Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Avoidance Learning: A response to a cue that is instrumental in avoiding a noxious experience.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Reversal Learning: Any situation where an animal or human is trained to respond differentially to two stimuli (e.g., approach and avoidance) under reward and punishment conditions and subsequently trained under reversed reward values (i.e., the approach which was previously rewarded is punished and vice versa).Serial Learning: Learning to make a series of responses in exact order.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Probability Learning: Usually refers to the use of mathematical models in the prediction of learning to perform tasks based on the theory of probability applied to responses; it may also refer to the frequency of occurrence of the responses observed in the particular study.Conditioning, Classical: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Spatial Behavior: Reactions of an individual or groups of individuals with relation to the immediate surrounding area including the animate or inanimate objects within that area.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Paired-Associate Learning: Learning in which the subject must respond with one word or syllable when presented with another word or syllable.Feedback, Psychological: A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Long-Term Potentiation: A persistent increase in synaptic efficacy, usually induced by appropriate activation of the same synapses. The phenomenological properties of long-term potentiation suggest that it may be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Conditioning, Operant: Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Neural Networks (Computer): A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Memory, Long-Term: Remembrance of information from 3 or more years previously.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Programmed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Electroshock: Induction of a stress reaction in experimental subjects by means of an electrical shock; applies to either convulsive or non-convulsive states.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Knowledge of Results (Psychology): A principle that learning is facilitated when the learner receives immediate evaluation of learning performance. The concept also hypothesizes that learning is facilitated when the learner is promptly informed whether a response is correct, and, if incorrect, of the direction of error.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Group Processes: The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Mushroom Bodies: Prominent lobed neuropils found in ANNELIDA and all ARTHROPODS except crustaceans. They are thought to be involved in olfactory learning and memory.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Amnesia: Pathologic partial or complete loss of the ability to recall past experiences (AMNESIA, RETROGRADE) or to form new memories (AMNESIA, ANTEROGRADE). This condition may be of organic or psychologic origin. Organic forms of amnesia are usually associated with dysfunction of the DIENCEPHALON or HIPPOCAMPUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-7)Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Corpus Striatum: Striped GRAY MATTER and WHITE MATTER consisting of the NEOSTRIATUM and paleostriatum (GLOBUS PALLIDUS). It is located in front of and lateral to the THALAMUS in each cerebral hemisphere. The gray substance is made up of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the lentiform nucleus (the latter consisting of the GLOBUS PALLIDUS and PUTAMEN). The WHITE MATTER is the INTERNAL CAPSULE.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Basal Ganglia: Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Finches: Common name for small PASSERIFORMES in the family Fringillidae. They have a short stout bill (BEAK) adapted for crushing SEEDS. Some species of Old World finches are called CANARIES.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Support Vector Machines: Learning algorithms which are a set of related supervised computer learning methods that analyze data and recognize patterns, and used for classification and regression analysis.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Imprinting (Psychology): A particular kind of learning characterized by occurrence in very early life, rapidity of acquisition, and relative insusceptibility to forgetting or extinction. Imprinted behavior includes most (or all) behavior commonly called instinctive, but imprinting is used purely descriptively.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Olfactory Pathways: Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; OLFACTORY TRACT; OLFACTORY TUBERCLE; ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE; and OLFACTORY CORTEX.Pattern Recognition, Physiological: The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Self-Evaluation Programs: Educational programs structured in such a manner that the participating professionals, physicians, or students develop an increased awareness of their performance, usually on the basis of self-evaluation questionnaires.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Speech Perception: The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Long-Term Synaptic Depression: A persistent activity-dependent decrease in synaptic efficacy between NEURONS. It typically occurs following repeated low-frequency afferent stimulation, but it can be induced by other methods. Long-term depression appears to play a role in MEMORY.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Histology: The study of the structure of various TISSUES of organisms on a microscopic level.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Scopolamine Hydrobromide: An alkaloid from SOLANACEAE, especially DATURA and SCOPOLIA. Scopolamine and its quaternary derivatives act as antimuscarinics like ATROPINE, but may have more central nervous system effects. Among the many uses are as an anesthetic premedication, in URINARY INCONTINENCE, in MOTION SICKNESS, as an antispasmodic, and as a mydriatic and cycloplegic.