Aquatic Organisms: Organisms that live in water.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Water Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Daphnia: A diverse genus of minute freshwater CRUSTACEA, of the suborder CLADOCERA. They are a major food source for both young and adult freshwater fish.Amber: A yellowish fossil resin, the gum of several species of coniferous trees, found in the alluvial deposits of northeastern Germany. It is used in molecular biology in the analysis of organic matter fossilized in amber.Ecotoxicology: The study of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION and the toxic effects of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS on the ECOSYSTEM. The term was coined by Truhaut in 1969.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Toxicity Tests, Acute: Experiments designed to determine the potential toxic effects of one-time, short-term exposure to a chemical or chemicals.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Vibrio: A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Lethal Dose 50: The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Toxicity Tests: An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Cladocera: A suborder of CRUSTACEA, order Diplostraca, comprising the water fleas. They are benthic filter feeders that consume PHYTOPLANKTON. The body is laterally compressed and enclosed in a bivalved carapace, from which the head extends.Anostraca: An order of CRUSTACEA comprised of shrimp-like organisms containing body trunks with at least 20 segments. The are commonly used as aquarium food.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Dose Fractionation: Administration of the total dose of radiation (RADIATION DOSAGE) in parts, at timed intervals.Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated: CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY that combines several intensity-modulated beams to provide improved dose homogeneity and highly conformal dose distributions.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Antidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Ponds: Inland bodies of standing FRESHWATER usually smaller than LAKES. They can be man-made or natural but there is no universal agreement as to their exact size. Some consider a pond to be a small body of water that is shallow enough for sunlight to reach the bottom.Delphinium: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain ACONITINE and other diterpenoid alkaloids.Birnaviridae: A family of bisegmented, double-stranded RNA viruses causing infection in fish, mollusks, fowl, and Drosophila. There are three genera: AQUABIRNAVIRUS; AVIBIRNAVIRUS; and ENTOMOBIRNAVIRUS. Horizontal and vertical transmission occurs for all viruses.Radiotherapy, Conformal: Radiotherapy where there is improved dose homogeneity within the tumor and reduced dosage to uninvolved structures. The precise shaping of dose distribution is achieved via the use of computer-controlled multileaf collimators.Hydrocharitaceae: A plant family of the order Hydrocharitales, subclass ALISMATIDAE, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Toxicity Tests, Chronic: Experiments designed to determine the potential toxic effects of a long-term exposure to a chemical or chemicals.Zigadenus: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE that is fatally toxic to grazing animals. The name is similar to another plant called Camas (CAMASSIA).Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Cassia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Many species of this genus, including the medicinal C. senna and C. angustifolia, have been reclassified into the Senna genus (SENNA PLANT) and some to CHAMAECRISTA.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Ascaridia: A genus of nematode worms in the superfamily Heterakoidea. A. galli and A. lineata are important intestinal parasites of domestic fowl.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Invertebrates: Animals that have no spinal column.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Plant Bark: The outer layer of the woody parts of plants.Animal Testing Alternatives: Procedures, such as TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES; mathematical models; etc., when used or advocated for use in place of the use of animals in research or diagnostic laboratories.Cetacea: An order of wholly aquatic MAMMALS occurring in all the OCEANS and adjoining seas of the world, as well as in certain river systems. They feed generally on FISHES, cephalopods, and crustaceans. Most are gregarious and most have a relatively long period of parental care and maturation. Included are DOLPHINS; PORPOISES; and WHALES. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp969-70)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Aldicarb: Carbamate derivative used as an insecticide, acaricide, and nematocide.Eutrophication: The enrichment of a terrestrial or aquatic ECOSYSTEM by the addition of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, that results in a superabundant growth of plants, ALGAE, or other primary producers. It can be a natural process or result from human activity such as agriculture runoff or sewage pollution. In aquatic ecosystems, an increase in the algae population is termed an algal bloom.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Hydrobiology: The study of aquatic life inhabiting bodies of water, including growth, morphology, physiology, genetics, distribution, and interactions with other organisms and the environment. It includes MARINE HYDROBIOLOGY.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Eukaryota: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Malvaceae: The mallow family of the order Malvales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members include GOSSYPIUM, okra (ABELMOSCHUS), HIBISCUS, and CACAO. The common names of hollyhock and mallow are used for several genera of Malvaceae.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Tinospora: A plant genus of the family MENISPERMACEAE. Members have been used in AYURVEDIC MEDICINE. Hypoglycemic effect has been reported.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Sirenia: An order of heavy-bodied, slow-moving, completely aquatic, herbivorous mammals. The body is fusiform, plump, and hairless, except for bristles on the snout. Hindlimbs are absent, the forelimbs are modified to flippers, and the tail is a horizontal fluke. (From Scott, Concise Encyclopedia Biology, 1996)Soman: An organophosphorus compound that inhibits cholinesterase. It causes seizures and has been used as a chemical warfare agent.Zanthoxylum: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. Some members of Zanthoxylum are reclassified from ELEUTHEROCOCCUS, Melicope, and EVODIA. The twigs are used as dental brushing sticks (TOOTHBRUSHING). Most plants that are called Fagara have been reclassified as Zanthoxylum, however some Fagara were reclassified to MELICOPE (also in the Rutacea family) or to GLEDITSIA (a genus in the FABACEAE family).Pipidae: A family of the order Anura, distinguished by the lack of a tongue. It includes four living genera of aquatic "toads". Two of the most familiar pipids are the popularly called Surinam "toad" (Pipa pipa) and XENOPUS LAEVIS.Potamogetonaceae: A plant family of the order Najadales, subclass Alismatidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons).Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Mice, Inbred ICRAmphipoda: An order of mostly marine CRUSTACEA containing more than 5500 species in over 100 families. Like ISOPODA, the other large order in the superorder Peracarida, members are shrimp-like in appearance, have sessile compound eyes, and no carapace. But unlike Isopoda, they possess thoracic gills and their bodies are laterally compressed.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Artemia: A genus of CRUSTACEA of the order ANOSTRACA, found in briny pools and lakes and often cultured for fish food. It has 168 chromosomes and differs from most crustaceans in that its blood contains hemoglobin.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Coal Tar: A by-product of the destructive distillation of coal used as a topical antieczematic. It is an antipruritic and keratoplastic agent used also in the treatment of psoriasis and other skin conditions. Occupational exposure to soots, tars, and certain mineral oils is known to be carcinogenic according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985) (Merck Index, 11th ed).Chemical Warfare Agents: Chemicals that are used to cause the disturbance, disease, or death of humans during WARFARE.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Crustacea: A large subphylum of mostly marine ARTHROPODS containing over 42,000 species. They include familiar arthropods such as lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE), crabs (BRACHYURA), shrimp (PENAEIDAE), and barnacles (THORACICA).Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Eichhornia: A plant genus of the family PONTEDERIACEAE that is used as a biological filter for treating wastewater.Zooplankton: Minute free-floating animal organisms which live in practically all natural waters.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Toxicology: The science concerned with the detection, chemical composition, and biological action of toxic substances or poisons and the treatment and prevention of toxic manifestations.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Sarin: An organophosphorus ester compound that produces potent and irreversible inhibition of cholinesterase. It is toxic to the nervous system and is a chemical warfare agent.Emaciation: Clinical manifestation of excessive LEANNESS usually caused by disease or a lack of nutrition (MALNUTRITION).Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Melastomataceae: A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida composed of tropical plants with parallel-nerved leaves.Araceae: A plant family of the order Arales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida (monocot). Many members contain OXALIC ACID and calcium oxalate (OXALATES).Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.
Toxicants can affect an organism's behavior, which with aquatic organisms, may impact their ability to swim, feed or avoid ... These effects are generally not observed well in a shorter acute toxicity test. A longer, chronic toxicity test will allow ... In the context of aquatic toxicology, a toxic chemical, or toxicant, directly affects an aquatic organism but does not ... Aquatic Toxicology 68:369-392. Rand, G.M. (Ed). Fundamentals of Aquatic Toxicology: Effects, Environmental Fate, and Risk ...
"Biotic ligand model of the acute toxicity of metals. 2. Application to acute copper toxicity in freshwater fish and Daphnia". ... The future characterization of metals for the BLM like Ag, Zn, Pb, Al, Ni, and Cd on aquatic systems and organisms will help ... Brown, P.L.; Markich, S.J. (2000). "Evaluation of the free ion activity model of metal-organism interaction: extension of the ... Current knowledge of how specific water quality parameters alter the toxicity of metals to aquatic life is still growing. In ...
Acute aquatic toxicity means the intrinsic property of a material of causing injury to an aquatic organism in a short-term ... Chronic aquatic toxicity means the potential or actual properties of a material to cause adverse effects to aquatic organisms ... Substances and mixtures of this hazard class are assigned to one of three toxicity categories on the basis of acute toxicity ... Substances and mixtures in this hazard class are assigned to one of four toxicity categories on the basis of acute data and ...
EPA to be protective of aquatic organisms. Aquatic toxicology Environmental toxicology Ecotoxicology Toxicology Acute toxicity ... of an organism's lifespan. Results of aquatic chronic toxicity tests can be used to determine water quality guidelines and ... commonly to aquatic organisms. Examples of common aquatic chronic toxicity test organisms, durations, and endpoints include: ... The acute to chronic ratio (ACR) allows for an estimation of chronic toxicity using acute toxicity data. It is calculated by ...
"Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms, Fifth Edition." ... Direct toxicity results from a toxicant acting at the site of action in or on the organism. Indirect toxicity occurs with a ... effects on aquatic organisms from a toxicant. Toxicity tests can be used to assess the potential for damage to an aquatic ... For this reason, sediment toxicity can play a major role in the adverse biological effects seen in aquatic organisms, ...
Bradbury SP, Carlson RW, Henry TR (1989). "Polar Narcosis in Aquatic Organisms". In Williams LR, Cowgill UM. Aquatic toxicology ... the same mode of action elicit similar sets of responses in the organism and can be classified by the same fish acute toxicity ... 96-hour acute toxicity tests data, FATS data and QSARs to create a computer based expert system that predicts chemical toxicity ... Structure-Activity Relationships for Acute Aquatic Toxicity". QSAR & Combinatorial Science. 27 (1): 77-90. doi:10.1002/qsar. ...
... of the organisms die during an acute toxicity test is used to derive a value called the acute to chronic ratio (ACR). The MATC ... The CMC is the highest concentration of a chemical in water that aquatic organisms can be exposed to acutely without causing an ... Many of these methods use the same test organism or are designed for the same exposure time. Common test organisms include, but ... Acute toxicity tests are normally 24-96 hours, whereas chronic tests will typically run for a week or longer. Using the MATC to ...
... and formulations with POEA are not approved for aquatic use due to aquatic organism toxicity.[23] Due to the presence of POEA, ... but are not approved for aquatic use in the US due to their toxicity to aquatic organisms. ... that increase the acute toxicity of glyphosate within a formulation.[36] The surfactant POEA is not considered an acute ... may have negative impacts on various aquatic organisms like protozoa, mussels, crustaceans, frogs and fish.[34] Aquatic ...
