as a uterotonic agent to induce labor and abortion in various animals such as cows and pigs. In human medicine, it may be used off-label for similar purposes, but its use must be under the close supervision of a healthcare provider due to potential side effects and risks.

It is important to note that Dinoprost is not approved by the FDA for use in humans, and its availability may vary depending on the country or region. Always consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any medication, including Dinoprost.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fats that are essential for human health. The "omega-3" designation refers to the location of a double bond in the chemical structure of the fatty acid, specifically three carbon atoms from the end of the molecule.

There are three main types of omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). EPA and DHA are primarily found in fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, as well as in algae. ALA is found in plant sources, such as flaxseeds, chia seeds, walnuts, and some vegetable oils.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including reducing inflammation, lowering the risk of heart disease, improving brain function, and supporting eye health. They are also important for fetal development during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It is recommended that adults consume at least 250-500 milligrams of combined EPA and DHA per day, although higher intakes may be beneficial for certain conditions. ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA in the body, but this process is not very efficient, so it is important to consume preformed EPA and DHA from dietary sources or supplements.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Diacylglycerols (also known as diglycerides) are a type of glyceride, which is a compound that consists of glycerol and one or more fatty acids. Diacylglycerols contain two fatty acid chains bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. They are important intermediates in the metabolism of lipids and can be found in many types of food, including vegetable oils and dairy products. In the body, diacylglycerols can serve as a source of energy and can also play roles in cell signaling processes.

Microsomes are subcellular membranous vesicles that are obtained as a byproduct during the preparation of cellular homogenates. They are not naturally occurring structures within the cell, but rather formed due to fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during laboratory procedures. Microsomes are widely used in various research and scientific studies, particularly in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.

Microsomes are rich in enzymes, including the cytochrome P450 system, which is involved in the metabolism of drugs, toxins, and other xenobiotics. These enzymes play a crucial role in detoxifying foreign substances and eliminating them from the body. As such, microsomes serve as an essential tool for studying drug metabolism, toxicity, and interactions, allowing researchers to better understand and predict the effects of various compounds on living organisms.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Prostaglandins D" is not a recognized or established term in the field of medicine or physiology. Prostaglandins are a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects in the body. They are classified into several types based on their chemical structure and biological activity, including Prostaglandin D (PGD), but referring to "Prostaglandins D" as a single entity is not standard.

Prostaglandin D (PGD) itself is a type of prostaglandin that is rapidly converted to other compounds in the body and has been studied for its potential role in various physiological processes, such as inflammation, fever, and blood flow regulation. However, it's important to note that specific medical definitions or clinical uses related to "Prostaglandins D" are not well-established.

If you have any further questions or need more information about a specific aspect of prostaglandins or their role in the body, I would be happy to help!

Group II Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a class of enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. They are classified as one of the several groups of PLA2 based on their structure, function, and calcium dependence.

Group II PLA2s are secreted enzymes that require millimolar concentrations of calcium ions for their activity. They consist of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight ranging from 14 to 18 kDa. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes, including inflammation, host defense, and lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of Group II PLA2 activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that combines the separating power of gas chromatography with the identification capabilities of mass spectrometry. This method is used to separate, identify, and quantify different components in complex mixtures.

In GC-MS, the mixture is first vaporized and carried through a long, narrow column by an inert gas (carrier gas). The various components in the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase inside the column, leading to their separation based on their partition coefficients between the mobile and stationary phases. As each component elutes from the column, it is then introduced into the mass spectrometer for analysis.

The mass spectrometer ionizes the sample, breaks it down into smaller fragments, and measures the mass-to-charge ratio of these fragments. This information is used to generate a mass spectrum, which serves as a unique "fingerprint" for each compound. By comparing the generated mass spectra with reference libraries or known standards, analysts can identify and quantify the components present in the original mixture.

GC-MS has wide applications in various fields such as forensics, environmental analysis, drug testing, and research laboratories due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and ability to analyze volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

Phosphatidylinositols (PIs) are a type of phospholipid that are abundant in the cell membrane. They contain a glycerol backbone, two fatty acid chains, and a head group consisting of myo-inositol, a cyclic sugar molecule, linked to a phosphate group.

Phosphatidylinositols can be phosphorylated at one or more of the hydroxyl groups on the inositol ring, forming various phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs) with different functions. These signaling molecules play crucial roles in regulating cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and signal transduction pathways that control cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a prominent phosphoinositide involved in the regulation of ion channels, enzymes, and cytoskeletal proteins. Upon activation of certain receptors, PIP2 can be cleaved by the enzyme phospholipase C into diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), which act as second messengers to trigger downstream signaling events.

Lipid peroxides are chemical compounds that form when lipids (fats or fat-like substances) oxidize. This process, known as lipid peroxidation, involves the reaction of lipids with oxygen in a way that leads to the formation of hydroperoxides and various aldehydes, such as malondialdehyde.

Lipid peroxidation is a naturally occurring process that can also be accelerated by factors such as exposure to radiation, certain chemicals, or enzymatic reactions. It plays a role in many biological processes, including cell signaling and regulation of gene expression, but it can also contribute to the development of various diseases when it becomes excessive.

Examples of lipid peroxides include phospholipid hydroperoxides, cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides, and triglyceride hydroperoxides. These compounds are often used as markers of oxidative stress in biological systems and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and other conditions associated with oxidative damage.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Bradykinin is a naturally occurring peptide in the human body, consisting of nine amino acids. It is a potent vasodilator and increases the permeability of blood vessels, causing a local inflammatory response. Bradykinin is formed from the breakdown of certain proteins, such as kininogen, by enzymes called kininases or proteases, including kallikrein. It plays a role in several physiological processes, including pain transmission, blood pressure regulation, and the immune response. In some pathological conditions, such as hereditary angioedema, bradykinin levels can increase excessively, leading to symptoms like swelling, redness, and pain.

Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is an omega-6 fatty acid that the body derives from linoleic acid, another omega-6 fatty acid. It is found in small amounts in some plant-based oils such as evening primrose oil, borage oil, and black currant seed oil. GLA has been studied for its potential anti-inflammatory effects and has been suggested to help with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, eczema, and diabetic neuropathy. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential health benefits.

Fatty acid desaturases are enzymes that introduce double bonds into fatty acid molecules, thereby reducing their saturation level. These enzymes play a crucial role in the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, which are essential components of cell membranes and precursors for various signaling molecules.

The position of the introduced double bond is specified by the type of desaturase enzyme. For example, Δ-9 desaturases introduce a double bond at the ninth carbon atom from the methyl end of the fatty acid chain. This enzyme is responsible for converting saturated fatty acids like stearic acid (18:0) to monounsaturated fatty acids like oleic acid (18:1n-9).

In humans, there are several fatty acid desaturases, including Δ-5 and Δ-6 desaturases, which introduce double bonds at the fifth and sixth carbon atoms from the methyl end, respectively. These enzymes are essential for the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3).

Disorders in fatty acid desaturase activity or expression have been linked to various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and metabolic disorders. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of these enzymes is crucial for developing strategies to modulate fatty acid composition in cells and tissues, which may have therapeutic potential.

Lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) are a type of glycerophospholipids, which are major components of cell membranes. They are formed by the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholines, another type of glycerophospholipids, catalyzed by the enzyme phospholipase A2. LPCs contain a single fatty acid chain attached to a glycerol backbone and a choline headgroup.

In medical terms, LPCs have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell signaling, membrane remodeling, and inflammation. Elevated levels of LPCs have been found in several diseases, including cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. They can also serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions.

Phosphatidylcholines (PtdCho) are a type of phospholipids that are essential components of cell membranes in living organisms. They are composed of a hydrophilic head group, which contains a choline moiety, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. Phosphatidylcholines are crucial for maintaining the structural integrity and function of cell membranes, and they also serve as important precursors for the synthesis of signaling molecules such as acetylcholine. They can be found in various tissues and biological fluids, including blood, and are abundant in foods such as soybeans, eggs, and meat. Phosphatidylcholines have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their role in maintaining healthy lipid metabolism and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Epoxide hydrolases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides, which are molecules containing a three-membered ring consisting of two carbon atoms and one oxygen atom. This reaction results in the formation of diols, which are molecules containing two hydroxyl groups (-OH).

Epoxide hydrolases play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) and the metabolism of endogenous compounds. They help to convert toxic epoxides into less harmful products, which can then be excreted from the body.

There are two main types of epoxide hydrolases: microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). mEH is primarily responsible for metabolizing xenobiotics, while sEH plays a role in the metabolism of endogenous compounds such as arachidonic acid.

Impaired function or inhibition of epoxide hydrolases has been linked to various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, these enzymes are considered important targets for the development of drugs and therapies aimed at treating these conditions.

5-Lipoxygenase-activating proteins (FLAPs) are a type of enzyme found in the cell membrane that play a crucial role in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are lipid mediators involved in inflammation and immune responses. FLAPs activate 5-lipoxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, a precursor for other leukotrienes.

FLAP inhibitors are a class of drugs that block the activity of FLAPs and have been investigated as potential treatments for inflammatory diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. By inhibiting FLAP, these drugs can reduce the production of leukotrienes and other pro-inflammatory mediators, thereby alleviating the symptoms of inflammation and potentially slowing down the progression of related diseases.

Phosphatidic acids (PAs) are a type of phospholipid that are essential components of cell membranes. They are composed of a glycerol backbone linked to two fatty acid chains and a phosphate group. The phosphate group is esterified to another molecule, usually either serine, inositol, or choline, forming different types of phosphatidic acids.

PAs are particularly important as they serve as key regulators of many cellular processes, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and autophagy. They can act as signaling molecules by binding to and activating specific proteins, such as the enzyme phospholipase D, which generates second messengers involved in various signaling pathways.

PAs are also important intermediates in the synthesis of other phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol. They are produced by the enzyme diacylglycerol kinase (DGK), which adds a phosphate group to diacylglycerol (DAG) to form PA.

Abnormal levels of PAs have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of PAs is an active area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Cyclohexanones are organic compounds that consist of a cyclohexane ring (a six-carbon saturated ring) with a ketone functional group (-CO-) attached to it. The general structure is C6H11CO. They can be found in various natural sources, including essential oils and certain plants, but many cyclohexanones are also synthesized for use in the chemical industry.

Cyclohexanones are important intermediates in the production of various chemicals, such as nylon and other synthetic fibers, resins, and perfumes. One of the most common cyclohexanones is cyclohexanone itself, which is a colorless liquid with an odor reminiscent of peppermint or acetone. It is used in the production of adipic acid, a precursor to nylon.

Like other ketones, cyclohexanones can undergo various chemical reactions, such as reduction, oxidation, and condensation. However, due to the cyclic structure of cyclohexanones, they also exhibit unique reactivity patterns that are exploited in organic synthesis.

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Glycerides are esters formed from glycerol and one, two, or three fatty acids. They include monoglycerides (one fatty acid), diglycerides (two fatty acids), and triglycerides (three fatty acids). Triglycerides are the main constituents of natural fats and oils, and they are a major form of energy storage in animals and plants. High levels of triglycerides in the blood, also known as hypertriglyceridemia, can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Linolenic acids are a type of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that are essential to the human body, meaning they cannot be produced by the body and must be obtained through diet. There are two main types of linolenic acids: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid, and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an omega-6 fatty acid.

Alpha-linolenic acid is found in plant-based sources such as flaxseeds, chia seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts, and soybeans. It is a precursor to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), two other important omega-3 fatty acids that are found in fatty fish and are associated with numerous health benefits.

Gamma-linolenic acid is found in smaller amounts in certain plant-based oils such as borage oil, black currant seed oil, and evening primrose oil. It has been studied for its potential anti-inflammatory effects and may be beneficial for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, eczema, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS).

It is important to maintain a balance between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the diet, as excessive intake of omega-6 fatty acids can contribute to inflammation and chronic disease. ALA and GLA are both important components of a healthy diet and have been associated with numerous health benefits, including reduced inflammation, improved heart health, and reduced risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

Lipoxins are a group of naturally occurring, short-lived signaling molecules called eicosanoids that are derived from arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid. They were first discovered in the 1980s and are produced by cells involved in the inflammatory response, such as white blood cells (leukocytes).

Lipoxins have potent anti-inflammatory effects and play a crucial role in regulating and resolving the inflammatory response. They work by modulating the activity of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes, and promoting the resolution of inflammation through the activation of anti-inflammatory pathways.

Lipoxins have been shown to have potential therapeutic applications in a variety of inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is a type of essential fatty acid, which means that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through diet. It is an 18-carbon fatty acid with three cis double bonds, and its chemical formula is C18:3 n-3 or 9c,12c,15c-18:3.

ALA is one of the two essential omega-3 fatty acids, along with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). ALA is found in a variety of plant sources, including flaxseeds, chia seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts, soybeans, and some vegetable oils such as canola and soybean oil.

ALA is an important precursor to EPA and DHA, which have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including reducing inflammation, improving heart health, and supporting brain function. However, the conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA is limited in humans, and it is recommended to consume foods rich in EPA and DHA directly, such as fatty fish and fish oil supplements.

Medically speaking, a deficiency in ALA can lead to various health issues, including dry skin, hair loss, poor wound healing, and increased risk of heart disease. Therefore, it is important to include adequate amounts of ALA-rich foods in the diet to maintain optimal health.

Type C phospholipases, also known as group CIA phospholipases or patatin-like phospholipase domain containing proteins (PNPLAs), are a subclass of phospholipases that specifically hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids. They belong to the PNPLA family, which includes nine members (PNPLA1-9) with diverse functions in lipid metabolism and cell signaling.

Type C phospholipases contain a patatin domain, which is a conserved region of approximately 240 amino acids that exhibits lipase and acyltransferase activities. These enzymes are primarily involved in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, membrane remodeling, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA1 (adiponutrin) is mainly expressed in the liver and adipose tissue, where it plays a role in lipid droplet homeostasis and triglyceride hydrolysis. PNPLA2 (ATGL or desnutrin) is a key regulator of triglyceride metabolism, responsible for the initial step of triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipose tissue and other tissues.

PNPLA3 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 epsilon or iPLA2ε) is involved in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways. Mutations in PNPLA3 have been associated with an increased risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic liver disease, and hepatic steatosis.

PNPLA4 (lipase maturation factor 1 or LMF1) is involved in the intracellular processing and trafficking of lipases, such as pancreatic lipase and hepatic lipase. PNPLA5 ( Mozart1 or GSPML) has been implicated in membrane trafficking and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA6 (neuropathy target esterase or NTE) is primarily expressed in the brain, where it plays a role in maintaining neuronal integrity by regulating lipid metabolism. Mutations in PNPLA6 have been associated with neuropathy and cognitive impairment.

PNPLA7 (adiponutrin or ADPN) has been implicated in lipid droplet formation, triacylglycerol hydrolysis, and cell signaling pathways. Mutations in PNPLA7 have been associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD and hepatic steatosis.

PNPLA8 (diglyceride lipase or DGLα) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA9 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 gamma or iPLA2γ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA10 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 delta or iPLA2δ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA11 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 epsilon or iPLA2ε) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA12 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 zeta or iPLA2ζ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA13 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 eta or iPLA2η) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA14 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 theta or iPLA2θ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA15 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 iota or iPLA2ι) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA16 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 kappa or iPLA2κ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA17 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 lambda or iPLA2λ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA18 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 mu or iPLA2μ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA19 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 nu or iPLA2ν) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA20 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 xi or iPLA2ξ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA21 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 omicron or iPLA2ο) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA22 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 pi or iPLA2π) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA23 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 rho or iPLA2ρ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA24 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 sigma or iPLA2σ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA25 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 tau or iPLA2τ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA26 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 upsilon or iPLA2υ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA27 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 phi or iPLA2φ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA28 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 chi or iPLA2χ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA29 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 psi or iPLA2ψ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA30 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 omega or iPLA2ω) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA31 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 pi or iPLA2π) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA32 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 rho or iPLA2ρ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA33 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 sigma or iPLA2σ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, ar

Ionophores are compounds that have the ability to form complexes with ions and facilitate their transportation across biological membranes. They can be either organic or inorganic molecules, and they play important roles in various physiological processes, including ion homeostasis, signal transduction, and antibiotic activity. In medicine and research, ionophores are used as tools to study ion transport, modulate cellular functions, and as therapeutic agents, especially in the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections.

Linoleoyl-CoA desaturase (LCD) is an enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also known as delta-6 desaturase because it introduces a double bond into fatty acids at the delta-6 position. Specifically, LCD catalyzes the conversion of linoleoyl-CoA (a saturated fatty acid) to gamma-linolenoyl-CoA (an unsaturated fatty acid) by introducing a double bond between the sixth and seventh carbon atoms in the fatty acid chain.

LCD is an important enzyme in the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), which are essential for human health. LCPUFAs play critical roles in various physiological processes, including brain function, immune response, and inflammation. Since humans cannot synthesize linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid, we must obtain it from our diet, and LCD is necessary to convert this dietary linoleic acid into other LCPUFAs.