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Habits: Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Multimedia: Materials, frequently computer applications, that combine some or all of text, sound, graphics, animation, and video into integrated packages. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Rotarod Performance Test: A performance test based on forced MOTOR ACTIVITY on a rotating rod, usually by a rodent. Parameters include the riding time (seconds) or endurance. Test is used to evaluate balance and coordination of the subjects, particular in experimental animal models for neurological disorders and drug effects.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.ReadingFeeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Mice, Inbred C57BLEscape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Neostriatum: The phylogenetically newer part of the CORPUS STRIATUM consisting of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and PUTAMEN. It is often called simply the striatum.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Dendritic Spines: Spiny processes on DENDRITES, each of which receives excitatory input from one nerve ending (NERVE ENDINGS). They are commonly found on PURKINJE CELLS and PYRAMIDAL CELLS.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Dyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)CA1 Region, Hippocampal: One of four subsections of the hippocampus described by Lorente de No, located furthest from the DENTATE GYRUS.Dentate Gyrus: GRAY MATTER situated above the GYRUS HIPPOCAMPI. It is composed of three layers. The molecular layer is continuous with the HIPPOCAMPUS in the hippocampal fissure. The granular layer consists of closely arranged spherical or oval neurons, called GRANULE CELLS, whose AXONS pass through the polymorphic layer ending on the DENDRITES of PYRAMIDAL CELLS in the hippocampus.Set (Psychology): Readiness to think or respond in a predetermined way when confronted with a problem or stimulus situation.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Online Systems: Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Olfactory Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of olfactory stimuli, such as odors, are recognized and interpreted by the brain.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.
Available historical data appears in the table below. Class-size reduction Maimonides' Rule Small learning communities Small ... though a smaller number of studies attempt to cast doubt on the connection between class size and student learning. Some ... class sizes should be very small. "For the purposes of convenience, the children are divided into small groups of eight to ... My definition of a utopia is very simple: classes of 15 or smaller - out of this, a great nation can be built. Classes have 35 ...
At university, Hobbes appears to have followed his own curriculum; he was "little attracted by the scholastic learning". He did ... In 1654 a small treatise, Of Liberty and Necessity, directed at Hobbes, was published by Bishop John Bramhall. Bramhall, a ... He then returned to hard work on the first two sections of his work and published little except a short treatise on optics ( ... It was divided into two small volumes (Human Nature, or the Fundamental Elements of Policie and De corpore politico, or the ...
Robins, a ranter, was a man of little education. By his own account, "As for humane learning, I never had any; my Hebrew, Greek ... He appears to have been a small farmer, owning some land. This he sold, and, coming to London with his wife Mary (or Joan) ... Robins probably viewed himself as an incarnation of the divine being; he asserted that he had appeared on earth before, as Adam ...
Danny is twenty-two years old but he appears much younger; his learnt manner is one of faux aggression; however, he fails to ... He knows the small space well, it fits him and he owns it. There is a sense of latent sexual and physical power about the man. ... Mona is a small, dark-haired girl in her late teens, with a mild pregnancy bump that is not seen immediately. Her hair is loose ... Danny is a little slow but essentially sweet. Jude is Eighteen years old, dressed in school trousers, shirt and tie. A large ...
A vessel soon appeared, coming toward the submarine. As the target approached, the submarine identified it as a small ship. ... The submarine went deep, received a short depth charge attack, and came up to periscope depth to learn that her target had gone ... That night, the submarine fired six torpedoes at a ship that was being towed by a smaller freighter. Five of the torpedoes ... The next day, the submarine fired a spread of three torpedoes at a small cargo ship. Two missed and the third exploded ...
Mika Yamaguchi (山口美香, Yamaguchi Mika): Appears in episode 36. She is the little sister of Misa. She loves her sister more than ... She originally lived as a normal girl named Sayoko Tsukikage (月影小夜子, Tsukikage Sayoko) until she learned that she is Wandering ... It appeared again in the Gaoranger vs Super Sentai. Turbo Truck (ターボトラック, Tābo Torakku): A race truck driven by Black Turbo. It ... Riki would appear years later to grant the Greater Power of the TurboRangers to the Gokaigers during Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger, ...
"A little learning is a dang'rous thing" (frequently misquoted as "A little knowledge is a dang'rous thing"), and "Fools rush in ... Consequently, Dennis also appears in Pope's later satire, The Dunciad. Part II of An Essay on Criticism includes a famous ... A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring. This is in reference to the spring in the ... The first line of this couplet is often misquoted as "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing". The Essay also gives this ...