Aquatic toxicity[edit]. Aquatic toxicity testing subjects key indicator species of fish or crustacea to certain concentrations ... or has no data for acute toxicity.. Factors influencing toxicity[edit]. Toxicity of a substance can be affected by many ... Toxicity is the degree to which a chemical substance or a particular mixture of substances can damage an organism.[1] Toxicity ... As already mentioned, radiation can have a toxic effect on organisms.[3] ...
... or tissue residue-based toxicity tests. Historically, aquatic toxicology toxicity tests have focused on water-based approaches ... A review of the tissue residue approach for organic and organometallic compounds in aquatic organisms. Integrated environmental ... Tissue residue is the concentration of a chemical or compound in an organism's tissue, or a portion of an organism's tissue. ... Currently, the majority of the data available is derived from acute lethal response studies. Tissue residue of metals in ...
Due to hydrophobic properties, in aquatic ecosystems DDT and its metabolites are absorbed by aquatic organisms and adsorbed on ... Acute toxicity[edit]. DDT is classified as "moderately toxic" by the US National Toxicology Program (NTP)[83] and "moderately ... Genomic studies in the model genetic organism Drosophila melanogaster revealed that high level DDT resistance is polygenic, ... "DDT, p,p' - toxicity, ecological toxicity and regulatory information".. *^ World Health Organization, The WHO Recommended ...
... bioaccumulation and toxicity. The toxicity tests used are acute toxicity of fish, acute toxicity of Daphnia sp. and growth ... on aquatic micro-organism or how it may affect other animals. Therefore, the precautionary principle must be guiding. ... Concentrations of EPPPs can vary from 1 ng to 1 mg per litre (2). Serious effects of EPPPs on water-living organisms, ... Environmental risk refers to the risk of toxicity to the aquatic environment. It is based on the ratio between predicted ...
Later, he turned to the flow of information outside the organism, and how physics constrains how organisms behave. More ... Dusenbery, David B. (1973). Countercurrent separation: A new method for studying behavior of small aquatic organisms. ... S.G. Donkin & D.B. Dusenbery (1993).A soil toxicity test using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and an effective method of ... P.L. Williams & D.B. Dusenbery (1988). Using the nematode C. elegans to predict mammalian acute lethality to metallic salts. ...
... is very toxic to aquatic organisms, namely fish, aquatic invertebrates, and phytoplankton. It was found to remain in the ... the numbers are acute 0.037 and chronic 0.0023 µg/L. The human health contaminate criterion for water plus organism is 0.059 µg ... Due to its toxicity, it was banned or severely restricted in many countries. In 1982, Shell discontinued its manufacturing. In ... In cases of acute exposure, this may result in seizures, or even death. Because endrin can be stored in body fats, acute endrin ...
Proper waste disposal ==Ecotoxicity testing== * Acute and chronic toxicity tests are performed for terrestrial organisms ... Ecology portal Biology portal Environment portal Aquatic toxicology Ecology Ecotoxicity Environmental toxicology Toxicity ... Because they are at the bottom of the pyramid, every other organism in an ecosystem relies on the health and abundance of the ... 2011 Total amount of acute toxicity is directly related to the classification of toxicity. < 1 part per million→ ...
Olfaction Aquatic toxicology Clean Water Act (in the US) Fish acute toxicity syndrome Stream ecology Pre-spawn mortality in ... Depending on the chemical and how lipophilic, or fat-loving, they are they can move in and out of organisms at different rates ... or salinity can alter how the metals interact or are metabolized by the organism. Fish are oftentimes less tolerant to metals ... acute and chronic toxicity testing do not explicitly address nervous system function and underestimate thresholds for toxicity ...
The results from acute toxicity tests can thus help determine whether the effect identified is due to a specific contaminant. ... Co tolerance is the ability of an organism to develop a tolerance to a certain toxicant in short term tests, and obtain that ... In situ sampling involves setting up a sampling device in an aquatic ecosystem and allowing it to colonize for some time (e.g. ... This means that depending on the type of chemicals present in the environment, the concentration, and the organisms that are ...
... is the degree to which a chemical substance or a particular mixture of substances can damage an organism. Toxicity can ... While GHS does not define toxicity past 100 mg/l, the EPA currently lists aquatic toxicity as "practically non-toxic" in ... or has no data for acute toxicity. Toxicity of a substance can be affected by many different factors, such as the pathway of ... As already mentioned, radiation can have a toxic effect on organisms. Toxicity can be measured by its effects on the target ( ...
... in identifying acute toxicity syndromes in fish: Part 1. Pentachlorophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, tricaine methanesulfonate and 1- ... However, it is unlikely that every chemical has the same mode of toxic action in every organism, so this variability should be ... The target site and mechanism of toxic action through which narcosis affects organisms are still unclear, but there are ... Modes of toxic action are important, widely used tools in ecotoxicology and aquatic toxicology because they classify toxicants ...
Soil-dwelling organisms, potentially exposed to Bt toxins through root exudates, are not impacted by the growth of Bt crops. ... Bt toxins are less likely to accumulate in bodies of water, but pollen shed or soil runoff may deposit them in an aquatic ... Widespread concerns over toxicity in non-target lepidopterans, such as the monarch butterfly, have been disproved through ... The United States Environmental Protection Agency recognizes mouse acute oral feeding studies where doses as high as 5,000 mg/ ...
Kenaga, E. E. (1982). "Predictability of chronic toxicity from acute toxicity of chemicals in fish and aquatic invertebrates". ... uses acute toxicity data to gauge the chronic toxicity (MATC) of a chemical of interest to an organism. The science behind ... Scientific methods for determining acute and chronic toxicity to organisms are inherently imperfect and non-uniform throughout ... of test organisms in an acute toxicity test (LC50). M A T C = ( N O E C ) ( L O E C ) {\displaystyle MATC={\sqrt {(NOEC)(LOEC ...
