Protein components on the surface of LIPOPROTEINS. They form a layer surrounding the hydrophobic lipid core. There are several classes of apolipoproteins with each playing a different role in lipid transport and LIPID METABOLISM. These proteins are synthesized mainly in the LIVER and the INTESTINES.
Structural proteins of the alpha-lipoproteins (HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS), including APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I and APOLIPOPROTEIN A-II. They can modulate the activity of LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE. These apolipoproteins are low in atherosclerotic patients. They are either absent or present in extremely low plasma concentration in TANGIER DISEASE.
A group of apolipoproteins that can readily exchange among the various classes of lipoproteins (HDL; VLDL; CHYLOMICRONS). After lipolysis of TRIGLYCERIDES on VLDL and chylomicrons, Apo-C proteins are normally transferred to HDL. The subtypes can modulate remnant binding to receptors, LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE, or LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE.
Major structural proteins of triacylglycerol-rich LIPOPROTEINS. There are two forms, apolipoprotein B-100 and apolipoprotein B-48, both derived from a single gene. ApoB-100 expressed in the liver is found in low-density lipoproteins (LIPOPROTEINS, LDL; LIPOPROTEINS, VLDL). ApoB-48 expressed in the intestine is found in CHYLOMICRONS. They are important in the biosynthesis, transport, and metabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. Plasma Apo-B levels are high in atherosclerotic patients but non-detectable in ABETALIPOPROTEINEMIA.
The most abundant protein component of HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS or HDL. This protein serves as an acceptor for CHOLESTEROL released from cells thus promoting efflux of cholesterol to HDL then to the LIVER for excretion from the body (reverse cholesterol transport). It also acts as a cofactor for LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE that forms CHOLESTEROL ESTERS on the HDL particles. Mutations of this gene APOA1 cause HDL deficiency, such as in FAMILIAL ALPHA LIPOPROTEIN DEFICIENCY DISEASE and in some patients with TANGIER DISEASE.
The second most abundant protein component of HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS or HDL. It has a high lipid affinity and is known to displace APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I from HDL particles and generates a stable HDL complex. ApoA-II can modulate the activation of LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE in the presence of APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I, thus affecting HDL metabolism.
A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.
A 9-kDa protein component of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. It contains a cofactor for LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE and activates several triacylglycerol lipases. The association of Apo C-II with plasma CHYLOMICRONS; VLDL, and HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS is reversible and changes rapidly as a function of triglyceride metabolism. Clinically, Apo C-II deficiency is similar to lipoprotein lipase deficiency (HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE I) and is therefore called hyperlipoproteinemia type IB.
A 9-kDa protein component of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS and CHYLOMICRON REMNANTS. Apo C-III, synthesized in the liver, is an inhibitor of LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE. Apo C-III modulates the binding of chylomicron remnants and VLDL to receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) thus decreases the uptake of triglyceride-rich particles by the liver cells and subsequent degradation. The normal Apo C-III is glycosylated. There are several polymorphic forms with varying amounts of SIALIC ACID (Apo C-III-0, Apo C-III-1, and Apo C-III-2).
A class of lipoproteins of small size (4-13 nm) and dense (greater than 1.063 g/ml) particles. HDL lipoproteins, synthesized in the liver without a lipid core, accumulate cholesterol esters from peripheral tissues and transport them to the liver for re-utilization or elimination from the body (the reverse cholesterol transport). Their major protein component is APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I. HDL also shuttle APOLIPOPROTEINS C and APOLIPOPROTEINS E to and from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins during their catabolism. HDL plasma level has been inversely correlated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
A glycoprotein component of HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS that transports small hydrophobic ligands including CHOLESTEROL and STEROLS. It occurs in the macromolecular complex with LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE. Apo D is expressed in and secreted from a variety of tissues such as liver, placenta, brain tissue and others.
Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.
A 6.6-kDa protein component of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; INTERMEDIATE-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. Apo C-I displaces APO E from lipoproteins, modulate their binding to receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL), and thereby decrease their clearance from plasma. Elevated Apo C-I levels are associated with HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA and ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.
A class of lipoproteins of very light (0.93-1.006 g/ml) large size (30-80 nm) particles with a core composed mainly of TRIGLYCERIDES and a surface monolayer of PHOSPHOLIPIDS and CHOLESTEROL into which are imbedded the apolipoproteins B, E, and C. VLDL facilitates the transport of endogenously made triglycerides to extrahepatic tissues. As triglycerides and Apo C are removed, VLDL is converted to INTERMEDIATE-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS, then to LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS from which cholesterol is delivered to the extrahepatic tissues.
Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, stored in fat cells and used as energy; they are measured in blood tests to assess heart disease risk, with high levels often resulting from dietary habits, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.
A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A 513-kDa protein synthesized in the LIVER. It serves as the major structural protein of low-density lipoproteins (LIPOPROTEINS, LDL; LIPOPROTEINS, VLDL). It is the ligand for the LDL receptor (RECEPTORS, LDL) that promotes cellular binding and internalization of LDL particles.
A 241-kDa protein synthesized only in the INTESTINES. It serves as a structural protein of CHYLOMICRONS. Its exclusive association with chylomicron particles provides an indicator of intestinally derived lipoproteins in circulation. Apo B-48 is a shortened form of apo B-100 and lacks the LDL-receptor region.
Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.
Intermediate-density subclass of the high-density lipoproteins, with particle sizes between 7 to 8 nm. As the larger lighter HDL2 lipoprotein, HDL3 lipoprotein is lipid-rich.
An autosomal recessively inherited disorder caused by mutation of ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS involved in cellular cholesterol removal (reverse-cholesterol transport). It is characterized by near absence of ALPHA-LIPOPROTEINS (high-density lipoproteins) in blood. The massive tissue deposition of cholesterol esters results in HEPATOMEGALY; SPLENOMEGALY; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; large orange tonsils; and often sensory POLYNEUROPATHY. The disorder was first found among inhabitants of Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay, MD.
An enzyme secreted from the liver into the plasma of many mammalian species. It catalyzes the esterification of the hydroxyl group of lipoprotein cholesterol by the transfer of a fatty acid from the C-2 position of lecithin. In familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency disease, the absence of the enzyme results in an excess of unesterified cholesterol in plasma. EC 2.3.1.43.
A class of lipoproteins of small size (18-25 nm) and light (1.019-1.063 g/ml) particles with a core composed mainly of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and smaller amounts of TRIGLYCERIDES. The surface monolayer consists mostly of PHOSPHOLIPIDS, a single copy of APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100, and free cholesterol molecules. The main LDL function is to transport cholesterol and cholesterol esters to extrahepatic tissues.
Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.
A superfamily of large integral ATP-binding cassette membrane proteins whose expression pattern is consistent with a role in lipid (cholesterol) efflux. It is implicated in TANGIER DISEASE characterized by accumulation of cholesteryl ester in various tissues.
Fatty acid esters of cholesterol which constitute about two-thirds of the cholesterol in the plasma. The accumulation of cholesterol esters in the arterial intima is a characteristic feature of atherosclerosis.
Electrophoresis in which a pH gradient is established in a gel medium and proteins migrate until they reach the site (or focus) at which the pH is equal to their isoelectric point.
Cell surface proteins that bind lipoproteins with high affinity. Lipoprotein receptors in the liver and peripheral tissues mediate the regulation of plasma and cellular cholesterol metabolism and concentration. The receptors generally recognize the apolipoproteins of the lipoprotein complex, and binding is often a trigger for endocytosis.
Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.
A class of lipoproteins that carry dietary CHOLESTEROL and TRIGLYCERIDES from the SMALL INTESTINE to the tissues. Their density (0.93-1.006 g/ml) is the same as that of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.
Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to low density lipoproteins (LDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
Centrifugation with a centrifuge that develops centrifugal fields of more than 100,000 times gravity. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Conditions with abnormally low levels of LIPOPROTEINS in the blood. This may involve any of the lipoprotein subclasses, including ALPHA-LIPOPROTEINS (high-density lipoproteins); BETA-LIPOPROTEINS (low-density lipoproteins); and PREBETA-LIPOPROTEINS (very-low-density lipoproteins).
Low-density subclass of the high-density lipoproteins, with particle sizes between 8 to 13 nm.
A lipoprotein that resembles the LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS but with an extra protein moiety, APOPROTEIN (A) also known as APOLIPOPROTEIN (A), linked to APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100 on the LDL by one or two disulfide bonds. High plasma level of lipoprotein (a) is associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
The protein components of a number of complexes, such as enzymes (APOENZYMES), ferritin (APOFERRITINS), or lipoproteins (APOLIPOPROTEINS).
Conditions with excess LIPIDS in the blood.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Technique involving the diffusion of antigen or antibody through a semisolid medium, usually agar or agarose gel, with the result being a precipitin reaction.
An enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the reaction of triacylglycerol and water to yield diacylglycerol and a fatty acid anion. The enzyme hydrolyzes triacylglycerols in chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, and diacylglycerols. It occurs on capillary endothelial surfaces, especially in mammary, muscle, and adipose tissue. Genetic deficiency of the enzyme causes familial hyperlipoproteinemia Type I. (Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.1.1.34.
(Z)-9-Octadecenoic acid 1,2,3-propanetriyl ester.
A hypertriglyceridemia disorder, often with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by the persistent elevations of plasma TRIGLYCERIDES, endogenously synthesized and contained predominantly in VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS (pre-beta lipoproteins). In contrast, the plasma CHOLESTEROL and PHOSPHOLIPIDS usually remain within normal limits.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A family of MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that require ATP hydrolysis for the transport of substrates across membranes. The protein family derives its name from the ATP-binding domain found on the protein.
Conditions with abnormally elevated levels of LIPOPROTEINS in the blood. They may be inherited, acquired, primary, or secondary. Hyperlipoproteinemias are classified according to the pattern of lipoproteins on electrophoresis or ultracentrifugation.
A 34-kDa glycosylated protein. A major and most common isoform of apolipoprotein E. Therefore, it is also known as apolipoprotein E (ApoE). In human, Apo E3 is a 299-amino acid protein with a cysteine at the 112 and an arginine at the 158 position. It is involved with the transport of TRIGLYCERIDES; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; CHOLESTEROL; and CHOLESTERYL ESTERS in and out of the cells.
The specialty of ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY applied to assays of physiologically important substances found in blood, urine, tissues, and other biological fluids for the purpose of aiding the physician in making a diagnosis or following therapy.
Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). High circulating levels of VLDL cholesterol are found in HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE IIB. The cholesterol on the VLDL is eventually delivered by LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS to the tissues after the catabolism of VLDL to INTERMEDIATE-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS, then to LDL.
