Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Patient Discharge Summaries: Summaries that serve as the primary documents communicating a patient's care plan to the post-hospital care team.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.CaliforniaHospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.United StatesVaginal Discharge: A common gynecologic disorder characterized by an abnormal, nonbloody discharge from the genital tract.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.KentuckyProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Microvascular Decompression Surgery: Surgery performed to relieve pressure from MICROVESSELS that are located around nerves and are causing NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES.Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.PennsylvaniaContinuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Medication Reconciliation: The formal process of obtaining a complete and accurate list of each patient's current home medications including name, dosage, frequency, and route of administration, and comparing admission, transfer, and/or discharge medication orders to that list. The reconciliation is done to avoid medication errors.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Methicillin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.New England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Dyscalculia: Impaired ability in numerical concepts. These inabilities arise as a result of primary neurological lesion, are syndromic (e.g., GERSTMANN SYNDROME ) or acquired due to brain damage.Russia (Pre-1917)Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Faculty, Nursing: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a nursing school.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Patient Isolation: The segregation of patients with communicable or other diseases for a specified time. Isolation may be strict, in which movement and social contacts are limited; modified, where an effort to control specified aspects of care is made in order to prevent cross infection; or reverse, where the patient is secluded in a controlled or germ-free environment in order to protect him or her from cross infection.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Nursing Stations: An area in a clinic, unit, or ward in a health care facility that serves as the administrative center for nursing care. (from Mosby's Medical Dictionary, 8th ed)Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.
  • Hospital patients who have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can prevent future infections by following a standard bathing protocol after discharge, according to research results published in the Feb. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine . (rush.edu)
  • Results Interviews were conducted with 45 healthcare professionals, with 20 patients at three time points and 189 hours of observation were undertaken. (bmj.com)
  • Full-thickness grafts but provide a subdartos pouch large e n o satisfactory form of wegener's granulomatosis presented with pulmonary hemorrhage in patients with mixed results, alternatively. (buffalo.edu)
  • The data included such medical information as CT scan results, injury characteristics and the patients' admission score on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). (eurekalert.org)
  • Approximately one of six patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has normal angiographic results and an unidentified source of bleeding. (ajnr.org)
  • Several studies have now shown that patients with focal SAH in front of the brain stem typically have normal angiographic results, do not rebleed, and have an excellent prognosis (1-7) . (ajnr.org)
  • Results Overall 38 229 patients were included, and during 2012 the mean age was 76.8 (SD 8.2) years and 43% (13 212) were male. (bmj.com)
  • Results- Of the 2460 IS/TIA patients, 291 (11.8%) had AF, of which 5.5% of patients were discharged on aspirin alone, 49.1% on warfarin alone, 1.4% on clopidogrel alone, 34.7% on warfarin plus aspirin, 2.1% on aspirin plus clopidogrel, and 1.0% on aspirin plus clopidogrel plus warfarin. (ahajournals.org)
  • Results: Approximately 17.5% of patients were readmitted in each cohort. (harvard.edu)
  • Results from 47 patients demonstrated that administering BPX-501 following an alpha/beta T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alpha/beta T-cell depleted haplo-HSCT) produced rapid immune reconstitution, low incidence of acute and chronic Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD), and a low rate of disease relapse. (globenewswire.com)
  • Methods and Results- We used prospectively collected data from a 19-center study of MI patients to examine the prevalence and predictors of thienopyridine discontinuation 30 days after DES treatment. (ahajournals.org)
  • Examining the comprehensive experience of patients who have undergone cardiac procedures such as CABG and valve replacement may provide tremendous value, given the labor-intensive and costly nature of these procedures. (elsevier.com)
  • If a patient has already undergone kidney transplantation, either through living or cadaveric donation, he/she can be evaluated for PAK. (barnabashealth.org)
