A plant family of the order Arales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida (monocot). Many members contain OXALIC ACID and calcium oxalate (OXALATES).
A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain konjac glucomannan (MANNANS) and SEROTONIN.
A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. It has a stemless, tuberous root.
A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. As a houseplant it sometimes poisons children and animals.
A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.
A plant subclass of the class Liliopsida (monocotyledons) in the Chronquist classification system. This is equivalent to the Alismatales order in the APG classification system. It is a primitive group of more or less aquatic plants.
A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain acrid calcium oxalate and LECTINS. Polynesians prepare the root into poi. Common names of Taro and Coco Yam (Cocoyam) may be confused with other ARACEAE; XANTHOSOMA; or with common yam (DIOSCOREA).
A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain beta-glucosidases and trypsin inhibitors.
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.
Derivatives of OXALIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that are derived from the ethanedioic acid structure.
A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.
Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.
The calcium salt of oxalic acid, occurring in the urine as crystals and in certain calculi.
Substances or materials used in the course of housekeeping or personal routine.

Biosynthesis of L-ascorbic acid and conversion of carbons 1 and 2 of L-ascorbic acid to oxalic acid occurs within individual calcium oxalate crystal idioblasts. (1/90)

L-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various (14)C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of (14)C into calcium oxalate crystals. [(14)C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-(14)C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-(14)C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (L-[1-(14)C]galactose; D-[1-(14)C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, D-[1-(14)C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > L-galactose > D-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via D-mannose and L-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments.  (+info)

Interaction of sulfate assimilation with carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Lemna minor. (2/90)

Cysteine synthesis from sulfide and O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) is a reaction interconnecting sulfate, nitrogen, and carbon assimilation. Using Lemna minor, we analyzed the effects of omission of CO(2) from the atmosphere and simultaneous application of alternative carbon sources on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) and nitrate reductase (NR), the key enzymes of sulfate and nitrate assimilation, respectively. Incubation in air without CO(2) led to severe decrease in APR and NR activities and mRNA levels, but ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was not considerably affected. Simultaneous addition of sucrose (Suc) prevented the reduction in enzyme activities, but not in mRNA levels. OAS, a known regulator of sulfate assimilation, could also attenuate the effect of missing CO(2) on APR, but did not affect NR. When the plants were subjected to normal air after a 24-h pretreatment in air without CO(2), APR and NR activities and mRNA levels recovered within the next 24 h. The addition of Suc and glucose in air without CO(2) also recovered both enzyme activities, with OAS again influenced only APR. (35)SO(4)(2-) feeding showed that treatment in air without CO(2) severely inhibited sulfate uptake and the flux through sulfate assimilation. After a resupply of normal air or the addition of Suc, incorporation of (35)S into proteins and glutathione greatly increased. OAS treatment resulted in high labeling of cysteine; the incorporation of (35)S in proteins and glutathione was much less increased compared with treatment with normal air or Suc. These results corroborate the tight interconnection of sulfate, nitrate, and carbon assimilation.  (+info)

Fatty acid composition of Dracunculus vulgaris Schott (Araceae) seed oil from Turkey. (3/90)

Dracunculus vulgaris Schott is only one taxon of the genus Dracunculus (Araceae) in Turkey. The tubers and the fruits with the seeds of D. vulgaris have long been in use for the treatment of rheumatism and hemorrhoids, respectively. The fatty acid composition of D. vulgaris seeds have been analyzed as their methyl esters by GC and GC-mass spectrometry. C16:0, C16:1n-7, C18:1n-9, C18:1n-7 (cis -vaccenic acid), C18:2n-6 and 13-phenyl tridecanoic acids were found to be the main components in the seed oil.  (+info)

Identification of Streptomyces coelicolor proteins that are differentially expressed in the presence of plant material. (4/90)

Streptomyces coelicolor and Lemna minor were used as a model to study the modulation of bacterial gene expression during plant-streptomycete interactions. S. coelicolor was grown in minimal medium with and without L. minor fronds. Bacterial proteomes were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and a comparison of the two culture conditions resulted in identification of 31 proteins that were induced or repressed by the presence of plant material. One-half of these proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. The induced proteins were involved in energetic metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, oxidative phosphorylation), protein synthesis, degradation of amino acids, alkenes, or cellulose, tellurite resistance, and growth under general physiological or oxidative stress conditions. The repressed proteins were proteins synthesized under starvation stress conditions. These results suggest that root exudates provide additional carbon sources to the bacteria and that physiological adaptations are required for efficient bacterial growth in the presence of plants.  (+info)

Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells. (5/90)

The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation.  (+info)