Deficiencies in LCD activity have been linked to various health conditions, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of LCD is an important area of research in nutrition and health.

Oxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of many natural products, as well as the detoxification and degradation of xenobiotics (foreign substances).

There are two main types of oxygenases: monooxygenases and dioxygenases. Monooxygenases introduce one atom of molecular oxygen into a substrate while reducing the other to water. An example of this type of enzyme is cytochrome P450, which is involved in drug metabolism and steroid hormone synthesis. Dioxygenases, on the other hand, incorporate both atoms of molecular oxygen into their substrates, often leading to the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds or the cleavage of existing ones.

It's important to note that while oxygenases are essential for many life-sustaining processes, they can also contribute to the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) during normal cellular metabolism. An imbalance in ROS levels can lead to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, which has been linked to various diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease.

Intramolecular oxidoreductases are a specific class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of electrons within a single molecule, hence the term "intramolecular." These enzymes are involved in oxidoreduction reactions, where one part of the molecule is oxidized (loses electrons) and another part is reduced (gains electrons). This process allows for the rearrangement or modification of functional groups within the molecule.

The term "oxidoreductase" refers to enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which are also known as redox reactions. These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy metabolism, detoxification, and biosynthesis.

It's important to note that intramolecular oxidoreductases should not be confused with intermolecular oxidoreductases, which catalyze redox reactions between two separate molecules.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are naturally occurring lipid compounds that play important roles as mediators in the body's inflammatory and physiological responses. They are intermediate products in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are synthesized by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2).

Synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides, on the other hand, are chemically synthesized versions of these compounds. They are used in medical research and therapeutic applications to mimic or inhibit the effects of naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides. These synthetic compounds can be used to study the mechanisms of prostaglandin action, develop new drugs, or as stand-in agents for the natural compounds in experimental settings.

It's important to note that while synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides can serve as useful tools in research and medicine, they also carry potential risks and side effects, much like their naturally occurring counterparts. Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and regulated to ensure safety and efficacy.

Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that specifically target and inhibit the COX-2 enzyme. This enzyme is responsible for the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever.

COX-2 inhibitors were developed to provide the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of NSAIDs without the gastrointestinal side effects associated with non-selective NSAIDs that inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. However, some studies have suggested an increased risk of cardiovascular events with long-term use of COX-2 inhibitors, leading to restrictions on their use in certain populations.

Examples of COX-2 inhibitors include celecoxib (Celebrex), rofecoxib (Vioxx, withdrawn from the market in 2004 due to cardiovascular risks), and valdecoxib (Bextra, withdrawn from the market in 2005 due to cardiovascular and skin reactions).

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Thromboxane receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a powerful inflammatory mediator and vasoconstrictor synthesized in the body from arachidonic acid. These receptors play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and modulation of immune responses.

There are two main types of thromboxane receptors: TPα and TPβ. The TPα receptor is primarily found on platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, while the TPβ receptor is expressed in various tissues such as the kidney, lung, and brain. Activation of these receptors by thromboxane A2 leads to a variety of cellular responses, including platelet activation and aggregation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation.

Abnormalities in thromboxane receptor function have been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and cancer. Therefore, thromboxane receptors are an important target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat these disorders.

Naphthalene is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with the formula C10H8. It is a white crystalline solid that is aromatic and volatile, and it is known for its distinctive mothball smell. In a medical context, naphthalene is primarily relevant as a potential toxin or irritant.

Naphthalene can be found in some chemical products, such as mothballs and toilet deodorant blocks. Exposure to high levels of naphthalene can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headaches. Long-term exposure has been linked to anemia and damage to the liver and nervous system.

In addition, naphthalene is a known environmental pollutant that can be found in air, water, and soil. It is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels and is also released from some industrial processes. Naphthalene has been shown to have toxic effects on aquatic life and may pose a risk to human health if exposure levels are high enough.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Thrombin is a serine protease enzyme that plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex series of biochemical reactions that leads to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) to prevent excessive bleeding during an injury. Thrombin is formed from its precursor protein, prothrombin, through a process called activation, which involves cleavage by another enzyme called factor Xa.

Once activated, thrombin converts fibrinogen, a soluble plasma protein, into fibrin, an insoluble protein that forms the structural framework of a blood clot. Thrombin also activates other components of the coagulation cascade, such as factor XIII, which crosslinks and stabilizes the fibrin network, and platelets, which contribute to the formation and growth of the clot.

Thrombin has several regulatory mechanisms that control its activity, including feedback inhibition by antithrombin III, a plasma protein that inactivates thrombin and other serine proteases, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), which inhibits the activation of factor Xa, thereby preventing further thrombin formation.

Overall, thrombin is an essential enzyme in hemostasis, the process that maintains the balance between bleeding and clotting in the body. However, excessive or uncontrolled thrombin activity can lead to pathological conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Endocannabinoids are naturally occurring compounds in the body that bind to cannabinoid receptors, which are found in various tissues and organs throughout the body. These compounds play a role in regulating many physiological processes, including appetite, mood, pain sensation, and memory. They are similar in structure to the active components of cannabis (marijuana), called phytocannabinoids, such as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). However, endocannabinoids are produced by the body itself, whereas phytocannabinoids come from the cannabis plant. The two most well-known endocannabinoids are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG).

Fish oils are a type of fat or lipid derived from the tissues of oily fish. They are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These fatty acids have been associated with various health benefits such as reducing inflammation, decreasing the risk of heart disease, improving brain function, and promoting eye health. Fish oils can be consumed through diet or taken as a dietary supplement in the form of capsules or liquid. It is important to note that while fish oils have potential health benefits, they should not replace a balanced diet and medical advice should be sought before starting any supplementation.

Unsaturated dietary fats are a type of fat that are primarily found in foods from plants. They are called "unsaturated" because of their chemical structure, which contains one or more double bonds in the carbon chain of the fat molecule. These double bonds can be either monounsaturated (one double bond) or polyunsaturated (multiple double bonds).

Monounsaturated fats are found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, while polyunsaturated fats are found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and vegetable oils. Unsaturated fats are generally considered to be heart-healthy, as they can help lower levels of harmful cholesterol in the blood and reduce the risk of heart disease.

It is important to note that while unsaturated fats are healthier than saturated and trans fats, they are still high in calories and should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine (fMLP) is not a medical condition, but rather a synthetic peptide that is often used in laboratory settings for research purposes. It is a formylated methionine residue linked to a leucine and phenylalanine tripeptide.

fMLP is a potent chemoattractant for certain types of white blood cells, including neutrophils and monocytes. When these cells encounter fMLP, they are stimulated to migrate towards the source of the peptide and release various inflammatory mediators. As such, fMLP is often used in studies of inflammation, immune cell function, and signal transduction pathways.

It's important to note that while fMLP has important research applications, it is not a substance that would be encountered or used in clinical medicine.

Lipoxygenases (LOX) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, forming hydroperoxides. These enzymes play a role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cancer. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found in animals, plants, and microorganisms. In humans, LOXs are involved in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes and lipoxins, which are important mediators of inflammation and resolution of inflammation, respectively.

Phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) are a type of phospholipid that are abundantly found in the cell membranes of living organisms. They play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and functionality of the cell membrane. PE contains a hydrophilic head, which consists of an ethanolamine group linked to a phosphate group, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. This unique structure allows PE to form a lipid bilayer, where the hydrophilic heads face outwards and interact with the aqueous environment, while the hydrophobic tails face inwards and interact with each other.

PE is also involved in various cellular processes, such as membrane trafficking, autophagy, and signal transduction. Additionally, PE can be modified by the addition of various functional groups or molecules, which can further regulate its functions and interactions within the cell. Overall, phosphatidylethanolamines are essential components of cellular membranes and play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis.

The seminal vesicles are a pair of glands located in the male reproductive system, posterior to the urinary bladder and superior to the prostate gland. They are approximately 5 cm long and have a convoluted structure with many finger-like projections called infoldings. The primary function of seminal vesicles is to produce and secrete a significant portion of the seminal fluid, which makes up the bulk of semen along with spermatozoa from the testes and fluids from the prostate gland and bulbourethral glands.

The secretion of the seminal vesicles is rich in fructose, which serves as an energy source for sperm, as well as various proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals that contribute to maintaining the optimal environment for sperm survival, nourishment, and transport. During sexual arousal and ejaculation, the smooth muscles in the walls of the seminal vesicles contract, forcing the stored secretion into the urethra, where it mixes with other fluids before being expelled from the body as semen.

Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is a type of prostaglandin, which is a group of lipid compounds that are derived enzymatically from arachidonic acid and have diverse hormone-like effects in various tissues. PGD2 is one of the most abundant prostaglandins produced in the human body and is primarily synthesized and released by activated mast cells, which are a type of immune cell found in various tissues throughout the body.

PGD2 has a wide range of biological activities, including vasodilation, bronchoconstriction, and modulation of immune responses. It also plays important roles in regulating sleep and wakefulness, as well as in the development of allergic inflammation and other inflammatory processes. PGD2 exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors, including the DP1 and CRTH2 receptors, which are expressed on various cell types throughout the body.

In addition to its role in normal physiological processes, PGD2 has also been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, including asthma, rhinitis, dermatitis, and certain types of cancer. As such, drugs that target the synthesis or action of PGD2 have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for these conditions.

Anthralin is a medication that is used to treat chronic plaque psoriasis. It is a synthetic form of a substance found in the bark of the araroba tree, which has been used traditionally in folk medicine to treat skin conditions. Anthralin works by slowing down the growth of skin cells, reducing inflammation, and helping to flake off scales.

Anthralin is available in various forms, including creams, ointments, and pastes, and is usually applied directly to the affected areas of the skin for a short period of time, typically ranging from 10 to 30 minutes, once or twice a day. It may take several weeks of regular use to see improvement in symptoms.

Anthralin can cause skin irritation, so it's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using this medication. You should also avoid applying anthralin to healthy skin and wash your hands thoroughly after each application to prevent accidentally transferring the medication to other parts of your body.

Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is commonly found in various natural oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and peanut oil. Its chemical formula is cis-9-octadecenoic acid, and it is a colorless liquid at room temperature with a slight odor. Oleic acid is an important component of human diet and has been shown to have various health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and improving immune function. It is also used in the manufacture of soaps, cosmetics, and other industrial products.

Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) often used for its analgesic (pain-relieving), antipyretic (fever-reducing), and anti-inflammatory effects. It works by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase, which is involved in the production of prostaglandins that cause inflammation and induce pain and fever. Ibuprofen is commonly used to alleviate symptoms of various conditions such as headaches, menstrual cramps, arthritis, mild fever, and minor aches and pains. It is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, suspensions, and topical creams or gels.

Prostaglandin antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play many roles in the body, including causing inflammation, promoting uterine contractions during labor and menstruation, and regulating blood flow in various tissues.

Prostaglandin antagonists are often used to treat conditions that involve excessive prostaglandin activity, such as:

* Pain and inflammation associated with arthritis or musculoskeletal injuries
* Migraines and other headaches
* Dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation)
* Preterm labor

Examples of prostaglandin antagonists include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib, as well as specific prostaglandin receptor antagonists such as misoprostol and telmisartan.

It's important to note that while prostaglandin antagonists can be effective in treating certain conditions, they can also have side effects and potential risks, so it's important to use them under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Isoprostanes are a type of prostaglandin-like compounds that are produced in the body through the free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid found in cell membranes. They are formed in situ on phospholipids and then released as free isoprostanes by the action of phospholipases.

Isoprostanes are chemically stable and can be measured in various biological fluids such as urine, blood, and breath to assess oxidative stress in the body. They have been used as biomarkers for lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage in several diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and respiratory diseases.

Isoprostanes can also activate various signaling pathways and contribute to the development of inflammation, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, and other physiological responses. Therefore, they play a significant role in the pathogenesis of several diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation.

Chromatography, gas (GC) is a type of chromatographic technique used to separate, identify, and analyze volatile compounds or vapors. In this method, the sample mixture is vaporized and carried through a column packed with a stationary phase by an inert gas (carrier gas). The components of the mixture get separated based on their partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases due to differences in their adsorption/desorption rates or solubility.

The separated components elute at different times, depending on their interaction with the stationary phase, which can be detected and quantified by various detection systems like flame ionization detector (FID), thermal conductivity detector (TCD), electron capture detector (ECD), or mass spectrometer (MS). Gas chromatography is widely used in fields such as chemistry, biochemistry, environmental science, forensics, and food analysis.

Nitrobenzenes are organic compounds that contain a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring. The chemical formula for nitrobenzene is C6H5NO2. It is a pale yellow, oily liquid with a characteristic sweet and unpleasant odor. Nitrobenzene is not produced or used in large quantities in the United States, but it is still used as an intermediate in the production of certain chemicals.

Nitrobenzenes are classified as toxic and harmful if swallowed, inhaled, or if they come into contact with the skin. They can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects such as damage to the nervous system and liver. Nitrobenzenes are also considered to be potential carcinogens, meaning that they may increase the risk of cancer with long-term exposure.

In a medical setting, nitrobenzene poisoning is rare but can occur if someone is exposed to large amounts of this chemical. Symptoms of nitrobenzene poisoning may include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, it can cause convulsions, unconsciousness, and even death. If you suspect that you or someone else has been exposed to nitrobenzenes, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

Inositol phosphates are a family of molecules that consist of an inositol ring, which is a six-carbon heterocyclic compound, linked to one or more phosphate groups. These molecules play important roles as intracellular signaling intermediates and are involved in various cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism.

Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), also known as phytic acid, is a form of inositol phosphate that is found in plant-based foods. IP6 has the ability to bind to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and iron, which can reduce their bioavailability in the body.

Inositol phosphates have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. For example, altered levels of certain inositol phosphates have been observed in cancer cells, suggesting that they may play a role in tumor growth and progression. Additionally, mutations in enzymes involved in the metabolism of inositol phosphates have been associated with several genetic diseases.

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that are an essential part of the immune system. They are large, specialized cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, as well as damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are found throughout the body, including in the bloodstream, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, and connective tissues. They play a critical role in inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair and remodeling.

Macrophages originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter the tissues, they differentiate into macrophages, which have a larger size and more specialized functions than monocytes. Macrophages can change their shape and move through tissues to reach sites of infection or injury. They also produce cytokines, chemokines, and other signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Macrophages have a variety of surface receptors that allow them to recognize and respond to different types of foreign substances and signals from other cells. They can engulf and digest foreign particles, bacteria, and viruses through a process called phagocytosis. Macrophages also play a role in presenting antigens to T cells, which are another type of immune cell that helps coordinate the immune response.

Overall, macrophages are crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis, defending against infection, and promoting wound healing and tissue repair. Dysregulation of macrophage function has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Membrane lipids are the main component of biological membranes, forming a lipid bilayer in which various cellular processes take place. These lipids include phospholipids, glycolipids, and cholesterol. Phospholipids are the most abundant type, consisting of a hydrophilic head (containing a phosphate group) and two hydrophobic tails (composed of fatty acid chains). Glycolipids contain a sugar group attached to the lipid molecule. Cholesterol helps regulate membrane fluidity and permeability. Together, these lipids create a selectively permeable barrier that separates cells from their environment and organelles within cells.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyunsaturated Alkamides" is not a widely recognized medical term or concept. It seems to be a combination of two different terms: "polyunsaturated" which relates to fatty acid chemistry, and "alkamides" which are a type of compound found in certain plants.

1. Polyunsaturated: This term refers to fatty acids that have multiple double bonds in their carbon chain. These fatty acids are essential to the human diet and are commonly found in foods like fish, nuts, and seeds. They are often referred to as Omega-3 or Omega-6 fatty acids.

2. Alkamides: These are a type of compound found in some plants, including Echinacea species. They have been studied for their potential biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects.

Without more context, it's difficult to provide a precise definition or medical interpretation of "Polyunsaturated Alkamides." If you have more information about how these terms are being used together, I'd be happy to try to provide a more specific answer.

Peroxides, in a medical context, most commonly refer to chemical compounds that contain the peroxide ion (O2−2). Peroxides are characterized by the presence of an oxygen-oxygen single bond and can be found in various substances.

In dentistry, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a widely used agent for teeth whitening or bleaching due to its oxidizing properties. It can help remove stains and discoloration on the tooth surface by breaking down into water and oxygen-free radicals, which react with the stain molecules, ultimately leading to their oxidation and elimination.

However, it is essential to note that high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide or prolonged exposure can cause tooth sensitivity, irritation to the oral soft tissues, and potential damage to the dental pulp. Therefore, professional supervision and appropriate concentration control are crucial when using peroxides for dental treatments.

Erucic acid is a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid, also known as cis-13-docosenoic acid. Its chemical formula is CH3(CH2)7CH=CH(CH2)11COOH. It is found in the seeds of members of the Brassica family of plants, including mustard, rapeseed, and turnip.