A condition of elevated levels of TRIGLYCERIDES in the blood.
Proteins that bind to and transfer CHOLESTEROL ESTERS between LIPOPROTEINS such as LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS and HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.
A mixture of very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), particularly the triglyceride-poor VLDL, with slow diffuse electrophoretic mobilities in the beta and alpha2 regions which are similar to that of beta-lipoproteins (LDL) or alpha-lipoproteins (HDL). They can be intermediate (remnant) lipoproteins in the de-lipidation process, or remnants of mutant CHYLOMICRONS and VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS which cannot be metabolized completely as seen in FAMILIAL DYSBETALIPOPROTEINEMIA.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
A family of scavenger receptors that are predominately localized to CAVEOLAE of the PLASMA MEMBRANE and bind HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.
Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.
A semisynthetic alkylated ESTRADIOL with a 17-alpha-ethinyl substitution. It has high estrogenic potency when administered orally, and is often used as the estrogenic component in ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES.
Relating to the size of solids.
A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.
An ACUTE PHASE REACTION protein present in low concentrations in normal sera, but found at higher concentrations in sera of older persons and in patients with AMYLOIDOSIS. It is the circulating precusor of amyloid A protein, which is found deposited in AA type AMYLOID FIBRILS.
Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
A technique that combines protein electrophoresis and double immunodiffusion. In this procedure proteins are first separated by gel electrophoresis (usually agarose), then made visible by immunodiffusion of specific antibodies. A distinct elliptical precipitin arc results for each protein detectable by the antisera.
A severe type of hyperlipidemia, sometimes familial, that is characterized by the elevation of both plasma CHYLOMICRONS and TRIGLYCERIDES contained in VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. Type V hyperlipoproteinemia is often associated with DIABETES MELLITUS and is not caused by reduced LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE activity as in HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE I .
An autosomal recessive disorder of lipid metabolism. It is caused by mutation of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein that catalyzes the transport of lipids (TRIGLYCERIDES; CHOLESTEROL ESTERS; PHOSPHOLIPIDS) and is required in the secretion of BETA-LIPOPROTEINS (low density lipoproteins or LDL). Features include defective intestinal lipid absorption, very low serum cholesterol level, and near absent LDL.
A synthetic phospholipid used in liposomes and lipid bilayers for the study of biological membranes.
A large group of structurally diverse cell surface receptors that mediate endocytic uptake of modified LIPOPROTEINS. Scavenger receptors are expressed by MYELOID CELLS and some ENDOTHELIAL CELLS, and were originally characterized based on their ability to bind acetylated LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. They can also bind a variety of other polyanionic ligand. Certain scavenger receptors can internalize micro-organisms as well as apoptotic cells.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
The metabolic process of breaking down LIPIDS to release FREE FATTY ACIDS, the major oxidative fuel for the body. Lipolysis may involve dietary lipids in the DIGESTIVE TRACT, circulating lipids in the BLOOD, and stored lipids in the ADIPOSE TISSUE or the LIVER. A number of enzymes are involved in such lipid hydrolysis, such as LIPASE and LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE from various tissues.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of cholesterol esters by the direct transfer of the fatty acid group from a fatty acyl CoA derivative. This enzyme has been found in the adrenal gland, gonads, liver, intestinal mucosa, and aorta of many mammalian species. EC 2.3.1.26.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
A subfamily in the family CEBIDAE that consists of four genera: CALLITHRIX (marmosets), CALLIMICO (Goeldi's monkey), LEONTOPITHECUS (lion tamarins), and SAGUINUS (long-tusked tamarins). The members of this family inhabit the tropical forests of South and Central America.
A highly dense subclass of the high-density lipoproteins, with particle sizes below 7 nm. They are also known as nascent HDL, composed of a few APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I molecules which are complexed with PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The lipid-poor pre-beta-HDL particles serve as progenitors of HDL3 and then HDL2 after absorption of free cholesterol from cell membranes, cholesterol esterification, and acquisition of apolipoproteins A-II, Cs, and E. Pre-beta-HDL initiate the reverse cholesterol transport process from cells to liver.
An enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the reaction of triacylglycerol and water to yield diacylglycerol and a fatty acid anion. It is produced by glands on the tongue and by the pancreas and initiates the digestion of dietary fats. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.1.1.3.
Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.
Receptors on the plasma membrane of nonhepatic cells that specifically bind LDL. The receptors are localized in specialized regions called coated pits. Hypercholesteremia is caused by an allelic genetic defect of three types: 1, receptors do not bind to LDL; 2, there is reduced binding of LDL; and 3, there is normal binding but no internalization of LDL. In consequence, entry of cholesterol esters into the cell is impaired and the intracellular feedback by cholesterol on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase is lacking.
A group of fatty acids that contain 18 carbon atoms and a double bond at the omega 9 carbon.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
An autosomal recessively inherited disorder caused by mutation of LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE that facilitates the esterification of lipoprotein cholesterol and subsequent removal from peripheral tissues to the liver. This defect results in low HDL-cholesterol level in blood and accumulation of free cholesterol in tissue leading to a triad of CORNEAL OPACITY, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), and PROTEINURIA.
A type of familial lipid metabolism disorder characterized by a variable pattern of elevated plasma CHOLESTEROL and/or TRIGLYCERIDES. Multiple genes on different chromosomes may be involved, such as the major late transcription factor (UPSTREAM STIMULATORY FACTORS) on CHROMOSOME 1.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Leukocyte differentiation antigens and major platelet membrane glycoproteins present on MONOCYTES; ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; PLATELETS; and mammary EPITHELIAL CELLS. They play major roles in CELL ADHESION; SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION; and regulation of angiogenesis. CD36 is a receptor for THROMBOSPONDINS and can act as a scavenger receptor that recognizes and transports oxidized LIPOPROTEINS and FATTY ACIDS.
The fatty portion of milk, separated as a soft yellowish solid when milk or cream is churned. It is processed for cooking and table use. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A group of familial disorders characterized by elevated circulating cholesterol contained in either LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS alone or also in VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS (pre-beta lipoproteins).
The process of converting an acid into an alkyl or aryl derivative. Most frequently the process consists of the reaction of an acid with an alcohol in the presence of a trace of mineral acid as catalyst or the reaction of an acyl chloride with an alcohol. Esterification can also be accomplished by enzymatic processes.
Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.
Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.
A family of anadromous fish comprising SALMON; TROUT; whitefish; and graylings. They are the most important food and game fishes. Their habitat is the northern Atlantic and Pacific, both marine and inland, and the Great Lakes. (Nelson: Fishes of the World, 1976, p97)
The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.
Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.
A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.
Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.
Electrophoresis in which agar or agarose gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Anguilla is not a term with a widely accepted medical definition; however, it is the scientific name for the freshwater eel species, and if used in a medical context, it may refer to a rare condition called Anguillula nephria, which is an intestinal infection caused by a roundworm.
A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.
A method of gel filtration chromatography using agarose, the non-ionic component of agar, for the separation of compounds with molecular weights up to several million.
Substances that lower the levels of certain LIPIDS in the BLOOD. They are used to treat HYPERLIPIDEMIAS.
Separation of particles according to density by employing a gradient of varying densities. At equilibrium each particle settles in the gradient at a point equal to its density. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Conditions with abnormally low levels of BETA-LIPOPROTEINS (low density lipoproteins or LDL) in the blood. It is defined as LDL values equal to or less than the 5th percentile for the population. They include the autosomal dominant form involving mutation of the APOLIPOPROTEINS B gene, and the autosomal recessive form involving mutation of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. All are characterized by low LDL and dietary fat malabsorption.
Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.
A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
An electrochemical process in which macromolecules or colloidal particles with a net electric charge migrate in a solution under the influence of an electric current.
The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Compounds that contain a 1-dimethylaminonaphthalene-5-sulfonyl group.
The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.
Abnormalities in the serum levels of LIPIDS, including overproduction or deficiency. Abnormal serum lipid profiles may include high total CHOLESTEROL, high TRIGLYCERIDES, low HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL, and elevated LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL.
A 44-kDa highly glycosylated plasma protein that binds phospholipids including CARDIOLIPIN; APOLIPOPROTEIN E RECEPTOR; membrane phospholipids, and other anionic phospholipid-containing moieties. It plays a role in coagulation and apoptotic processes. Formerly known as apolipoprotein H, it is an autoantigen in patients with ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
An early local inflammatory reaction to insult or injury that consists of fever, an increase in inflammatory humoral factors, and an increased synthesis by hepatocytes of a number of proteins or glycoproteins usually found in the plasma.
A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.
A ubiquitous family of proteins that transport PHOSPHOLIPIDS such as PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL and PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE between membranes. They play an important role in phospholipid metabolism during vesicular transport and SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION.
A highly conserved heterodimeric glycoprotein that is differentially expressed during many severe physiological disturbance states such as CANCER; APOPTOSIS; and various NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS. Clusterin is ubiquitously expressed and appears to function as a secreted MOLECULAR CHAPERONE.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
A polypeptide hormone of approximately 25 kDa that is produced by the SYNCYTIOTROPHOBLASTS of the PLACENTA, also known as chorionic somatomammotropin. It has both GROWTH HORMONE and PROLACTIN activities on growth, lactation, and luteal steroid production. In women, placental lactogen secretion begins soon after implantation and increases to 1 g or more a day in late pregnancy. Placental lactogen is also an insulin antagonist.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Sepharose is a brand name for a type of cross-linked agarose gel beads used as a matrix in chromatography and other biochemical procedures, known for their high porosity, mechanical stability, and low non-specific binding, making them suitable for various purification and analytical applications.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
Method for assessing flow through a system by injection of a known quantity of radionuclide into the system and monitoring its concentration over time at a specific point in the system. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
An autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by the accumulation of intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL or broad-beta-lipoprotein). IDL has a CHOLESTEROL to TRIGLYCERIDES ratio greater than that of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. This disorder is due to mutation of APOLIPOPROTEINS E, a receptor-binding component of VLDL and CHYLOMICRONS, resulting in their reduced clearance and high plasma levels of both cholesterol and triglycerides.