... and aquatic formulations do not use POEA due to aquatic organism toxicity.[116][123][124] Due to the presence of POEA, such ... for terrestrial uses of Roundup minimal acute and chronic risk was predicted for potentially exposed non-target organisms". ... Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity are dose-related. Skin exposure to ready-to-use concentrated glyphosate formulations can ... in aquatic environments.[125] Aquatic organism exposure risk to terrestrial formulations with POEA is limited to drift or ...
"The ester forms of 2,4-D can be highly toxic to fish and other aquatic life. 2,4-D generally has moderate toxicity to birds and ... the median lethal dose or LD50 determined in acute toxicity rat studies was 639 mg/kg. Urinary alkalinisation has been used in ... to be linked with the organism's identity without the need to culture the organism involved. Maximum residue limits were first ... 4-D catabolism have been identified for several organisms. As a result of the extensive metadata on environmental behavior, ...
Toxicity can also vary with the organism's placement within its food web. Bioaccumulation occurs when an organism stores ... Heavy metals can not only affect behaviors, but also the genetic makeup in aquatic organisms. In Canada, a study examined ... Someone who has come in contact with lead can have either acute or chronic lead poisoning. Those who experience acute poisoning ... Sources of environmental toxicityEdit. There are many sources of environmental toxicity that can lead to the presence of ...
Acute Toxicity Solid-Phase Test is a procedure that allows the test organism to come in direct contact with the solid sample as ... "Microtox Toxicity Test Systems - Where They Stand Today". Microscale Testing in Aquatic Toxicology: Advances, Techniques, and ... However, others have pointed out that the effect of luminosity on the survival of organisms is unknown. Concerns have also been ... Acute Toxicity Basic Test is a procedure that measures the relative acute toxicity of a sample. This test is the best protocol ...
Chiba, K., Y. Taki, K. Sakai i Y. Oozeki, 1989. Present status of aquatic organisms introduced into Japan. p. 63-70. A: S.S. De Silva (ed.) Exotic aquatic organisms in Asia. Proceedings of the Workshop on Introduction of Exotic Aquatic Organisms in Asia. Spec. Publ. Asian Fish. Soc. 3, 154 p. ...
Although often overlooked, seagrasses provide coastal zones with a number of ecosystem goods and services. Seagrasses are considered ecosystem engineers.[6][3][2] This means that the plants alter the ecosystem around them. This adjusting occurs in both physical and chemical forms. Many seagrass species produce an extensive underground network of roots and rhizome which stabilizes sediment and reduces coastal erosion.[7] This system also assists in oxygenating the sediment, providing a hospitable environment for sediment-dwelling organisms.[8] Seagrasses also enhance water quality by stabilizing heavy metals, pollutants, and excess nutrients[9][3][2] The long blades of seagrasses slow the movement of water which reduces wave energy and offers further protection against coastal erosion and storm surge. Furthermore, because seagrasses are underwater plants, they produce significant amounts of oxygen which oxygenate the water column. These meadows account for more than 10% of the ocean's total ...
Water is a critical issue for the survival of all living organisms. Some can use salt water but many organisms including the great majority of higher plants and most mammals must have access to fresh water to live. Some terrestrial mammals, especially desert rodents, appear to survive without drinking, but they do generate water through the metabolism of cereal seeds, and they also have mechanisms to conserve water to the maximum degree. Fresh water creates a hypotonic environment for aquatic organisms. This is problematic for some organisms with pervious skins or with gill membranes, whose cell membranes may burst if excess water is not excreted. Some protists accomplish this using contractile vacuoles, while freshwater fish excrete excess water via the kidney.[8] Although most aquatic organisms have a limited ability to regulate their osmotic balance and ...
An ecosystem is composed of biotic communities that are structured by biological interactions and abiotic environmental factors. Some of the important abiotic environmental factors of aquatic ecosystems include substrate type, water depth, nutrient levels, temperature, salinity, and flow.[9][12] It is often difficult to determine the relative importance of these factors without rather large experiments. There may be complicated feedback loops. For example, sediment may determine the presence of aquatic plants, but aquatic plants may also trap sediment, and add to the sediment through peat. The amount of dissolved oxygen in a water body is frequently the key substance in determining the extent and kinds of organic life in the water body. Fish need dissolved oxygen to survive, although their tolerance to low oxygen varies among species; in extreme cases of low oxygen some fish even resort to air gulping.[16] ...
An ecosystem is composed of biotic communities that are structured by biological interactions and abiotic environmental factors. Some of the important abiotic environmental factors of aquatic ecosystems include substrate type, water depth, nutrient levels, temperature, salinity, and flow.[9][12] It is often difficult to determine the relative importance of these factors without rather large experiments. There may be complicated feedback loops. For example, sediment may determine the presence of aquatic plants, but aquatic plants may also trap sediment, and add to the sediment through peat. The amount of dissolved oxygen in a water body is frequently the key substance in determining the extent and kinds of organic life in the water body. Fish need dissolved oxygen to survive, although their tolerance to low oxygen varies among species; in extreme cases of low oxygen some fish even resort to air gulping.[16] ...