Erucic acid has been associated with certain health concerns, particularly in relation to heart function. As a result, many modern varieties of rapeseed have been bred to contain very low levels of erucic acid. These low-erucic acid varieties are used to produce canola oil, which is widely consumed and considered to be a healthy cooking oil.

It's worth noting that while erucic acid has been the subject of some concern in the past, more recent research suggests that it may not be as harmful as previously thought. However, it is still recommended that individuals consume erucic acid in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

"Mortierella" is a genus of fungi that belongs to the family Mortierellaceae. These fungi are widely distributed in various environments, including soil, decaying plant material, and animal manure. Some species of Mortierella are known to produce enzymes that can break down complex organic compounds, making them useful in industrial applications such as bioremediation and the production of biofuels.

In a medical context, some species of Mortierella have been reported to cause rare but serious infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections typically involve the skin, soft tissues, or lungs and can be difficult to diagnose and treat due to their rarity and non-specific symptoms.

It's worth noting that Mortierella infections are not common, and most people come into contact with these fungi without experiencing any negative health effects. However, if you suspect that you may have a Mortierella infection or any other type of fungal infection, it's important to seek medical attention promptly.

Plasmalogens are a type of complex lipid called glycerophospholipids, which are essential components of cell membranes. They are characterized by having a unique chemical structure that includes a vinyl ether bond at the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone and an ester bond at the sn-2 position, with the majority of them containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. The headgroup attached to the sn-3 position is typically choline or ethanolamine.

Plasmalogens are abundant in certain tissues, such as the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. They have been suggested to play important roles in cellular functions, including membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and protection against oxidative stress. Reduced levels of plasmalogens have been associated with various diseases, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and aging-related conditions.

Pyrazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a six-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 2. The chemical structure of pyrazoles consists of a pair of nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other in the ring, which makes them unique from other azole heterocycles such as imidazoles or triazoles.

Pyrazoles have significant biological activities and are found in various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and natural products. Some pyrazole derivatives exhibit anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer properties.

In the medical field, pyrazoles are used in various drugs to treat different conditions. For example, celecoxib (Celebrex) is a selective COX-2 inhibitor used for pain relief and inflammation reduction in arthritis patients. It contains a pyrazole ring as its core structure. Similarly, febuxostat (Uloric) is a medication used to treat gout, which also has a pyrazole moiety.

Overall, pyrazoles are essential compounds with significant medical applications and potential for further development in drug discovery and design.

Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a type of chromatography used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture. In TLC, the sample is applied as a small spot onto a thin layer of adsorbent material, such as silica gel or alumina, which is coated on a flat, rigid support like a glass plate. The plate is then placed in a developing chamber containing a mobile phase, typically a mixture of solvents.

As the mobile phase moves up the plate by capillary action, it interacts with the stationary phase and the components of the sample. Different components of the mixture travel at different rates due to their varying interactions with the stationary and mobile phases, resulting in distinct spots on the plate. The distance each component travels can be measured and compared to known standards to identify and quantify the components of the mixture.

TLC is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective technique that is widely used in various fields, including forensics, pharmaceuticals, and research laboratories. It allows for the separation and analysis of complex mixtures with high resolution and sensitivity, making it an essential tool in many analytical applications.

Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) is a type of lipid mediator called a cysteinyl leukotriene, which is derived from arachidonic acid through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. It is primarily produced by activated mast cells and basophils, and to a lesser extent by eosinophils, during an allergic response or inflammation.

LTC4 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases by causing bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, mucus secretion, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site of inflammation. It exerts its effects by binding to cysteinyl leukotriene receptors (CysLT1 and CysLT2) found on various cell types, including airway smooth muscle cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and immune cells.

LTC4 is rapidly metabolized to Leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and then to Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) by enzymes such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and dipeptidases, which are present in the extracellular space. These metabolites also have biological activity and contribute to the inflammatory response.

Inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase or leukotriene receptor antagonists are used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of asthma, allergies, and other inflammatory conditions.

Lipid metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down and utilizes lipids (fats) for various functions, such as energy production, cell membrane formation, and hormone synthesis. This complex process involves several enzymes and pathways that regulate the digestion, absorption, transport, storage, and consumption of fats in the body.

The main types of lipids involved in metabolism include triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and fatty acids. The breakdown of these lipids begins in the digestive system, where enzymes called lipases break down dietary fats into smaller molecules called fatty acids and glycerol. These molecules are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the liver, which is the main site of lipid metabolism.

In the liver, fatty acids may be further broken down for energy production or used to synthesize new lipids. Excess fatty acids may be stored as triglycerides in specialized cells called adipocytes (fat cells) for later use. Cholesterol is also metabolized in the liver, where it may be used to synthesize bile acids, steroid hormones, and other important molecules.

Disorders of lipid metabolism can lead to a range of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). These conditions may be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle habits, or a combination of both. Proper diagnosis and management of lipid metabolism disorders typically involves a combination of dietary changes, exercise, and medication.

Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, including cannabis. They are responsible for the distinctive aromas and flavors found in different strains of cannabis. Terpenes have been found to have various therapeutic benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial properties. Some terpenes may also enhance the psychoactive effects of THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It's important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential medical benefits and risks associated with terpenes.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Platelet activation is the process by which platelets (also known as thrombocytes) become biologically active and change from their inactive discoid shape to a spherical shape with pseudopodia, resulting in the release of chemical mediators that are involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. This process is initiated by various stimuli such as exposure to subendothelial collagen, von Willebrand factor, or thrombin during vascular injury, leading to platelet aggregation and the formation of a platelet plug to stop bleeding. Platelet activation also plays a role in inflammation, immune response, and wound healing.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

1-Acylglycerophosphocholine O-Acyltransferase is an enzyme that belongs to the family of transferases, specifically those acyltransferases transferring groups other than aminoacyl groups. It is responsible for catalyzing the reaction that transfers an acyl group from an acyl-CoA to the sn-2 position of 1-acylglycerophosphocholine, resulting in the formation of phosphatidylcholine, which is a major component of biological membranes. This enzyme plays a crucial role in lipid metabolism and has been implicated in various diseases, including atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer.

Stearic acid is not typically considered a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. It is a saturated fatty acid with the chemical formula C18H36O2. Stearic acid is commonly found in various foods such as animal fats and vegetable oils, including cocoa butter and palm oil.

In a medical context, stearic acid might be mentioned in relation to nutrition or cosmetics. For example, it may be listed as an ingredient in some skincare products or medications where it is used as an emollient or thickening agent. It's also worth noting that while stearic acid is a saturated fat, some studies suggest that it may have a more neutral effect on blood cholesterol levels compared to other saturated fats. However, this is still a topic of ongoing research and debate in the medical community.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Proadifen is not typically referred to as a medical term or definition in modern medicine. However, it is an old antihistamine drug that was used in the past for its properties as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). MAOIs were used primarily in the treatment of depression but have largely been replaced by newer classes of drugs due to their potential for serious side effects.

Here is a brief medical definition of Proadifen as an MAOI:

Proadifen (SKF-525A): An older, nonselective and irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) that was used in the past for its antidepressant effects. Its use has been largely discontinued due to the risk of serious adverse reactions, such as hypertensive crises, when combined with certain foods or medications containing tyramine.

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify the chemical components of a mixture or compound. It works by ionizing the sample, generating charged molecules or fragments, and then measuring their mass-to-charge ratio in a vacuum. The resulting mass spectrum provides information about the molecular weight and structure of the analytes, allowing for identification and characterization.

In simpler terms, mass spectrometry is a method used to determine what chemicals are present in a sample and in what quantities, by converting the chemicals into ions, measuring their masses, and generating a spectrum that shows the relative abundances of each ion type.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Virulence factors in Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, refer to the characteristics or components of the organism that contribute to its ability to cause disease. These virulence factors include:

1. Pertussis Toxin (PT): A protein exotoxin that inhibits the immune response and affects the nervous system, leading to the characteristic paroxysmal cough of whooping cough.
2. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin (ACT): A toxin that increases the levels of cAMP in host cells, disrupting their function and contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease.
3. Filamentous Hemagglutinin (FHA): A surface protein that allows the bacterium to adhere to host cells and evade the immune response.
4. Fimbriae: Hair-like appendages on the surface of the bacterium that facilitate adherence to host cells.
5. Pertactin (PRN): A surface protein that also contributes to adherence and is a common component of acellular pertussis vaccines.
6. Dermonecrotic Toxin: A toxin that causes localized tissue damage and necrosis, contributing to the inflammation and symptoms of whooping cough.
7. Tracheal Cytotoxin: A toxin that damages ciliated epithelial cells in the respiratory tract, impairing mucociliary clearance and increasing susceptibility to infection.

These virulence factors work together to enable Bordetella pertussis to colonize the respiratory tract, evade the host immune response, and cause the symptoms of whooping cough.

Acetophenones are organic compounds that consist of a phenyl group (a benzene ring with a hydroxyl group replaced by a hydrogen atom) bonded to an acetyl group (a carbonyl group bonded to a methyl group). The chemical structure can be represented as CH3COC6H5.

Acetophenones are aromatic ketones and can be found in essential oils of various plants, as well as in some synthetic fragrances. They have a characteristic sweet, fruity odor and are used in the perfume industry. In addition to their use as fragrances, acetophenones have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and analgesic effects. However, more research is needed before they can be considered safe and effective for medical use.

F2-isoprostanes are a type of prostaglandin-like compound that is formed in the body through the free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid found in cell membranes. They are produced in response to oxidative stress and are often used as a biomarker for lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage in various diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. F2-isoprostanes are chemically stable and can be measured in biological fluids such as blood, urine, and breath condensate. They have been shown to cause vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, and inflammation, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of various diseases.

Catechols are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzene ring with two hydroxyl groups (-OH) attached to it in the ortho position. The term "catechol" is often used interchangeably with "ortho-dihydroxybenzene." Catechols are important in biology because they are produced through the metabolism of certain amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, and are involved in the synthesis of various neurotransmitters and hormones. They also have antioxidant properties and can act as reducing agents. In chemistry, catechols can undergo various reactions, such as oxidation and polymerization, to form other classes of compounds.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Pertussis toxin is an exotoxin produced by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, which is responsible for causing whooping cough in humans. This toxin has several effects on the host organism, including:

1. Adenylyl cyclase activation: Pertussis toxin enters the host cell and modifies a specific G protein (Gαi), leading to the continuous activation of adenylyl cyclase. This results in increased levels of intracellular cAMP, which disrupts various cellular processes.
2. Inhibition of immune response: Pertussis toxin impairs the host's immune response by inhibiting the migration and function of immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages. It also interferes with antigen presentation and T-cell activation, making it difficult for the body to clear the infection.
3. Increased inflammation: The continuous activation of adenylyl cyclase by pertussis toxin leads to increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, contributing to the severe coughing fits and other symptoms associated with whooping cough.

Pertussis toxin is an essential virulence factor for Bordetella pertussis, and its effects contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of whooping cough. Vaccination against pertussis includes inactivated or genetically detoxified forms of pertussis toxin, which provide immunity without causing disease symptoms.

Second messenger systems are a type of intracellular signaling pathway that allows cells to respond to external signals, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. When an extracellular signal binds to a specific receptor on the cell membrane, it activates a G-protein or an enzyme associated with the receptor. This activation leads to the production of a second messenger molecule inside the cell, which then propagates the signal and triggers various intracellular responses.

Examples of second messengers include cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), inositol trisphosphate (IP3), diacylglycerol (DAG), and calcium ions (Ca2+). These second messengers activate or inhibit various downstream effectors, such as protein kinases, ion channels, and gene transcription factors, leading to changes in cellular functions, such as metabolism, gene expression, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis.

Second messenger systems play crucial roles in many physiological processes, including sensory perception, neurotransmission, hormonal regulation, immune response, and development. Dysregulation of these systems can contribute to various diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

Alkaloids are a type of naturally occurring organic compounds that contain mostly basic nitrogen atoms. They are often found in plants, and are known for their complex ring structures and diverse pharmacological activities. Many alkaloids have been used in medicine for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and therapeutic properties. Examples of alkaloids include morphine, quinine, nicotine, and caffeine.

Sulfonamides are a group of synthetic antibacterial drugs that contain the sulfonamide group (SO2NH2) in their chemical structure. They are bacteriostatic agents, meaning they inhibit bacterial growth rather than killing them outright. Sulfonamides work by preventing the bacteria from synthesizing folic acid, which is essential for their survival.

The first sulfonamide drug was introduced in the 1930s and since then, many different sulfonamides have been developed with varying chemical structures and pharmacological properties. They are used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and ear infections.

Some common sulfonamide drugs include sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (a combination of a sulfonamide and another antibiotic called trimethoprim). While sulfonamides are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can cause side effects such as rash, nausea, and allergic reactions. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Superoxides are partially reduced derivatives of oxygen that contain one extra electron, giving them an overall charge of -1. They are highly reactive and unstable, with the most common superoxide being the hydroxyl radical (•OH-) and the superoxide anion (O2-). Superoxides are produced naturally in the body during metabolic processes, particularly within the mitochondria during cellular respiration. They play a role in various physiological processes, but when produced in excess or not properly neutralized, they can contribute to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, potentially leading to the development of various diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders.

I apologize, but I am not able to provide a medical definition for "Egtazic Acid" because it is not a term that is recognized in the field of medicine or pharmacology. It is possible that you may have meant "Egтарic Acid," which also does not have a specific medical meaning, or "Ethylene Glycol Tetraacetic Acid (EGTA)," which is a chemical compound used in research and medicine for its ability to bind calcium ions. If you have any other questions, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Group V Phospholipases A2 (Group V PLA2s) are a subclass of the phospholipase A2 enzymes, which are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group V PLA2s are calcium-dependent cytosolic enzymes that play a role in inflammation, immunity, and cell signaling processes.

Group V PLA2s consist of three isoforms (Group VA,VB,VC) which are expressed in various tissues including the brain, lungs, and reproductive organs. They have been implicated in several pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and cancer.

In addition to their enzymatic activity, Group V PLA2s also have non-enzymatic functions, including acting as chaperone proteins, regulating gene expression, and modulating the activity of other signaling molecules. Further research is needed to fully understand the complex roles and mechanisms of Group V PLA2s in health and disease.

A kidney, in medical terms, is one of two bean-shaped organs located in the lower back region of the body. They are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the body by performing several crucial functions such as:

1. Regulation of water and electrolyte balance: Kidneys help regulate the amount of water and various electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and calcium in the bloodstream to maintain a stable internal environment.

2. Excretion of waste products: They filter waste products from the blood, including urea (a byproduct of protein metabolism), creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle tissue), and other harmful substances that result from normal cellular functions or external sources like medications and toxins.

3. Endocrine function: Kidneys produce several hormones with important roles in the body, such as erythropoietin (stimulates red blood cell production), renin (regulates blood pressure), and calcitriol (activated form of vitamin D that helps regulate calcium homeostasis).

4. pH balance regulation: Kidneys maintain the proper acid-base balance in the body by excreting either hydrogen ions or bicarbonate ions, depending on whether the blood is too acidic or too alkaline.

5. Blood pressure control: The kidneys play a significant role in regulating blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which constricts blood vessels and promotes sodium and water retention to increase blood volume and, consequently, blood pressure.

Anatomically, each kidney is approximately 10-12 cm long, 5-7 cm wide, and 3 cm thick, with a weight of about 120-170 grams. They are surrounded by a protective layer of fat and connected to the urinary system through the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Lipid peroxidation is a process in which free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), steal electrons from lipids containing carbon-carbon double bonds, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). This results in the formation of lipid hydroperoxides, which can decompose to form a variety of compounds including reactive carbonyl compounds, aldehydes, and ketones.

Malondialdehyde (MDA) is one such compound that is commonly used as a marker for lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation can cause damage to cell membranes, leading to changes in their fluidity and permeability, and can also result in the modification of proteins and DNA, contributing to cellular dysfunction and ultimately cell death. It is associated with various pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

The endothelium is the thin, delicate tissue that lines the interior surface of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels. It is a single layer of cells called endothelial cells that are in contact with the blood or lymph fluid. The endothelium plays an essential role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating blood flow, coagulation, platelet activation, immune function, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). It also acts as a barrier between the vessel wall and the circulating blood or lymph fluid. Dysfunction of the endothelium has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammation, and cancer.

Lipids are a broad group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents. They include fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E, and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Lipids serve many important functions in the body, including energy storage, acting as structural components of cell membranes, and serving as signaling molecules. High levels of certain lipids, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Mixed Function Oxygenases (MFOs) are a type of enzyme that catalyze the addition of one atom each from molecular oxygen (O2) to a substrate, while reducing the other oxygen atom to water. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of various endogenous and exogenous compounds, including drugs, carcinogens, and environmental pollutants.

MFOs are primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells and consist of two subunits: a flavoprotein component that contains FAD or FMN as a cofactor, and an iron-containing heme protein. The most well-known example of MFO is cytochrome P450, which is involved in the oxidation of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds such as steroids, fatty acids, and vitamins.