Vitamin A is linked to the expression of the AI-CIII-AIV gene cluster in familial combined hyperlipidemia. (1/1178)

There is growing evidence of the capacity of vitamin A to regulate the expression of the genetic region that encodes apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, C-III, and A-IV. This region in turn has been proposed to modulate the expression of hyperlipidemia in the commonest genetic form of dyslipidemia, familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL). The hypothesis tested here was whether vitamin A (retinol), by controlling the expression of the AI-CIII-AIV gene cluster, plays a role in modulating the hyperlipidemic phenotype in FCHL. We approached the subject by studying three genetic variants of this region: a C1100-T transition in exon 3 of the apoC-III gene, a G3206-T transversion in exon 4 of the apoC-III gene, and a G-75-A substitution in the promoter region of the apoA-I gene. The association between plasma vitamin A concentrations and differences in the plasma concentrations of apolipoproteins A-I and C-III based on the different genotypes was assessed in 48 FCHL patients and 74 of their normolipidemic relatives. The results indicated that the subjects carrying genetic variants associated with increased concentrations of apoA-I and C-III (C1100-T and G-75-A) also presented increased plasma concentrations of vitamin A. This was only observed among the FCHL patients, which suggested that certain characteristics of these patients contributed to this association. The G3206-T was not associated with changes in either apolipoprotein concentrations or in vitamin A. In summary, we report a relationship between genetically determined elevations of proteins of the AI-CIII-AIV gene cluster and vitamin A in FCHL patients. More studies will be needed to confirm that vitamin A plays a role in FCHL which might also be important for its potential application to therapeutical approaches.  (+info)

Regulation of the human apolipoprotein AIV gene expression in transgenic mice. (2/1178)