Though little used by the company, he appeared in All-Star Squadron #31 and #60 and Starman #46. Rookie cop Chuck Lane learns ... He first appeared in Smash Comics #22 (May 1941). Like most of Quality's characters, the Jester was later purchased by DC ... but is an Olympic-level athlete and a brilliant hand-to-hand combatant and in some later adventures is aided by a small flying ...
Eighteen days later, a group of aliens appears. Avery is assigned to learn the aliens' language, and he reports that it is ... The Rorvan invite a small group of humans, including Avery and Lorenzen, to accompany them to their settlement. As the group of ... It originally appeared in the June and July 1954 issues of magazine Astounding Science Fiction, and was later reprinted in 1956 ... Anderson was able to sell Question and Answer to Astounding (where it appeared a few months after "Sucker Bait") and later to ...
A third plane called the Dash Bird 3 appears in episode 23. Team DASH also has an android operator, who learns a bit about ... Her name is Elly and she has a small ball shaped robot called Koko which makes a high pitched sound to respond to queries. This ... She learns human behavior and once wished to become a human. She even cried in Episode 16 and in the final episode. During the ... Another Ultraman known as Ultraman Xenon, or Janos, appears for the first time in episode 13, and again briefly in episode 39. ...
After a little over a month they had permanent teeth. This means that they learned and were able to forage for solid food much ... These were apparently mixed fruit and foliage consumers and moderate seed predators; neither species appears to have been a ... Just a small amount of competition could offset the balance of an ecosystem. Also, the introduction of man-made charcoal and ... The relatively small body of Palaeopropithecus, while large compared to the modern lemur, had a great degree curve because it ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Also appearing as -, - (2015). The Smarter Screen: What Your Business Can Learn ... rather than a co-author-Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post notes that Lehrer's name appears on the cover "in far smaller type ... What Your Business Can Learn from the Way Consumers Think Online. London, ENG: Piatkus-Little Brown. ISBN 9780349410395. CS1 ... As of 2016, four books have appeared to which Lehrer is either an author or a cover-presented contributor; two have ...
He is lazy and does not like to be troubled with small things. He carries a huge sword that appears to be broken. However, his ... Here, Taisou learns of his innate "Star" ability and activates it. He defeats the rest of the assassins and secures the ... Shuki is very interested by Taisou and wants to learn more about him. "One Who Scales the Heavens" Tousen (杜遷) Tousen is the ... "Falling Star" Taisou (戴宗) Taisou appears as a young boy. He belongs to the rebel group Taiten-Gyoudou. Also known as the" ...
Thereafter his name stopped appearing as "publisher" on his magazines. He had to learn about farming, an important issue in the ... He had done little study at University, and passed his finals with the help of last-minute coaching from friends. After ... making smaller cities into counties in their own right, so ending the confusion as to whether county or district council were ... Thatcher, who only learned of the meeting through Cuckney, was displeased, as were Brittan and the Treasury, who thought the US ...
... he appears to have little interest in Q Junior's progress before departing. Q Junior becomes depressed, and decides to take ... When Janeway hears of this, she takes Q Junior along to locate the Chokuzan ship, hoping to learn how to heal Icheb. When they ... Janeway asserts that Q Junior needs to learn there are consequences of his actions. By order of the Continuum, Q strips Q ... Q brought him to Voyager to hopefully have Q Junior learn something. Janeway suggests some "father-son" time, but after ten ...
She usually only appears when Kaito is on a mission or he needs her help. "X-Kai vol. 1 (Japanese)". Amazon Japan. Retrieved ... Later on in the series, Kaito takes in a little boy he names Renge, who has been abused by his parents and other adults. As the ... When they first meet, he had no name, so Kaito named him "Renge." Renge has difficulties speaking, but he learns new things ... Renge Renge is a little boy that Kaito found. ...
Michael was "of no little learning" and gave his son his early education. The son "appears to have been an exemplary child, ... He read a good deal on his own account, but had little inclination for games. Serious and precocious, he even at this time ... The magazine did not pay and his father had lost money which entailed moving the family to a smaller house in Southampton and ... Learning and Working: six lectures and The Religion of Rome: 4 lectures (1855) The Patriarchs and Lawgivers of the Old ...
Robert and Andre are perhaps zombies, animated by Datura's stolen ti bon ange (Good Little Angel). They appear to have a hunger ... How else would one learn to avoid saying those things that would elicit laughter from strangers? The mockery of friends is ... They appear to have a hunger for flesh. Also, they never speak and they disappear after being "killed". Cheval Robert is the ... while Robert appears to be a bit nervous. Odd encounters Robert in a hotel suite while hiding from Datura. Robert is ...