MFOs can catalyze a variety of reactions, including hydroxylation, epoxidation, dealkylation, and deamination, among others. These reactions often lead to the activation or detoxification of xenobiotics, making MFOs an important component of the body's defense system against foreign substances. However, in some cases, these reactions can also produce reactive intermediates that may cause toxicity or contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Aristolochic acids are a group of naturally occurring chemical compounds that are found in certain plants of the Aristolochiaceae family, including Aristolochia and Asarum species. These compounds have been identified as nephrotoxic (kidney-damaging) and carcinogenic (cancer-causing) agents in humans and animals.

Aristolochic acids are present in the roots, rhizomes, and fruits of these plants, and they have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, such as treating inflammation, pain, and gastrointestinal disorders. However, their use has been linked to severe kidney damage and upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (a type of kidney cancer) in humans.

The nephrotoxicity and carcinogenicity of aristolochic acids are believed to be due to their ability to form DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and chromosomal damage in the kidneys and other organs. As a result, the use of products containing aristolochic acids has been banned or restricted in many countries, and they are considered to be unsafe for human consumption.

Prostaglandin receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind and respond to prostaglandins, which are hormone-like lipid compounds that play important roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes in the body. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX) and are released by many different cell types in response to various stimuli.

There are four major subfamilies of prostaglandin receptors, designated as DP, EP, FP, and IP, each of which binds specifically to one or more prostaglandins with high affinity. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which means that they activate intracellular signaling pathways through the interaction with heterotrimeric G proteins.

The activation of prostaglandin receptors can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including changes in ion channel activity, enzyme activation, and gene expression. These responses can have important consequences for many physiological processes, such as inflammation, pain perception, blood flow regulation, and platelet aggregation.

Prostaglandin receptors are also targets for various drugs used in clinical medicine, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and prostaglandin analogs. NSAIDs work by inhibiting the enzymes that synthesize prostaglandins, while prostaglandin analogs are synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of natural prostaglandins by activating specific prostaglandin receptors.

In summary, prostaglandin receptors are a class of cell surface receptors that bind and respond to prostaglandins, which are important signaling molecules involved in various physiological processes. These receptors are targets for various drugs used in clinical medicine and play a critical role in the regulation of many bodily functions.

Enzyme induction is a process by which the activity or expression of an enzyme is increased in response to some stimulus, such as a drug, hormone, or other environmental factor. This can occur through several mechanisms, including increasing the transcription of the enzyme's gene, stabilizing the mRNA that encodes the enzyme, or increasing the translation of the mRNA into protein.

In some cases, enzyme induction can be a beneficial process, such as when it helps the body to metabolize and clear drugs more quickly. However, in other cases, enzyme induction can have negative consequences, such as when it leads to the increased metabolism of important endogenous compounds or the activation of harmful procarcinogens.

Enzyme induction is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology, as it can affect the efficacy and safety of drugs and other xenobiotics. It is also relevant to the study of drug interactions, as the induction of one enzyme by a drug can lead to altered metabolism and effects of another drug that is metabolized by the same enzyme.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Synthetic prostaglandins are human-made versions of prostaglandins, which are naturally occurring hormone-like substances in the body that play many roles in health and disease. Prostaglandins are produced in various tissues throughout the body and have diverse effects, such as regulating blood flow, promoting inflammation, causing muscle contraction or relaxation, and modulating pain perception.

Synthetic prostaglandins are developed to mimic the effects of natural prostaglandins and are used for therapeutic purposes in medical treatments. They can be chemically synthesized or derived from animal tissues. Synthetic prostaglandins have been used in various clinical settings, including:

1. Induction of labor: Synthetic prostaglandin E1 (dinoprostone) and prostaglandin E2 (misoprostol) are used to ripen the cervix and induce labor in pregnant women.
2. Abortion: Misoprostol is used off-label for early pregnancy termination, often in combination with mifepristone.
3. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric ulcers: Misoprostol is sometimes prescribed to protect the stomach lining from developing ulcers due to long-term NSAID use.
4. Treatment of postpartum hemorrhage: Synthetic prostaglandins like carboprost (15-methyl prostaglandin F2α) and dinoprostone are used to manage severe bleeding after childbirth.
5. Management of dysmenorrhea: Misoprostol is sometimes prescribed for the treatment of painful periods or menstrual cramps.
6. Treatment of erectile dysfunction: Alprostadil, a synthetic prostaglandin E1, can be used as an intracavernosal injection or urethral suppository to treat erectile dysfunction.

It is important to note that while synthetic prostaglandins mimic the effects of natural prostaglandins, they may also have additional or different properties and potential side effects. Therefore, their use should be under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Biological factors are the aspects related to living organisms, including their genes, evolution, physiology, and anatomy. These factors can influence an individual's health status, susceptibility to diseases, and response to treatments. Biological factors can be inherited or acquired during one's lifetime and can interact with environmental factors to shape a person's overall health. Examples of biological factors include genetic predisposition, hormonal imbalances, infections, and chronic medical conditions.

Group X Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a group of enzymes that belong to the larger family of PLA2 enzymes, which are responsible for hydrolyzing the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group X PLA2 enzymes selectively hydrolyze arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is a precursor for eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules involved in inflammation and other physiological processes.

Group X PLA2 enzymes are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, and play important roles in host defense, inflammation, and lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of Group X PLA2 activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is crucial for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), also known as free fatty acids (FFA), refer to fatty acid molecules that are not bound to glycerol in the form of triglycerides or other esters. In the bloodstream, NEFAs are transported while bound to albumin and can serve as a source of energy for peripheral tissues. Under normal physiological conditions, NEFA levels are tightly regulated by the body; however, elevated NEFA levels have been associated with various metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

Tandem pore domain potassium (K2P) channels are a subfamily of potassium channels that contain two pore-forming domains in a single polypeptide chain. These channels are also known as "double-barreled" or "leak" potassium channels because they provide a background leak conductance for potassium ions across the cell membrane. They are involved in regulating the resting membrane potential and excitability of cells, and are targets for various therapeutic agents. Examples of K2P channels include TREK, TRAAK, TASK, TWIK, and THIK families.

Meclofenamic acid is a type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, such as cyclooxygenase (COX), which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Meclofenamic acid is often used to treat a variety of conditions, including menstrual cramps, arthritis, and other types of musculoskeletal pain. It may also be used to reduce fever and relieve symptoms associated with colds and flu.

Like other NSAIDs, meclofenamic acid can have side effects, such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney or liver problems. It should be taken under the guidance of a healthcare provider, who can monitor for potential adverse effects and adjust the dosage accordingly.

A chemical stimulation in a medical context refers to the process of activating or enhancing physiological or psychological responses in the body using chemical substances. These chemicals can interact with receptors on cells to trigger specific reactions, such as neurotransmitters and hormones that transmit signals within the nervous system and endocrine system.

Examples of chemical stimulation include the use of medications, drugs, or supplements that affect mood, alertness, pain perception, or other bodily functions. For instance, caffeine can chemically stimulate the central nervous system to increase alertness and decrease feelings of fatigue. Similarly, certain painkillers can chemically stimulate opioid receptors in the brain to reduce the perception of pain.

It's important to note that while chemical stimulation can have therapeutic benefits, it can also have adverse effects if used improperly or in excessive amounts. Therefore, it's essential to follow proper dosing instructions and consult with a healthcare provider before using any chemical substances for stimulation purposes.

Eicosanoid receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind and respond to signaling molecules called eicosanoids. These receptors play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, blood clotting, and the regulation of blood pressure and flow.

Eicosanoids are derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids with 20 carbon atoms (hence "eicosa" in eicosanoid). They include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, and lipoxins.

Eicosanoid receptors are found on various cell types throughout the body, including immune cells, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and neurons. When an eicosanoid binds to its specific receptor, it triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression, cell behavior, or both.

There are several families of eicosanoid receptors, including prostaglandin receptors, thromboxane receptors, leukotriene receptors, and lipoxin receptors. Each family contains multiple subtypes with distinct pharmacological properties and physiological functions.

Understanding the role of eicosanoid receptors in health and disease has important implications for drug development and the treatment of various medical conditions, such as inflammation, pain, asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.

Phospholipases A2, Secretory (sPLA2s) are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. They are called "secretory" because they are secreted by various cells, such as inflammatory cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and epididymal cells, into the extracellular space or biological fluids.

sPLA2s are small enzymes with a molecular weight of approximately 14-18 kDa and contain a highly conserved calcium-binding site that is essential for their catalytic activity. They play important roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, host defense, lipid metabolism, and cell signaling.

Inflammation is one of the main biological functions of sPLA2s. They are rapidly released from activated immune cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, in response to various stimuli, including bacterial products, cytokines, and oxidative stress. Once secreted, sPLA2s can induce the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor (PAF), which contribute to the amplification and perpetuation of the inflammatory response.

Dysregulation of sPLA2 activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, acute pancreatitis, sepsis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, sPLA2s are considered potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of these disorders.

Phospholipase D is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine and other glycerophospholipids to produce phosphatidic acid and a corresponding alcohol. This reaction plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and lipid metabolism. There are several isoforms of Phospholipase D identified in different tissues and organisms, each with distinct regulatory mechanisms and functions. The enzyme's activity can be modulated by various factors such as calcium ions, protein kinases, and G proteins, making it a critical component in the regulation of cellular homeostasis.

Autacoids are endogenous substances that are released by various cells in the body and have a localized, hormone-like effect on nearby tissues. They include chemicals such as histamine, serotonin (5-HT), prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and bradykinin. Autacoids are involved in various physiological processes, including inflammation, pain perception, smooth muscle contraction, and blood vessel dilation or constriction. They often act as mediators of the immune response and can contribute to the symptoms of allergies, asthma, and other medical conditions.

Flurbiprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Flurbiprofen is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and topical creams or gels. It is used to treat a variety of conditions, such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, dental pain, and migraines.

Like other NSAIDs, flurbiprofen can cause side effects, such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney problems, especially when taken in high doses or for long periods of time. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

Tin compounds refer to chemical substances that contain tin (Sn) combined with one or more other elements. Tin can form various types of compounds, including oxides, sulfides, halides, and organometallic compounds. These compounds have different properties and uses depending on the other element(s) they are combined with.

For example:

* Tin (IV) oxide (SnO2) is a white powder used as an opacifying agent in glass and ceramics, as well as a component in some types of batteries.
* Tin (II) sulfide (SnS) is a black or brown solid used in the manufacture of some types of semiconductors.
* Tin (IV) chloride (SnCl4) is a colorless liquid used as a catalyst in the production of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and other plastics.
* Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are used as biocides and antifouling agents in marine paints. However, they have been found to be toxic to aquatic life and are being phased out in many countries.

Medical definitions generally do not include plant oils as a specific term. However, in a biological or biochemical context, plant oils, also known as vegetable oils, are defined as lipid extracts derived from various parts of plants such as seeds, fruits, and leaves. They mainly consist of triglycerides, which are esters of glycerol and three fatty acids. The composition of fatty acids can vary between different plant sources, leading to a range of physical and chemical properties that make plant oils useful for various applications in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Some common examples of plant oils include olive oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, and jojoba oil.

Isomerism is a term used in chemistry and biochemistry, including the field of medicine, to describe the existence of molecules that have the same molecular formula but different structural formulas. This means that although these isomers contain the same number and type of atoms, they differ in the arrangement of these atoms in space.

There are several types of isomerism, including constitutional isomerism (also known as structural isomerism) and stereoisomerism. Constitutional isomers have different arrangements of atoms, while stereoisomers have the same arrangement of atoms but differ in the spatial arrangement of their atoms in three-dimensional space.

Stereoisomerism can be further divided into subcategories such as enantiomers (mirror-image stereoisomers), diastereomers (non-mirror-image stereoisomers), and conformational isomers (stereoisomers that can interconvert by rotating around single bonds).

In the context of medicine, isomerism can be important because different isomers of a drug may have different pharmacological properties. For example, some drugs may exist as pairs of enantiomers, and one enantiomer may be responsible for the desired therapeutic effect while the other enantiomer may be inactive or even harmful. In such cases, it may be important to develop methods for producing pure enantiomers of the drug in order to maximize its efficacy and minimize its side effects.

Dietary fats, also known as fatty acids, are a major nutrient that the body needs for energy and various functions. They are an essential component of cell membranes and hormones, and they help the body absorb certain vitamins. There are several types of dietary fats:

1. Saturated fats: These are typically solid at room temperature and are found in animal products such as meat, butter, and cheese, as well as tropical oils like coconut and palm oil. Consuming a high amount of saturated fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and increase the risk of heart disease.
2. Unsaturated fats: These are typically liquid at room temperature and can be further divided into monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats, found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, can help lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol while maintaining levels of healthy HDL cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fats, found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and walnuts, have similar effects on cholesterol levels and also provide essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that the body cannot produce on its own.
3. Trans fats: These are unsaturated fats that have been chemically modified to be solid at room temperature. They are often found in processed foods such as baked goods, fried foods, and snack foods. Consuming trans fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and lower levels of healthy HDL cholesterol, increasing the risk of heart disease.

It is recommended to limit intake of saturated and trans fats and to consume more unsaturated fats as part of a healthy diet.

Hydrolysis is a chemical process, not a medical one. However, it is relevant to medicine and biology.

Hydrolysis is the breakdown of a chemical compound due to its reaction with water, often resulting in the formation of two or more simpler compounds. In the context of physiology and medicine, hydrolysis is a crucial process in various biological reactions, such as the digestion of food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Enzymes called hydrolases catalyze these hydrolysis reactions to speed up the breakdown process in the body.

Amidines are organic compounds that contain a functional group with the structure R-C=N-R, where R can be an alkyl or aromatic group. This functional group consists of a carbonyl (C=O) group and a nitrogen atom (N) connected to two organic groups (R).

In medical terminology, amidines are not commonly used. However, some amidine derivatives have been investigated for their potential therapeutic properties. For example, certain amidine compounds have shown antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. Some of these compounds have also been studied as potential drugs for the treatment of various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

It is important to note that while some amidines may have therapeutic potential, they can also be toxic at high concentrations and should be handled with care.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

Leukotriene antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of leukotrienes, which are chemicals released by the immune system in response to an allergen or irritant. Leukotrienes cause airway muscles to tighten and inflammation in the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing. By blocking the action of leukotrienes, leukotriene antagonists can help relieve these symptoms and improve lung function. These medications are often used to treat asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Examples of leukotriene antagonists include montelukast, zafirlukast, and pranlukast.

Coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, also known as CoA synthetases, are a class of enzymes that activate acyl groups, such as fatty acids and amino acids, by forming a thioester bond with coenzyme A. This activation is an essential step in various metabolic pathways, including fatty acid oxidation, amino acid catabolism, and the synthesis of several important compounds like steroids and acetylcholine.

CoA ligases catalyze the following reaction:

acyl group + ATP + CoA ↔ acyl-CoA + AMP + PP~i~

In this reaction, an acyl group (R-) from a carboxylic acid is linked to the thiol (-SH) group of coenzyme A through a high-energy thioester bond. The energy required for this activation is provided by the hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate (PP~i~).

CoA ligases are classified into three main types based on the nature of the acyl group they activate:

1. Acyl-CoA synthetases (or long-chain fatty acid CoA ligases) activate long-chain fatty acids, typically containing 12 or more carbon atoms.
2. Aminoacyl-CoA synthetases activate amino acids to form aminoacyl-CoAs, which are essential intermediates in the catabolism of certain amino acids.
3. Short-chain specific CoA ligases activate short-chain fatty acids (up to 6 carbon atoms) and other acyl groups like acetate or propionate.

These enzymes play a crucial role in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis, metabolism, and the synthesis of various essential biomolecules.

Propyl Gallate is a synthetic antioxidant used in the preservation of fats and oils, as well as cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Its chemical formula is C10H12O3, and it is structurally similar to other gallates such as octyl gallate and dodecyl gallate. Propyl Gallate works by scavenging free radicals and preventing the oxidation of lipids, thereby increasing the shelf life of products. It has been approved for use in food by regulatory agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), but its use is restricted to certain levels due to potential health concerns. Some studies have suggested that propyl gallate may have hormonal effects, genotoxicity, and carcinogenic potential, but more research is needed to confirm these findings.

Potassium channels are membrane proteins that play a crucial role in regulating the electrical excitability of cells, including cardiac, neuronal, and muscle cells. These channels facilitate the selective passage of potassium ions (K+) across the cell membrane, maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping action potentials. They are composed of four or six subunits that assemble to form a central pore through which potassium ions move down their electrochemical gradient. Potassium channels can be modulated by various factors such as voltage, ligands, mechanical stimuli, or temperature, allowing cells to fine-tune their electrical properties and respond to different physiological demands. Dysfunction of potassium channels has been implicated in several diseases, including cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Ionomycin is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound used in medical and biological research. Ionomycin is a type of ionophore, which is a molecule that can transport ions across cell membranes. Specifically, ionomycin is known to transport calcium ions (Ca²+).

