Computers, Handheld: A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.ComputersAttitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Microcomputers: Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.Computer Peripherals: Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Computer User Training: Process of teaching a person to interact and communicate with a computer.Data Display: The visual display of data in a man-machine system. An example is when data is called from the computer and transmitted to a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY or LIQUID CRYSTAL display.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Miniaturization: The design or construction of objects greatly reduced in scale.Teleradiology: The electronic transmission of radiological images from one location to another for the purposes of interpretation and/or consultation. Users in different locations may simultaneously view images with greater access to secondary consultations and improved continuing education. (From American College of Radiology, ACR Standard for Teleradiology, 1994, p3)Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Literature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)Computer Literacy: Familiarity and comfort in using computers efficiently.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Computer Systems: Systems composed of a computer or computers, peripheral equipment, such as disks, printers, and terminals, and telecommunications capabilities.Micromanipulation: The performance of dissections, injections, surgery, etc., by the use of micromanipulators (attachments to a microscope) that manipulate tiny instruments.Muscle Strength Dynamometer: A device that measures MUSCLE STRENGTH during muscle contraction, such as gripping, pushing, and pulling. It is used to evaluate the health status of muscle in sports medicine or physical therapy.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Psychology, Military: The branch of applied psychology concerned with psychological aspects of selection, assignment, training, morale, etc., of Armed Forces personnel.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Decision Support Systems, Clinical: Computer-based information systems used to integrate clinical and patient information and provide support for decision-making in patient care.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Optical Processes: Behavior of LIGHT and its interactions with itself and materials.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Computer Terminals: Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Forms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Pharmacopoeias as Topic: Authoritative treatises on drugs and preparations, their description, formulation, analytic composition, physical constants, main chemical properties used in identification, standards for strength, purity, and dosage, chemical tests for determining identity and purity, etc. They are usually published under governmental jurisdiction (e.g., USP, the United States Pharmacopoeia; BP, British Pharmacopoeia; P. Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopoeia). They differ from FORMULARIES in that they are far more complete: formularies tend to be mere listings of formulas and prescriptions.Wireless Technology: Techniques using energy such as radio frequency, infrared light, laser light, visible light, or acoustic energy to transfer information without the use of wires, over both short and long distances.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Computers, Analog: Computers in which quantities are represented by physical variables; problem parameters are translated into equivalent mechanical or electrical circuits as an analog for the physical phenomenon being investigated. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted: Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Tomography: Imaging methods that result in sharp images of objects located on a chosen plane and blurred images located above or below the plane.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Hospitals, Community: Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Minicomputers: Small computers that lack the speed, memory capacity, and instructional capability of the full-size computer but usually retain its programmable flexibility. They are larger, faster, and more flexible, powerful, and expensive than microcomputers.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Tonometry, Ocular: Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Electric Impedance: The resistance to the flow of either alternating or direct electrical current.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.PennsylvaniaBlood Glucose Self-Monitoring: Self evaluation of whole blood glucose levels outside the clinical laboratory. A digital or battery-operated reflectance meter may be used. It has wide application in controlling unstable insulin-dependent diabetes.Automatic Data Processing: Data processing largely performed by automatic means.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Neural Networks (Computer): A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.Medical Informatics Applications: Automated systems applied to the patient care process including diagnosis, therapy, and systems of communicating medical data within the health care setting.Computers, Molecular: Computers whose input, output and state transitions are carried out by biochemical interactions and reactions.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.United StatesAdministration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Word Processing: Text editing and storage functions using computer software.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Software Design: Specifications and instructions applied to the software.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
  • The addition of the PowerScan 9500-DK imager provides our customers with an enhanced option in industrial scanning," comments Giulio Berzuini, General Manager & VP, HandHeld Scanners, Datalogic ADC. (prweb.com)
  • The Memor X3 mobile computer is offered with a full portfolio of models featuring different scan engine options, including an entry-level linear imager, a top-performance laser scanner with Gorilla Glass scan window, and a 2D imager ideal for pharmaceutical applications. (cdw.com)
  • 2016. Privacy-driven Design of Learning Analytics Applications - Exploring the Design Space of Solutions for Data Sharing and Interoperability. (uib.no)
