Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Hip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Joint DiseasesBone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Hip Contracture: Permanent fixation of the hip in primary positions, with limited passive or active motion at the hip joint. Locomotion is difficult and pain is sometimes present when the hip is in motion. It may be caused by trauma, infection, or poliomyelitis. (From Current Medical Information & Technology, 5th ed)Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease: A particular type of FEMUR HEAD NECROSIS occurring in children, mainly male, with a course of four years or so.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Polyethylenes: Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Arthritis, Infectious: Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Epiphyses, SlippedOsteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Joint Capsule: The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Knee: A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphyses: A developmental deformity in which the metaphysis of the FEMUR moves proximally and anteriorly away from FEMUR HEAD (epiphysis) at the upper GROWTH PLATE. It is most common in male adolescents and is associated with a greater risk of early OSTEOARTHRITIS of the hip.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Orthopedic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.Buttocks: Either of two fleshy protuberances at the lower posterior section of the trunk or HIP in humans and primate on which a person or animal sits, consisting of gluteal MUSCLES and fat.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Chromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tantalum: Tantalum. A rare metallic element, atomic number 73, atomic weight 180.948, symbol Ta. It is a noncorrosive and malleable metal that has been used for plates or disks to replace cranial defects, for wire sutures, and for making prosthetic devices. (Dorland, 28th ed)Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by retropatellar or peripatellar PAIN resulting from physical and biochemical changes in the patellofemoral joint. The pain is most prominent when ascending or descending stairs, squatting, or sitting with flexed knees. There is a lack of consensus on the etiology and treatment. The syndrome is often confused with (or accompanied by) CHONDROMALACIA PATELLAE, the latter describing a pathological condition of the CARTILAGE and not a syndrome.Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Disarticulation: Amputation or separation at a joint. (Dorland, 28th ed)Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Vitallium: An alloy of 60% cobalt, 20% chromium, 5% molybdenum, and traces of other substances. It is used in dentures, certain surgical appliances, prostheses, implants, and instruments.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Cobalt: A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.Cerebral Palsy: A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)Epiphyses: The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Canes: Sticks used as walking aids. The canes may have three or four prongs at the end of the shaft.Arthrometry, Articular: Measurements of joint flexibility (RANGE OF MOTION, ARTICULAR), usually by employing an angle-measuring device (arthrometer). Arthrometry is used to measure ligamentous laxity and stability. It is often used to evaluate the outcome of ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT replacement surgery.Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Joint Deformities, Acquired: Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.Lower Extremity: The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bone Lengthening: Increase in the longest dimension of a bone to correct anatomical deficiencies, congenital, traumatic, or as a result of disease. The lengthening is not restricted to long bones. The usual surgical methods are internal fixation and distraction.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.ArthritisTomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Rosa: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE and order Rosales. This should not be confused with the genus RHODIOLA which is sometimes called roseroot.Hemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Waist-Hip Ratio: The waist circumference measurement divided by the hip circumference measurement. For both men and women, a waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) of 1.0 or higher is considered "at risk" for undesirable health consequences, such as heart disease and ailments associated with OVERWEIGHT. A healthy WHR is 0.90 or less for men, and 0.80 or less for women. (National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2004)Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.DislocationsLocomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Patient Positioning: Moving a patient into a specific position or POSTURE to facilitate examination, surgery, or for therapeutic purposes.
The modified posterior MIS approach to hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty (hip replacement) displays a host of ... None of the above approaches offer a fluoroscopy-free approach to Minimal Invasive Hip Resurfacing. The only documented ... Although hip resurfacing has been around for some 40 years, the contemporary metal on metal bearing hip resurfacing has only ... for hip resurfacing from the conventional open approach (15-30 cm), to a mini-incision approach (7-15 cm) has been well ...
The lateral approach is also commonly used for hip replacement. The approach requires elevation of the hip abductors (gluteus ... The minimally invasive hip resurfacing procedure is a further refinement to hip resurfacing. Current alternatives also include ... Hip resurfacing is an alternative to hip replacement surgery. It has been used in Europe for over seventeen years and become a ... The first line approach as an alternative to hip replacement is conservative management which involves a multimodal approach of ...
Following a hip resurfacing operation in 2011, he moved to the UCI Professional Continental team Utensilnord-Named, but ... Quickly gaining his UCI coaching acrreditions he was approached by a number of teams to help assist with coaching and mentoring ... Augustyn was forced to retire from professional cycling in May 2014 due to a persistent hip problem which originated in a crash ... continued to suffer problems, indicating the hip implant was not coping with the rigours of professional racing. Following ...