  • The authors analyzed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) hospital discharge database from 2007 to 2009 to determine factors that influenced hospital charges in patients who had undergone transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing disease. (thejns.org)
  • Patients with RMS can present with an asymptomatic mass or with signs and symptoms that are associated with the primary tumor site and the presence or absence of distant metastases. (scirp.org)
  • The most common primary site is head and neck (approximately 35 to 40 percent), the second common site are the genitourinary tract and the extremities (25 percent and 20 percent). (scirp.org)
  • Patient adherence to visits with their primary physician remained stable during the study period. (ahrq.gov)
  • An additional 214 injuries were managed and discharged at the 10 trauma stabilization points (TSP) and primary healthcare centers. (who.int)
  • At presentation, 20-25% of patients will have clinically detectable liver metastases and up to 50% of all patients will develop liver metastases after re-section of the primary tumour within three years of follow up. (wikipedia.org)
  • Problem definition: Inpatient beds are usually grouped into several wards, and each ward is assigned to serve patients from certain "primary" specialties. (ssrn.com)
  • However, when a patient waits excessively long before a primary bed becomes available, hospital managers have the option to assign her to a non-primary bed though it is undesirable. (ssrn.com)
  • There was no significant difference in the mean age (83 years), gender makeup (50% female), racial makeup (19% non-White), and primary payer between patients who did and did not have a 30dRA. (ahajournals.org)
  • The primary end point was patient pain scores (visual analog scale [VAS], rated 0-10) for 48 hours after surgery. (thejns.org)
  • 3 The primary symptoms in patients with uterine leiomyoma include feelings of pressure and pain in the pelvis, which tend to worsen as the size of the leiomyoma increases. (jaoa.org)
  • In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. (hindawi.com)
  • The main outcome is the level of ADL functioning six months after discharge compared to premorbid functioning measured with the Katz ADL index. (uva.nl)
  • The aim of this study was to validate the predictive value of serial creatinine concentrations and to study the utility of cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as predictors of outcome in patients with acute paraquat poisoning. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In the hypothermia group, 49% survived with a good neurologic outcome (discharged home or to rehabilitation facility), while only 26% in the normothermia group survived with good neurologic outcome ( P = .046). (uspharmacist.com)
  • Sensitivity analyses were also performed by calculating patient demographic-and case-mix-adjusted COV values for each outcome using weighted age- and sex-standardized values. (ajmc.com)
  • The Changing Lives by Eradicating Antibiotic Resistance, or CLEAR, trial divided 2,121 adult patients at random into one of two groups. (rush.edu)
  • Although rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is rare in adults, accounting for 2 to 5 percent of adult sarcomas, approximately 40 percent of RMS cases arise in adults. (scirp.org)
  • In 2009, only 63% of patients in the adult emergency department (ED) at Auckland City Hospital were admitted, discharged or transferred from ED within 6 hours of arrival. (nzma.org.nz)
  • From 2001 to 2010, rates of CDI among hospitalized adults rose from 4.5 to 8.2 CDI discharges per 1,000 total adult hospital discharges. (apic.org)
  • The efficacy, safety and tolerability of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) has been demonstrated in three phase III double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trials in 1,049 adult patients with partial onset seizures (2-4). (science20.com)
  • This study was a single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled intervention trial involving adult patients with planned transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumors randomized into 2 groups. (thejns.org)
  • The EEG during seizures is most often high-voltage (200-400 µV) generalized discharges, which may appear to have a focal onset. (medscape.com)
  • however, patients experience symptom onset before discharge in only 24.2% of cases. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting approximately 1 in 100 people - and the successful treatment of partial-onset seizures (the most common type of epilepsy) remains a challenge. (science20.com)
  • Nick Burgin, Managing Director Eisai in the UK, said The effective treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures remains a major challenge for clinicians as well as for patients with epilepsy and their families. (science20.com)
  • The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged without development of neurological sequelae. (nih.gov)