Genetic relationships of Aglaonema species and cultivars inferred from AFLP markers. (6/90)

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Aglaonema is an important ornamental foliage plant genus, but genetic relationships among its species and cultivars have not been reported. This study analysed genetic relatedness of 54 cultivars derived from nine species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. METHODS: Initially, 48 EcoRI + 2/MseI + 3 primer set combinations were screened, from which six primer sets that showed clear scoreable and highly polymorphic fragments were selected and used for AFLP reactions. AFLP fragments were scored and entered into a binary data matrix as discrete variables. Jaccard's coefficient of similarity was calculated for all pair-wise comparisons among the 54 cultivars, and a dendrogram was constructed by the unweighted pair-group method using the arithmetic average (UPGMA). KEY RESULTS: The number of AFLP fragments generated per primer set ranged from 59 to 112 with fragment sizes varying from 50 to 565 bp. A total of 449 AFLP fragments was detected, of which 314 were polymorphic (70 %). All cultivars were clearly differentiated by their AFLP fingerprints. The 54 cultivars were divided into seven clusters; cultivars within each cluster generally share similar morphological characteristics. Cluster I contains 35 cultivars, most of them are interspecific hybrids developed mainly from A. commutatum, A. crispum or A. nitidum. However, Jaccard's similarity coefficients among these hybrids are 0.84 or higher, suggesting that these popular hybrid cultivars are genetically much closer than previously thought. This genetic similarity may imply that A. nitidum and A. crispum are likely progenitors of A. commutatum. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study demonstrate the efficiency and ease of using AFLP markers for investigating genetic relationships of ornamental foliage plants, a group usually propagated vegetatively. The AFLP markers developed will help future Aglaonema cultivar identification, germplasm conservation and new cultivar development.  (+info)

Effects of a PAL inhibitor on phenolic accumulation and UV-B tolerance in Spirodela intermedia (Koch.). (7/90)

Duckweed (Spirodela intermedia) was grown axenically on 1/2 strength Hutner's nutrient solution plus 1% sucrose, with the l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) inhibitor 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP) at 0.0, 0.05, or 10 microM, at constant 25 degrees C and a light intensity of 300 micromol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation from CW fluorescent lamps. Growth with 10 microM AIP led to decreased frond area and fresh weight, but dry weight was unchanged. Microscopic examination of fronds revealed increased frond thickness and a lack of reticulate aerenchyma. Ultraviolet epifluorescence microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy of methanolic extracts confirmed the dose-dependent inhibition of secondary phenolic synthesis with the near total elimination of secondary phenolic accumulation at the 10 microM level. AIP-treated plants showed increased sensitivity to UV-B as shown by a reduced F(v)/F(m). The results provided direct evidence of the working hypothesis that phenols function to screen UV radiation from reaching photosynthetic tissues or damaging other sensitive tissues. A novel histochemical method employing zirconyl chloride to visualize phenols is discussed.  (+info)

Coronamycins, peptide antibiotics produced by a verticillate Streptomyces sp. (MSU-2110) endophytic on Monstera sp. (8/90)

Coronamycin is a complex of novel peptide antibiotics with activity against pythiaceous fungi and the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. It is also active against the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with an IC(50) of 9.0 ng ml(-1). Coronamycin is produced by a verticillate Streptomyces sp. isolated as an endophyte from an epiphytic vine, Monstera sp., found in the Manu region of the upper Amazon of Peru. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the fermentation broths of this endophyte on silica gel and HPLC chromatography yielded two principal, inseparable, peptides with masses of 1217.9 and 1203.8 Da. Three other minor, but related components, are also present in the preparation. Amino acid analysis of coronamycin revealed residues of component 1, component 2, methionine, tyrosine and leucine at a ratio of 2:2:1:1:3. Other compounds with antifungal activities are also produced by this endophytic streptomycete.  (+info)

Araceae is a family of flowering plants, also known as the arum or aroid family. It includes a diverse range of species, such as calla lilies, peace lilies, and jack-in-the-pulpit. These plants are characterized by their unique inflorescence structure, which consists of a specialized leaf-like structure called a spathe that surrounds and protects a spike-like structure called a spadix, where the flowers are located.

The flowers of Araceae plants are often small and inconspicuous, and may be surrounded by showy bracts or modified leaves. Many species in this family produce attractive berries or fruits that contain seeds. Some members of Araceae contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation to the skin and mucous membranes if handled improperly.

Araceae plants are found worldwide, with a majority of species occurring in tropical regions. They are grown for their ornamental value, as well as for their edible fruits and tubers. Some species have medicinal uses, while others are invasive and can cause ecological damage in certain areas.