Natural disturbances, such as grazing, storms, ice-scouring, and desiccation, are an inherent part of seagrass ecosystem dynamics. Seagrasses display an extraordinarily high degree of phenotypic plasticity, adapting rapidly to changing environmental conditions.. Seagrasses are in global decline, with some 30,000 km2 (12,000 sq mi) lost during recent decades. The main cause is human disturbance, most notably eutrophication, mechanical destruction of habitat, and overfishing. Excessive input of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus) is directly toxic to seagrasses, but most importantly, it stimulates the growth of epiphytic and free-floating macro- and micro-algae. This weakens the sunlight, reducing the photosynthesis that nourishes the seagrass and the primary production results.. Decaying seagrass leaves and algae fuels increasing algal blooms, resulting in a positive feedback. This can cause a complete regime shift from seagrass to algal dominance. Accumulating evidence also suggests that ...
The state of Campeche is located in southeast Mexico, on the west side of the Yucatan Peninsula. The territory is 56,858.84 square kilometres (21,953.32 sq mi), which is 2.6% of Mexico's total.[9] It borders the states of Yucatán, Quintana Roo and Tabasco, with the country of Belize to the east, Guatemala to the south and the Gulf of Mexico to the west.[9] Politically, it is divided into eleven municipalities: Calkiní, Calakmul, Campeche, Candelaria, Champotón, Ciudad del Carmen, Escárcega, Hecelchakán, Hopelchén, Palizada and Tenabo. Campeche is a relatively flat area of Mexico with 523 km (325 mi) of shoreline on the Gulf of Mexico.[10] Most of the surface is of sedimentary rock much of which is from marine origin. The area with the highest elevations is near the borders with Guatemala and Quintana Roo. Notable elevations include Cerro Champerico, Cerro los Chinos, Cerro El Ramonal, Cerro El Doce, and Cerro El Gavilán. However, these hills are separated by large expanses of lower flat ...
Because silicones are heavily used in biomedical and cosmetic applications, their toxicology has been intensively examined. "The inertness of silicones toward warmblooded animals has been demonstrated in a number of tests." With an LD50 in rats of ,50 g/kg, they are virtually nontoxic.[12] Cyclomethicones are ubiquitous because they are widely used in biomedical and cosmetic applications and can be found at high levels in American cities and can be toxic to aquatic animals in concentrations often found in the environment.[13][14] The cyclomethicones D4 and D5 are bioaccumulative in some aquatic organisms, according to one report.[15] However, Norwegian researcher Nicholas Warner cautioned that findings about bioaccumulation have been largely based on laboratory studies, while field studies of bioaccumulation are still contradicting each other. "Even if the concentrations of siloxanes we have found in fish are high compared ...
Because silicones are heavily used in biomedical and cosmetic applications, their toxicology has been intensively examined. "The inertness of silicones toward warmblooded animals has been demonstrated in a number of tests." With an LD50 in rats of ,50 g/kg, they are virtually nontoxic.[11] Cyclomethicones are ubiquitous because they are widely used in biomedical and cosmetic applications and can be found at high levels in American cities and can be toxic to aquatic animals in concentrations often found in the environment.[12][13] The cyclomethicones D4 and D5 are bioaccumulative in some aquatic organisms, according to one report.[14] However, Norwegian researcher Nicholas Warner cautioned that findings about bioaccumulation have been largely based on laboratory studies, while field studies of bioaccumulation are still contradicting each other. "Even if the concentrations of siloxanes we have found in fish are high compared ...
One of the more important factors influencing the distribution of wetland plants, and aquatic plants in particular, is nutrient availability.[4] Duckweeds tend to be associated with fertile, even eutrophic conditions. They can be spread by waterfowl and small mammals, transported inadvertently on their feet and bodies,[5] as well as by moving water. In water bodies with constant currents or overflow, the plants are carried down the water channels and do not proliferate greatly. In some locations, a cyclical pattern driven by weather patterns exists in which the plants proliferate greatly during low water-flow periods, then are carried away as rainy periods ensue. Duckweed is an important high-protein food source for waterfowl. The tiny plants provide cover for fry of many aquatic species. The plants are used as shelter by pond-water species such as bullfrogs and fish such as bluegills. They also provide shade and, although frequently ...
... (USAS) is the national federation for aquatic sports which represents the United States in FINA (Fédération Internationale de Natation). Since by U.S. law and FINA regulations, the United States must have only one national federation for itself to FINA, United States Aquatic Sports has served as the unifying body for the sports since 1980. Five separate national governing bodies (NGBs) make up USAS: USA Swimming, USA Diving, United States Synchronized Swimming, USA Water Polo, and United States Masters Swimming. Of the five, only United States Masters Swimming (USMS) is not a member of the United States Olympic Committee (USMS's main aim is adult swimming, exclusive of Olympic-swimming which is the domain of USA Swimming). United States Aquatic Sports plays a very minor role in representation, and while USAS is the titular member federation, the NGBs play de facto roles in making decisions about ...
Fischer, W. i J.-C. Hureau (eds.), 1985. FAO species identification sheets for fishery purposes. Southern Ocean (fishing areas 48, 58 and 88) (CCAMLR convention area). Prepared and published with the support of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources. FAO, Roma. 471 p. ...
Ang Plesiadapiformes ("malapit na tulad ng Adapida" o "halos Adapiformes") ay isang ekstinkt na order ng mga mamalya. Ito ay malapit na nauugnay sa mga primado o isang prekursor ng mga ito. Ang mga Plesiadapiformes ay unang lumitaw sa fossil rekord sa panahong Kretaseyoso bagaman marami ang ekstinkt sa simula ng panahong Eoseno. Posibleng ang mga ito ang mga unang mamalya na nag-ebolb ng mga kuko ng daliri kesa sa mga kukong kalawit.[1]. ...
Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents to Aquatic Organisms. Cincinnati, Ohio: Environmental Protection Agency. ... a function-based detector is defined as a naturally occurring biological organism or portion of that organism (whether organ, ... Methods for Measuring Acute Toxicity of Effluents of Receiving Water to Freshwater and Marine Organisms. Washington, D.C.: ... various aquatic invertebrates, earthworms, protozoans, and seeds are all used for bioassays of aquatic samples.2 Daphnia (small ...