  • It is suitable for process control applications, such as verification or calibration of pressure gauges, transducers, transmitters, pressure switches, and safety valves. (automation.com)
  • The ICL3244E is a 3 driver, 5 receiver device that provides a complete serial port suitable for laptop or notebook computers. (intersil.com)
  • As diabetes has in many cases an asymptomatic nature, the time frame between sustained hyperglycemia and observable complications can be extended, thus making a long-term program of secondary prevention an essential part of appropriate diabetes care and a suitable domain for technology-based diabetes management applications. (nih.gov)
  • This reader has multiple interfaces making it suitable for a variety of applications including warehouse and logistics centers, manufacturing, and entertainment venues. (prweb.com)
  • this was used by Apple Computer and Borland in the late 1980s and later developed into Delphi on the Microsoft Windows platform. (wikipedia.org)
  • First, the exponential growth of personal computer technology in the late 1980s rendered most of the available test batteries obsolete before they could be disseminated widely and tested for effectiveness in military nutrition research settings. (nap.edu)
  • It was this breakthrough that made possible the sophisticated high-speed computers and large-capacity semiconductor memories of today's information age. (computer.org)
  • BlackBerry and iPhone users will find the shortcut options a real benefit to quickly getting navigating, accessing, and restarting your computer remotely. (geardiary.com)
  • iPhone users may find selecting desktop applications within RDM+ a bit frustrating at first due to the need to double-tap the iPhone screen to mimic mouse clicking on a menu. (geardiary.com)
  • Big Entertainment and its new subsidiary hollywood.com, Inc. (which owns Hollywood.com) have announced that Hollywood.com has been named a strategic partner for the AvantGo.com interactive Internet service, placing content from the popular movie website into the palms of handheld computer users. (writenews.com)
  • s lineup of free personalized content and interactive applications available to users of Palm OS and Windows CE-based handheld computers. (writenews.com)
  • Currently, handheld computer users who select Hollywood.com from the AvantGo.com site are able to determine where and when movies are playing nationwide. (writenews.com)
  • Once the new instructions are embedded in the chips delivered next year, handheld users will see immediate benefits in being able to take advantage of existing applications originally developed for desktop and notebook PCs, an Intel executive said. (eweek.com)
  • By augmenting handhelds with position tracking equipment, users have a "larger virtual workspace" with which to manipulate the pen or pointing device. (wisc.edu)
  • We present concrete applications that illustrate these roles, and describe how handhelds can serve as mobile mediators between computer-augmented everyday artifacts, their users, and background infrastructure services. (sciweavers.org)
  • Model AEK-CHP-245-1 allows for evaluation of company's ANT-2.45-CHP antenna, suited for 2.4 GHz applications including 802.11, Bluetooth, Zigbee, and Home RF. (thomasnet.com)
  • She also leads a national Network Plus: Connected Everything, which brings together communities of computer scientists, manufacturing, design, business and engineering specialists to examine digital manufacturing. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Much of the history of computer language design during the 1960s traces its history to the ALGOL 60 language. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the uptake of design patterns has been slow outside of the computer science community. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • However, all other applications benefit from the sophisticated design, easy installation, high durability, a large product range and extensive customer services as well. (barcode-uk.com)
  • The objective of this research was to design and fabricate a handheld multispectral instrument for food safety inspection for raw meat, poultry and other foodstuffs. (usda.gov)
  • This article presents information regarding the laptop computer Toshiba Portege R100 from Toshiba Corp. What people look for in a notebook computer these days is light weight and wireless LAN capability. (ebscohost.com)
  • Called Intel Wireless MMX, the 64-bit parallel multimedia architecture could boost application performance up to 60 percent in XScale-based handhelds. (eweek.com)
  • Also, high quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Human and Computer Engineering are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. (waset.org)
  • Selenium currently has a variety of applications, ranging from standard external preparations for skin problems to experimental and theoretical applications in nutrition and internal medicine. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Science Education integrate theoretical considerations in the field with methodology and practical applications in the selected primary, middle, and high schools. (boun.edu.tr)
  • DT Research's rugged tablet computers provide a strong mobile computing platform at a very affordable cost. (prweb.com)
  • DT Research's rugged tablet computers provide a strong mobile computing platform at a very affordable cost,' stated Stephanie Kreitner, Marketing Director for Group Mobile. (prweb.com)
  • The Memor X3 mobile computer stands out with its long-lasting battery, for its WiFi connectivity IEEE 802.11 a/b/g/n, for its bright 2.4" QVGA touchscreen, and for its performance, powered by a 806 MHz processor. (cdw.com)
  • Unlike other languages that have a limited number of structures with which to accomplish all of a user's applications, a programmer can extend a FORTH implementation to provide the structure or tools exactly needed to accomplish the task at hand. (hpmuseum.org)
  • This study was conducted to gain a better understanding of the baseline computer skills and needs of our hospital pharmacists immediately prior to the implementation of an applied informatics program. (jmir.org)
  • When Apple introduced it to the mobile handset business a couple of years ago, the ubiquitous 'apps' or IT enabled applications added millions of features overnight. (indiatimes.com)
  • Supporting students awareness of the complex way that contextual issues affect knowledge application in authentic situations is a critical instructional mission and can lead to improved problem solving in the workplace. (nottingham.ac.uk)