"Amorphophallus" is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae, also known as the aroid family. These plants are native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands. They are characterized by their large, distinctive inflorescences, which are often accompanied by a strong, unpleasant odor that attracts pollinators such as flies and beetles.

The name "Amorphophallus" comes from the Greek words "amorphos," meaning formless, and "phallos," meaning penis, and refers to the shape of the inflorescence in some species. The most well-known species is Amorphophallus titanum, also known as the corpse flower, which produces one of the largest and smelliest inflorescences in the plant kingdom.

In addition to their unusual inflorescences, many species of Amorphophallus are also grown for their large, starchy tubers, which are used as a food source in some cultures.

Arisaema is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae, also known as "Jack-in-the-pulpit." These herbaceous perennial plants are native to Asia and North America and are characterized by their unique inflorescence, which consists of a hooded spathe surrounding a club-shaped spadix. Some species of Arisaema contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation and swelling if ingested. These plants have been used in traditional medicine in some cultures, but it is important to note that they can also be toxic and should only be used under the guidance of a trained medical professional.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Philodendron" is not a medical term. It is a genus of flowering plants in the arum family, Araceae. These are native to the tropical Americas and some parts of the West Indies. Some philodendron species are popular as indoor houseplants due to their adaptability to various environments.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help!

Inflorescence is a term used in the field of botany, which includes the study of plants. However, I understand that you are asking for a medical definition. In the context of medicine, specifically in pathology, inflorescence may refer to the arrangement or growth pattern of lesions or neoplasms (abnormal growths) in a particular area of the body.

To provide a precise medical definition, I would need more context about how the term is being used. Nonetheless, based on the botanical definition, inflorescence refers to the cluster or arrangement of flowers on a stem or branch. It can take various forms, such as spikes, racemes, panicles, umbels, and corymbs, depending on the pattern in which flowers are arranged.

Alismatidae is a subclass of monocotyledonous aquatic and semi-aquatic flowering plants, also known as the water plantains. This group includes several families of plants that are typically found in wetlands, marshes, and along the edges of bodies of water. The plants in this group have adapted to their aquatic environments with specialized structures such as floating leaves and air-filled tissues that help them float on the water's surface. Some examples of plants in Alismatidae include waterlilies, pondweeds, and cattails.

Colocasia is a genus of flowering plants in the arum family, Araceae. It includes several species commonly known as taro or elephant ears, which are cultivated for their edible corms and leaves. The term "colocasia" is also used more specifically to refer to certain species within this genus, such as Colocasia esculenta, which is one of the most widely consumed types of taro.

It's important to note that while colocasia plants have many uses and are an important food source in many parts of the world, they also contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation and discomfort if eaten raw or improperly prepared. Proper cooking and preparation is necessary to remove these crystals and make colocasia safe to eat.

Alocasia is a genus of flowering plants in the arum family, Araceae. It includes several species that are commonly grown as ornamental houseplants for their attractive, often large and colorful leaves. Some popular species include Alocasia amazonica (Elephant's Ear), Alocasia x calidora (Kris Plant), and Alocasia polyphylla (Silver Dragon). These plants are native to tropical regions of Asia and Eastern Australia.

It is important to note that some species of Alocasia contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation and discomfort if ingested or come into contact with the skin or eyes. Therefore, it is recommended to handle these plants with care and keep them out of reach of children and pets.

Angiosperms, also known as flowering plants, are a group of plants that produce seeds enclosed within an ovary. The term "angiosperm" comes from the Greek words "angeion," meaning "case" or "capsule," and "sperma," meaning "seed." This group includes the majority of plant species, with over 300,000 known species.

Angiosperms are characterized by their reproductive structures, which consist of flowers. The flower contains male and female reproductive organs, including stamens (which produce pollen) and carpels (which contain the ovules). After fertilization, the ovule develops into a seed, while the ovary matures into a fruit, which provides protection and nutrition for the developing embryo.

Angiosperms are further divided into two main groups: monocots and eudicots. Monocots have one cotyledon or embryonic leaf, while eudicots have two. Examples of monocots include grasses, lilies, and orchids, while examples of eudicots include roses, sunflowers, and legumes.

Angiosperms are ecologically and economically important, providing food, shelter, and other resources for many organisms, including humans. They have evolved a wide range of adaptations to different environments, from the desert to the ocean floor, making them one of the most diverse and successful groups of plants on Earth.

Poison Control Centers are specialized organizations that provide immediate, free, and expert advice and treatment recommendations for exposure to potentially harmful substances, also known as poisons. They are staffed by trained healthcare professionals, including medical toxicologists, nurses, pharmacists, and poison information providers. These centers manage a wide range of poisoning cases, from accidental ingestions in children to intentional overdoses and chemical exposures in adults. They offer 24/7 emergency hotline services to the public, healthcare providers, and first responders for poison-related emergencies and provide valuable resources for poison prevention and education. The primary goal of Poison Control Centers is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with poison exposures and promote overall public health and safety.