2009). Acute and chronic toxicity of atrazine and its metabolites deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine on aquatic organisms ... or whole organism spatial domain. Proceedings of SPIE-International Society of Optical Engineering, Defense, Security, and ... 2011) Proteomics in aquatic amphipods: Can it be used to determine mechanisms of toxicity and interspecies responses after ... 2017) Acute mixture toxicity of halogenated chemicals and their next generation counterparts on zebrafish embryos. Chemosphere ...
Results of the study indicate potential toxicity of dimethoate in fingerlings of common carp for which the natural waterbodies ... The present study was designed to investigate acute toxicity of dimethoate on juvenile,i, Cyprinus carpio ,/i,var.,i, communis ... Dimethoate is found to exhibit toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms, particularly fishes. It is one of the important ... enzyme in the synaptic cleft which leads to paralysis in acute toxicity exposures. However, the OP toxicity in natural ...
2000) and most published data relate to aquatic organisms (Gledhill et al. 1991; Heinze 2001). This work aims to address the ... In: Epstein HF, Shakes DC (eds) Caenorhabditis elegans: modern biological analysis of an organism. Academic, San Diego, pp 4-27 ... Aquatic and mammalian toxicity data are available for LAB (Gledhill et al. 1991; Heinze 2001). The European Centre for ... OECD (1984) Guideline for the testing of chemicals, 207: earthworm, acute toxicity tests. OECD, ParisGoogle Scholar ...
Renewal Toxicity Tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia three-brood toxicity test~ effluents~ Ceriodaphnia dubia~ cladocera~ ... E1023 Guide for Assessing the Hazard of a Material to Aquatic Organisms and Their Uses ... 5.1 Ceriodaphnia was first used as a toxicity test organism by Mount and Norberg (4). Introduced for use in effluent and ... Most such predictions are based on the results of acute toxicity tests, and so the usefulness of the results of a three-brood ...
Bradbury SP, Carlson RW, Henry TR (1989). "Polar Narcosis in Aquatic Organisms". In Williams LR, Cowgill UM. Aquatic toxicology ... the same mode of action elicit similar sets of responses in the organism and can be classified by the same fish acute toxicity ... 96-hour acute toxicity tests data, FATS data and QSARs to create a computer based expert system that predicts chemical toxicity ... Structure-Activity Relationships for Acute Aquatic Toxicity". QSAR & Combinatorial Science. 27 (1): 77-90. doi:10.1002/qsar. ...
... and the findings contrasted with the known acute and chronic toxicity of neonicotinoids to various aquatic organisms. Impacts ... and the findings contrasted with the known acute and chronic toxicity of neonicotinoids to various aquatic organisms. Impacts ... and secondly in the transfer of residues to the aquatic environment. The high toxicity of these insecticides to aquatic insects ... The high toxicity of these insecticides to aquatic insects and other arthropods has been recognised, but there is little ...
... insecticides and herbicides including toxicity, water pollution, ecological toxicity, uses and regulatory status. ... Summary of Acute Toxicity for Organism Group. Sorry, no acute aquatic ecotoxicity data available for this chemical. Try related ... Toxicity to aquatic organisms. Chemical Identification and Use for All Chemicals. Basic Identification Information About This ... Summary of Acute Toxicity for Organism Group. Sorry, no honeybee acute toxicity data available for this chemical. Try related ...
Acute and chronic toxicity data are available for aquatic organisms. The toxic effect that occurred at lowest concentration was ... It is important to note that in the second most sensitive study, tumours were present in the organism. Khudoley (1977) reported ... For long-term exposure of aquatic organisms to NDMA, the critical toxicity value (CTV) is 4000 g/litre, based on a 13-day EC50 ... Draper AC, Fisher JW (1980) The effects of selected aquatic sediments on the acute toxicity of N-nitrosodimethylamine to ...
Daphnia Toxicity Measure of the acute toxicity to Daphnia (invertebrate aquatic organisms) Algae Toxicity Measure of the acute ... Other Any additional characteristic (e.g., soil organism toxicity, WGK water classification, etc.) relevant to the overall ... Acute Toxicity Potential to cause harm upon initial, short term exposure Chronic Toxicity Potential to cause harm upon repeated ... Fish Toxicity Measure of the acute toxicity to fish (both saltwater and freshwater) ...
Berberis tinctoria fabricated silver nanoparticles exhibit acute toxicity toward Ae. albopictus, while sparing the mosquito ... essential oil against four mosquito vectors of public health importance and its biosafety on non-target aquatic organisms. ... Inactivated vaccines are prepared through the killing of the pathogenic organism and immunizing host along with an adjuvant. ... Govindarajan, M., Kadaikunnan, S., Alharbi, N. S., and Benelli, G. (2016a). Acute toxicity and repellent activity of the ...
In addition to whole-organism responses, changes in antioxidative processes in D. magna were quantified. Acute toxicity was ... This study provides evidence of biomodification of a carbon-based nanomaterial by an aquatic organism. The modification ... activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as well as lipid peroxidation suggested that exposed organisms ... Acute toxicity was observed only in the highest test concentrations. These are important findings related to determining the ...
... which may affect aquatic as well as terrestrial organisms. Toxicity to terrestrial organisms was further assessed by testing ... Eluates were produced from the sludge samples and tested for acute toxicity toward the freshwater micro-crustacean Daphnia ... which does not allow quantifying the toxicity for this organism. However, the earthworm avoidance test can give a response of a ... Toxicity reduction was lower for UMT and much lower for TT. Toxicity to A. globiformis appears much more related to the ...