Alternative Bearing Designs for Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty. Zebra lines of pamidronate therapy in children.4.31 Impact Factor ... "A new approach to asylum seeker policy". The Wire. Retrieved 3 November 2015. Australia, Amnesty International. "QLD Northern ... "Alternative Bearing Designs for Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty : Techniques in Orthopaedics". Journals.lww.com. 1 September 2015 ... As an Australian orthopaedic surgeon, he specialises in hip, knee, trauma and osseointegration surgery, focusing in hip ...
In 1981, the duo's single "Hip Shake Jerk" became a hit in Australia, reaching No. 12, and their first album On the Uptake was ... Later that year, Campsie and McFarlane resurfaced as The Quick. Their debut single, "Sharks Are Cool, Jets Are Hot" was ... showed the band moving away from their earlier dance-friendly roots and adopting a more mainstream AOR approach and ... resurfacing as Giant Steps in 1988 and releasing their sole album The Book of Pride through A&M. Book of Pride found Campsie ...
The second is the transdeltoid approach, which provides a straight on approach at the glenoid. However, during this approach ... total hip arthroplasty) with a prosthetic hip. This procedure involves replacing both the acetabulum (hip socket) and the head ... Other forms of arthroplasty include resection(al) arthroplasty, resurfacing arthroplasty, mold arthroplasty, cup arthroplasty, ... Hip replacement can be performed as a total replacement or a hemi (half) replacement. A total hip replacement consists of ...
Hip dysplasia (human) - Hip examination - Hip fracture - Hip replacement - Hip resurfacing - Hip spica cast - Hoffa fracture - ... Hardinge lateral approach to the hip - Harrington rod - Harris Hip Score - Harris lines - Harrison's groove - Haversian canal ... Smith-Petersen anterior approach to the hip - Smith's fracture - Soft tissue injury - Southwick angle - Speed's test - Spina ... Watson-Jones anterolateral approach to the hip - Watson's test - Weaver-Dunn procedure - Webbed toes - Wedge fracture - Weil's ...
Due to sinking ratings, a month later, long-time hip-hop/R&B station KKBT eliminated hip hop from the format in favor of ... In April 2006, KDAY began moving away from a Rhythmic Contemporary direction to an Urban Contemporary approach as the station ... The Steve Harvey morning show was dropped on May 29, 2009, but later resurfaced on KJLH. In addition, Michael Baisden's ... Mack eventually added hip hop to its playlist to appeal to mostly young black and Latino listeners. Dr. Dre and DJ Yella Boy ...
... resurfaced in the 1970s with a series of releases which-like the street corner practices of doo-wop foreshadowing those of hip ... almost ad hoc independent approach creating a valuable and unique New York sound. Quoting Fileti, David Toop makes the point ... originator of hip hop's breakbeat DJing style), one of the prime movers in the emergence of hip hop in the 1970s. By 1980, ... A "break" was a short percussive passage in a record which hip hop DJs would loop (using two copies, one for each turntable) in ...
Hip resurfacing is another option for correcting hip dysplasia in adults. It is a type of hip replacement that preserves more ... "Developmental dysplasia of the hip: a new approach to incidence". Pediatrics. 103 (1): 93-9. doi:10.1542/peds.103.1.93. PMID ... "Newborn Screening and Prevention - International Hip Dysplasia Institute". "Hip Clicks and Hip Dysplasia - International Hip ... Hip dysplasia can develop in older age. Adolescents and adults with hip dysplasia may present with hip pain and in some cases ...
... joint replacement surgery or resurfacing may be recommended. Evidence supports joint replacement for both knees and hips as it ... Civjan N (2012). Chemical Biology: Approaches to Drug Discovery and Development to Targeting Disease. John Wiley & Sons. p. 313 ... levels as a prognostic marker for incidence of both knee and hip osteoarthritis. A review of biomarkers in hip osteoarthritis ... "Hip pain and mobility deficits-hip osteoarthritis: clinical practice guidelines linked to the international classification of ...
The BAR gunner, who could stealthily approach the enemy gun position alone (and prone if need be), proved invaluable in this ... The idea would resurface in the submachine gun and ultimately the assault rifle. It is not known if any of the belt-cup devices ... to support the stock of the rifle when held at the hip. In theory, this allowed the soldier to lay suppressive fire while ... or to be fired from the hip. This is a concept called "walking fire" - thought to be necessary for the individual soldier ...