Oxalates, also known as oxalic acid or oxalate salts, are organic compounds that contain the functional group called oxalate. Oxalates are naturally occurring substances found in various foods such as spinach, rhubarb, nuts, and seeds. They can also be produced by the body as a result of metabolism.

In the body, oxalates can bind with calcium and other minerals to form crystals, which can accumulate in various tissues and organs, including the kidneys. This can lead to the formation of kidney stones, which are a common health problem associated with high oxalate intake or increased oxalate production in the body.

It is important for individuals with a history of kidney stones or other kidney problems to monitor their oxalate intake and limit consumption of high-oxalate foods. Additionally, certain medical conditions such as hyperoxaluria, a rare genetic disorder that causes increased oxalate production in the body, may require medical treatment to reduce oxalate levels and prevent complications.

Poisoning is defined medically as the harmful, sometimes fatal, effect produced by a substance when it is introduced into or absorbed by living tissue. This can occur through various routes such as ingestion, inhalation, injection, or absorption through the skin. The severity of poisoning depends on the type and amount of toxin involved, the route of exposure, and the individual's age, health status, and susceptibility. Symptoms can range from mild irritation to serious conditions affecting multiple organs, and may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, seizures, or unconsciousness. Immediate medical attention is required in cases of poisoning to prevent severe health consequences or death.

Plant poisoning is a form of poisoning that occurs when someone ingests, inhales, or comes into contact with any part of a plant that contains toxic substances. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type and amount of plant consumed or exposed to, as well as the individual's age, health status, and sensitivity to the toxin.

Symptoms of plant poisoning may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, skin rashes, seizures, or in severe cases, even death. Some common plants that can cause poisoning include poison ivy, poison oak, foxglove, oleander, and hemlock, among many others.

If you suspect plant poisoning, it is important to seek medical attention immediately and bring a sample of the plant or information about its identity if possible. This will help healthcare providers diagnose and treat the poisoning more effectively.

Calcium oxalate is a chemical compound with the formula CaC2O4. It is the most common type of stone found in kidneys, also known as kidney stones. Calcium oxalate forms when there is too much calcium or oxalate in the urine. This can occur due to various reasons such as dietary habits, dehydration, medical conditions like hyperparathyroidism, or genetic factors.

Calcium oxalate stones are hard and crystalline and can cause severe pain during urination or while passing through the urinary tract. They may also lead to other symptoms like blood in the urine, nausea, vomiting, or fever. Prevention strategies for calcium oxalate stones include staying hydrated, following a balanced diet, and taking prescribed medications to control the levels of calcium and oxalate in the body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Household Products" is not a term with a specific medical definition. Household products generally refer to items that are used in the home for cleaning, maintenance, and personal care. They can include things like cleaning supplies, laundry detergent, dish soap, personal care products (such as shampoo, toothpaste, and lotion), and other similar items. However, there is no medical context in which "household products" has a specific or technical meaning. If you have any concerns about the safety or health effects of a particular household product, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or reaching out to the manufacturer for more information.