The apolipoprotein (Apo) AI-CIII-AIV gene cluster has a complex pattern of gene expression that is modulated by both gene- and cluster-specific cis-acting elements. In particular the regulation of Apo AIV expression has been previously studied in vivo and in vitro including several transgenic mouse lines but a complete, consistent picture of the tissue-specific controls is still missing. We have analysed the role of the Apo AIV 3' flanking sequences in the regulation of gene expression using both in vitro and in vivo systems including three lines of transgenic mice. The transgene consisted of a human fragment containing 7 kb of the 5' flanking region, the Apo AIV gene itself and 6 kb of the 3' flanking region (-7+6 Apo AIV). Accurate analysis of the Apo AIV mRNA levels using quantitative PCR and Northern blots showed that the 7+6 kb Apo AIV fragment confers liver-specific regulation in that the human Apo AIV transgene is expressed at approximately the same level as the endogenous mouse Apo AIV gene. In contrast, the intestinal regulation of the transgene did not follow, the pattern observed with the endogenous gene although it produced a much higher intestinal expression following the accepted human pattern. Therefore, this animal model provides an excellent substrate to design therapeutic protocols for those metabolic derangements that may benefit from variations in Apo AIV levels and its anti-atherogenic effect.  (+info)

Lipid and apolipoprotein predictors of atherosclerosis in youth: apolipoprotein concentrations do not materially improve prediction of arterial lesions in PDAY subjects. The PDAY Research Group. (3/1178)

We compared serum lipid and apolipoprotein predictors of atherosclerosis in cases from the multicenter study, Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY). The lipid measures included HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and non-HDL-C, and the apolipoprotein measures included concentrations of apoA1, apoB, and Lp(a), and sizes of the apo(a) proteins. We tested whether the apolipoprotein measures predicted atherosclerotic lesions as well as the more traditional lipid measures. We estimated extent of lesions as fatty streaks or raised lesions (fibrous plaques, complicated or calcified lesions) in 3 sites: thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta, and right coronary artery. Neither apoA1 nor apoB measures were as strongly or consistently correlated with extent of lesions as the corresponding lipid measure (HDL-C and non-HDL-C, respectively). Beyond the basic model that included sex, age, race, smoking status, hypertension, and the lipid measures, apoA1 and apoB added only an average 1.3% increased explanatory ability to the model, whereas HDL-C plus non-HDL-C added an average 2.5%. The results suggest that the traditional lipid measures are more useful than apolipoprotein measures for detecting young persons at high risk of precocious atherosclerosis. Because of large racial differences, the two Lp(a)-related measures, Lp(a) concentrations and apo(a) size, were evaluated in blacks and whites separately. Under these circumstances, neither of the Lp(a)-related measures was strongly or consistently correlated with extent of lesions.  (+info)

Serum lipoprotein(a) and apolipoprotein(a) phenotypes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (4/1178)

OBJECTIVE: To determine serum lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) concentrations and to analyze the apolipoprotein(a) (Apo[a]) phenotype in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The subjects included 131 patients with RA and 200 healthy control subjects. Serum Lp(a) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the Apo(a) phenotype was determined by immunoblotting. HLA-DR typing was also done. RESULTS: The mean serum Lp(a) level was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the RA patients (27.5 mg/dl) than in the controls (15.0 mg/dl). The S3 allele was found in 70.0% of the patients versus 39.5% of the controls (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in HLA-DR4 positivity between patients with and without the S3 phenotype. CONCLUSION: The serum Lp(a) level was increased in patients with RA, possibly partly because of S3 phenotype predominance.  (+info)

Lipoprotein(a) levels and apolipoprotein(a) isoforms related to life style risk factors. (5/1178)

Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has been considered to be a predictor of premature coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a) levels are largely genetically determined, but the detailed mechanism of Lp(a) elevation is uncertain. We examined the association between Lp(a) levels and apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] phenotypes as well as that of Lp(a) level and other various conditions. The subjects were 280 healthy Japanese (102 males and 178 females) aged 39 to 70 years who were living in a rural community in 1992. We obtained apo(a) phenotypes determined by SDS-PAGE as well as Lp(a) levels and other cardiovascular risk factors. We combined apo(a) phenotypes form 4 groups according to molecular weights (from high apo(a) molecular weight to low: I, II, III and IV). Lp(a) levels were associated with apo(a) phenotype-groups, that is, they were inversely associated with apo(a) molecular weight. Small apo(a) phenotypes were less frequent than large ones. The median Lp(a) level was higher in smoking (29.2 mg/dL) than in non-smoking subjects (18.5 mg/dL) in phenotype-group III. Adjusted means of total cholesterol and fibrinogen levels in apo(a) phenotype-group IV were the highest of all phenotype-groups. Age, apo(a) phenotype, smoking status, total cholesterol and fibrinogen were positively correlated with Lp(a) levels by multiple regression analysis. Lp(a) levels were found to be mainly associated with apo(a) phenotype, but varied broadly within the same apo(a) phenotype at various conditions, such as smoking status and high total cholesterol.  (+info)

Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass and heparin on plasma levels of Lp(a) and Apo(a) fragments. (6/1178)

Fragments of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)], the distinctive glycoprotein of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], are present in human plasma and urine and have been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. The mechanism responsible for the generation of apo(a) fragments in vivo is poorly understood. In this study, we examined the plasma levels of Lp(a) and apo(a) fragments [or free apo(a)] and urinary apo(a) in 15 subjects who underwent cardiac surgery necessitating cardiopulmonary bypass. We also measured the plasma concentration and activity of polymorphonuclear elastase, an Lp(a)-cleaving enzyme in vitro, and plasma levels of C-reactive protein. Despite a marked activation of polymorphonuclear cells and a pronounced inflammatory response, as documented by an 8-fold and a 35-fold increase in plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase and C-reactive protein, respectively, the proportion of plasma free apo(a) to Lp(a) and urinary excretion of apo(a) remained unchanged over a 7-day period after surgery, and polymorphonuclear elastase activity remained undetectable in plasma. No fragmentation of apo(a) was observed ex vivo in plasma samples collected before and after surgery. These data indicate that in this model, apo(a) is not fragmented in plasma and are consistent with the hypothesis that apo(a) fragments result from a constitutively active tissue mechanism that is not modified by cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.  (+info)

Depletion of pre beta 1LpA1 and LpA4 particles by mast cell chymase reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells induced by plasma. (7/1178)

Exposure of the LpA1-containing particles present in HDL3 and plasma to a minimal degree of proteolysis by the neutral protease chymase from exocytosed rat mast cell granules (granule remnants) leads to a reduction in the high-affinity component of cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, a role for mast cell chymase in the depletion of the lipid-poor minor components of HDL that are specifically involved in reverse cholesterol transport as initial acceptors of cellular cholesterol. Thus, addition of proteolytically active granule remnants or human skin chymase to cholesterol-loaded macrophages of mouse or human origin incubated with human apoA1, ie, a system in which prebeta1LpA1 is generated, resulted in a sharp reduction in the high-affinity cholesterol efflux promoted by apoA1. As determined by nondenaturing 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, the granule remnants effectively depleted the prebeta1LpA1, but not the alphaLpA1, in HDL3 and in plasma during incubation at 37 degrees C for <1 hour. Incubation of plasma with granule remnants for 1 hour also led to near disappearance of the LpA4-1 and LpA4-2 particles, but did not affect the distribution of the apoA2-containing lipoproteins present in the plasma. We conclude that the reduced ability of granule remnant-treated HDL3 and granule remnant-treated plasma to induce cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells is caused by selective depletion by mast cell chymase of quantitatively minor A1- and A4-containing subpopulations of HDL. Because these particles, ie, prebeta1LpA1 and LpA4, are efficient acceptors of cholesterol from cell surfaces, their depletion by mast cells may block the initiation of reverse cholesterol transport in vivo and thereby favor foam cell formation in the arterial intima, the site of atherogenesis.  (+info)