Exposure to pesticides can result in acute toxicity (caused by a single exposure) or chronic toxicity (caused by long-term ... of pesticides in Midwestern streams to understand the complexity of stream organism exposure and to estimate toxicity in 100 ... Pesticide toxicity to aquatic organisms was estimated by comparing the concentrations measured in the streams to U.S. ... Estimated Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms in Midwestern Streams Driven by Relatively Few of the 227 Pesticides Analyzed. ...
A summary of the acute toxicity of 14 phthalate esters to representative aquatic organisms. Environmental Toxicology and ... Acute lethal toxicity of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons to two planktonic crustaceans: The key role of organism- ... Comparative acute toxicity of the first 50 Multicentre Evaluation of In Vitro Cytotoxicity chemicals to aquatic non-vertebrates ... The acute toxicity of 78 chemicals and pesticide formulations against two brackish water organisms, the Bleak (Alburnus ...
Toxicity reports, per the UN Globally Harmonized System for acute aquatic organism toxicity, skin irritation, eye irritation, ... Inclusion of genetically modified organisms in packaging materials *Biodegradability of packaging *Use of PVC in packaging ... contains a substance that is listed under California Proposition 65 as causing reproductive and/or developmental toxicity at a ... PRODUCT SAFETY AND POTENTIAL TOXICITY (maximum of 15 points): *Comparative hazard assessment of ingredients ...
Toxicity reports, per the UN Globally Harmonized System for acute aquatic organism toxicity, skin irritation, eye irritation, ... Inclusion of genetically modified organisms in materials and ingredients *Biodegradability of product ... Lab results for LC50 inhalation acute toxicity * ... Lab results for LD50 oral acute toxicity *Lab results for LD50 ... as a Group 1 or 2A IARC carcinogen or under California Proposition 65 as causing reproductive and/or developmental toxicity at ...
Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Atrazine and Its Metabolites Deethylatrazine and Deisopropylatrazine on Aquatic Organisms ... The absence of organism-level responses was probably not related to a lack of sensitivity, as previous studies in our ... In general, acute and chronic toxicity was ranked ATRZ > DEA > DIA. All 96-h median inhibition concentrations (IC(50)) were ... Proteomics in Aquatic Amphipods: Can It Be Used to Determine Mechanisms of Toxicity and Interspecies Responses After Exposure ...
Since the acute toxicity of TCP to aquatic organisms is also low, it is unlikely that it poses a threat to such organisms. As a ... Organism Isomer Temper- Species Effect Concent- Reference ature ration ( C) (mg/litre ... 6.2 Aquatic organisms Data on the toxicity of TCP to aquatic organisms are presented in Table 11. Table 10. Toxicity of TCP to ... There are few data on the acute toxicity of TCP to aquatic invertebrates: a 48-h LC50 for Daphnia of 5.6 mg per litre, a 24-h ...
... was developed to explain and predict the effects of water chemistry on the acute toxicity of metals to aquatic organisms. The ... biotic ligand is defined as a specific receptor within an organism where metal complexation leads to acute toxicity. The BLM is ... Biotic Ligand Model of the Acute Toxicity of Metals, 2. Application to acute copper toxicity in Freshwater Fish and Daphnia The ... has been developed for predicting and explaining the bioavailability and toxicity of mixtures of metals to aquatic organisms. ...
Acute aquatic toxicity: The intrinsic property of a substance to harm an aquatic organism in a short-term exposure to it. The ... Chronic aquatic toxicity: The intrinsic property of a substance to cause adverse effects to aquatic organisms during aquatic ... Acute Toxicity39. This GHS defines acute toxicity as those adverse effects occurring after oral or dermal administration of a ... If adequate chronic data are not available, then classification is accomplished by using information on acute aquatic toxicity ...
... and the toxicity of the water to aquatic organisms. These objectives are designed to represent the maximum amount of pollutants ... There shall be no acute toxicity in ambient waters. Acute toxicity is defined as a median of less than 90 percent survival, or ... the health of an organism, population, or community. ... aquatic life. Effects on aquatic organisms, wildlife, and human ... In addition, the health and life history characteristics of aquatic organisms in waters affected by controllable water quality ...
... the impact of anthropogenic stressors is affecting the aquatic ecosystems, especially essential microorganisms such as ... Ventura SP, Gonçalves AM, Gonçalves F, Coutinho JA (2010) Assessing the toxicity on [C3mim][Tf2N] to aquatic organisms of ... Toxicity of single and mixed contaminants in seawater measured with acute toxicity bioassays. ScientificWorldJournal 2: 1115- ... Organism. Environmental change. Generations (selection+control conditions). Plastic response (grow rate). Total evolutionary ...
Seeland A, Oetken M, Kiss A, Fries E, Oehlmann J (2012): Acute and chronic toxicity of benzotriazoles to aquatic organisms. ... Nowak C, Vogt C, Barateiro Diogo J, Schwenk K (2007): Genetic impoverishment in laboratory stocks of the test organism ... Sieratowicz A, Kaiser D, Behr M, Oetken M, Oehlmann J (2011): Acute and chronic toxicity of four frequently used UV filter ... Whole effluent toxicity assessment at a wastewater treatment plant upgraded with a full-scale post-ozonation using aquatic key ...
... insecticides and herbicides including toxicity, water pollution, ecological toxicity, uses and regulatory status. ... Summary of Acute Toxicity for Organism Group. Sorry, no acute aquatic ecotoxicity data available for this chemical. Try related ... Toxicity to aquatic organisms. Related Chems. List of chemicals in the same family, including breakdown products, salts, esters ... Acute Toxicity 2. Clothianidin Thiamethoxam WHO Acute Hazard. TRI Acute Hazard. Material Safety Data Sheets. Acute rating from ...