"Araceae - Flowering Plant Families, UH Botany". University of Hawaii. Retrieved 17 January 2014. "Araceae" (PDF). Iowa State ... International Aroid Society The Uberlist of Araceae (pdf) list of publications (March 2008) for Dr. h.c. Josef Bogner Araceae ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Araceae. Wikispecies has information related to Araceae. ... The genera of Araceae. London: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-900347-22-9. OCLC 60140655. Stevens, P.F. "Araceae". ...
2013). The following is Bogner & Nicolson's (1991) classification of Araceae as cited in Mayo et al. (1997). Araceae Subfamily ... The Genera of Araceae as listed by the International Aroid Society Boyce, P. C. & Croat, T. B. (2011 onwards). The Überlist of ... This is a list of genera in the plant family Araceae. As currently circumscribed, the family contains over 3700 species into ... 23C Araceae-Lasioideae". Das Pflanzenreich (in German). 48: 1-130, 36. de Loureiro, João (1790). Flora Cochinchinensis (in ...
This is a list of diseases of foliage plants belonging to the Araceae. Common Names of Diseases, The American Phytopathological ...
Crusio, W.E.; de Graaf, A. (1986). "Lagenandra dewitii Crusio et de Graaf (Araceae), eine neue Art aus Sri Lanka". Aqua Planta ... Araceae)". Botaniska Notiser. 130: 381-382. Jan D. Bastmeijer. "Cryptocoryne dewitii". Retrieved 2009-02-21. Idei, Takashige ( ... ISBN 978-3-8001-7185-9. Crusio, W. (1979). "A revision of Anubias Schott (Araceae). (Primitiae Africanae XII)". Mededelingen ... 2010). "Der natürliche Standort von Cryptocoryne dewitii N. Jacobsen (Araceae) in Papua Neuguinea". Aqua Planta. 35 (1): 23-38 ...
Rendle, A. B. (1913). "Araceae". Catalogue of the plants collected by Mr. & Mrs. P. A. Talbot in the Oban district, S. Nigeria ... Engler, Adolf (1889). "Araceae". Mittheilungen von Forschungsreisen und Gelehrten aus den Deutschen Schutzgebieten. 2: 149. ... London.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link) Crusio WE (1987). "Die Gattung Anubias SCHOTT (Araceae)". ... Crusio, W. (1979). "A revision of Anubias Schott (Araceae). (Primitiae Africanae XII)". Mededelingen Landbouwhogeschool ...
Engler, Adolf (1879). "Araceae". In Alphonse de Candolle (ed.). Monographiae Phanerogamarum (in Latin). Vol. 2. Paris: Masson. ... Crusio WE (1987). "Die Gattung Anubias SCHOTT (Araceae)". Aqua Planta. Sonderheft (1): 1-44. Christel Kasselmann (2002). ... Crusio, W. (1979). "A revision of Anubias Schott (Araceae). (Primitiae Africanae XII)". Mededelingen Landbouwhogeschool ...
Araceae))". Taxon. 26 (2/3): 337-338. doi:10.2307/1220579. JSTOR 1220579. "Amorphophallus paeoniifolius". Germplasm Resources ...
Part 1. Araceae. University Museum, The University of Tokyo Material Report No. 5: 1-27, pl. 1-63. __________. 1982. Araceae. ... Notes on Arisaema robustum (Engl.) Nakai, a species of the Araceae in Japan. Sci. Rep. Tohoku Univ., ser. 4, Biol. 29: 431-435 ... and by the Araceae treatment for the Wildflowers of Japan (Ohashi, 1982). He continued the work of the noted botanist Hara on ... http://www.aroid.org/literature/croat/history5.pdf History and Current Status of Systematic Research with Araceae by Thomas B. ...
... is a species in the family Araceae. This species is native to Brazil and Bolivia, and has peltate leaves ... Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families Gomes Gonçalves, E. & Nadruz Coelho, M.A. (2009). Araceae. Flora dos estados de ...
Engler, Adolf (1879). "Araceae". In Alphonse de Candolle (ed.). Monographiae Phanerogamarum. Vol. 2. Paris: Masson. "Araceae - ... The Anubiadeae are a tribe of the family Araceae, subfamily Aroideae. The tribe was first described in 1879 by Adolf Engler and ... Crusio, W. (1979). "A revision of Anubias Schott (Araceae). (Primitiae Africanae XII)". Mededelingen Landbouwhogeschool ...
... is a plant species belonging to the Araceae genus Cryptocoryne. It was first described in 1977 from dried ... Araceae)". Botaniska Notiser. 130: 381-382. Jan D. Bastmeijer. "Cryptocoryne dewitii". Retrieved 2009-02-21. Idei, Takashige ( ... 2010). "Der natürliche Standort von Cryptocoryne dewitii N. Jacobsen (Araceae) in Papua Neuguinea". Aqua Planta. 35 (1): 23-38 ...
Araceae genera, Flora of Southern America, All stub articles, Araceae stubs). ... Araceae. [11:] 1-46. In G. F. Bocquet & M. R. Crosby (eds.) Flora del Paraguay. Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques de la Ville ... Spathicarpa is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae, all of which are endemic to South America. Spathicarpa ... World Checklist and Bibliography of Araceae (and Acoraceae): 1-560. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ...