DePuy said the recall was due to unpublished National Joint Registry data showing a 12% revision rate for resurfacing at five ... Concerns about metal-on-metal hip implant systems. 2011". 2011. Meier, Barry (March 8, 2013). "J.&J. Loses First Case Over ... who recently received FDA approval for an office-based approach to imaging meibomian glands and treating meibomian gland ... years and an ASR XL revision rate of 13%. All hip prostheses fail in some patients, but it is expected that the rate will be ...
On August 14, 2015, at 3 PM, the 105 frequencies flipped to classic hip hop as 105 The Vibe, which joins K273BH/KTCZ-FMHD3 in ... Plans changed eventually and they decided to go with a more local approach (though REV105 did syndicate a show, Spin Radio for ... Kevin Cole, the former program director at REV105, and a veteran of the old KJ104, later resurfaced at KEXP in Seattle, ... The three stations broadcast a classic hip hop radio format, with the moniker "105 The Vibe." The studios and offices are in ...
Hip resurfacing. *Hip replacement. *Rotationplasty. *Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. *Knee replacement/ ...
The knees may move downwards a bit at the same time by bending at the hips for stability. The return stroke feathers the fins ... DIR A holistic approach to scuba diving, which encompasses several essential elements, including fundamental diving skills, ... but relies on a diver's ability to hold his or her breath until resurfacing. also Breath-hold diving, and apnea (q.v.). free- ... The diver bends forward at the hips and waist and falls forward into the water, making a partial somersault and breaking the ...
Campbell resurfaced in 1988 as a fringe candidate for mayor of North York. Most recently, Campbell has run for Mayor of Toronto ... Lorinc, John (April 6, 2011). "Ford's unique approach to campaign financing: Borrow from family firm". The Globe and Mail. ... August 10 Di Fiore is a hip-hop artist and freelance journalist best known for the controversy following a piece he wrote for ... and said the approach to the city's finances should be "clinical as opposed to a sledgehammer." He pledged to use the next four ...
Entrance Moves Kayakers can perform a variety of moves as they begin a surf on a wave if they are approaching it from upstream ... and if the initial bow drive was hard enough their toes will resurface, and the entire boat will be airborne, giving it the ... time the kayaker rotates his entire body to face the water hands outstretched in front of his head while they rotate their hips ... If the kayaker is approaching a play feature that does not have eddy access they do not have the right to push a kayaker ...
... one recently resurfaced as a multi-purpose court) with a timber tennis shed (pre-1946) to the south of Block A. The tennis shed ... an easy and cost-effective approach that also enabled the government to provide facilities in remote areas. Standard designs ... is located south of the western tennis court; and is lowset, sheltered by a corrugated metal-clad hip roof, and clad with a ...
Rear Admiral Hipper arrived in Seydlitz at 15:10, but by then the battle was over. The most significant result of the battle ... When she resurfaced all the larger ships had gone, and the submarine rescued the British crewmen, still afloat in small boats ... Such an approach was still expected by the British population. However, it was realised that the advent of submarines armed ... Hipper was unaware of the scale of the attack, but ordered the light cruisers SMS Stettin and Frauenlob to defend the ...
Osteochondral allografting using donor cartilage has been used most historically in knees, but is also emerging in hips, ankles ... An advantage to this approach is that a person's own stem cells are used, avoiding transmission of genetic diseases. It is also ... following any articular cartilage repair procedure is paramount for the success of any articular cartilage resurfacing ... though no rejection drugs are required and infection has been shown to be lesser than that of a total knee or hip. ...
Other positive prognostic factors for independent walking were active hips and knees, hip flexion contractures of less than 20 ... This tissue can be used to resurface the thumb-index web after a comprehensive release of all the tight structures to allow for ... Rink, Britton D. (2011). "Arthrogryposis: A Review and Approach to Prenatal Diagnosis". Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey. 66 ... hip (flexed, abducted and externally rotated, frequently dislocated); elbow (extension and pronation) and foot (clubfoot). ...
The Houston, Texas hip hop music blog Waffles & Wings has previously published suspicions that James Z is actually hip-hop ... The band is said to be collaborating with noted third coast underground producer and beat-maker James Z. Z approached the band ... Five years after the release of their Mayfeeder album, Earwig resurfaced from the Columbus indie rock underground with 1999's " ...
Hip resurfacing. *Hip replacement. *Rotationplasty. *Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. *Knee replacement/ ... Anterior approach to cervical spine.. Cervical spine[edit]. *Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF)[3] ...
