Comfrey: Perennial herb Symphytum officinale, in the family Boraginaceae, used topically for wound healing. It contains ALLANTOIN, carotene, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE); GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, resin, SAPONINS; TANNINS; triterpenoids, VITAMIN B12, and ZINC. Comfrey also contains PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS and is hepatotoxic if ingested.Arnica: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The dried flower heads of Arnica montana are used externally as a counterirritant and tincture for sprains and bruises, either as crude extract or in homeopathic dilution (HOMEOPATHY). Arnica contains volatile oils (OILS, VOLATILE), arnicin, arnisterol, FLAVONOIDS; TANNINS; and resin. The common name of Wolf's Bane is similar to the common name for ACONITUM.Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: A group of ALKALOIDS, characterized by a nitrogen-containing necine, occurring mainly in plants of the BORAGINACEAE; COMPOSITAE; and LEGUMINOSAE plant families. They can be activated in the liver by hydrolysis of the ester and desaturation of the necine base to reactive electrophilic pyrrolic CYTOTOXINS.Skin Cream: A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.Depsides: Phenolic benzoic acid esters.Coriandrum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Bites and StingsHome Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).Waste Water: Contaminated water generated as a waste product of human activity.Arctium: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Arctiin (LIGNANS) is in the seed.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Lavandula: A plant genus of the LAMIACEAE family.Fantasy: An imagined sequence of events or mental images, e.g., daydreams.Boraginaceae: The Borage plant family is in the class Magnoliopsida, subclass Asteridae, order Lamiales. It is characterized by hairy foliage, usually alternate and simple; flowers are funnel-shaped or tubular. Some of the species contain PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Amino Acids, Essential: Amino acids that are not synthesized by the human body in amounts sufficient to carry out physiological functions. They are obtained from dietary foodstuffs.Vitamins: Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.Carotenoids: The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.beta Carotene: A carotenoid that is a precursor of VITAMIN A. It is administered to reduce the severity of photosensitivity reactions in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria (PORPHYRIA, ERYTHROPOIETIC). (From Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Engewood, CO, 1995.)Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Asia, Western: The geographical designation for the countries of the MIDDLE EAST and the countries BANGLADESH; BHUTAN; INDIA; NEPAL; PAKISTAN; and SRI LANKA. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993 & Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Autoradiography: The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Killer Cells, Natural: Bone marrow-derived lymphocytes that possess cytotoxic properties, classically directed against transformed and virus-infected cells. Unlike T CELLS; and B CELLS; NK CELLS are not antigen specific. The cytotoxicity of natural killer cells is determined by the collective signaling of an array of inhibitory and stimulatory CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. A subset of T-LYMPHOCYTES referred to as NATURAL KILLER T CELLS shares some of the properties of this cell type.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Ginger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Taraxacum: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain chicoric and chlorogenic acids and germacrane- and eudesmane-type SESQUITERPENES.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Dendrobium: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that contains dihydroayapin (COUMARINS) and phenanthraquinones.Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.
  • It isn't eaten a lot, as it has a slightly hairy, rough texture as the leaves age, but the young leaves and buds are very tender and delicious in recipes such as Comfrey Leaf Lemonade Fritters . (monicawilde.com)
  • Due to this, medicinal or food products for internal use containing comfrey root , are restricted in many countries, with a few also restricting comfrey leaf , although it contains far fewer alkaloids. (monicawilde.com)
  • Common comfrey in England mainly has strong coloured pink-purple flowers and lance shaped leaves, while Russian comfrey, which tends to be a bigger plant with broader pointed leaves, has paler violet or blue-purple flowers. (monicawilde.com)
  • Incidentally, comfrey is one of the few plants that takes up vitamin B12 from the soil, the vitamin that vegans need to supplement with to avoid pernicious anaemia. (monicawilde.com)
  • The United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and Germany also have banned the sale of oral products containing comfrey. (memhc.org)
  • The benefits of topical applications of comfrey are based primarily on anecdotal evidence, and little research has been done to confirm the efficacy of comfrey for its purported uses. (livestrong.com)
  • After numerous successful applications of comfrey while raising livestock, both as food and medicine, Doubleday founded the Henry Doubleday Research Association in England. (proliberty.com)
  • Vitamin E and Pro-Vitamin B5 promote healthy tissue regeneration, while calming botanical extracts of Licorice, Comfrey and Burdock soothe the skin. (ulta.com)
  • Calming extracts of Licorice, Comfrey and Burdock soothe skin and decrease sensitivity. (ulta.com)
  • People who are very active tend to eventually get injuries and if you're a parent you dread the days your children get hurt, but did you know there's a natural plant called comfrey that helps heal bones and sports injuries faster? (emaxhealth.com)
  • In fact, cultivation of the plant dates back to around 400 B.C. when Greeks and Romans used comfrey to stop heavy bleeding, treat bronchial problems and heal broken bones. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Traditionally, oral or topical use of comfrey was said to help bones heal more rapidly, and this is the origin of its Latin name Symphytum (drawing together). (grandstrandmed.com)
  • Reflexology applies pressure to certain reflex points on the feet and hands to help the body heal itself. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Although there is a little scientific evidence to support its use, a person can try applying a vitamin C cream to the affected area to improve healing. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 142 people with acute ankle sprain, use of comfrey cream for 8 days significantly enhanced rate of recovery. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • 13 In another randomized trial of 379 people with acute back pain, a topical combination of comfrey and methyl nicotinate cream reduced back pain (at rest and with movement), decreased functional impairment, and reduced use of rescue medication compared to methyl nicotinate cream alone or placebo. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • 15 The higher concentration cream (10%) contained 10 times more comfrey than the low-concentration cream (considered the reference or placebo cream). (grandstrandmed.com)
  • in other words, every 100 grams of cream contains the equivalent of 25 grams of comfrey sap. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • Proponents claim that comfrey cream can treat a variety of health conditions and injuries. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Comfrey cream could help ease back pain , suggests a 2010 study from the British Journal of Sports Medicine . (verywellhealth.com)
  • While studies suggest that comfrey cream may offer some pain-relieving benefits, large-scale clinical trials are needed to confirm these effects. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Combine the heavy cream with the grounded comfrey. (hubpages.com)
  • Take 40ml Organic Moisturising Cream Base, add 10ml Infused Comfrey Oil, 6 drops Neroli essential oil, 2 Jasmine, 2 Rose, 4 Frankincense and 4 Patchouli. (baseformula.com)
  • Comfrey cream has been shown to be fairly helpful in fracture healing. (rockandice.com)
  • Traditional healers have also used oral preparations of comfrey to treat stomach issues, such as ulcers, colitis, and diarrhea. (healthline.com)