Volume 2. Pteridophytes, Spermatophytes; Acanthaceae-Araceae. Edinburgh Journal of Botany 55(2): 317-318. doi:10.1017/ ... Volume 2, Pteridophytes, Spermatophytes, Acanthaceae-Araceae (1995). ISBN 9780915279746. 706 pp., 1285 species treated, 618 ...
POWO, Araceae, Neotropikey. Coombes 2012, p. 52. Stearn 2002, p. 53. IPNI, Araceae, Type. Christenhusz, Fay & Chase 2017, pp. ... POWO, Araceae. POWO, Rapateaceae, Flora of West Tropical Africa. Christenhusz, Fay & Chase 2017, p. 123. Coombes 2012, p. 72. ...
Araceae)" (PDF). Aroideana. 43 (1-2). v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with ... Anthurium vittariifolium is a species of flowering plant in the genus Anthurium (family Araceae) native to the Amazon basin; ...
Araceae Juss. Butomaceae Mirb. Cymodoceaceae Vines Hydrocharitaceae Juss. Juncaginaceae Rich. Posidoniaceae Vines ...
V.4. Araceae - Orchidaceae. Novosibirsk: Nauka. Vvedensky AI. 1935. Onion . Allium L. In: Komarov VL., ed. Flora URSS. V.4. ...
family ARACEAE]". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) "Culcasia scandens - Useful Tropical Plants". ...
Araceae flowers often trap beetles in a compartment with the pollen: the beetles must pass through a constriction of the spathe ... Araceae)" (PDF). Aroideana - Journal of the International Aroid Society. 28: 104-112. Moretto P, Krell FT, Aristophanous M, ... akeassii (Araceae) by dung beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea)". Catharsius - la Revue. 18: 19-36. Korotkova N, ... Cantharophily is often the main pollination system in the Araceae family. It occurs in genera such as Amorphophallus, ...
Araceae (1); Rubiaceae (1); Bignoriaceae (1). In terms of importance value, palms are highly valued by all species of capuchin ... Araceae (4, 5.5%); Bombacaceae (4, 5.5%); Palmae (4, 5.5%). Defler collected 40 species of plants from 23 families eaten by ...
"Taman Araceae". Raya-LIPI, PKT Kebun. "Taman Teisjmann". Sepetak Meksiko di Kebun Raya Bogor. Kompas, September 7, 2014. Raya- ... Situated behind the seed bank of the garden, an area devoted to Araceae species of flora was built in 2010. This garden ...
Araceae (1.95%); Elaeocarpaceae (1.78%); Dilleniaceae (1.69%), Combretaceae (1.17%), Apocynaceae (1%); Aquifoliaceae (1%), ...
Araceae) Lilloa Speg. Some 113 species, including (Acanthaceae) Chaetochlamys lilloi J.L.Lotti (Acanthaceae) Justicia lilloi ( ...
Haigh, A. Araceae. Archived 2020-11-12 at the Wayback Machine Neotropical Araceae. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Anthurium spp. ... Engler, A. (1905). Araceae-Pothoideae. Das Pflanzenreich IV. 23B, Heft 21, pp. 1-330. Sections of Anthurium. Archived December ... Croat, T. (1983). A revision of the genus Anthurium (Araceae) of Mexico and Central America. Part 1: Mexico and Middle America ... Nadruz Coelho, M.A., Waechter, J.L. & Mayo, S.J. (2009). Revisão taxonômica das espécies de Anthurium (Araceae) seção Urospadix ...
Araceae superorder 3. Cyclanthanae order 1. Cyclanthales family 1. Cyclanthaceae superorder 4. Pandananae order 1. Pandanales ...
Araceae". Curtis's Botanical Magazine. 13 (1): 14-18. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8748.1996.tb00530.x. JSTOR 45065142. Media related to ...
"The Systematics of Araceae". Archived from the original on 2012-11-19. Retrieved 2013-07-05. Asiatica plant catalogue Archived ... Homalomena is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae. Homalomena are found in southern Asia and the southwestern ... Govaerts, R. & Frodin, D.G. (2002). World Checklist and Bibliography of Araceae (and Acoraceae): 1-560. The Board of Trustees ... Boyce, P.C. & Wong, S.Y. (2009). Studies on Homalomeneae (Araceae) of Borneo IV: Homalomena specimens in the herbarium ...
This resin producing quality is unique to Philodendron and Monstera, as other genera of Araceae do not produce it on their ... Philodendron is a large genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae. As of September 2015[update], the World Checklist of ... Compared to other genera of the family Araceae, philodendrons have an extremely diverse array of growth methods. The habits of ... These same beetles could also pollinate other genera outside of philodendron, as well as outside of the family Araceae. The ...
ISBN 1-900347-22-9. Grob, G.B.J. (2002). "Phylogeny of the Tribe Thomsonieae (Araceae) Based on Chloroplast matK and trnL ... Mayo, Simon; Bogner, Justin; Boyce, Peter (January 1997). The Genera of Araceae. Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. ...