In medical research, ionomycin is often used to study the role of calcium in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, and muscle contraction. It can be used to selectively increase intracellular calcium concentrations in experiments, allowing researchers to observe the effects on cell function. Ionomycin is also used in the study of calcium-dependent enzymes and channels.

It's important to note that ionomycin is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and narrow range of applications.

Free radicals are molecules or atoms that have one or more unpaired electrons in their outermost shell, making them highly reactive. They can be formed naturally in the body through processes such as metabolism and exercise, or they can come from external sources like pollution, radiation, and certain chemicals. Free radicals can cause damage to cells and contribute to the development of various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxidants are substances that can neutralize free radicals and help protect against their harmful effects.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Homosteroids" is not a recognized term in medical or scientific literature. It seems like there may be a misunderstanding or a typo in the term you're looking for. Steroids, however, are organic compounds that include several types of hormones and signaling molecules. If you have any other terms or concepts you would like me to explain, please let me know!

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Acylation is a medical and biological term that refers to the process of introducing an acyl group (-CO-) into a molecule. This process can occur naturally or it can be induced through chemical reactions. In the context of medicine and biology, acylation often occurs during post-translational modifications of proteins, where an acyl group is added to specific amino acid residues, altering the protein's function, stability, or localization.

An example of acylation in medicine is the administration of neuraminidase inhibitors, such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu), for the treatment and prevention of influenza. These drugs work by inhibiting the activity of the viral neuraminidase enzyme, which is essential for the release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Oseltamivir is administered orally as an ethyl ester prodrug, which is then hydrolyzed in the body to form the active acylated metabolite that inhibits the viral neuraminidase.

In summary, acylation is a vital process in medicine and biology, with implications for drug design, protein function, and post-translational modifications.

Thimerosal is a mercury-containing organic compound that has been used as a preservative in various pharmaceutical products, including vaccines, to prevent contamination by bacteria. It is metabolized or degraded into ethylmercury and thiosalicylate. Ethylmercury is an organomercurial compound that is less toxic than methylmercury and is excreted from the body more quickly. Thimerosal has been used in vaccines since the 1930s, and its use has been thoroughly studied and reviewed by regulatory agencies and health organizations worldwide. No evidence has been found to link thimerosal-containing vaccines to any harmful effects, except for minor reactions at the injection site. However, due to unfounded concerns about its safety, thimerosal was removed from or reduced in most childhood vaccines in the United States and other countries as a precautionary measure, starting in the late 1990s. Despite the removal of thimerosal from most vaccines, autism rates have not decreased, which supports the conclusion that thimerosal does not cause autism.

Vasodilation is the widening or increase in diameter of blood vessels, particularly the involuntary relaxation of the smooth muscle in the tunica media (middle layer) of the arteriole walls. This results in an increase in blood flow and a decrease in vascular resistance. Vasodilation can occur due to various physiological and pathophysiological stimuli, such as local metabolic demands, neural signals, or pharmacological agents. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, tissue perfusion, and thermoregulation.

Platelet aggregation inhibitors are a class of medications that prevent platelets (small blood cells involved in clotting) from sticking together and forming a clot. These drugs work by interfering with the ability of platelets to adhere to each other and to the damaged vessel wall, thereby reducing the risk of thrombosis (blood clot formation).

Platelet aggregation inhibitors are often prescribed for people who have an increased risk of developing blood clots due to various medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, stroke, or a history of heart attack. They may also be used in patients undergoing certain medical procedures, such as angioplasty and stenting, to prevent blood clot formation in the stents.

Examples of platelet aggregation inhibitors include:

1. Aspirin: A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that irreversibly inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase, which is involved in platelet activation and aggregation.
2. Clopidogrel (Plavix): A P2Y12 receptor antagonist that selectively blocks ADP-induced platelet activation and aggregation.
3. Prasugrel (Effient): A third-generation thienopyridine P2Y12 receptor antagonist, similar to clopidogrel but with faster onset and greater potency.
4. Ticagrelor (Brilinta): A direct-acting P2Y12 receptor antagonist that does not require metabolic activation and has a reversible binding profile.
5. Dipyridamole (Persantine): An antiplatelet agent that inhibits platelet aggregation by increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in platelets, which leads to decreased platelet reactivity.
6. Iloprost (Ventavis): A prostacyclin analogue that inhibits platelet aggregation and causes vasodilation, often used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.
7. Cilostazol (Pletal): A phosphodiesterase III inhibitor that increases cAMP levels in platelets, leading to decreased platelet activation and aggregation, as well as vasodilation.
8. Ticlopidine (Ticlid): An older P2Y12 receptor antagonist with a slower onset of action and more frequent side effects compared to clopidogrel or prasugrel.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to and are activated by the lipid mediator Leukotriene B4. There are two main types of LTB4 receptors, named BLT1 and BLT2.

BLT1 is highly expressed in cells of the immune system such as neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells, and it mediates many of the pro-inflammatory effects of LTB4, including chemotaxis, adhesion, and activation of these cells.

BLT2 is more widely expressed in various tissues, including the skin, lung, and intestine, and it has been shown to play a role in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as pain sensation, wound healing, and cancer progression.

Overall, LTB4 receptors are important targets for the development of therapies aimed at modulating inflammation and immune responses.

1. Thromboxane A2 Receptors: These are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds and responds to thromboxane A2 (TXA2), which is a powerful vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator hormone. They play a crucial role in hemostasis, blood clotting, and the regulation of vascular tone. These receptors are found in various tissues, including the cardiovascular system, lungs, kidneys, and central nervous system.

2. Thromboxane A2: This is a type of eicosanoid, derived from arachidonic acid, that acts as a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator. It is primarily produced by activated platelets during the blood clotting process and contributes to the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis. Thromboxane A2 has a very short half-life (approximately 30 seconds) due to its rapid conversion to the more stable thromboxane B2.

3. Prostaglandin H2: This is an intermediate compound in the synthesis of various prostanoids, including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and prostacyclins. It is produced from arachidonic acid via the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Prostaglandin H2 serves as a precursor for several downstream eicosanoids that have diverse biological activities, such as modulating inflammation, pain, fever, and vascular tone.

Lysophospholipids are a type of glycerophospholipid, which is a major component of cell membranes. They are characterized by having only one fatty acid chain attached to the glycerol backbone, as opposed to two in regular phospholipids. This results in a more polar and charged molecule, which can play important roles in cell signaling and regulation.

Lysophospholipids can be derived from the breakdown of regular phospholipids through the action of enzymes such as phospholipase A1 or A2. They can also be synthesized de novo in the cell. Some lysophospholipids, such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), have been found to act as signaling molecules that bind to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, survival, and migration.

Abnormal levels of lysophospholipids have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the biology of lysophospholipids has important implications for developing new therapeutic strategies.

I apologize, but "estrenes" is not a term commonly used in medical terminology in English. It may be a term used in another language or context. If you could provide more context or clarify what you are looking for, I would be happy to help further.

Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) is a biological mediator derived from the arachidonic acid pathway, which plays a significant role in the inflammatory response. It is a type of leukotriene that is synthesized from leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) via the action of enzymes such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and dipeptidases.

LTE4 is a potent bronchoconstrictor, meaning it can cause narrowing of the airways in the lungs, and it also has chemotactic properties that attract inflammatory cells such as eosinophils to sites of inflammation. It is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases, where it contributes to bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and mucus production.

LTE4 can be measured in urine as a biomarker of airway inflammation, particularly in patients with asthma. Increased levels of LTE4 in the urine have been associated with more severe asthma symptoms, poorer lung function, and increased risk of exacerbations.

N-Formylmethionine (fMet) is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term. It is the formylated derivative of methionine, which is one of the twenty standard amino acids, and it plays a crucial role in the initiation of protein synthesis in prokaryotes and organelles of eukaryotic cells, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts.

In the context of medical research or clinical laboratory reports, you might encounter fMet in relation to bacterial infections, proteomics, or mitochondrial function. For example, formylated methionine residues on bacterial peptides can stimulate immune responses and are recognized by specific receptors on human immune cells, which can have implications for understanding infectious diseases and inflammation.

To provide a concise definition:
N-Formylmethionine (fMet) is the formylated derivative of methionine, primarily known for its role as the initiator amino acid in protein synthesis in prokaryotes and certain organelles of eukaryotic cells.

Peritoneal macrophages are a type of immune cell that are present in the peritoneal cavity, which is the space within the abdomen that contains the liver, spleen, stomach, and intestines. These macrophages play a crucial role in the body's defense against infection and injury by engulfing and destroying foreign substances such as bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms.

Macrophages are large phagocytic cells that originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter tissue, they can differentiate into macrophages, which have a variety of functions depending on their location and activation state.

Peritoneal macrophages are involved in various physiological processes, including the regulation of inflammation, tissue repair, and the breakdown of foreign substances. They also play a role in the development and progression of certain diseases, such as cancer and autoimmune disorders.

These macrophages can be collected from animals or humans for research purposes by injecting a solution into the peritoneal cavity and then withdrawing the fluid, which contains the macrophages. These cells can then be studied in vitro to better understand their functions and potential therapeutic targets.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there isn't a specific type or classification of prostaglandins known as "Prostaglandins B." Prostaglandins are a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects in various tissues. They are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including inflammation, pain perception, fever, blood pressure regulation, and modulation of the reproductive system.

Prostaglandins are typically classified based on their chemical structure and the type of fatty acid they are derived from. The main groups include Prostaglandin A, B, D, E, F, and I series. Each group has different biological activities and functions in the body. If you have any more specific questions about prostaglandins or a related topic, feel free to ask!

Gene expression regulation, enzymologic refers to the biochemical processes and mechanisms that control the transcription and translation of specific genes into functional proteins or enzymes. This regulation is achieved through various enzymatic activities that can either activate or repress gene expression at different levels, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription factor activation, mRNA processing, and protein degradation.

Enzymologic regulation of gene expression involves the action of specific enzymes that catalyze chemical reactions involved in these processes. For example, histone-modifying enzymes can alter the structure of chromatin to make genes more or less accessible for transcription, while RNA polymerase and its associated factors are responsible for transcribing DNA into mRNA. Additionally, various enzymes are involved in post-transcriptional modifications of mRNA, such as splicing, capping, and tailing, which can affect the stability and translation of the transcript.

Overall, the enzymologic regulation of gene expression is a complex and dynamic process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment and maintain proper physiological function.

Miconazole is an antifungal medication used to treat various fungal infections, including those affecting the skin, mouth, and vagina. According to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database maintained by the National Library of Medicine, miconazole is classified as an imidazole antifungal agent that works by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes. By disrupting the structure and function of the fungal cell membrane, miconazole can help to kill or suppress the growth of fungi, providing therapeutic benefits in patients with fungal infections.

Miconazole is available in various formulations, including creams, ointments, powders, tablets, and vaginal suppositories, and is typically applied or administered topically or vaginally, depending on the site of infection. In some cases, miconazole may also be given intravenously for the treatment of severe systemic fungal infections.

As with any medication, miconazole can have side effects and potential drug interactions, so it is important to use it under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Common side effects of miconazole include skin irritation, redness, and itching at the application site, while more serious side effects may include allergic reactions, liver damage, or changes in heart rhythm. Patients should be sure to inform their healthcare provider of any other medications they are taking, as well as any medical conditions they have, before using miconazole.

Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE inhibitors) are a class of drugs that work by blocking the action of phosphodiesterase enzymes, which are responsible for breaking down cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), two crucial intracellular signaling molecules.

By inhibiting these enzymes, PDE inhibitors increase the concentration of cAMP and cGMP in the cells, leading to a variety of effects depending on the specific type of PDE enzyme that is inhibited. These drugs have been used in the treatment of various medical conditions such as erectile dysfunction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and heart failure.

Examples of PDE inhibitors include sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), vardenafil (Levitra) for erectile dysfunction, and iloprost, treprostinil, and sildenafil for pulmonary arterial hypertension. It's important to note that different PDE inhibitors have varying levels of selectivity for specific PDE isoforms, which can result in different therapeutic effects and side effect profiles.

Glycerophospholipids, also known as phosphoglycerides, are a major class of lipids that constitute the structural components of biological membranes. They are composed of a glycerol backbone to which two fatty acid chains and a phosphate group are attached. The phosphate group is esterified to an alcohol, typically choline, ethanolamine, serine, or inositol, forming what is called a phosphatidyl headgroup.

The chemical structure of glycerophospholipids allows them to form bilayers, which are essential for the formation of cell membranes and organelles within cells. The fatty acid chains, which can be saturated or unsaturated, contribute to the fluidity and permeability of the membrane. Glycerophospholipids also play important roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell recognition, and metabolism.

Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is commonly found in various natural oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and grapeseed oil. Its chemical formula is cis-9-octadecenoic acid, and it is a colorless liquid at room temperature. Oleic acid is an important component of human diet and has been shown to have potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and improving immune function. It is also used in the manufacture of soaps, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Prostanoic acids are a type of fatty acid that are produced naturally in the body as part of the prostaglandin metabolic pathway. They are derived from arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid, and are involved in various physiological processes such as inflammation, blood flow regulation, and platelet aggregation. Prostanoic acids include compounds such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), prostacyclin (PGI2), and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). These compounds act as signaling molecules, binding to specific receptors on the surface of cells and triggering a variety of cellular responses. They are synthesized and released by cells in response to various stimuli, such as injury or infection, and play important roles in the body's response to these stressors.

Staurosporine is an alkaloid compound that is derived from the bacterium Streptomyces staurosporeus. It is a potent and broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor, which means it can bind to and inhibit various types of protein kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC), cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and tyrosine kinases.

Protein kinases are enzymes that play a crucial role in cell signaling by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modulating their activity. The inhibition of protein kinases by staurosporine can disrupt these signaling pathways and lead to various biological effects, such as the induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death) and the inhibition of cell proliferation.

Staurosporine has been widely used in research as a tool to study the roles of protein kinases in various cellular processes and diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammation. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is limited due to its lack of specificity and high toxicity.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

NADPH oxidase is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various cell types. The primary function of NADPH oxidase is to catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADPH to molecular oxygen, resulting in the formation of superoxide radicals. This enzyme complex consists of several subunits, including two membrane-bound components (gp91phox and p22phox) and several cytosolic components (p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and rac1 or rac2). Upon activation, these subunits assemble to form a functional enzyme complex that generates ROS, which serve as important signaling molecules in various cellular processes. However, excessive or uncontrolled production of ROS by NADPH oxidase has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, such as cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

Imidazoles are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a double-bonded nitrogen atom and two additional nitrogen atoms in the ring. They have the chemical formula C3H4N2. In a medical context, imidazoles are commonly used as antifungal agents. Some examples of imidazole-derived antifungals include clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole. These medications work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes, leading to increased permeability and death of the fungal cells. Imidazoles may also have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anticancer properties.

Esterification is a chemical reaction that involves the conversion of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid into an ester, typically through the removal of a molecule of water. This reaction is often catalyzed by an acid or a base, and it is a key process in organic chemistry. Esters are commonly found in nature and are responsible for the fragrances of many fruits and flowers. They are also important in the production of various industrial and consumer products, including plastics, resins, and perfumes.

Epoxy compounds, also known as epoxy resins, are a type of thermosetting polymer characterized by the presence of epoxide groups in their molecular structure. An epoxide group is a chemical functional group consisting of an oxygen atom double-bonded to a carbon atom, which is itself bonded to another carbon atom.

Epoxy compounds are typically produced by reacting a mixture of epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A or other similar chemicals under specific conditions. The resulting product is a two-part system consisting of a resin and a hardener, which must be mixed together before use.

Once the two parts are combined, a chemical reaction takes place that causes the mixture to cure or harden into a solid material. This curing process can be accelerated by heat, and once fully cured, epoxy compounds form a strong, durable, and chemically resistant material that is widely used in various industrial and commercial applications.

In the medical field, epoxy compounds are sometimes used as dental restorative materials or as adhesives for bonding medical devices or prosthetics. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergic reactions to certain components of epoxy compounds, so their use must be carefully evaluated and monitored in a medical context.

Hydrazines are not a medical term, but rather a class of organic compounds containing the functional group N-NH2. They are used in various industrial and chemical applications, including the production of polymers, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. However, some hydrazines have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Exposure to high levels of hydrazines can be toxic and may cause damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system. Therefore, medical professionals should be aware of the potential health hazards associated with hydrazine exposure.

Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1 is a specific isoform of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system, which is involved in the metabolism of various xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. This enzyme is primarily located in the liver and to some extent in other organs such as the lungs, brain, and kidneys.

CYP2E1 plays a significant role in the metabolic activation of several procarcinogens, including nitrosamines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain solvents. It also contributes to the oxidation of various therapeutic drugs, such as acetaminophen, anesthetics, and anticonvulsants. Overexpression or induction of CYP2E1 has been linked to increased susceptibility to chemical-induced toxicity, carcinogenesis, and alcohol-related liver damage.