He would resurface in 2007 as the rapping frontman of a hip-hop/heavy metal band called Backup Radio with guitarist/vocalist ... The album incorporated styles from hardcore approaches reminiscent of Public Enemy and The Bomb Squad to ragga and new jack ... Credit to the Nation are an English hip hop group, who had chart success in the 1990s and are best known for their Nirvana- ... The band had also developed their own brand of conscious hip hop drawing on British life and experience (including, but not ...
Big Ball, DogJob, Get Hip, Repulsion, Amphetamine Reptile, Boomba, Epitaph, Bitzcore, Sympathy, Burning Heart, Virgin, Man's ... All songs on this release would resurface on their next album, with the exception of "Six Pack". Their second album "Never is ... When Turbonegro was approached by the organizers of the Norwegian Quart Festival about possible participation in 2002, ...
Hip resurfacing is a valid alternative. This procedure involves the use of two very thin metal domes to resurface the ... The results of hip resurfacing are better than those of traditional hip arthroplasty, especially in active patients, with ... the patient is in a position similar to that of a patient undergoing hip arthroplasty for the first time. Hip resurfacing is ... Hip resurfacing also is advantageous because, if the procedure has to be repeated, ...
i,Case Presentation,/i,. A 75-year-old female who had left metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 6 years ago presented with left groin ... The pseudotumor was excised through a separate iliofemoral approach and revision of the hip implant was undertaken through a ... i,Conclusion,/i,. A combined approach with vascular surgeons is required. Combined resection of the pseudotumor and revision of ... i,Results,/i,. Our case was initially treated for DVT followed by dual surgical approach. ...
"Hip resurfacing is the ideal solution for many younger, more active patients who suffer from hip pain," Dr. Trinidad said. " ... SOMCs Trinidad Using New Hip Resurfacing ApproachPosted on February 4, 2008. ... those who have had Birmingham Hip Resurfacing generally tend to have a quicker recovery than those having total hip replacement ... The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing System now provides me with an alternative that meets the needs of my more active patients." ...
Tag Archives: anterior surgical approach. Incidence of nerve damage with anterior approach. Surface Hippy Hip Resurfacing ... Hip Resurfacing Stories*Athletes Hip Resurfacing Stories*Baseball, Football, Soccer, Basketball, Golf, Tennis ... Surface Hippy Hip Resurfacing Information. Hip Resurfacing articles, doctor information and personal stories. ... Surface Hippy presents information about hip resurfacing. It does not provide medical advice.. It is designed to support, not ...
2006 There are two ways to look at approaches to hip resurfacing or any hip arthroplasty. One is to view it with the… ... I have a metal allergy, can I have a hip resurfacing? →. Anterior and Posterior Approaches for hip resurfacing by Dr. Bose. ... There are two ways to look at approaches to hip resurfacing or any hip arthroplasty. One is to view it with the amount of ... Home→HR Info→Surgical Approaches→Anterior and Posterior Approaches for hip resurfacing by Dr. Bose ...
... is a surgical technique that has a number of approaches and procedures that differentiate it from traditional hip replacement ... there are a number of other surgical interventions such as hip resurfacing and partial hip replacement to relieve hip pain of ... There are also a number of non-surgical treatment options for hip pain which can avoid or delay the need for more aggressive ... While total hip replacement is the most common hip surgery, ... Partial Hip Replacement. Hip Resurfacing Hip resurfacing is ...
Patient-specific acetabular guide for anterior approach. US9066727. 3 Mar 2011. 30 Jun 2015. Materialise Nv. Patient-specific ... In the resurfacing of a patients hip, installation of the resurfacing device requires that a guide wire for a drill is ... System for modular hip resurfacing. US9554910. 17 Oct 2012. 31 Jan 2017. Biomet Manufacturing, Llc. Patient-specific glenoid ... Hip resurfacing surgical guide tool. US8737700. 14 Apr 2010. 27 May 2014. Otismed Corporation. Preoperatively planning an ...
We measured oxygen concentration during hip resurfacing through the trochanteric flip approach (n = 15 patients) and compared ... of hip resurfacing and considered by some to be related to reduced blood flow as a consequence of the surgical approach. ... Both of these approaches were superior in terms of oxygenation preservation to the posterior approach which resulted in a ... Preservation of oxygenation with the trochanteric flip was similar to that observed with the anterolateral approach, but with ...