Darla appears and drags Drusilla off. As Angel races to the W&H offices, Cordelia has a vision which sends them elsewhere. The ... Holland attempts to convince the two that he and his associates are their allies, to little effect. Angel finds a survivor at ... the clothing store and learns where Darla and Drusilla have gone. When he arrives at Holland's home, however, he refuses to ... As he makes a speech, Darla and Drusilla appear, intent on slaughter. ...
After Witkin's death, little research was done on field independence-dependence. However, new research began to appear in the ... He was a pioneer of the theory of cognitive styles and learning styles (developed in cooperation with Solomon Asch, Donald ... These people will disregard the external cues, and use information from their bodies in adjusting the rod to appear upright. ... Herman Witkin; Pioneered in Studies Of Learning Process. New York Times Haggbloom, Steven J.; Warnick, Jason E.; Jones, Vinessa ...
The adjective Celtic, formed after French celtique, appears a little later, in the mid 17th century. An early attestation is ... The name of the Celtae is revived in the learned literature of the Early Modern period. The French celtique and the German ... 150, later also appearing as Hierni and Hiberni), and by 314, to the Scoti. Simon James argues that, while the term "Celtic" ... in later Latin whenever it appears beside a front vowel like /e/. The pronunciation with /k/ was taken into German, /s/ into ...
Adolescents appear to acquire these behaviors by observational learning of older individuals. The crab-eating macaque lives in ... They also easily adjust to human settlements; they are considered sacred at some Hindu temples and on some small islands, but ... Thus, group living appears to be maintained solely due to the safety against predation. Group living in all species is ... After a conflict within a group, the aggressor appears to scratch itself at a higher rate than before the conflict. Though the ...
Kathleen first appears when Theresa visits her in a prison in London. Kathleen is not happy to learn that Theresa is staying ... After a small argument, Kathleen returns to her cell, leaving Theresa in tears. Kathleen is released from prison months later ... She first appeared during late-night spin-off Hollyoaks Later in September 2009 as the sister of Myra McQueen (Nicole Barber- ... Hollyoaks producers announced that Kathleen would be portrayed by Alison Burrows and would appear in the second series of ...
They decide that it doesn't appear so, and they head home for the evening. In a turn of events at home, Joe learns that his ... They find a re-growing potion that Patsy had been working on was stolen, and a small drop of the potion caused a branch to grow ... Nicholas Binks: We don't learn very much about Joe Binks, other than the fact that him and his son appear to be very close, as ... He meets several women in what appears to be an office building, the first of which is a girl named Twiggy, who appears to be a ...
A loss of this gene does not appear to cause learning disabilities, however. Other genes in the deleted region are also likely ... Chromosome 22 is the second smallest human chromosome (chromosome 21 being smaller), spanning about 49 million DNA base pairs ... A small percentage of affected individuals have shorter deletions in the same region. The loss of one particular gene, TBX1, is ... A small extra chromosome is made up of genetic material from chromosome 22 that has been abnormally duplicated (copied). The ...
However, Sapir showed little understanding for Benedict's private thoughts and feelings. In particular, his conservative gender ... She became the first woman to be recognized as a prominent leader of a learned profession.[2] She can be viewed as a ... whose emphasis is on how one's moral conduct appears to outsiders in contradistinction to America's (Christian) 'guilt' culture ... just so many little bones and muscles-so we can only have come from one set of ancestors no matter what our color, the shape of ...
Gibbons are small apes in the family Hylobatidae. While they share the same kingdom , phylum , class , and order of humans and ... It is in this second step that blunders may appear. Just if there are no such intrusions is what is performed an instance of " ... Traditional Transmission : Human language is not completely innate , and acquisition depends in part on the learning of a ... In human language, there are only a small set of sound ranges that are used and the differences between these bits of sound are ...
How Brandon Learned to Small Talk and Why It Transformed All His Relationships. ... Brain Development Appears to Differ in Children Who Stutter. By Janice Wood Associate News Editor ... "The more we know about motor learning in these kids, the more we can adjust our treatment - deliver it in a shorter period of ... Wood, J. (2018). Brain Development Appears to Differ in Children Who Stutter. Psych Central. Retrieved on January 22, 2020, ...