... is a plant species of family Araceae. This type of woody vine is endemic in Maluku Islands' rainforest. ... K.Krause) Alderw.. In: Govaerts, R. (2015). World Checklist of Araceae. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ...
"Araceae - Flowering Plant Families, UH Botany". University of Hawaii. Retrieved 17 January 2014. "Araceae" (PDF). Iowa State ... International Aroid Society The Uberlist of Araceae (pdf) list of publications (March 2008) for Dr. h.c. Josef Bogner Araceae ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Araceae. Wikispecies has information related to Araceae. ... The genera of Araceae. London: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-900347-22-9. OCLC 60140655. Stevens, P.F. "Araceae". ...
Familia: Araceae Juss. Juss. (1789), nom. cons. (Arum Family - arum family - Aronstabgewächse) Subfamilia: Aroideae. Tribus: ...
Anatomical characters have been used in classic taxonomic treatments of Araceae and it appears that leaf anatomy may provide ... Caracteres anatômicos têm sido empregados em clássicos tratamentos para Araceae e a anatomia foliar pode prover vários ... Urospadix and related groups (Araceae). The genus has traditionally been considered taxonomically difficult and there has been ...
Members of the Araceae family very commonly have calcium oxalate crystals which can cause irritation (Prychid & Rudall 1999; ...
cate-araceae.org - Slot80 telah sukses dalam membangun komunitas pemain yang solid dan berkelanjutan, menjadi pusat interaksi, ...
... J Pharmacogn Phytochem 2017;6(3):234-242. ... Purpose: Anchomanes difformis (Araceae) is widely used in subsaharan Africa against, constipation, edema, high blood pressure ...
Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share Alike CC BY-NC-SA Licence.. ...
... Sample information. Sample ID. 15-3-1. Species. calamus. Genus. Acorus. Family. ARACEAE. Search. Google ...
Family: Araceae *SubFamily: Aroideae *Tribe: Caladieae *SubTribe: Flowering Data:. This accession has been observed in bloom on ... Family: Araceae Juss.. *Country of Origin: Ecuador *Habitat: steep rocky cliffs along the Rio Nangaritza *Description: It ... Current Accessions in the Araceae. Subfamily Aroideae *Aglaonema commutatum. *Aglaonema costatum *Aglaonema nitidum. Subfamily ...
fr araceae A French term in ConceptNet 5.8 Sources: French Wiktionary and Open Multilingual WordNet ...
Internetowa baza ro lin ozdobnych: drzewa, krzewy, byliny, trawy, paprocie...
Family: Araceae - arum family Species in the arum family are mostly small perennial herbs, though the family encompasses a wide ...
NUMBER OF GENERA IN Araceae: 111. KEW LIST: Araceae. Aglaodorum Aglaonema Alloschemone Alocasia Ambrosina Amorphophallus ... Rhodospatha (Araceae). syn: Anepsias. 51 species names (IPNI) found:. ---SELECT A SPECIES NAME--- Rhodospatha acosta-solisii ... Rhodospatha Araceae images, classification, nomenclature, synonymy at ...
Michael Madison, A NEW SPECIES OF RHODOSPATHA (ARACEAE) FROM COLOMBIA , Selbyana: Vol. 1 No. 4 (1976) ... Michael Madison, NOTES ON CALADIUM (ARACEAE) AND ITS ALLIES , Selbyana: Vol. 5 No. 3/4 (1981) ... Michael Madison, ALLOSCHEMONE AND SCINDAPSUS (ARACEAE) , Selbyana: Vol. 1 No. 4 (1976) ... Madison, M. (1978). A NEW ANTHURIUM FROM WESTERN ECUADOR (ARACEAE). Selbyana, 2(2/3), 286. Retrieved from https://ojs.test.flvc ...
Get free DOTA2 Autographed Araceaes Tribute Spear, Skins, Loading Screen, Arcana, Items skin by earning Points through ... Convert Your Points Into Free DOTA2 Item Autographed Araceaes Tribute Spear. GameTame provides the best and easy way to earn ...
ARACEAE. ARALIACEAE. Taxon: Araliaceae pro parte. Name: Jun Wen. Address: Botany Section - Systematic Biology. Smithsonian ...
Intreaga familie de Araceae intr-un singur loc - Philodendroni, Monstera, Alocasia, Aglaonema, Pothos, Caladium si multe alte ... Intreaga familie de Araceae intr-un singur loc - Philodendroni, Monstera, Alocasia, Aglaonema, Pothos, Caladium si multe alte ...
Araceae. Subfamily Aroideae Tribe Areae *Sauromatum venosum - Trop. Africa to China (Yunnan) Subfamily Aroideae Tribe ...
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Araceae. Baeckea. * Baeckea virgata = Sannantha spp. (Baeckea). Baileys grevillea. * Grevillea baileyana (Baileys Grevillea) ...
Volume 04: Araceae - Orchidaceae. 2001. 250 p. gr8vo. Hardcover. 184,04 € inkl. MwSt (EU - Käufer) * 172,00€ exkl. MWSt. ( ...