The trapdoor procedure is performed via open hip surgical dislocation and currently can be performed in a trap-less manner ... Moderate to large areas of osteonecrosis may lead to subchondral collapse and subsequent need for total hip arthroplasty, often ... Surgical Technique: Hip Resurfacing Posterolateral Approach February 19, 2016 * Endoscopic Gluteus Medius Repair: Case ... Hip Arthroscopy: Comparison of the Extracapsular Capsulotomy Technique to the Interportal Technique February 19, 2016 ...
The modified posterior MIS approach to hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty (hip replacement) displays a host of ... None of the above approaches offer a fluoroscopy-free approach to Minimal Invasive Hip Resurfacing. The only documented ... Although hip resurfacing has been around for some 40 years, the contemporary metal on metal bearing hip resurfacing has only ... for hip resurfacing from the conventional open approach (15-30 cm), to a mini-incision approach (7-15 cm) has been well ...
... we reported changes to intra-operative blood flow during hip resurfacing arthroplasty comparing two surgical approaches. In ... eight had their arthroplasty through a posterior approach and five through a trochanteric-flip approach. RESULTS: One year ... which is seen with the posterior approach compared with trochanteric flip, does not result in any difference in vascularity or ... and to use these results to compare the posterior and the trochanteric-flip approaches. METHODS: In our previous work, ...
Partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint - a new approach to treat local osteochondral defects? / Gelenkoberflächen-Teilersatz ... Novel telemetric signal averaging ECG approach to determine electrical atrial and ventricular conduction delays in implantable ... FE-analysis of surface stresses for the tribological system in total hip prostheses. Behrens, Bernd-Arno / Helms, Gabriele / ...
Several days of hard skiing and moderate hiking after which the hips were screaming. Ive got about 40 years of skiing on them ... My initial ortho x-rays and says you need a hip replacement. What about skiing? Youre done. Not ... This is an infomercial for you young guys to remember when your hips decide to quit on you. Well, it started about 2 years ago ... If you can find a doc that uses an anterior approach for a total hip the issues with snow plowing and posterior dislocation are ...
Purchase Techniques in Hip Arthroscopy and Joint Preservation Surgery - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9781416056423, ... Anterior Hueter Approach for Hip Resurfacing in the Arthritic Patient. Chapter 35. Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Young Active ... Chapter 11: Peripheral Compartment Approach to Hip Arthroscopy. Chapter 12: Complex Therapeutic Hip Arthroscopy with the use of ... Techniques in Hip Arthroscopy and Joint Preservation Surgery 1st Edition. Expert Consult: Online and Print with DVD. ...
Anterior Approach Hip Replacement. *Total Hip Replacement. *Partial Hip Replacement. *Hip Resurfacing ... Anterior Approach Hip Replacement. A relatively new approach to hip replacement in the United States, anterior approach hip ... a unique muscle-sparing procedure that uses the natural muscle at the front of the hip to access the hip joint and insert a hip ... Our OrthoColorado Hospital hip surgery specialists practice at Panorama Orthopedics. To request an appointment, complete the ...
... to the side of the hip, or from in front of the hip. Total hip replacement with anterior approach refers to surgeries done from ... It replaces your hip joint with an artificial one. It is also called hip arthroplasty. Healthcare providers can do these ... in front of the hip. These surgeries may also be called mini, modified, minimally invasive, or muscle-sparing surgeries. ... A total hip replacement is a type of surgery. ... such as total hip resurfacing. Talk with your healthcare ...
Hip,Replacement,-,APAC,Analysis,and,Market,Forecasts,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters, ... 3.4.11 Resurfacing Arthroplasty 46 3.4.12 Computer-Navigated Hip Replacement 47 3.5 Surgical Approaches 47 3.5.1 Anterolateral ... Figure 4: Hip Arthrodesis 41 Figure 5: Partial Hip Arthroplasty and Total Hip Arthroplasty 44 Figure 6: Surgical Approach Used ... Table 75: i-Hip Total Hip Implant (Iconacy Orthopedic Implants) 117 Table 76: SWOT i-Hip Total Hip Implant 117 Table 77: EcoFit ...
Birmingham Hip Resurfacing Surgery abroad in India offers info on Birmingham Hip Resurfacing Surgery surgeon,hip surgery ... Hip resurfacing is an approach to treat the following illnesses of the hip : -. *Osteoarthritis (OA) : - The leading cause of ... What is Hip Resurfacing ?. Hip resurfacing (also known as hip resurfacing surgery, Birmingham hip resurfacing, Birmingham hip ... Birmingham Hip Resurfacing Surgery, Birmingham Hip Resurfacing India, Hip Resurfacing abroad, Hip Nerve Pain, Birmingham Hip ...