Rosie DiManno usually appears Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.. *Report an error ... Jian Ghomeshi fall from the marquee firmament will have little impact on the average sexual brute who torments a twenty- ... Ghomeshis fall from the marquee firmament will have little impact, I suspect, on the sexual brute who torments a twenty- ... Innately agenda-driven, they have precious little regard for the grey zones of human interaction. This too often results in ...
... as reflected in low learning levels, traps many of its young people in poverty and prevents faster economic growth and more ... Large numbers of students appear to be learning little; up to one-third of those completing primary school lack basic numeracy ... Large numbers of students appear to be learning little; up to one-third of those completing primary school lack basic numeracy ... 1. Make learning outcomes the central goal of education policy. This means consistently defining and tracking student learning ...
Scientists are only beginning to learn how this complex, strange, and highly entertaining behavior evolved. ... Deep in the cloud forest of South America the tiny club-winged manakin sings with its wings. ... Bone density appears to be critical. In a paper that will be published later this year, Bostwick and her colleagues describe ... Deep in the cloud forest of South America the tiny club-winged manakin sings with its wings. Scientists are only beginning to ...
He has also written three books, "How We Learn" about the cognitive science of learning; "Poison Most Vial" and "Island of the ... A version of this article appears in print on , Section D. , Page 1. of the New York edition. with the headline: Depression ... A generation ago, depression was viewed as an unwanted guest: a gloomy presence that might appear in the wake of a loss or a ... Whats Life Like After Depression? Surprisingly, Little Is Known. Most research on depression focuses on the afflicted, a new ...
Do the colors appear different?. Scale: Is the artwork bigger or smaller than you expected? If so, how does the size affect ... Divide students into small groups. Have them use the research they did from Lesson 1 homework assignment, and notes they took ... 4.3 Take an active part in a small-group discussion about the artistic value of specific works of art, with a wide range of the ... Have each small group offer their interpretations to the class and explain their justification. Ask whether other students ...
Her recent work appears in Alaska Quarterly Review and South Dakota Review. An Arkansas Arts Council fellow, she teaches in ...
For those irked by the "little black boxes" of widescreen movies, this may not be the option for you. For everyone else, its ... Westworld Season 3 Trailer Appears to Debut Unannounced Cast Members. By Joanna Robinson ... Smaller sequences were shot on 35mm, like every movie made before 1999. Theaters equipped with the right projectors will show ... focused on the humans and their tiny place in the world. Where practically achieved effects end and CG begins is a mystery. ...
AGNs appear point-like on optical images. It is instructive to work out how small a region these imaging observations indicate ... Learning outcomes. After studying this course, you should be able to:. *. describe the principal differences between a ... You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and ... The point-like nature of AGNs and their rapid variability imply that the emitting region is smaller than the size of the Solar ...
Intelligence may be normal, or the patient may have a learning disability. The limbs may be asymmetric, and camptodactyly (ie, ... 1, 2] Silver-Russell syndrome is characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation leading to a small-for- ... Because length usually is less than normal, the head appears disproportionately large. ... Clinical features are easier to identify in infants and younger children, particularly the small triangular facies. These ...
Little Learners Love Literacy is a sequenced phonics reading program to give children confidence and success. Letters and ... Note that your submission may not appear immediately on our site. Close ... Little Learners 4 - Learn to read with phonics for iPhone. $6.99 Learning Logic iOS Version 1.2 Full Specs ... From Learning Logic: Little Learners Love Literacy is a sequenced phonics reading program to give children confidence and ...
And, surprisingly, learning to drive appeared to reduce the rats stress. The results of this research could help scientists ... Rats are capable of driving tiny cars, researchers found. It eases their anxiety. * Author: Lateshia Beachum, The Washington ... Lambert said her team will focus next on how rats have the capability to learn driving skills and why it seems to alleviate ... And the rats that actually got to drive the cars, researchers found, appeared to be less stressed than rats that were merely ...
It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more. ... He has helped co-workers learn to avoid the post-lunch blahs by helping them learn about how high glycemic foods stress their ... It took some acceptance on my part to realize that Id rather have a little embarrassment from a co-workers simple question ... My articles and columns have appeared in many of the major diabetes magazines and websites. Read more ...
It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more. ... Kim calls his tiny lancets "tiniBoy" and says that although the tiniBoy lancet is very beneficial for diabetic kids and babies ... The story started, he told me, about three years ago when he learned that he had type 2 diabetes. "The lancets that I used hurt ... I think that they reduce the pain of testing by about 50%. I learned about them on your blog and purchased them at amazon. ...