CATE Araceae. *Soares, M.L.C. & Mayo, S.J. 2001. Three new species of Philodendron (Araceae) from the Ducke Forest Reserve, ... CATE Araceae. *Haigh, A., Clark, B., Reynolds, L., Mayo, S.J., Croat, T.B., Lay, L., Boyce, P.C., Mora, M., Bogner, J., Sellaro ... Govaerts, R. & Frodin, D.G. (2002). World Checklist and Bibliography of Araceae (and Acoraceae): 1-560. The Board of Trustees ... M., Wong, S.Y., Kostelac, C., Grayum, M.H., Keating, R.C., Ruckert, G., Naylor, M.F. and Hay, A., CATE Araceae, 17 Dec 2011. ...
Studies on Monstereae (Araceae) of Peninsular Malaysia II: Rhaphidophora latevaginata, newly recorded for West Malaysia. Ahmad ...
The diversity of aroids (Araceae) in Bogor Botanic Gardens, Indonesia: Collection, conservation and utilization ##plugins. ... One of the richest collections in the Gardens comprises members of the aroid family (Araceae). The aroids are planted in ... The diversity of aroids (Araceae) in Bogor Botanic Gardens, Indonesia: Collection, conservation and utilization. Biodiversitas ...
Thread by: arman omidvar, Apr 23, 2020, 12 replies, in forum: Araceae ...
Araceae USDA hardiness 6-9 Known Hazards The plant contains calcium oxylate crystals. These cause an extremely unpleasant ...
Araceae - Palmae, Araliaceae, Asparagaceae, Asphodelaceae, Xanthorrhoeaceae, Asteraceae, Bignoniaceae, Boraginaceae, ...
Wang B, Han L, Chen C, Wang Z. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dieffenbachia seguine (Araceae). Mitochondrial DNA. ... Floral vasculature and its variation for carpellary supply in Anthurium (Araceae, Alismatales). PeerJ. 2017. 5:e2929. [QxMD ... Zhong LY, Wu H. [Current researching situation of mucosal irritant compontents in Araceae family plants]. Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za ...
Familia: Araceae Subfamilia: Aroideae Tribus: Caladieae Genus: Syngonium Species (34): S. angustatum - S. armigerum - S. ...
Version 1.1 of The Plant List has been superseded and should no longer be used.. The new version is available at http://www.worldfloraonline.org/tpl/tro-50124024. The new version is enhanced, using more data sources including Taxonomic Expert Networks and will be more frequently updated.. ...
  • Modern studies based on gene sequences show the Araceae (including the Lemnoideae, duckweeds) to be monophyletic, and the first diverging group within the Alismatales. (wikipedia.org)
  • Floral vasculature and its variation for carpellary supply in Anthurium (Araceae, Alismatales). (medscape.com)
  • Species within Araceae are often rhizomatous or tuberous, and the leaves nearly always contain calcium oxalate crystals or raphides, in varying degrees. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the earliest observations of species in the Araceae was conducted by Theophrastus in his work Enquiry into Plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • cate-araceae - Bagi pemain pemula, bandar togel online olxtoto terpercaya pasti ingin menang bukan? (cate-araceae.org)
  • Enter your CATE Araceae username. (myspecies.info)
  • 1997. The Genera of Araceae. (nih.gov)
  • A comprehensive taxonomy of Araceae was published by Mayo et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wang B, Han L, Chen C, Wang Z. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dieffenbachia seguine (Araceae). (medscape.com)
  • 2004. Intergeneric and infrafamilial phylogeny of subfamily Monsteroideae (Araceae) revealed by chloroplast trnL-F sequences. (nih.gov)
  • The Araceae are a family of monocotyledonous flowering plants in which flowers are borne on a type of inflorescence called a spadix. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zhong LY, Wu H. [Current researching situation of mucosal irritant compontents in Araceae family plants]. (medscape.com)
  • The Araceae were not recognized as a distinct group of plants until the 16th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Les plantes figurant dans cette liste on t class es selon une m thodologie UICN afin d' valuer un niveau d'urgences en mati re de conservation. (florealpes.com)
  • Floral vasculature and its variation for carpellary supply in Anthurium (Araceae, Alismatales). (medscape.com)
  • Many tropical Araceae plants grow on trees as epiphytes. (botanicka.cz)
  • Visitors can find many Araceae plants in our botanical garden. (botanicka.cz)
  • Duckweeds (Lemnoideae) are a group of higher aquatic plants belonging to the Araceae and commonly found in freshwater habitats. (phys.org)
  • The Araceae are one of the most diverse monocot families with numerous morphological and ecological novelties. (nih.gov)