... a common type of surgery where a damaged hip joint is replaced with an artificial one (known as a prosthesis) ... There is an alternative type of surgery to hip replacement, known as hip resurfacing. This involves removing the damaged ... An advantage to this approach is that it removes less bone. However, it may not be suitable for:. *adults over the age of 65 ... When a hip replacement is needed. Hip replacement surgery is usually necessary when the hip joint is worn or damaged to the ...
OHSU hip doctors treat hip pain and problems with surgical and non-surgical hip treatments. Learn more about our specialized ... OHSU hip doctors treat hip pain and problems with surgical and non-surgical hip treatments. Learn more about our specialized ... Mini total hip replacement. *Total hip replacement, anterior approach. *Total hip resurfacing ... Hip resurfacing surgery Hip resurfacing surgery is designed for active adults younger than 60 who need a hip replacement. In ...
Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a type of hip replacement that replaces the arthritic surface of the joint but removes far less ... to the hip joint. The anterior approach from the front of the hip and the posterior approach from the back of the hip. There is ... Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty. A Patients Guide to Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty. Introduction. A hip that is painful as a ... Hip resurfacing may only affect the head of the femur or it may involve both the femoral head and the hip socket. ...
July 2007 - A New Concern: Posterior Approach Hip Surgery and the Blood Supply to the Femoral Head. Surgical approach and AVN: ... Notching of the femoral neck during resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip - A vascular study; Beaule P. etal. Jan 06 ... The effect of surgical approach on blood flow to the femoral head during resurfacing; Khan, A. etal. Jan 07 ... Most hip surgeons, including Dr. Gross, use the posterior surgical appoach. This saves more muscle and soft tissue from trauma ...
In addition to this he performs hip arthroscopy for internal derangement of the hip joint. [/no-lexicon] ... Primary and revision hip joint replacement. Minimally invasive approaches. Bone preserving hip resurfacing. Metal on metal and ... These include hip resurfacing and Thrust Plate Prosthesis (TPP) both of which have a metal on metal bearing surface. I also use ... Hip Surgery. I am one of leading surgeons in the UK who is able to offer key hole surgery of the hip joint (Arthroscopy) for ...
Learn about the many benefits hip resurfacing has over the traditional hip replacement surgery from the experts at the ... hip resurfacing involves shaving and capping only a few millimeters of the joint surface. Since this approach preserves more of ... For the active person with hip pain due to arthritis, hip resurfacing has many advantages over hip replacement and can lead to ... Importantly, hip resurfacing neednt be looked at as a temporary procedure, inevitably leading to hip replacement down the road ...
... in Metal-on-Polyethylene Total Hip Arthroplasty Compared With Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty and Resurfacing Hip ... Equal Primary Fixation of Resurfacing Stem, but Inferior Cup Fixation With Anterolateral vs Posterior Surgical Approach. A 2- ... Year Blinded Randomized Radiostereometric and Dual-energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Study of Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing ... Does a titanium sleeve reduce the frequency of pseudotumors in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty at 5-7years follow-up? ...
  • I start poking around on the interweb a few weeks ago to see if the devices have been re-approved by the FDA, and found a doc in Columbia, SC who specializes in hip resurfacing. (tetongravity.com)
  • We present a case of large pelvic pseudotumor associated with MoM hip resurfacing resulting in deep vein thrombosis (DVT). (hindawi.com)
  • Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings have been associated with a variety of complications resulting from adverse reaction to metal debris. (hindawi.com)
  • A 75-year-old female who had left metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 6 years ago presented with left groin pain associated with unilateral lower limb edema and swelling. (hindawi.com)
  • Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing was popularised in the late 1990s. (hindawi.com)
  • A plain radiograph of her pelvis showed satisfactory positioning of right uncemented total hip replacement with 36 mm metal-on-metal articulation (Corail/Pinnacle) and left hip resurfacing, without adverse features (Figure 1 ). (hindawi.com)
  • In January 2012, concerns were raised over the safety of larger metal-on-metal hip implants. (tyronetimes.co.uk)
  • SAN DIEGO -- Already controversial metal-on-metal (MoM) implants for hip resurfacing or replacement may have lost what remained of their luster with a series of new studies reported by researchers from several countries. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It is a metal on metal design, and not suitable for those with metal allergies, osteoporosis, or a relatively small hip joint. (ballaratosm.com.au)