... as the United States increasingly distances itself from the events of the financial meltdown worker disenchantment appears to ... Among the information gleaned from the survey the team at Littler learned how current economic conditions impacted the ... Among the information gleaned from the survey, the team at Littler learned how current economic conditions impacted the ... Among the information gleaned from the survey, the team at Littler learned how current economic conditions impacted the ...
This story appears in the October 2011 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe ». Its tough to go anywhere these days without finding ... And all we have to do to learn about a business were thinking of patronizing is drop its name into a web search box and wait ... How Two Small Companies Are Driving Revenue Using Social Media Next Article *--shares ... From inspiration on starting a business to learning more about how to find solutions - make our site yours and never miss a ...
Most of the smaller states, along with.... Appears in 6 books from 1999-2004 ... Page 73 - The reform process is a learning process The process is evolutionary and developmental in nature. It cannot be ...
I thought Id say a little bit about them. ... birds I think typically have smaller genomes (which appears to ... Purely because I want to share the photos I took - well, and because amphiumas are weird, little known and really, really neat ... The more we learn about animals, the more difficult it becomes to make generalisations, and one of the generalisations I recall ... This puts those with smaller cells at an advantage, and smaller cells are caused by smaller genomes. Thus, selection for faster ...
One little change just isnt enough.. The post One Just Isnt Enough appeared first on The Simple Dollar. ... Russia-Lebanon deal? What the resurgent power sees in Syrias tiny neighbor. ... Russia-Lebanon deal? What the resurgent power sees in Syrias tiny neighbor. ...
It appears that CDC capacity is a tiny fraction of this amount! What is this test like? Why is their throughput so low? ... Id be interested to learn more about flu testing techniques. It seems like the labs are having a hard time processing the ... You can also shop using Amazon Smile and though you pay nothing more we get a tiny something. ... New cases are still appearing but much less frequently and they are… ...
Conclusions: Neighborhood physical conditions appear to have a significant, though small effect on gonorrhea rates. ... Learning Objectives: Participants will learn the current scope of the U.S. HIV PN system, the success of the system in ... Learning Objectives: By the end of the session, participants will learn of themes around disclosure and not disclosure of HIV ... Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:. 1. Identify the main findings from new research ...
... for the horse soon learns to read the expression of the face and voice,.... Appears in 15 books from 1858-1881 ... my little boy- ho ! my little boy ! Pretty boy ! Nice lady ! or something of that kind, constantly repeating the same ...
9 Little Signs You Might Be Working Too Hard. The saying goes, "work hard, play hard," but sometimes the tides shift, and ... 5 Timeless Lessons We Learned From Jane Austen. The name Jane Austen usually conjures images of women in bonnets and men in ... who appeared in season 3 of The … ... If any cracks appear in the faces of our buildings or …. ...
  • Created by reading experts and based on best practice teaching, the lively stories and sequenced progression will ensure children learn to read. (cnet.com)
  • As a leading labor and employment practice in the United States, Littler Mendelson PC maintains a unique perspective on developments in the space and connections that provide context to broader trends. (law.com)
  • Barry Hartstein, co-chair of Littler Mendelson's EEO and Diversity Practice, says that the situation is likely the result of a harsh job markets impact on two active employee populations. (law.com)
  • With a little practice you can learn to take advantage of even small bits of time available to you. (sfwa.org)
  • To learn this art properly, though, you'll need to gather the right supplies and devote plenty of time to patient practice. (wikihow.com)
  • The South Asia region faces particular challenges that further complicate the task of improving student learning outcomes. (worldbank.org)
  • Where spelling / grammar errors are not part of the learning outcomes and do not interfere with the meaning of what is being communicated, these errors are not considered as part of the mark awarded. (soas.ac.uk)
  • However, in courses where spelling / grammar errors are part of the learning outcomes (eg in language courses), these will be marked down accordingly. (soas.ac.uk)
  • In this year's Executive Employer Survey Report , the firm tapped those connections in an effort to learn more about what's top of mind in the workplace, especially as it relates to employee satisfaction and predilection to sue. (law.com)
  • Littler found some surprising changes from last year's survey. (law.com)
  • Gill, who moved to L.A. from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, is a leader in robotic surgery, in which he performs major procedures by making only four to five small keyhole incisions without cutting any muscle, improving both the surgery and the recovery time. (hollywoodreporter.com)
  • Once the area is numb, your surgeon will make small incisions around the site of your fat deposits. (healthline.com)