Seminal plasma choline phospholipid-binding proteins stimulate cellular cholesterol and phospholipid efflux. (8/1178)

Bovine seminal plasma (BSP) contains a family of phospholipid-binding proteins (BSP-A1/-A2, BSP-A3 and BSP-30-kDa, collectively called BSP proteins) that potentiate sperm capacitation induced by high-density lipoproteins. We showed recently that BSP proteins stimulate cholesterol efflux from epididymal spermatozoa and play a role in capacitation. Here, we investigated whether or not BSP proteins could stimulate cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from fibroblasts. Cells were radiolabeled ([3H]cholesterol or [3H]choline) and the appearance of radioactivity in the medium was determined in the presence of BSP proteins. Alcohol precipitates of bovine seminal plasma (designated crude BSP, cBSP), purified BSP-A1/-A2, BSP-A3 and BSP-30-kDa proteins stimulated cellular cholesterol and choline phospholipid efflux from fibroblasts. Efflux mechanistic differences were observed between BSP proteins and other cholesterol acceptors. Preincubation of BSP-A1/-A2 proteins with choline prevented cholesterol efflux, an effect not observed with apolipoprotein A-I. Also, the rate of BSP-induced efflux was rapid during the first 20 min, but leveled off thereafter in contrast to a relatively slow, but constant, rate of cholesterol efflux mediated by apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-I-containing reconstituted lipoproteins (LpA-I) and high-density lipoproteins. These results indicate that fibroblasts are a good cell model to study the mechanism of lipid efflux mediated by BSP proteins.  (+info)

Apolipoproteins are a group of proteins that are associated with lipids (fats) in the body and play a crucial role in the metabolism, transportation, and regulation of lipids. They are structural components of lipoprotein particles, which are complexes of lipids and proteins that transport lipids in the bloodstream.

There are several types of apolipoproteins, including ApoA, ApoB, ApoC, ApoD, ApoE, and others. Each type has a specific function in lipid metabolism. For example, ApoA is a major component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), often referred to as "good cholesterol," and helps remove excess cholesterol from cells and tissues and transport it to the liver for excretion. ApoB, on the other hand, is a major component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad cholesterol," and plays a role in the delivery of cholesterol to cells and tissues.

Abnormal levels of apolipoproteins or dysfunctional forms of these proteins have been linked to various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Therefore, measuring apolipoprotein levels in the blood can provide valuable information for diagnosing and monitoring these conditions.

Apolipoprotein A (apoA) is a type of apolipoprotein that is primarily associated with high-density lipoproteins (HDL), often referred to as "good cholesterol." There are several subtypes of apoA, including apoA-I, apoA-II, and apoA-IV.

ApoA-I is the major protein component of HDL particles and plays a crucial role in reverse cholesterol transport, which is the process by which excess cholesterol is removed from tissues and delivered to the liver for excretion. Low levels of apoA-I have been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

ApoA-II is another protein component of HDL particles, although its function is less well understood than that of apoA-I. Some studies suggest that apoA-II may play a role in regulating the metabolism of HDL particles.

ApoA-IV is found in both HDL and chylomicrons, which are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary lipids from the intestine to the liver. The function of apoA-IV is not well understood, but it may play a role in regulating appetite and energy metabolism.

Overall, apolipoproteins A are important components of HDL particles and play a critical role in maintaining healthy lipid metabolism and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apolipoprotein C (apoC) is a group of proteins that are associated with lipoproteins, which are complex particles composed of lipids and proteins that play a crucial role in the transport and metabolism of lipids in the body. There are three main types of apoC proteins: apoC-I, apoC-II, and apoC-III.

ApoC-I is involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism and has been shown to inhibit the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which is an enzyme that facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL).

ApoC-II is a cofactor for lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides in chylomicrons and VLDL, leading to the formation of smaller, denser lipoproteins. A deficiency in apoC-II can lead to hypertriglyceridemia, a condition characterized by elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood.

ApoC-III is also involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism and has been shown to inhibit the activity of lipoprotein lipase and CETP. Elevated levels of apoC-III have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, possibly due to its effects on lipoprotein metabolism.

In summary, apolipoprotein C is a group of proteins that are involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism and have important roles in the transport and metabolism of lipids in the body.

Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a type of protein that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of lipids, particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol. ApoB is a component of LDL particles and serves as a ligand for the LDL receptor, which is responsible for the clearance of LDL from the bloodstream.

There are two main forms of ApoB: ApoB-100 and ApoB-48. ApoB-100 is found in LDL particles, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles, and chylomicrons, while ApoB-48 is only found in chylomicrons, which are produced in the intestines and responsible for transporting dietary lipids.

Elevated levels of ApoB are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as they indicate a higher concentration of LDL particles in the bloodstream. Therefore, measuring ApoB levels can provide additional information about CVD risk beyond traditional lipid profile tests that only measure total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is a major protein component of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in human plasma. It plays a crucial role in the metabolism and transport of lipids, particularly cholesterol, within the body. ApoA-I facilitates the formation of HDL particles, which are involved in the reverse transport of cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. This process is known as reverse cholesterol transport and helps maintain appropriate cholesterol levels in the body. Low levels of ApoA-I or dysfunctional ApoA-I have been associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.

Apolipoprotein A-II (ApoA-II) is a protein component of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), often referred to as "good cholesterol." It is one of the major apolipoproteins in HDL and plays a role in the structure, metabolism, and function of HDL particles. ApoA-II is produced primarily in the liver and intestine and helps facilitate the transport of cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. Additionally, ApoA-II has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and may play a role in the regulation of the immune response.

Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a protein involved in the metabolism of lipids, particularly cholesterol. It is produced primarily by the liver and is a component of several types of lipoproteins, including very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL).

ApoE plays a crucial role in the transport and uptake of lipids in the body. It binds to specific receptors on cell surfaces, facilitating the delivery of lipids to cells for energy metabolism or storage. ApoE also helps to clear cholesterol from the bloodstream and is involved in the repair and maintenance of tissues.

There are three major isoforms of ApoE, designated ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4, which differ from each other by only a few amino acids. These genetic variations can have significant effects on an individual's risk for developing certain diseases, particularly cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease. For example, individuals who inherit the ApoE4 allele have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, while those with the ApoE2 allele may have a reduced risk.

In summary, Apolipoprotein E is a protein involved in lipid metabolism and transport, and genetic variations in this protein can influence an individual's risk for certain diseases.

Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) is a type of apolipoprotein, which are proteins that bind to lipids to form lipoprotein complexes. ApoC-II is a component of several lipoproteins, including very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, which are responsible for the transport of fat molecules, such as triglycerides and cholesterol, in the bloodstream.

ApoC-II plays a crucial role in the activation of lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme that breaks down triglycerides in VLDL and chylomicrons into fatty acids, which can then be taken up by cells for energy production or storage. Therefore, ApoC-II deficiency can lead to hypertriglyceridemia, a condition characterized by high levels of triglycerides in the blood.

In addition to its role in lipid metabolism, ApoC-II has been implicated in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the arteries and can lead to serious cardiovascular complications, such as heart attack and stroke.

Apolipoprotein C-III (APOC3) is a protein that is produced in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream. It is a component of certain lipoproteins, including very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, which are responsible for transporting fat molecules, such as triglycerides and cholesterol, throughout the body.