The activity of CYP2E1 can be influenced by various factors, including genetic polymorphisms, age, sex, smoking status, and exposure to certain chemicals or drugs. Understanding the regulation and function of this enzyme is crucial for predicting individual susceptibility to chemical-induced toxicities and diseases, as well as for optimizing drug therapy and minimizing adverse effects.

Linseed oil, also known as flaxseed oil, is not a medical term per se, but I can certainly provide you with some relevant information from a medical perspective.

Linseed oil is a type of drying oil that is derived from the seeds of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum). It is rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega-3 fatty acid, and has been used in various industrial and artisanal applications.

In the context of medicine and health, linseed oil is sometimes discussed for its potential health benefits due to its high ALA content. Some studies suggest that consuming a balanced diet with adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids may help support heart health, reduce inflammation, and promote brain function. However, it's essential to note that the overall scientific evidence is still limited, and more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and establish appropriate dosages.

Additionally, linseed oil should not be confused with linsed oil, a topical preparation used in traditional medicine for skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. Linsed oil typically contains a mixture of linseed oil, lead salts, and turpentine, which is not recommended due to the potential toxicity of lead.

Hydroxy acids are a class of chemical compounds that contain both a carboxylic acid group and a hydroxyl group. They are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetic products for their exfoliating, moisturizing, and anti-aging properties. The two main types of hydroxy acids used in skincare are alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) and beta-hydroxy acids (BHAs).

Alpha-hydroxy acids include compounds such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid. They work by breaking down the "glue" that holds dead skin cells together, promoting cell turnover and helping to improve the texture and tone of the skin. AHAs are also known for their ability to improve the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and age spots.

Beta-hydroxy acids, on the other hand, are primarily represented by salicylic acid. BHAs are oil-soluble, which allows them to penetrate deeper into the pores and exfoliate dead skin cells and excess sebum that can lead to clogged pores and acne breakouts.

It is important to note that hydroxy acids can cause skin irritation and sensitivity to sunlight, so it is recommended to use sunscreen and start with lower concentrations when first incorporating them into a skincare routine.

Sesterterpenes are a class of naturally occurring compounds derived from five units of isoprene, consisting of 25 carbon atoms. They are characterized by a unique carbon skeleton and can be found in various plants, fungi, and marine organisms. Some sesterterpenes have been identified to possess biological activities, such as antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, they are not widely studied or used in medical contexts compared to other classes of terpenes.

Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a type of cytokine, which are proteins that play a crucial role in cell signaling. Specifically, IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is involved in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses in the body. It is produced by various cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, in response to infection or injury.

IL-1 exists in two forms, IL-1α and IL-1β, which have similar biological activities but are encoded by different genes. Both forms of IL-1 bind to the same receptor, IL-1R, and activate intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the production of other cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory mediators.

IL-1 has a wide range of biological effects, including fever induction, activation of immune cells, regulation of hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells), and modulation of bone metabolism. Dysregulation of IL-1 production or activity has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, IL-1 is an important target for the development of therapies aimed at modulating the immune response and reducing inflammation.

Vasoconstrictor agents are substances that cause the narrowing of blood vessels by constricting the smooth muscle in their walls. This leads to an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in blood flow. They work by activating the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine that bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel walls, causing them to contract.

Vasoconstrictor agents are used medically for a variety of purposes, including:

* Treating hypotension (low blood pressure)
* Controlling bleeding during surgery or childbirth
* Relieving symptoms of nasal congestion in conditions such as the common cold or allergies

Examples of vasoconstrictor agents include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and epinephrine. It's important to note that prolonged use or excessive doses of vasoconstrictor agents can lead to rebound congestion and other adverse effects, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, which originates from the left ventricle of the heart and carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. It can be divided into several parts, including the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The ascending aorta gives rise to the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. The aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic, left common carotid, and left subclavian arteries, which supply blood to the head, neck, and upper extremities. The descending aorta travels through the thorax and abdomen, giving rise to various intercostal, visceral, and renal arteries that supply blood to the chest wall, organs, and kidneys.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Acyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an acyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to a hydrogen atom) from one molecule to another. This transfer involves the formation of an ester bond between the acyl group donor and the acyl group acceptor.

Acyltransferases play important roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of lipids, fatty acids, and other metabolites. They are also involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) by catalyzing the addition of an acyl group to these compounds, making them more water-soluble and easier to excrete from the body.

Examples of acyltransferases include serine palmitoyltransferase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of sphingolipids, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters between lipoproteins.

Acyltransferases are classified based on the type of acyl group they transfer and the nature of the acyl group donor and acceptor molecules. They can be further categorized into subclasses based on their sequence similarities, three-dimensional structures, and evolutionary relationships.

Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a chemical compound that plays a crucial role in energy transfer within cells. It is a nucleotide, which consists of a adenosine molecule (a sugar molecule called ribose attached to a nitrogenous base called adenine) and two phosphate groups.

In the cell, ADP functions as an intermediate in the conversion of energy from one form to another. When a high-energy phosphate bond in ADP is broken, energy is released and ADP is converted to adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which serves as the main energy currency of the cell. Conversely, when ATP donates a phosphate group to another molecule, it is converted back to ADP, releasing energy for the cell to use.

ADP also plays a role in blood clotting and other physiological processes. In the coagulation cascade, ADP released from damaged red blood cells can help activate platelets and initiate the formation of a blood clot.

Vasoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of blood vessels due to the contraction of the smooth muscle in their walls. This process decreases the diameter of the lumen (the inner space of the blood vessel) and reduces blood flow through the affected vessels. Vasoconstriction can occur throughout the body, but it is most noticeable in the arterioles and precapillary sphincters, which control the amount of blood that flows into the capillary network.

The autonomic nervous system, specifically the sympathetic division, plays a significant role in regulating vasoconstriction through the release of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Various hormones and chemical mediators, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and serotonin, can also induce vasoconstriction.

Vasoconstriction is a vital physiological response that helps maintain blood pressure and regulate blood flow distribution in the body. However, excessive or prolonged vasoconstriction may contribute to several pathological conditions, including hypertension, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases.

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a highly sensitive analytical technique used in clinical and research laboratories to measure concentrations of various substances, such as hormones, vitamins, drugs, or tumor markers, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues. The method relies on the specific interaction between an antibody and its corresponding antigen, combined with the use of radioisotopes to quantify the amount of bound antigen.

In a typical RIA procedure, a known quantity of a radiolabeled antigen (also called tracer) is added to a sample containing an unknown concentration of the same unlabeled antigen. The mixture is then incubated with a specific antibody that binds to the antigen. During the incubation period, the antibody forms complexes with both the radiolabeled and unlabeled antigens.

After the incubation, the unbound (free) radiolabeled antigen is separated from the antibody-antigen complexes, usually through a precipitation or separation step involving centrifugation, filtration, or chromatography. The amount of radioactivity in the pellet (containing the antibody-antigen complexes) is then measured using a gamma counter or other suitable radiation detection device.

The concentration of the unlabeled antigen in the sample can be determined by comparing the ratio of bound to free radiolabeled antigen in the sample to a standard curve generated from known concentrations of unlabeled antigen and their corresponding bound/free ratios. The higher the concentration of unlabeled antigen in the sample, the lower the amount of radiolabeled antigen that will bind to the antibody, resulting in a lower bound/free ratio.

Radioimmunoassays offer high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, making them valuable tools for detecting and quantifying low levels of various substances in biological samples. However, due to concerns about radiation safety and waste disposal, alternative non-isotopic immunoassay techniques like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have become more popular in recent years.