  • While the recession undoubtedly affected workers, as the United States increasingly distances itself from the events of the financial meltdown, worker disenchantment appears to be paradoxically increasing. (law.com)
  • She is author of Unraveled, a Novel About a Meltdown, The Little Book of the Icelanders, The Little Book of Icelandic, The Little Book of the Hidden People, and Living Inside the Meltdown. (amazon.com)
  • It also should increase understanding about motor-sequence learning differences between children who stutter and those who do not, he notes. (psychcentral.com)
  • All specific learning differences (SpLDs) exist on a continuum from mild to moderate through to severe. (soas.ac.uk)
  • The challenge and opportunity in an educational context - for teacher and student - is to be aware of the specific effects of these differences and to explore a variety of methods and techniques to facilitate optimal learning. (soas.ac.uk)
  • No consistent differences were seen in the vitamin content of organic products, and only one nutrient - phosphorus - was significantly higher in organic versus conventionally grown produce (and the researchers note that because few people have phosphorous deficiency, this has little clinical significance). (stanford.edu)
  • The limbs are so tiny that they really can't be much use in swimming, foraging or in crawling (either on submerged or emergent substrates), but they're larger in juveniles and may play a role in their behaviour. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Here, we targeted this missing link by examining the effects of prior knowledge on human navigational learning in a hippocampally dependent virtual navigation paradigm that closely relates to foundational studies in rodents. (frontiersin.org)
  • The rat is an appropriate model for the human brain in many ways since it has all the same areas and neurochemicals as the human brain - just smaller, of course," said Kelly Lambert, professor of behavioral neuroscience, in a statement. (adn.com)
  • The researchers were also unable to identify specific fruits and vegetables for which organic appeared the consistently healthier choice, despite running what Bravata called "tons of analyses. (stanford.edu)
  • This means consistently defining and tracking student learning outcome measures, and then using those measures to guide all aspects of education policy, including teacher deployment and training, and allocation of public spending on education. (oneworld.net)
  • A generation ago, depression was viewed as an unwanted guest: a gloomy presence that might appear in the wake of a loss or a grave disappointment and was slow to find the door. (nytimes.com)
  • Early signs and symptoms can include irritability, depression , small involuntary movements, poor coordination, and trouble learning new information or making decisions. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Oddie, brought up by his father and paternal grandmother, goes back to the Birmingham area to learn more about his mother's life and her struggles with manic depression and her mother-in-law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interstellar is meticulously composed - the rotating vessel seen in silhouette against Saturn, vistas of watery nothingness on an oceanic planet, the unimaginable sights beyond a black hole's event horizon - and yet it is still restrained, focused on the humans and their tiny place in the world. (vanityfair.com)
  • To date, convergence across the schema-enhanced learning and memory literature may be constrained by the predominant use of hippocampally dependent spatial navigation paradigms in rodents, and non-spatial list-based learning paradigms in humans. (frontiersin.org)
  • In the interdunal flats, small shrubs like Mormon tea and rubber rabbitbrush can rise one or two feet above the biological crust of the interdunal flats, spread their seeds in hopeful places downwind, and await the inevitable smothering dunes. (nps.gov)
  • Although the function of this protein is unclear, it appears to play an important role in nerve cells (neurons) in the brain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The elongated protein is cut into smaller, toxic fragments that bind together and accumulate in neurons, disrupting the normal functions of these cells. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Halil Dundar, coauthor and team leader of the report says, "unless the focus of education policy is explicitly shifted to improving student learning, the investments governments have made over the past decade will be wasted. (worldbank.org)
  • They are Australias favourite learn-to-read books. (cnet.com)
  • These books examine the intersecting lives of three men from the small Canadian town of Deptford and interweave Davies' moral concerns with bits of arcane lore and his enduring interest in Jungian psychotherapy. (britannica.com)
  • So I used a baby fence to create a small "playroom" between my desk and one of the bookshelves and filled it with her toys and books. (sfwa.org)
  • Dividing books into smaller sections can provide more focus and allow each one to do one thing well, which benefits everyone. (wikibooks.org)
  • His books include "Learned Sukra," "Speedily Enjoyment," and "Seyng Howe Thei Beyng Not Able to Flie. (mcsweeneys.net)
  • The people it haunted could acknowledge the poor company - I've been a little depressed since my father died - without worrying that they had become chronically ill. (nytimes.com)
  • Like most people, I learned about Dr. Kim's lancets by word of mouth. (mendosa.com)