  • Mahapatra CT, Damayanti NP, Guffey SC, Serafin SS, Irudayaraj J, Sepúlveda MS. (2017) Comparative in vitro toxicity assessment of perfluorinated carboxylic acids. (purdue.edu)
  • 5.3 Results of three-brood toxicity tests with C. dubia might be used to predict chronic or partial chronic effects on species in field situations as a result of exposure under comparable conditions. (astm.org)
  • 5.4 Results of three-brood toxicity tests with C. dubia might be compared with the chronic sensitivities of different species and the chronic toxicities of different materials, and to study the effects of various environmental factors on results of such tests. (astm.org)
  • 5.5 Results of three-brood toxicity tests with C. dubia might be useful for predicting the results of chronic tests on the same test material with the same species in another water or with another species in the same or a different water. (astm.org)
  • In addition to conducting an acute test with unfed C. dubia , it might also be desirable to conduct an acute test in which the organisms are fed the same as in the three-brood test, to see if the presence of that concentration of that food affects the results of the acute test and the acute chronic ratio (see 10.4.1 ). (astm.org)
  • It should be noted that results from an acute test may not necessarily correspond to those of a chronic test, due to the addition of food to the chronic test. (astm.org)
  • Sorry, no honeybee chronic toxicity data available for this chemical. (pesticideinfo.org)
  • At least one pesticide in more than half of the 100 streams sampled in the Midwest exceeded a toxicity threshold predicted to cause harm to aquatic insects and other stream organisms, ranging from acute effects (mortality after short-term exposure) in 12 streams to chronic effects (longer term impairments to reproduction and development) in 41 streams. (usgs.gov)
  • Chronic Toxicity: The NOEL for plasma cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition from a 4-week dog feeding study is 0.00125 mg/kg/day the NOEL for brain/red blood cell ChE from a l-year dog study is 0.060 mg/kg/day. (cornell.edu)
  • Mazzeo DEC, Misovic A, Oliveira FA, Levy CE, Oehlmann J, Marchi MRR (2018): Effects of biostimulation by sugarcane bagasse and coffee grounds on sewage sludges, focusing agricultural use: Microbial characterization, respirometric assessment and toxicity reduction. (uni-frankfurt.de)
  • 5.5.1 A 48 or 96-h EC50 or LC50 can sometimes be obtained from a three-brood toxicity test with a known test material, but often all the concentrations in the test will be below the EC50 or LC50. (astm.org)
  • This study evaluated the acute toxicity of prothioconazole to zebrafish embryos by assessing their hatching rate and malformation when exposed to different concentrations of prothioconazole. (bvsalud.org)
  • 5.8 Results of three-brood toxicity tests with C. dubia might be an important consideration when assessing the hazards of materials to aquatic organisms (see Guide E1023 ), or when deriving water quality criteria for aquatic organisms. (astm.org)
  • For many years the transport sector had a uniform system for the classification and labeling of products through the efforts of the United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transportation of Dangerous Goods (UNCETDG), but its work was restricted to physical hazards and acute toxicity. (mysafetylabels.com)
  • By definition, modes of action are characterized by FATS because the combination of common responses that represent each fish acute toxicity syndrome characterize an adverse biological effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • 110) 1.Tritolyl phosphates - adverse effects 2.Tritolyl phosphates - toxicity I.Series ISBN 92 4 157110 1 (NLM Classification: QV 627) ISSN 0250-863X The World Health Organization welcomes requests for permission to reproduce or translate its publications, in part or in full. (inchem.org)
  • These objectives are designed to represent the maximum amount of pollutants that can remain in the water column without causing any adverse effect on organisms using the aquatic system as habitat, on people consuming those organisms or water, and on other current or potential beneficial uses (as described in Chapter 2 ). (ca.gov)
  • Substances with an activating or inhibitory effect on the estrogen and/or androgen receptor of organisms may interfere with reproduction, affect the metabolism and immune system and induce the formation of tumours. (ecotoxcentre.ch)
  • The acceptable short-term field study shows significant acute mortalities of birds, mammals, reptiles, and fish resulting from broadcast application of terbufos to corn fields at 1 pound active ingredient per acre (l lb ai/A). In the same study, the application of terbufos as a soil-incorporated treatment to corn fields at 2 lb ai resulted in acute mortalities to birds and reptiles. (cornell.edu)
  • Impacts on populations and aquatic communities, mostly using mesocosms, are reviewed next to identify the communities most at risk from those that undergo little or no impact. (frontiersin.org)
  • Toxicology Characteristics - Acute Oral: Toxicity Category I (1.6 and 1.3 mg/kg for male and female rats, respectively). (cornell.edu)
  • California's regulatory framework uses water quality objectives both to define appropriate levels of environmental quality and to control activities that can adversely affect aquatic systems. (ca.gov)
  • Two decades of regulatory experience and extensive research in environmental science have demonstrated that beneficial uses are not fully protected unless pollutant levels in all parts of the aquatic system are also monitored and controlled. (ca.gov)
  • When environmental change exceeds the range of variation that can be coped with by organisms through plasticity, selection processes may occur and evolutionary dynamics take place. (omicsonline.org)
  • Results of the study indicate potential toxicity of dimethoate in fingerlings of common carp for which the natural waterbodies must be continuously monitored to reduce its impact across food chains. (hindawi.com)
  • This policy is aimed at protecting relatively uncontaminated aquatic systems where they exist and preventing further degradation. (ca.gov)