  • Postural control is the ability of the body to balance an upright body position under the influence of gravity.The aim of the study is to investigate whether training with the Galileo device by means of vibration on the soles of the feet and / or by changing the position to 15 ° can improve the postural control and thus the postoperative mobilization of patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 7 The spores are resistant to environmental insults (e.g., pH and temperature), and transmission typically occurs from workers and the environment to patients. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Doc, my wife got lots of white vaginal discharge till today, before she was pregnant she never had this kind of discharges, i know that discharging do occurs during pregnancy untill date of delivery but now its been already more than a month but her discharges seems to be increasing more than before, is there any relationship with the virus(HIV) in her body? (thebody.com)
  • Of 902 patients admitted to hospital, who did not undergo cardioversion or catheter ablation, 41% were prescribed aspirin either alone or in combination with an anticoagulant. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Aspirin use was particularly common among patients with CHD, whereas the authors stressed that anticoagulation is the best option in patients with stable CHD. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • However the QOF still uses the CHADS 2 score and rewards GPs for putting patients on either aspirin or an anticoagulant, for those with a score of 1. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • The GCS scores range from 3 to 15, from severe to mild, and is intended to rate the consciousness of patients who have suffered an acute brain injury. (eurekalert.org)
  • Perform brain computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both of these studies in every patient with neonatal seizures to exclude structural lesions and intracranial hemorrhage. (medscape.com)
  • Up to 40% of patients with partial seizures do not achieve seizure control with current anti-epileptics (1). (science20.com)
  • Unfortunately despite advances in treatment and investigation many such patients continue to have seizures. (science20.com)
  • Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease characterised by abnormal discharges of neuronal activity causing seizures. (science20.com)
  • Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), β-blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins have all been shown to reduce death and reinfarction among patients who have experienced an acute myocardial infarction. (cmaj.ca)
  • MADRID, Spain, June 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Bellicum Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq:BLCM), a leader in developing novel, controllable cellular immunotherapies for cancers and orphan inherited blood disorders, today announced data from its ongoing multicenter BP-004 trial of BPX-501 and rimiducid in a cohort of pediatric patients with acute leukemias who lack a matched donor. (globenewswire.com)
  • Commented Rick Fair, President and CEO of Bellicum Pharmaceuticals, "We are pleased by the profile observed with BPX-501 in pediatric patients receiving a haploidentical transplant, and by its potential to reduce disease relapse. (globenewswire.com)
  • Using the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) detector and experimental radiotracer [18F]FTC-146 and positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) scanner, the researchers may potentially identify the source of pain generation in patients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and chronic sciatica. (stanford.edu)
  • The researchers noted in the paper that persistent symptoms can be debilitating in many ways for patients. (eurekalert.org)
  • MedTrak, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) electronic physician communication tool, has proven successful and is poised to move forward with an initiative the investigators call virtual continuity, allowing PCPs to follow their patients electronically if they cannot do so physically. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • and 3) a telephone call to the patient 3 weeks after a visit with no physician feedback provided. (ahrq.gov)
  • Parameningeal lesions can cause nasal, aural, or sinus obstruction with or without a mucopurulent or sanguineous discharge while orbital tumors cause proptosis and ophthalmoplegia. (scirp.org)
  • Has the marketing of oxycodone been so effective that a whole new group of patients now "require" strong opioids? (bpac.org.nz)
  • Group 1 patients were treated with scheduled IV ibuprofen, scheduled oral acetaminophen, and rescue opioids. (thejns.org)
  • 3 - 8 Current American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines advocate anticoagulation use as a class IA recommendation in patients with AF and IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA). (ahajournals.org)
  • The classic electroencephalogram (EEG) observed in 60% of patients with benign idiopathic neonatal convulsions (BINCs) is nonreactive, focal, rhythmic activity in the theta (4-7 Hz) frequency, which may be mixed with sharp waves. (medscape.com)
  • The remaining patients with benign idiopathic neonatal convulsions have either a normal interictal EEG or focal abnormalities. (medscape.com)
  • In a small percentage of patients, focal, often rolandic, discharges or spikes may be present. (medscape.com)
  • Angiographic changes of vasospasm are uncommon in patients with this type of hemorrhage, and if vasospasm is present, it is mild and focal. (ajnr.org)