... is also a precursor to anandamide. Some arachidonic acid is converted into hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids ( ... it is uncertain if humans can in fact convert linoleic acid to arachidonic acid.) As little or no arachidonic acid is found in ... β-hydroxy β-methylbutyric acid (HMB), and phosphatidic acids. Arachidonic acid is one of the most abundant fatty acids in the ... but peanut oil does not contain any arachidonic acid. In chemical structure, arachidonic acid is a carboxylic acid with a 20- ...
... (5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 5-HPETE) is an intermediate in the metabolism of ... 5-Hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid and 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid; or c) the specialized pro-resolving mediators of inflammation, ... arachidonic acid by the ALOX5 enzyme in humans or Alox5 enzyme in other mammals. The intermediate is then further metabolized ... Fatty acids, All stub articles, Alkene stubs, Biochemistry stubs). ...
Arachidonic acid (AA) is a 20-carbon omega-6 essential fatty acid.[1] It sits at the head of the "arachidonic acid cascade," ... In the arachidonic acid cascade, dietary linoleic acid (18:2 ω-6) is desaturated and elongated to form arachidonic acid (and ... Daniele Piomelli Arachidonic Acid The arachidonic acid cascade proceeds somewhat differently in the brain. Neurohormones, ... Essential fatty acid Omega-3 fatty acid Omega-6 fatty acid Ratios of Omega 3 to Omega 6 in different foods Eicosanoid ...
The essential polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA C20H32O2; 20:4, n-6), formed by the synthesis from dietary ... "Arachidonic acid". pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2022-11-24. Holmes RS, Wright MW, Laulederkind SJ, Cox LA, Hosokawa M, ... linoleic acid (LA: C18H32O2 18:2, n-6), has a role as a human carboxylesterase inhibitor. The carboxylesterase family of ...
Eicosanoids act as neuromodulators via the Arachidonic acid cascade. Orexins (-A and -B) are involved in a number of cognitive ... "Arachidonic Acid". Neuropsychopharmacology: The Fifth Generation of Progress. Retrieved 2006-03-03. "Neurotrophic factors". ...
... (12-HETE) is a derivative of the 20 carbon polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, ... it metabolizes arachidonic acid to 12(R)-HpETE. Cytochrome P450 enzymes convert arachidonic acid to a variety of hydroperoxy, ... ALOX12 metabolizes arachidonic acid almost exclusively to 12(S)-hydroperoxy-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HpETE or ... Oliw, E. H. (1993). "Bis-Allylic hydroxylation of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid by human hepatic monooxygenases". ...
Arachidonic acid (AA) was identified as an ApoD ligand with a much better affinity than that of progesterone or pregnenolone. ... Morais Cabral JH, Atkins GL, Sánchez LM, López-Boado YS, López-Otin C, Sawyer L (June 1995). "Arachidonic acid binds to ... Kuehl FA, Jr; Egan, RW (28 November 1980). "Prostaglandins, arachidonic acid, and inflammation". Science. 210 (4473): 978-84. ... Other ApoD ligands include E-3-methyl-2-hexenoïc acid, a scent molecule present in body odor secretions; retinoic acid, which ...
... as it is an essential fatty acid. Linoleic acid (LA: C 18H 32O 2; 18:2, ω-6) is a precursor to arachidonic acid (AA: C 20H 32O ... It is a fatty acid sometimes denoted 18:2 (n-6) or 18:2 cis-9,12. A linoleate is a salt or ester of this acid. Linoleic acid is ... "Compound Summary: Linoleic acid". PubChem. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Linoleic acid MS Spectrum Fatty Acids: Methylene- ... Reduction of the carboxylic acid group of linoleic acid yields linoleyl alcohol. Linoleic acid is a surfactant with a critical ...
They metabolize the omega-6 fatty acids arachidonic acid, which possess four double bonds, to 8 different epoxide isomers which ... see 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid), i.e. 19-hydroxyhydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and/or 20-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid, take ... These tissues are known to metabolize arachidonic acid to EETs; it has been shown or is presumed that they also metabolize EPA ... 13-epoxides isomers termed coronaric acids or isoleukotoxins. They metabolize the omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid, ...
Capdevila, Jorge H.; Falck, John R. (1 November 2018). "Thematic Review Series: Living History of Lipids The arachidonic acid ... Roman, RJ (January 2002). "P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid in the control of cardiovascular function". Physiological ... Capdevila, JH; Falck, JR; Harris, RC (February 2000). "Cytochrome P450 and arachidonic acid bioactivation. Molecular and ... Cytochrome P-450 controlled stereoselectivity of the hepatic arachidonic acid epoxygenase". The Journal of Biological Chemistry ...
... arachidonic acid is produced through decomposition of the phospholipid cell membrane. This gives rise to the arachidonic acid ... List of saturated fatty acids Carboxylic acid List of carboxylic acids Dicarboxylic acid Simopoulos, Artemis P. (2002). "Omega‐ ... Cervonic acid (or docosahexaenoic acid) has 22 carbons, is found in fish oil, is a 4,7,10,13,16,19-hexa unsaturated fatty acid ... CAS Registry Number 20290-75-9. Arachidonic acid (arachidonic's) has 20 carbons, is present in animal visceral fat (brain, ...
These enzymes epoxidize the double bonds in arachidonic acid to form four regioisomers. Arachidonic acid is also the precursor ... There are epoxides of other lipids besides arachidonic acid such as the omega three docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ... Moghaddam M, Motoba K, Borhan B, Pinot F, Hammock BD (August 1996). "Novel metabolic pathways for linoleic and arachidonic acid ... Spector AA (April 2009). "Arachidonic acid cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway". J. Lipid Res. 50 Suppl (Suppl): S52-6. doi: ...
... arachidonic acid, to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); another CYP epoxygenase pathway metabolizes the 20-carbon omega-3 fatty ... see 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid), i.e. 19-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and/or 20-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid, take on ... These tissues are known to metabolize arachidonic acid to EETs; it has been shown or is presumed that they also metabolize DHA ... Spector, A. A. (2009). "Arachidonic acid cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway". The Journal of Lipid Research. 50 Suppl (Suppl ...
Arachidonic acid can then go on into the cyclooxygenase pathway (producing prostoglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGF2), prostacyclins ( ... It has been reported that the toxin activates the arachidonic acid cascade in isolated rat aorta. The toxin-induced contraction ... Piomelli, Daniele (1993-04-01). "Arachidonic acid in cell signaling" (PDF). Current Opinion in Cell Biology. 5 (2): 274-280. ... to platelet surface receptors can trigger the activation of phospholipase C to catalyze the release of arachidonic acid from ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. As of late 2007, 4 structures have been solved for this class of ... Enzymatic conversion into 5,6-dihydroxy-7,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid by mouse liver cytosolic epoxide hydrolase". J. Biol. ... "Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of leukotriene A4 hydrolase". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84 (19): 6677-81. Bibcode ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. As of late 2007, 3 structures have been solved for this class of ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. Watanabe K, Shimizu T, Iguchi S, Wakatsuka H, Hayashi M, Hayaishi O ( ...
... ω-6 fatty acids: gamma-linolenic acid or GLA (18:3n-6) dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid or DGLA (20:3n-6) arachidonic acid or AA (20 ... ω-3 fatty acid: α-linolenic acid or ALA (18:3n-3) ω-6 fatty acid: linoleic acid or LA (18:2n-6) These two fatty acids cannot be ... This role cannot be met by any ω-3 fatty acids or by arachidonic acid. The main physiological requirement for ω-6 fatty acids ... T]he turnover of essential fatty acids is increased (7). Arachidonic acid is one of the essential fatty acids affected. Kruger ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. Orning L (December 1987). "Omega-oxidation of cysteine-containing ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. As of late 2007, 3 structures have been solved for this class of ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. As of late 2007[update], 7 structures have been solved for this class ... On the other hand, tyrosine is an ideal proton donor at higher pH because of its pKa value (10.1). The type of amino acid that ... The primary structure of prostaglandin F synthase consists of 323 amino acid residues. The secondary structure consists of 17 α ... and amino acid sequence. In addition, it is categorized as C3 (AKR1C3) because it is an isoform of 3α-hydroxysteroid ...
arachidonic acid) than those of omega−3. However, in terms of heart health omega-6 fatty acids are less harmful than they are ... Omega−3 fatty acids, also called Omega−3 oils, ω−3 fatty acids or n−3 fatty acids, are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ... 3 fatty acids involved in human physiology are α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid ( ... Three omega−3 fatty acids are important in human physiology, α-linolenic acid (18:3, n-3; ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5, n- ...
Regulation of arachidonic acid metabolites in macrophages. J. Exp. Med. 152:324-335. 1982 With W. A. Scott, N. A. Pawlowski, H ... Regulation of arachidonic acid metabolism by macrophage activation. J. Exp. Med. 155:1148-1160. With W. C. Van Voorhis, G. ... Bacterial lipopolysaccharides prime macrophages for enhanced release of arachidonic acid metabolites. J. Exp. Med. 164:165-179 ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. It employs one cofactor, heme. Romano MC, Eckardt RD, Bender PE, ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. Sok DE, Kang JB, Shin HD (1988). "15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid ... H+ The 3 substrates of this enzyme are 15-Hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid (i.e. 15(S)-15-hydroxy-5,8,11-cis-13-trans- ...
Bundy GL, Nidy EG, Epps DE, Mizsak SA, Wnuk RJ (1986). "Discovery of an arachidonic acid C-8 lipoxygenase in the gorgonian ... This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. As of late 2007, only one structure has been solved for this class of ...
This enzyme participates in arachidonic acid metabolism. In March 2012 American scientists reported a discovery that shows this ...
... see 12-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, by a member of the 15-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, 15(S)-HETE (see ... 12-Hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT) as well as by three products of the 12-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid ... Eicosanoid receptor 12-Hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid 12-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid 15-Hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid ... Cabral M, Martín-Venegas R, Moreno JJ (Aug 2013). "Role of arachidonic acid metabolites on the control of non-differentiated ...
A further downstream event is activation of the arachidonic acid pathway. PGE2 release comes from the arachidonic acid pathway ... resulting in activation of the arachidonic acid pathway.[citation needed] Of these, IL-1β, TNF, and IL-6 are able to raise the ...
Leslie CC (2004). "Regulation of arachidonic acid availability for eicosanoid production". Biochem. Cell Biol. 82 (1): 1-17. ... 2006). "The LIFEdb database in 2006". Nucleic Acids Res. 34 (Database issue): D415-8. doi:10.1093/nar/gkj139. PMC 1347501. PMID ...
10E-trienoic acid, or 12(S)-HHTrE) is a 17 carbon metabolite of the 20 carbon polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. It ... 10-heptadecatrienoic acid as an arachidonic acid metabolite produced by human HL-60 leukemia cells". Biochemical Pharmacology. ... thromboxane synthase leads to the production of a broadly active arachidonic acid metabolite, TXA2, plus two other arachidonic ... 8E-heptadecadienoic acid (12-oxo-5Z,8E-heptadecadienoic acid) and 12-hydroxy-heptadecadienoic acid. Acidic conditions (pH~1.1- ...
Arachidonic acid is also a precursor to anandamide. Some arachidonic acid is converted into hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids ( ... it is uncertain if humans can in fact convert linoleic acid to arachidonic acid.) As little or no arachidonic acid is found in ... β-hydroxy β-methylbutyric acid (HMB), and phosphatidic acids. Arachidonic acid is one of the most abundant fatty acids in the ... but peanut oil does not contain any arachidonic acid. In chemical structure, arachidonic acid is a carboxylic acid with a 20- ...
I. The European patent 1 642 983 was maintained in amended form by the decision of the opposition division pronounced at the oral proceedings held on 11 June 2009.. II. Appeals were filed against this decision by the patent proprietor and by opponents 01 and 02. Opponent 03 had withdrawn its opposition on 4 July 2008 and is therefore not a party to the appeal proceedings.. III. The patent proprietor requested to set aside the decision under appeal and to maintain the patent as granted or on the basis of any of the auxiliary requests filed with the statement of grounds of appeal. The opponents requested that the decision under appeal be set aside and the patent be revoked. All appellants requested oral proceedings.. IV. With letter of 14 May 2014 the patent proprietor withdrew all of its previous requests, and stated that it did no longer approve the text in which the patent was granted and would not be filing a new text to replace the disapproved text.. ...
Arachidonic Acid*Calcium*Carbohydrates*Chloride*Docosahexaenoic Acid*Fat*Folic Acid*Iodine*Iron*Linoleic Acid*Linolenic Acid* ... Arachidonic Acid; Calcium; Carbohydrates; Chloride; Docosahexaenoic Acid; Fat; Folic Acid; Iodine; Iron; Linoleic Acid; ... Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)*Vitamin B6*Vitamin C*Vitamin D*Vitamin E*Vitamin H (Biotin)*Vitamin K1*Zinc. ... Pantothenic Acid); Vitamin B6; Vitamin C; Vitamin D; Vitamin E; Vitamin H (Biotin); Vitamin K1; Zinc. ...
Cargill is a supplier of Arachidonic Acid, or ARA, which is used to develop infant nutrition solutions. ... Arachidonic acid (ARA), used in conjunction with Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), represent a nutrient combination that is important ... Home/Products & Services/Food & Beverage/North America Food & Beverage Products/Health Promoting Ingredients / Arachidonic Acid ... For use in Europe, Cargill ARA oil complies with the specifications of the Arachidonic acid-rich oil from the fungus ...
Arachidonic Acid Market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report, By Form; By Source; By Application; By Region; Segment ... South America Arachidonic Acid Market - Growth, Trends, and Forecast (2018-2023). * Report ... Arachidonic Acid Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report by Form (Solid, Solvent), by Source (Plant, Animal), by ... Arachidonic Acid (ARA) Global Market Insights 2023, Analysis and Forecast to 2028, by Manufacturers, Regions, Technology, ...
Arachidonic acid (20:4(n-6)), which is released by cells responding to a wide range of stimuli, may play an important role in ... Arachidonic acid (20:4(n-6)), which is released by cells responding to a wide range of stimuli, may play an important role in ... Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by arachidonic acid in rat liver epithelial WB cells by a protein kinase C- ... In addition, fatty acids of the n-3 series were effective activators of MAPK. The present study, to our knowledge, is the first ...
The biochemical pathway product-precursor difference, arachidonic acid minus linoleic acid, was 31% and 13% greater for I/I and ... Basal plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid status was 8% greater in I/I compared to D/D individuals. ... selection on a regulatory insertion-deletion polymorphism in FADS2 influences apparent endogenous synthesis of arachidonic acid ... selection on a regulatory insertion-deletion polymorphism in FADS2 influences apparent endogenous synthesis of arachidonic acid ...
Inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism: effects on rat striatal dopamine release and uptake.. W A Cass, G Larson, F A ... Inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism: effects on rat striatal dopamine release and uptake.. W A Cass, G Larson, F A ... Inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism: effects on rat striatal dopamine release and uptake.. W A Cass, G Larson, F A ... In contrast, arachidonic acid (30 microM) produced no effects. In slices prelabeled with [3H]DA, exposure to BPB, U-73122 and ...
Macrophages, Tumor microenvironment, Arachidonic acid, TAM, IFNG, IFNB, IL6, Lipid rafts, IL12, ASK1, p38, HSP27, Actin ... Deregulation of signal transduction pathways in macrophages by arachidonic acid in the ovarian cancer microenvironment ...
Characterization of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism by Rat Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: The Involvement of CYP1As. Ahmed A. El-Sherbeni ... Characterization of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism by Rat Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: The Involvement of CYP1As ... Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes mediate arachidonic acid (AA) oxidation to several biologically active metabolites. Our aims in ... CYP2C11 produced epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) as 61.3%, and CYP2C6 produced midchain HETEs and EETs as 48.3 and 29.4%, ...
Effects of dietary arachidonic acid in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) distal intestine lipid classes and gut health. ... Effects of dietary arachidonic acid in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) distal intestine lipid classes and gut health. ... Rivero-Ramirez F, Torrecillas S, Betancor MB, Izquierdo MS, Caballero MJ & Montero D (2020) Effects of dietary arachidonic acid ... Aquaculture; Dicentrarchus labrax; Arachidonic acid; Gut polar lipids; Distal intestine; Gut health ...
Modification of serum fatty acids in preterm infants by parenteral lipids and enteral docosahexaenoic acid/arachidonic acid : A ... Modification of serum fatty acids in preterm infants by parenteral lipids and enteral docosahexaenoic acid/arachidonic acid : A ... Arachidonic acid, Docosahexaenoic acid, Extremely preterm infants, Intravenous lipid emulsion, LCPUFA, Parenteral nutrition. in ... Arachidonic acid; Docosahexaenoic acid; Extremely preterm infants; Intravenous lipid emulsion; LCPUFA; Parenteral nutrition}}, ...
Noticing the lack of fatty acids in media for the culture of cardiomyocytes derived from human pluri... , Find, read and cite ... Human heart changes its energetic substrates from lactate and glucose to fatty acids during the neonatal period. ... Effects of docosahexaenoic acid or arachidonic acid supplementation on the behavior of cardiomyocytes derived from human ... 2023). Effects of docosahexaenoic acid or arachidonic acid supplementation on the behavior of cardiomyocytes derived from human ...
While fatty acids play essential roles in the physiology of the myocardium, conventional culture media contain little lipid. We ...
... acids , organic acids and salts , carboxylic acids , fatty acids , long chain fatty acids , arachidonic acid ... acids , organic acids and salts , carboxylic acids , fatty acids , essential fatty acids , arachidonic acid ... organic acids and salts , carboxylic acids , fatty acids , unsaturated fatty acids , polyunsaturated fatty acids , arachidonic ... carboxylic acids , fatty acids , unsaturated fatty acids , polyunsaturated fatty acids , arachidonic acid ...
Fatty acid metabolism (Homo sapiens) * Arachidonic acid metabolism (Homo sapiens) * Synthesis of (16-20)- ... Metabolism of arachidonic acid to 20-hydroxy-5,8,11, 14-eicosatetraenoic acid by P450 enzymes in human liver: involvement of ... Several cytochrome P450s (CYPs) convert arachidonic acid to 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). The CYPs and their ... hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) (Homo sapiens) * Arachidonic acid is hydroxylated to 20-HETE by CYP(3) (Homo sapiens) ...
Angiotensin II activates cPLA2? and releases arachidonic acid from tissue phospholipids. immune Uncategorized Bay 65-1942 HCl, ... Angiotensin II activates cPLA2? and releases arachidonic acid from tissue phospholipids which mediate or modulate one or more ... activation most likely through the release of arachidonic acid and generation of eicosanoids with predominant pro-hypertensive ... For instance, recent researches showed that acid ceramidase, known as an important enzyme, which can regulate the levels of ...
Real Supplements gives you the best Arachidonic Acid on the market today. Our top-rated lists are fresh and current so you get ... 1 Arachidonic Acid (aka ARA)*1.1 Best Arachidonic Acid Products *1.2 Top 10 benefits of Arachidonic acid in the body*1.2.1 1. ... EPA Muscle , Phosphatidic Acid , Epicatechin , Arachidonic Acid , Wellsports *Contains Arachidonic Acid for muscle and strength ... EVOGANICA ARACHIDONIC Acid - 500 MGS Per Serving - 120 Servings *ARACHIDONIC Acid - 500 MGS Per Serving - 120 Servings - by ...
Arachidonic acid-d5 (Immunocytophyt-d5) is the deuterium labeled Arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid is an essential fatty acid ... We do not sell to patients.Arachidonic acid-d5CAS No. : 123167-26-0Biological Activity: ... 3-Hydroxyglutaric acid-d5;DPPC-d62;SDMA-d6;2-Mercaptobenzothiazole;N-Acetyl-L-glutamic acid-d5;(3R,5S)-3-Hydroxy Cotinine-d3; ... Biliverdin hydrochloride;D-Glucose-13C,d1-3;2,3-Diaminopropionic acid hydrochloride;Docosanoic acid-d3;Choline-d6 chloride; ...
Arachidonic acid is an essential omega-6 unsaturated fatty acid that is required by the body for the proper functioning of the ... Arachidonic acid is an essential, omega-6 unsaturated fatty acid that is required by the body for the proper functioning of the ... Arachidonic acid is safe to consume for active individuals, however, if you have cardiovascular issues or heart problems, you ... Arachidonic acid converts in to PGF2alpha and PGE2 post-workout and this helps to repair muscle tissue. ...
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... A. VOLTERRA. ... GLUTAMATE UPTAKE IS INHIBITED BY ARACHIDONIC ACID AND OXYGEN RADICALS VIA 2 DISTINCT AND ADDITIVE MECHANISMS / A. VOLTERRA, D. ... is inhibited by both arachidonic acid (AA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), via incompletely defined molecular mechanisms. ... is inhibited by both arachidonic acid (AA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), via incompletely defined molecular mechanisms. ...
FADS1 and arachidonic acid. by karsten , posted in: Genetic associations , The association of the FADS1 locus with arachidonic ... palmic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0) and oleic acid (C18:1) can be synthesized de novo in the human body. In the Kennedy ... Long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids have to be produced from the essential fatty acid linoleic acids (C18:2) in the omega-6 ... In particular, the concentrations of the direct product of FADS1, arachidonic acid as well as those of its lyso- ...
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  • Arachidonic acid is a precursor to a wide range of eicosanoids: The enzymes cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (i.e. prostaglandin G/H synthase 1 and 2 {PTGS1 and PTGS2}) convert arachidonic acid to prostaglandin G2 and prostaglandin H2, which in turn may be converted to various prostaglandins, to prostacyclin, to thromboxanes, and to the 17-carbon product of thromboxane metabolism of prostaglandin G2/H2, 12-Hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT). (wikipedia.org)
  • Inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism: effects on rat striatal dopamine release and uptake. (aspetjournals.org)
  • However, the results also suggest that certain inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism are relatively potent DA uptake blockers/releasers and that this action is unrelated to their inhibition of enzymes in the arachidonic acid cascade. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Although the pathways and products of arachidonic acid metabolism in mammalian cells have been intensely studied, the presence and function of pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism in helminthic parasites are largely undefined. (grantome.com)
  • Utilizing adults and microfilariae of the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi, this project will investigate the biochemical pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism in these filarial nematodes. (grantome.com)
  • Pathways of parasite metabolism of arachidonic acid to cyclooxygenase (e.g., prostaglandins) or lipoxygenase (e.g., leukotrienes) products will be defined utilizing reverse phase HPLC and radioimmunoassays. (grantome.com)
  • Possible actions of the antifilarial agent, diethylcarbamazine, on the pathways of parasite arachidonic acid metabolism will be determined. (grantome.com)
  • The FADS1 gene codes for the fatty acid delta-5 desaturase, a key enzyme in the metabolism of long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. (metabolomix.com)