  • Zuckerberg was sincere in his swashbuckling belief that Facebook was among a small number of players that had the money, know-how, and global reach to fast-forward history, jump-starting the economic lives of the 5 billion people who do not yet surf the web. (wired.com)
  • The term 'Specific Learning Difference' (SpLD) refers to a difference / difficulty people have with particular aspects of learning. (soas.ac.uk)
  • Monolingual people assume that learning another language, say Spanish, is unremarkable because they think it is simply a matter of switching out an English word for a Spanish word. (cnn.com)
  • I don't ever recommend people keep smaller and runtier fowl for breeding. (backyardchickens.com)
  • The disorder appears to be less common in some other populations, including people of Japanese, Chinese, and African descent. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You can read the abstract online at " A Pain-free Lancet with a Small Needle for Glucose Measurement . (mendosa.com)
  • The researchers hoped the volunteers would soon learn which abstract image was associated with the painful electric shock and this would elicit feelings of fear, pessimism and dread - a so-called conditioning response. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Dr. Kim's technical review of the tiniBoy lancets appears in the January 28, 2010, issue of Clinical Medicine Insights: Endocrinology and Diabetes. (mendosa.com)
  • The survey also found that unhappy workers appear to be less wary about remaining in their current positions due to an inability to find employment elsewhere. (law.com)
  • It also found that, even with laptops, not every student was off surfing celebrity gossip sites while they were supposed to be learning about the law. (techdirt.com)
  • Crystal Smith-Spangler and her colleagues reviewed many of the studies comparing organic and conventionally grown food, and found little evidence that organic foods are more nutritious. (stanford.edu)
  • The nation's welfare system was so discouraging to individual initiative that those forced to accept public assistance had little hope of ever achieving self- support again, and those who sought competitive employment in regular industry or the professions found most of the doors barred against them. (nfb.org)
  • While the region has made tremendous gains in expanding access to schooling over the past decade, a new report by the World Bank, Student Learning in South Asia , says that poor quality education is holding the region back. (worldbank.org)
  • In the first comprehensive study to analyze the performance of South Asian educational systems in terms of student learning, the World Bank highlights two main areas of concern. (worldbank.org)
  • Dozens of studies on Class-size reduction demonstrate its positive impact on student performance, though a smaller number of studies attempt to cast doubt on the connection between class size and student learning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Becoming a Golden Hawk means more than just cheering on our (really good) varsity teams - it means being a student who cares about your community, who works hard in the classroom, and who takes advantage of all the learning opportunities that can happen outside the classroom, too. (wlu.ca)
  • He explained that "his standard of efficiency demanded a small school conducted by brilliant scholars…" Erasmus recognized that most parents would nevertheless have to settle for large class sizes because of the financial costs of such tutoring. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following sensitization, very little stimulation is then required to produce exceedingly large effects. (wikibooks.org)
  • It is therefore far easier to catch small animals & other things like crayfish than large game like deer and boar. (jiscmail.ac.uk)
  • They can occur in large clusters, giving the appearance of many tiny dots. (healthline.com)
  • Our sample included elite schools and mainstream ones, large programs and small ones, in roughly equal measure. (edweek.org)
  • He has helped co-workers learn to avoid the post-lunch blahs by helping them learn about how high glycemic foods stress their bodies and advising them to experiment with different food choices. (mendosa.com)
  • And all we have to do to learn about a business we're thinking of patronizing is drop its name into a web search box and wait for the results. (entrepreneur.com)
  • Patterns that are of consequence to our daily lives are readily learned, which suggests the presence of powerful biases in their search and representation. (wikibooks.org)
  • So Bravata, who is also chief medical officer at the health-care transparency company Castlight Health, did a literature search, uncovering what she called a "confusing body of studies, including some that were not very rigorous, appearing in trade publications. (stanford.edu)
  • While some of these methods may be relatively harmless, there is little scientific evidence to back up claims of effectiveness. (wikihow.com)
  • I had 115 yards to the back-left pin, and it was a little downwind. (pgatour.com)
  • Papa Duck s wings are outstretched to welcome his little wanderers just back from their final encounter charming young Anna in her wading pool. (worldcat.org)
  • The image appears three-dimensional from the front, but the back remains flat. (wikihow.com)
  • You'll chip away at the wood little by little to create three-dimensional patterns on a wood board, but the back of the piece will remain flat. (wikihow.com)