APOC3 plays a role in regulating the metabolism of these lipoproteins. Specifically, it inhibits the activity of an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which breaks down triglycerides in VLDL and chylomicrons. As a result, high levels of APOC3 can lead to an increase in triglyceride levels in the blood, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Genetic variations in the APOC3 gene have been associated with differences in triglyceride levels and risk of cardiovascular disease. Some studies have suggested that reducing APOC3 levels through genetic editing or other means may be a promising strategy for lowering triglycerides and reducing the risk of heart disease.

High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) are a type of lipoprotein that play a crucial role in the transportation and metabolism of cholesterol in the body. They are often referred to as "good" cholesterol because they help remove excess cholesterol from cells and carry it back to the liver, where it can be broken down and removed from the body. This process is known as reverse cholesterol transport.

HDLs are composed of a lipid core containing cholesteryl esters and triglycerides, surrounded by a shell of phospholipids, free cholesterol, and apolipoproteins, primarily apoA-I. The size and composition of HDL particles can vary, leading to the classification of different subclasses of HDL with varying functions and metabolic fates.

Elevated levels of HDL have been associated with a lower risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, while low HDL levels increase the risk. However, it is essential to consider that HDL function and quality may be more important than just the quantity in determining cardiovascular risk.

Apolipoprotein D (apoD) is a protein that is associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in the blood. It is one of several apolipoproteins that are involved in the transport and metabolism of lipids, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, in the body.

ApoD is produced by the APOD gene and is found in various tissues, including the brain, where it is believed to play a role in protecting nerve cells from oxidative stress. It has also been studied for its potential role in Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders.

In addition to its role in lipid metabolism and neuroprotection, apoD has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and may be involved in the regulation of immune responses. However, more research is needed to fully understand the functions and mechanisms of action of this protein.

Lipoproteins are complex particles composed of multiple proteins and lipids (fats) that play a crucial role in the transport and metabolism of fat molecules in the body. They consist of an outer shell of phospholipids, free cholesterols, and apolipoproteins, enclosing a core of triglycerides and cholesteryl esters.

There are several types of lipoproteins, including:

1. Chylomicrons: These are the largest lipoproteins and are responsible for transporting dietary lipids from the intestines to other parts of the body.
2. Very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL): Produced by the liver, VLDL particles carry triglycerides to peripheral tissues for energy storage or use.
3. Low-density lipoproteins (LDL): Often referred to as "bad cholesterol," LDL particles transport cholesterol from the liver to cells throughout the body. High levels of LDL in the blood can lead to plaque buildup in artery walls and increase the risk of heart disease.
4. High-density lipoproteins (HDL): Known as "good cholesterol," HDL particles help remove excess cholesterol from cells and transport it back to the liver for excretion or recycling. Higher levels of HDL are associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

Understanding lipoproteins and their roles in the body is essential for assessing cardiovascular health and managing risks related to heart disease and stroke.

Apolipoprotein C-I (apoC-I) is a small protein component of lipoproteins, which are particles that transport all fat molecules (lipids), including cholesterol, in the bloodstream. ApoC-I is primarily produced in the liver and intestines and plays a crucial role in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, such as very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons.

Apolipoprotein C-I has several functions:

1. Inhibition of lipoprotein lipase (LPL): ApoC-I inhibits the activity of LPL, an enzyme responsible for breaking down triglycerides in lipoproteins. This inhibition helps regulate the rate at which fatty acids are released from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and taken up by cells for energy production or storage.
2. Activation of hepatic lipase (HL): ApoC-I activates HL, an enzyme involved in the catabolism of intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL). This activation aids in the clearance of these particles from the circulation.
3. Regulation of cholesterol efflux: ApoC-I may also play a role in regulating cholesterol efflux, the process by which excess cholesterol is removed from cells and transported to the liver for excretion.

Genetic variations in the APOC1 gene, which encodes apoC-I, have been associated with alterations in lipid metabolism and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Cholesterol is a type of lipid (fat) molecule that is an essential component of cell membranes and is also used to make certain hormones and vitamins in the body. It is produced by the liver and is also obtained from animal-derived foods such as meat, dairy products, and eggs.

Cholesterol does not mix with blood, so it is transported through the bloodstream by lipoproteins, which are particles made up of both lipids and proteins. There are two main types of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), also known as "bad" cholesterol, and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), also known as "good" cholesterol.

High levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood can lead to a buildup of cholesterol in the walls of the arteries, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. On the other hand, high levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of these conditions because HDL helps remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream and transport it back to the liver for disposal.

It is important to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol through a balanced diet, regular exercise, and sometimes medication if necessary. Regular screening is also recommended to monitor cholesterol levels and prevent health complications.

VLDL (Very Low-Density Lipoproteins) are a type of lipoprotein that play a crucial role in the transport and metabolism of fat molecules, known as triglycerides, in the body. They are produced by the liver and consist of a core of triglycerides surrounded by a shell of proteins called apolipoproteins, phospholipids, and cholesterol.

VLDL particles are responsible for delivering fat molecules from the liver to peripheral tissues throughout the body, where they can be used as an energy source or stored for later use. During this process, VLDL particles lose triglycerides and acquire more cholesterol, transforming into intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL) and eventually low-density lipoproteins (LDL), which are also known as "bad" cholesterol.

Elevated levels of VLDL in the blood can contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease due to their association with increased levels of triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, as well as decreased levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are considered "good" cholesterol.

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, and they're found in the food we eat. They're carried in the bloodstream to provide energy to the cells in our body. High levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease, especially in combination with other risk factors such as high LDL (bad) cholesterol, low HDL (good) cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

It's important to note that while triglycerides are a type of fat, they should not be confused with cholesterol, which is a waxy substance found in the cells of our body. Both triglycerides and cholesterol are important for maintaining good health, but high levels of either can increase the risk of heart disease.

Triglyceride levels are measured through a blood test called a lipid panel or lipid profile. A normal triglyceride level is less than 150 mg/dL. Borderline-high levels range from 150 to 199 mg/dL, high levels range from 200 to 499 mg/dL, and very high levels are 500 mg/dL or higher.

Elevated triglycerides can be caused by various factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and kidney disease. Medications such as beta-blockers, steroids, and diuretics can also raise triglyceride levels.

Lifestyle changes such as losing weight, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet low in saturated and trans fats, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption, and quitting smoking can help lower triglyceride levels. In some cases, medication may be necessary to reduce triglycerides to recommended levels.

Lipids are a broad group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents. They include fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E, and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Lipids serve many important functions in the body, including energy storage, acting as structural components of cell membranes, and serving as signaling molecules. High levels of certain lipids, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) is a large protein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as "bad cholesterol." It plays a crucial role in the metabolism and transport of fats and cholesterol in the body. ApoB-100 is responsible for the binding of LDL to specific receptors on cell surfaces, facilitating the uptake of lipoprotein particles by cells. Elevated levels of apoB-100 in the blood are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

Apolipoprotein B-48 (apoB-48) is a protein component of chylomicrons, which are lipoprotein particles responsible for carrying dietary fat and cholesterol from the intestines to other parts of the body. ApoB-48 is produced in the intestines and is a shorter version of apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), which is a component of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) or "bad cholesterol."

Chylomicrons are assembled and secreted by intestinal cells after a meal, and apoB-48 is essential for the formation and function of these particles. ApoB-48-containing chylomicrons transport dietary lipids to various tissues, including the liver, where they contribute to the maintenance of lipid homeostasis.

Elevated levels of apoB-48 in the blood have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly in individuals with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS), a rare genetic disorder characterized by severely elevated triglyceride levels due to impaired clearance of chylomicrons.

HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol is often referred to as "good" cholesterol. It is a type of lipoprotein that helps remove excess cholesterol from cells and carry it back to the liver, where it can be broken down and removed from the body. High levels of HDL cholesterol have been associated with a lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

HDL3 (High-Density Lipoprotein 3) is a type of lipoprotein that plays a role in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol in the body. HDLs are commonly known as "good cholesterol" because they help remove excess cholesterol from cells and carry it back to the liver, where it can be broken down and removed from the body.

HDL3 is one of the subclasses of HDL based on its density and size. It is denser than HDL2 but less dense than HDL1. HDL3 is smaller in size and contains a higher proportion of protein to lipid compared to other HDL subclasses. It is also more efficient in reverse cholesterol transport, which is the process of removing cholesterol from tissues and delivering it to the liver for excretion.

It's worth noting that while high levels of HDL are generally associated with a lower risk of heart disease, recent research suggests that the relationship between HDL and cardiovascular health may be more complex than previously thought.

Tangier Disease is a rare inherited genetic disorder characterized by the deficiency of a protein called ApoA-I and a dysfunctional form of ApoA-II, which are important components of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), also known as "good cholesterol." This results in significantly reduced levels of HDL in the blood and an accumulation of cholesteryl esters in various tissues, including the tonsils, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and sometimes the peripheral nerves.

The condition is caused by mutations in the ABCA1 gene, which plays a crucial role in the reverse transport of cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. The disease manifests with symptoms such as enlarged orange-colored tonsils, swollen lymph nodes, cloudy corneas, and an increased risk of peripheral neuropathy due to nerve damage.

Tangier Disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, meaning that an individual must inherit two defective copies of the gene (one from each parent) to develop the disease.

Phosphatidylcholine-Sterol O-Acyltransferase (PCOAT, also known as Sterol O-Acyltransferase 1 or SOAT1) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. It is located in the endoplasmic reticulum and is responsible for the transfer of acyl groups from phosphatidylcholine to cholesterol, forming cholesteryl esters. This enzymatic reaction results in the storage of excess cholesterol in lipid droplets, preventing its accumulation in the cell membrane and potentially contributing to the development of atherosclerosis if not properly regulated.

Defects or mutations in PCOAT can lead to disruptions in cholesterol homeostasis, which may contribute to various diseases such as cardiovascular disorders, metabolic syndrome, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of this enzyme is essential for developing therapeutic strategies aimed at managing cholesterol-related disorders.

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL), also known as "bad cholesterol," are a type of lipoprotein that carry cholesterol and other fats from the liver to cells throughout the body. High levels of LDL in the blood can lead to the buildup of cholesterol in the walls of the arteries, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Lipoproteins are complex particles composed of proteins (apolipoproteins) and lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids) that are responsible for transporting fat molecules around the body in the bloodstream. LDL is one type of lipoprotein, along with high-density lipoproteins (HDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and chylomicrons.

LDL particles are smaller than HDL particles and can easily penetrate the artery walls, leading to the formation of plaques that can narrow or block the arteries. Therefore, maintaining healthy levels of LDL in the blood is essential for preventing cardiovascular disease.

Nephelometry and turbidimetry are methods used in clinical laboratories to measure the amount of particles, such as proteins or cells, present in a liquid sample. The main difference between these two techniques lies in how they detect and quantify the particles.

1. Nephelometry: This is a laboratory method that measures the amount of light scattered by suspended particles in a liquid medium at a 90-degree angle to the path of the incident light. When light passes through a sample containing particles, some of the light is absorbed, while some is scattered in various directions. In nephelometry, a light beam is shone into the sample, and a detector measures the intensity of the scattered light at a right angle to the light source. The more particles present in the sample, the higher the intensity of scattered light, which correlates with the concentration of particles in the sample. Nephelometry is often used to measure the levels of immunoglobulins, complement components, and other proteins in serum or plasma.

2. Turbidimetry: This is another laboratory method that measures the amount of light blocked or absorbed by suspended particles in a liquid medium. In turbidimetry, a light beam is shone through the sample, and the intensity of the transmitted light is measured. The more particles present in the sample, the more light is absorbed or scattered, resulting in lower transmitted light intensity. Turbidimetric measurements are typically reported as percent transmittance, which is the ratio of the intensity of transmitted light to that of the incident light expressed as a percentage. Turbidimetry can be used to measure various substances, such as proteins, cells, and crystals, in body fluids like urine, serum, or plasma.

In summary, nephelometry measures the amount of scattered light at a 90-degree angle, while turbidimetry quantifies the reduction in transmitted light intensity due to particle presence. Both methods are useful for determining the concentration of particles in liquid samples and are commonly used in clinical laboratories for diagnostic purposes.

ATP Binding Cassette Transporter 1 (ABC Transporter 1 or ABCB1) is a protein that belongs to the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These proteins utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to transport various substrates across membranes.

The ABCB1 gene encodes for the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a 170 kDa protein, which is an efflux transporter primarily located in the plasma membrane of various cell types, including epithelial and endothelial cells. P-gp plays a crucial role in limiting the absorption and facilitating the excretion of many drugs by actively pumping them out of cells, thereby contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells.

P-gp has a broad substrate specificity and can transport various structurally diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiviral drugs, and natural toxins. Its expression is often upregulated in cancer cells, leading to reduced intracellular drug accumulation and decreased therapeutic efficacy. In addition to its role in drug resistance, P-gp also functions in the absorption, distribution, and excretion of drugs in normal tissues, particularly in the intestine, liver, and kidney.

Cholesteryl esters are formed when cholesterol, a type of lipid (fat) that is important for the normal functioning of the body, becomes combined with fatty acids through a process called esterification. This results in a compound that is more hydrophobic (water-repelling) than cholesterol itself, which allows it to be stored more efficiently in the body.

Cholesteryl esters are found naturally in foods such as animal fats and oils, and they are also produced by the liver and other cells in the body. They play an important role in the structure and function of cell membranes, and they are also precursors to the synthesis of steroid hormones, bile acids, and vitamin D.

However, high levels of cholesteryl esters in the blood can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, a condition characterized by the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Cholesteryl esters are typically measured as part of a lipid profile, along with other markers such as total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

Isoelectric focusing (IEF) is a technique used in electrophoresis, which is a method for separating proteins or other molecules based on their electrical charges. In IEF, a mixture of ampholytes (molecules that can carry both positive and negative charges) is used to create a pH gradient within a gel matrix. When an electric field is applied, the proteins or molecules migrate through the gel until they reach the point in the gradient where their net charge is zero, known as their isoelectric point (pI). At this point, they focus into a sharp band and stop moving, resulting in a highly resolved separation of the different components based on their pI. This technique is widely used in protein research for applications such as protein identification, characterization, and purification.

Lipoprotein receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells that play a crucial role in the metabolism of lipoproteins, which are complex particles composed of lipids and proteins. These receptors bind to specific lipoproteins in the bloodstream, facilitating their uptake into the cell for further processing.

There are several types of lipoprotein receptors, including:

1. LDL (Low-Density Lipoprotein) Receptor: This receptor is responsible for recognizing and internalizing LDL particles, which are rich in cholesterol. Once inside the cell, LDL particles release their cholesterol, which can then be used for various cellular functions or stored for later use. Defects in the LDL receptor can lead to elevated levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood and an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
2. HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) Receptor: This receptor is involved in the clearance of HDL particles from the bloodstream. HDL particles are responsible for transporting excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver, where it can be processed and eliminated from the body.
3. VLDL (Very Low-Density Lipoprotein) Receptor: This receptor recognizes and internalizes VLDL particles, which are produced by the liver and carry triglycerides and cholesterol to peripheral tissues. VLDL particles are subsequently converted into LDL particles in the bloodstream.
4. LRP (Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein) Family: This family of receptors includes several members, such as LRP1 and LRP2, that play roles in various cellular processes, including lipid metabolism, protein trafficking, and cell signaling. They can bind to a variety of ligands, including lipoproteins, proteases, and extracellular matrix components.