  • Similarly, the negative association of the lyso-phosphatidylethanolamin PE a C10:0 can be considered a consequence of the overall changed balance in glycerophospholipid metabolism, since this metabolite can be produced from different phosphatidylethanolamines by abstraction of an arachidonic acid moiety. (metabolomix.com)
  • The synthesis or release of products of arachidonic acid metabolism following a stimulus as part of an inflammatory response, resulting in an increase in their intracellular or extracellular levels. (planteome.org)
  • These findings, confirming and extending earlier work from tumors and cell culture, suggest that the protective effect of aspirin and other NSAIDs in the development of human colon cancer may be mediated, at least in part, through their inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism by cyclooxygenase. (nih.gov)
  • Arachidonic acid (ARA), used in conjunction with Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), represent a nutrient combination that is important for infant development. (cargill.com)
  • 28 weeks of gestation (n = 204) receiving standard nutrition or daily enteral lipid supplementation with arachidonic acid (AA):docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (100:50 mg/kg/day). (lu.se)
  • Lipid Peroxidation of the Docosahexaenoic Acid/Arachidonic Acid Ratio Relating to the Social Behaviors of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Relationship with Ferroptosis. (bvsalud.org)
  • A phytanic acid-restricted diet and combination docosahexaenoic acid and cholic acid therapy may inhibit disease progression. (medscape.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility that arachidonic acid metabolites mediate D-2 dopamine (DA) receptor inhibition of striatal DA release. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Taken together, these results suggest that it is unlikely that arachidonic acid metabolites mediate the actions of release-modulating D-2 DA autoreceptors in the striatum. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes mediate arachidonic acid (AA) oxidation to several biologically active metabolites. (aspetjournals.org)
  • CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 produced ω -1→4 hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) as 88.7 and 62.7%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. (aspetjournals.org)
  • CYP2C11 produced epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) as 61.3%, and CYP2C6 produced midchain HETEs and EETs as 48.3 and 29.4%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. (aspetjournals.org)
  • This study reports the successive results of the effects of DHA or AA supplementation on hiPS-CM. In addition to the contractile force and mRNA measurements used in the previous study, we further investigated the effect of different cellular aggregations on the contractile force output by means of finite element analysis, measured glucose and fatty acids metabolites, and assessed cTNT and MLC2v expressions through immunofluorecsence evaluation. (techscience.com)
  • The potential roles of filarial parasite-derived arachidonic acid metabolites as mediators of pathogenicity and as modulators of host immunity will be examined. (grantome.com)
  • The association of the FADS1 locus with arachidonic acid and metabolites on its pathway is one of the loci with the strongest association signal and it is a prototype for a genetically influence metabotype (GIM). (metabolomix.com)
  • Leukotriene biosynthesis: direct chemical ionization mass spectrometry of underivatized arachidonic acid metabolites. (cdc.gov)
  • Arachidonic acid (AA, sometimes ARA) is a polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid 20:4(ω-6), or 20:4(5,8,11,14). (wikipedia.org)
  • Arachidonic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in the phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositides) of membranes of the body's cells, and is abundant in the brain, muscles, and liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skeletal muscle is an especially active site of arachidonic acid retention, accounting for roughly 10-20% of the phospholipid fatty acid content typically. (wikipedia.org)
  • see essential fatty acid interactions and the enzyme and metabolite linkages given in the previous paragraph for more details. (wikipedia.org)
  • ARA is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid [C20:4 (n-6)], naturally present in human mother's milk. (cargill.com)
  • Not only did incubation of WB cells with 20:4(n-6) result in the translocation of PKC alpha, delta, and epsilon to a particulate fraction, it was found that the fatty acid failed to activate MAPK in cells pretreated for 26 h with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which depleted WB cells of PKC alpha, delta and epsilon. (nih.gov)
  • We aimed to determine longitudinal serum fatty acid profiles in preterm infants and how the profiles are affected by enteral and parenteral lipid sources. (lu.se)
  • Overall, infants displayed common fatty acid trajectories over the study period. (lu.se)
  • However, remarkable differences in fatty acid patterns were observed depending on whether levels were expressed in relative or absolute units. (lu.se)
  • Further research is needed to establish optimal postnatal fatty acid supplementation and profiles in extremely preterm infants to promote development and long-term health. (lu.se)
  • Arachidonic acid is an essential fatty acid and a major constituent of biomembranes. (epigenetics-modulation-frontier.com)
  • Arachidonic acid is an essential, omega-6 unsaturated fatty acid that is required by the body for the proper functioning of the brain, liver and other organs. (mrsupps.com)
  • ARA is the primary fatty acid responsible for inflammation in muscle tissue. (elementnutraceuticals.com)
  • This 20-carbon omega-6 fatty acid resides in the cell membranes of our muscles, known as the sarcolemma. (elementnutraceuticals.com)
  • I should write here about the fatty acid cascade, prostaglandins, desaturation, saturate the article with scientific terms, but I consider such an approach inappropriate for two reasons. (healthytreatment.org)
  • Long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids have to be produced from the essential fatty acid linoleic acids (C18:2) in the omega-6 fatty acid synthesis pathway (top figure) and from alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3) in the omega-3 fatty acid synthesis pathway (not shown). (metabolomix.com)
  • In the Kennedy pathway, glycerol-phosphatidylcholins (PC) with different fatty acid side chains are then produced from two fatty acid moieties (bottom figure). (metabolomix.com)
  • In summary, we can conclude that the direction of all those associations can be explained by a modification in the efficiency of the fatty acid delta-5 desaturase reaction. (metabolomix.com)
  • Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 fatty acid that plays a vital role in the body's metabolic processes. (justsarms.com)
  • Arachidonic acid is an essential fatty acid that the body cannot produce on its own. (justsarms.com)
  • Global Arachidonic Acid Market is a crucial omega-6 fatty acid that plays a pivotal role in various physiological functions within the human body. (heyjinni.com)
  • Airway epithelial cells carry out their physiologic role in part by activating phospholipase-fatty acid oxygenation pathways. (wustl.edu)
  • Evaluation of RBC fatty acid content has become increasingly favored as a measure of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intake. (cdc.gov)
  • An omega-6 fatty acid (unsaturated fat) found in the outer layer of most cells in the body. (nutrition.ae)
  • Lipids are a very large family of non-homogenous compounds that typically consist of two hydrophobic, fatty acid tails, a glycerol backbone and a hydrophilic phosphate head. (sanbio.nl)
  • However, it does become essential if a deficiency in linoleic acid exists or if an inability to convert linoleic acid to arachidonic acid occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some mammals lack the ability or have a very limited capacity to convert linoleic acid to arachidonic acid, making it an essential part of their diets. (wikipedia.org)
  • As linoleic acid consumption does not seem to affect levels of arachidonic acid in plasma/serum or erythrocytes, it is uncertain if humans can in fact convert linoleic acid to arachidonic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biochemical pathway product-precursor difference, arachidonic acid minus linoleic acid, was 31% and 13% greater for I/I and I/D compared to D/D, respectively. (biorxiv.org)
  • It can be produced in the body by consuming significant amounts of linoleic acid, however, that becomes quite inconvenient, especially when limiting fat intake. (mrsupps.com)
  • A commercial source of arachidonic acid has been derived, however, from the fungus Mortierella alpina. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary source of arachidonic acid is microorganisms, fungi, and some marine organisms. (heyjinni.com)
  • From these results, it appears that the source of arachidonic acid supporting constitutive eicosanoid synthesis in BAEC is alkenylacyl phosphatidylethanolamine and that the limiting enzyme activity determining the rate of eicosanoid synthesis is a plasmalogen-specific phospholipase A 2 . (elsevierpure.com)
  • The South America arachidonic market was valued USD 28.16 million in 2016 and expected to reach 39.06 million USD by 2023 registering a CAGR of 5.5%, during the forecast period of 2018-2023. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • activation most likely through the release of arachidonic acid and generation of eicosanoids with predominant pro-hypertensive effects and activation of one or more signaling molecules including ERK1/2 and cSrc. (immune-source.com)
  • At the onset of acute hypoxia, eicosanoid synthesis by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) markedly decreases, reflecting a decreased release of arachidonic acid from endogenous stores. (elsevierpure.com)
  • However, the extraction and commercial production of arachidonic acid can be challenging, leading to limitations in the overall supply. (heyjinni.com)
  • The possibility that arachidonic acid transfer to PtdEtn subclasses is driven by distinct mechanisms is discussed. (torvergata.it)
  • In slices prelabeled with [3H]DA, exposure to BPB, U-73122 and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (a lipoxygenase inhibitor) significantly increased spontaneous outflow of tritium whereas the cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and indomethacin did not. (aspetjournals.org)
  • We are proud to offer PURE Arachidonic Acid without the useless fillers another brand uses. (thelipoguy.com.au)
  • There is 350mg of pure Arachidonic Acid per capsule. (thelipoguy.com.au)
  • There are 120 Capsules per bottle making this the best priced Pure Arachidonic Acid available. (thelipoguy.com.au)
  • One capsule of Enhanced Labs Arachidonic Acid contains 350mg of arachidonic acid. (realsupplements.net)
  • What is Enhanced Labs Arachidonic Acid? (nutrition.ae)
  • and releases arachidonic acid from tissue phospholipids which mediate or modulate one or more cardiovascular effects of angiotensin Bay 65-1942 HCl II and has been implicated in hypertension. (immune-source.com)
  • This enzyme releases arachidonic acid, the precursor of CysLTs, from the cell membranes, upon activation. (lu.se)
  • Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) are bioactive components of membrane phospholipids and serve as substrates for signaling molecules. (biorxiv.org)
  • Levels of 31 different fatty acids from serum phospholipids were determined by GC-MS and reported in relative (mol%) and absolute concentration (μmol l −1 ) units. (lu.se)
  • The ability of adults or microfilariae to incorporate 3H-arachidonic acid in vitro into parasite neutral and phospholipids has been assessed utilizing thin layer chromatography and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). (grantome.com)
  • The incorporation and redistribution of [1-14C]arachidonic acid in SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cell phospholipids were investigated. (torvergata.it)
  • and (b) triacylglycerols act as storage molecules for arachidonic acid which is subsequently incorporated into phospholipids. (torvergata.it)
  • The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE), which in turn converts to various leukotrienes (i.e., leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4, leukotriene D4, and leukotriene E4 as well as to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) which may then be further metabolized to 5-HETE's more potent 5-keto analog, 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) (also see 5-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • The enzyme 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX12) catalyzes oxidation of arachidonic acid to 12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HPETE), which may then be metabolized to 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and to hepoxilins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some arachidonic acid is converted into hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) by epoxygenase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several cytochrome P450s (CYPs) convert arachidonic acid to 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). (reactome.org)
  • Supplementation of essential fatty acids is necessary to cover the requirements of the different EFAs, including the ones belonging to the n-6 series, such as arachidonic acid (ARA). (stir.ac.uk)
  • A study published in the Journal of International Society of Sports Nutrition found that supplementation with arachidonic acid led to significant improvements in peak power output among resistance-trained men. (justsarms.com)
  • Given these benefits, it's clear that arachidonic acid can be a valuable addition to any fitness enthusiast's diet or supplementation routine. (justsarms.com)
  • ABSTRACT To examine whether dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids from Clupeonella grimmi can relieve symptoms of dysmenorrhoea, we carried out a cross-over clinical trial on 36 girls aged 18-22 years. (who.int)
  • In addition to being involved in cellular signaling as a lipid second messenger involved in the regulation of signaling enzymes, such as PLC-γ, PLC-δ, and PKC-α, -β, and -γ isoforms, arachidonic acid is a key inflammatory intermediate and can also act as a vasodilator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whenever you lift weights, the damaged muscle cells signal enzymes to flock towards the damaged tissue to free arachidonic acid from the intercellular membranes. (nutrition.ae)
  • For use in Europe, Cargill ARA oil complies with the specifications of the 'Arachidonic acid-rich oil from the fungus Mortierella alpina' as reported in the Union List of novel food. (cargill.com)
  • I'm writing about this because this topic begs to mention the dual role of some prostaglandins produced from arachidonic acid. (healthytreatment.org)
  • Arachidonic acid is a key player in this process as it is converted into prostaglandins - compounds that mediate this inflammatory response. (justsarms.com)
  • Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids , 70 (5), 449-53. (ed.ac.uk)
  • The freed arachidonic acid is used to create localized hormones called prostaglandins. (nutrition.ae)
  • Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor. (bvsalud.org)
  • Recent studies have shown that Arachidonic acid appears to help increase muscle mass and improve recovery as it increases the rate of protein synthesis in the body, especially post-workout. (mrsupps.com)
  • Adults can easily convert dietary fatty acids to ARA and DHA but that ability is incompletely developed in infants, leaving breast milk as their only natural source of ARA and DHA. (cargill.com)
  • Brazil is expected fueling the market of archidonic acid as the consumer looking for the healthy dietary supplement. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Rivero-Ramirez F, Torrecillas S, Betancor MB, Izquierdo MS, Caballero MJ & Montero D (2020) Effects of dietary arachidonic acid in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) distal intestine lipid classes and gut health. (stir.ac.uk)
  • The use of low fishmeal/fish oil in marine fish diets affects dietary essential fatty acids (EFAs) composition and concentration and, subsequently, may produce a marginal deficiency of those fatty acids with a direct impact on the fish intestinal physiology. (stir.ac.uk)
  • Arachidonic acid plays an essential role in the growth and repair of skeletal muscle tissue and works as an essential dietary component in the muscle hypertrophy process. (realsupplements.net)
  • As the demand for functional foods, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals continues to rise, arachidonic acid is likely to play a pivotal role in shaping the future of these industries. (heyjinni.com)
  • [ 8 ] A minor indication is failure of dietary management to reduce a high plasma phytanic acid level. (medscape.com)
  • This report presents dietary intake estimates for fats and fatty acids from the and cholesterol intakes in order to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2000, for the U.S. reduce one's risk of cardiovascular population. (cdc.gov)
  • Diets high in saturated fats and Examination Surveys (NHANES) and essential fatty acids from the diet, dietary cholesterol tend to raise blood provide information on the health and and aid in the absorption and transport cholesterol levels and increase a nutritional status of the civilian, of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids. (cdc.gov)
  • Dietary fat is often classified based encouraged to limit the amount of in 1999, the NHANES became a on the predominant types of fatty acids saturated fat and cholesterol in their continuous survey. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients with RD are unable to degrade phytanic acid because of a deficient activity of phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase (PhyH), a peroxisomal enzyme catalyzing the first step of phytanic acid alpha-oxidation. (medscape.com)
  • Pharmacological up-regulation of the omega-oxidation of phytanic acid may form the basis of the new treatment strategy for adult RD in the near future. (medscape.com)
  • Reuptake of glutamate in astrocytes, a critical mechanism involved in the maintenance of physiological excitatory amino acid neurotransmission, is inhibited by both arachidonic acid (AA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), via incompletely defined molecular mechanisms. (unimi.it)
  • NEARLY 2 MONTH SUPPLY - Each container of our Arachidonic Acid contains 150 capsules allowing you to experience its potential benefits for nearly 2 months if taken as directed. (realsupplements.net)
  • 4 capsules contains 1,400mg of Arachidonic Acid. (thelipoguy.com.au)
  • Enhanced Arachidonic Acid 120 Capsules Arachidonic Acid is a polyunsaturated fat that plays a role in the growth and repair of skeletal muscle tissue and is an essential component in the muscle. (bestpricenutrition.com)
  • Arachidonic acid is also a precursor to anandamide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) undergo lipid peroxidation and conversion into malondialdehyde (MDA). (bvsalud.org)
  • Results indicated that utilizing a routine dosage of Arachidonic Acid lead to greater lean body mass, increased strength, and power output compared to the placebo group. (realsupplements.net)
  • Researchers found that taking 1500mg of Arachidonic Acid over eight weeks increased lean body mass, strength, and peak power without any negatives. (realsupplements.net)
  • The enteral AA:DHA supplement increased the target fatty acids with little impact on other fatty acids. (lu.se)
  • SUPPORT MUSCLE & STRENGTH GAINS - Dorado Nutrition Arachidonic Acid is one of the newest and strongest muscle building support supplement available on the market. (realsupplements.net)
  • Arachidonic Acid is so powerful that its one of the only supplements recommended by the "Steroid Bible" as being comparable to Steroids while being a non hormonal supplement. (thelipoguy.com.au)
  • This means that you'll be seeing faster results which is why we developed our Arachidonic Acid supplement. (thelipoguy.com.au)
  • Link to all annotated objects annotated to arachidonic acid metabolite production involved in inflammatory response. (planteome.org)
  • The absolute concentration of total phospholipid fatty acids changed rapidly in the first weeks of life, peaking at day 3, median (Q1-Q3) 4452 (3645-5466) μmol l −1 , and was positively correlated to the intake of parenteral lipids. (lu.se)
  • Therefore, determining te factors that regulate arachidonic acid metabolismin airway epithelial cells is still a fundamental goal for unraveling the role of arachidonate products in airway function and for altering eicosanoid production in the airway. (wustl.edu)
  • Mechanisms of parasite incorporation of arachidonate will be further evaluated and compared with those for other saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. (grantome.com)
  • initially, phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) was poorly labelled, but at later stages it displayed the highest level of arachidonic acid incorporation, in comparison with other phospholipid classes. (torvergata.it)
  • The global arachidonic acid market has witnessed significant growth in recent years, driven by increasing awareness of its health benefits and its incorporation into various industries. (heyjinni.com)
  • Arachidonic acid (20:4(n-6)), which is released by cells responding to a wide range of stimuli, may play an important role in intracellular signaling. (nih.gov)
  • Human heart changes its energetic substrates from lactate and glucose to fatty acids during the neonatal period. (techscience.com)
  • Arachidonic acid converts in to PGF2alpha and PGE2 post-workout and this helps to repair muscle tissue. (mrsupps.com)
  • Arachidonic Acid is one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain and promotes the repair and growth of skeletal muscle tissue. (ibspot.com)
  • In low micromolar concentrations, BPB, U-73122 and nordihydroguaiaretic acid, but not aspirin and indomethacin, inhibited uptake of [3H]DA into striatal synaptosomes and binding of [3H]mazindol to the DA transporter. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The American Heart Association recommendation for those with no history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is to eat two fatty fish servings per week and for those with a history of CHD to consume 1 g/day of two omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid (Kris-Etherton, et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Arachidonic acid for signaling purposes appears to be derived by the action of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, 85 kDa), whereas inflammatory arachidonic acid is generated by the action of a low-molecular-weight secretory PLA2 (sPLA2, 14-18 kDa). (wikipedia.org)
  • The active ingredient in this product is Arachidonic Acid which has been clinically proven to work. (realsupplements.net)
  • WORKOUT PERFORMANCE & ENDURANCE - Help blast through workouts with 1500MG of Arachidonic Acid per serving. (realsupplements.net)
  • This suggests that arachidonic acid could help improve your strength and performance during high-intensity workouts such as weightlifting or sprinting. (justsarms.com)
  • By supplementing with arachidonic acid, you may be able to enhance this recovery process, reducing soreness and getting back into the gym faster after intense workouts. (justsarms.com)
  • Unlike competitors, we've made sure to use the clinically supported dosage as each serving of our Arachidone holds 1500mg of Arachidonic Acid. (realsupplements.net)
  • Arachidonic acid can also stimulate the production of testosterone in the body. (evolvedgenetics.com)
  • One of the primary benefits of arachidonic acid lies in its ability to stimulate muscle growth. (justsarms.com)
  • Arachidonic acid (AA) and Gamma linolenic acid have been shown to limit glioma cell growth, stimulate apoptosis and lipid peroxidation. (ed.ac.uk)
  • 2002). The Omega-3 Index is a measure of EPA (C20:5 n-3) and DHA (C22:6 n-3) in the blood, and expressed as a percent of 21 fatty acids, in specifically the red blood cell membranes (Harris, et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Esterified FA are hydrolyzed from washed RBC membranes using sequential treatment with mineral acid and base in the presence of heat. (cdc.gov)
  • The survival of all cells depends on fatty acids (FAs) that deliver energy supply and provide maintenance of the integrity of structural membranes. (frontiersin.org)
  • Here again, arachidonic acid proves beneficial due to its role in inflammation and healing processes. (justsarms.com)
  • Refsum disease (RD) is a neurocutaneous syndrome that is characterized biochemically by the accumulation of phytanic acid in plasma and tissues. (medscape.com)
  • Arachidonic acid is not one of the essential fatty acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The domesticated cat (felis catus) is a commonly-cited example of an obligate carnivore, as it is unable to desaturate essential fatty acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arachidonic acid is essential for the proper growth and development of animals, especially in poultry and aquaculture. (heyjinni.com)