In summary, lipoprotein receptors are essential for maintaining proper lipid metabolism and homeostasis by facilitating the uptake, processing, and elimination of lipoproteins in the body.

Lipid metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down and utilizes lipids (fats) for various functions, such as energy production, cell membrane formation, and hormone synthesis. This complex process involves several enzymes and pathways that regulate the digestion, absorption, transport, storage, and consumption of fats in the body.

The main types of lipids involved in metabolism include triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and fatty acids. The breakdown of these lipids begins in the digestive system, where enzymes called lipases break down dietary fats into smaller molecules called fatty acids and glycerol. These molecules are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the liver, which is the main site of lipid metabolism.

In the liver, fatty acids may be further broken down for energy production or used to synthesize new lipids. Excess fatty acids may be stored as triglycerides in specialized cells called adipocytes (fat cells) for later use. Cholesterol is also metabolized in the liver, where it may be used to synthesize bile acids, steroid hormones, and other important molecules.

Disorders of lipid metabolism can lead to a range of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). These conditions may be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle habits, or a combination of both. Proper diagnosis and management of lipid metabolism disorders typically involves a combination of dietary changes, exercise, and medication.

Chylomicrons are a type of lipoprotein that are responsible for carrying dietary lipids, such as triglycerides and cholesterol, from the intestines to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system and bloodstream. They are the largest lipoproteins and are composed of an outer layer of phospholipids, free cholesterol, and apolipoproteins, which surrounds a core of triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. Chylomicrons are produced in the intestinal mucosa after a meal containing fat, and their production is stimulated by the hormone cholecystokinin. Once in the bloodstream, chylomicrons interact with other lipoproteins and enzymes to deliver their lipid cargo to various tissues, including muscle and adipose tissue, where they are used for energy or stored for later use.

LDL, or low-density lipoprotein, is often referred to as "bad" cholesterol. It is one of the lipoproteins that helps carry cholesterol throughout your body. High levels of LDL cholesterol can lead to a buildup of cholesterol in your arteries, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Cholesterol is a type of fat (lipid) that is found in the cells of your body. Your body needs some cholesterol to function properly, but having too much can lead to health problems. LDL cholesterol is one of the two main types of cholesterol; the other is high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol.

It's important to keep your LDL cholesterol levels in a healthy range to reduce your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. A healthcare professional can help you determine what your target LDL cholesterol level should be based on your individual health status and risk factors.

Phospholipids are a major class of lipids that consist of a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. The head is composed of a phosphate group, which is often bound to an organic molecule such as choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol. The tails are made up of two fatty acid chains.

Phospholipids are a key component of cell membranes and play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the cell. They form a lipid bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing outwards and the hydrophobic tails facing inwards, creating a barrier that separates the interior of the cell from the outside environment.

Phospholipids are also involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, and protein function regulation. Additionally, they serve as emulsifiers in the digestive system, helping to break down fats in the diet.

Ultracentrifugation is a medical and laboratory technique used for the separation of particles of different sizes, densities, or shapes from a mixture based on their sedimentation rates. This process involves the use of a specialized piece of equipment called an ultracentrifuge, which can generate very high centrifugal forces, much greater than those produced by a regular centrifuge.

In ultracentrifugation, a sample is placed in a special tube and spun at extremely high speeds, causing the particles within the sample to separate based on their size, shape, and density. The larger or denser particles will sediment faster and accumulate at the bottom of the tube, while smaller or less dense particles will remain suspended in the solution or sediment more slowly.

Ultracentrifugation is a valuable tool in various fields, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and virology. It can be used to purify and concentrate viruses, subcellular organelles, membrane fractions, ribosomes, DNA, and other macromolecules from complex mixtures. The technique can also provide information about the size, shape, and density of these particles, making it a crucial method for characterizing and studying their properties.

Hypolipoproteinemias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by low levels of lipoproteins in the blood. Lipoproteins are complex particles composed of proteins and lipids that play a crucial role in the transport and metabolism of fat molecules, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, in the body.

There are several types of hypolipoproteinemias, each associated with deficiencies in specific lipoproteins:

1. Hypobetalipoproteinemia: This disorder is characterized by low levels of beta-lipoproteins, also known as low-density lipoproteins (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol. It can lead to decreased absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and an increased risk of fatty liver disease.
2. Abetalipoproteinemia: This is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the absence of beta-lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B, which results in very low levels of LDL cholesterol and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), or "good" cholesterol. It can lead to fat malabsorption, neurological symptoms, and retinal degeneration.
3. Tangier disease: This disorder is caused by a deficiency in apolipoprotein A-I and results in low levels of HDL cholesterol. It can cause enlarged orange-colored tonsils, neuropathy, and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.
4. Familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia: This disorder is characterized by low levels of HDL cholesterol due to a deficiency in apolipoprotein A-I or A-II. It can increase the risk of premature coronary artery disease.

It's important to note that while some hypolipoproteinemias are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, others may actually protect against it due to reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. Treatment for these disorders typically involves dietary modifications and supplementation of fat-soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids. In some cases, medication may be necessary to manage symptoms or prevent complications.

HDL2 (High-Density Lipoprotein 2) is a type of lipoprotein that plays a role in the transportation and metabolism of cholesterol in the body. HDL particles are responsible for picking up excess cholesterol from tissues and cells throughout the body and transporting it back to the liver, where it can be broken down and removed from the body. This process is known as reverse cholesterol transport.

HDL2 is one of the subclasses of HDL particles, which are classified based on their size, density, and composition. HDL2 particles are larger and denser than other HDL subclasses, such as HDL3. They have a higher proportion of cholesteryl esters to phospholipids and apolipoproteins compared to other HDL subclasses.

Elevated levels of HDL2 have been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, while low levels of HDL2 have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. However, the exact role of HDL2 in cardiovascular health and disease is still being studied and understood.

Lymph is a colorless, transparent fluid that circulates throughout the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune and circulatory systems. It consists of white blood cells called lymphocytes, proteins, lipids, glucose, electrolytes, hormones, and waste products. Lymph plays an essential role in maintaining fluid balance, absorbing fats from the digestive tract, and defending the body against infection by transporting immune cells to various tissues and organs. It is collected from tissues through lymph capillaries and flows through increasingly larger lymphatic vessels, ultimately returning to the bloodstream via the subclavian veins in the chest region.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Apoproteins are the protein components of lipoprotein complexes, which are responsible for transporting fat molecules, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, throughout the body. Apoproteins play a crucial role in the metabolism of lipids by acting as recognition signals that allow lipoproteins to interact with specific receptors on cell surfaces.

There are several different types of apoproteins, each with distinct functions. For example, apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) is the major protein component of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are responsible for transporting excess cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. Apolipoprotein B (apoB) is a large apoprotein found in low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and lipoprotein(a). ApoB plays a critical role in the assembly and secretion of VLDL from the liver, and it also mediates the uptake of LDL by cells.

Abnormalities in apoprotein levels or function can contribute to the development of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, measuring apoprotein levels in the blood can provide valuable information for diagnosing and monitoring these conditions.

Hyperlipidemias are a group of disorders characterized by an excess of lipids (fats) or lipoproteins in the blood. These include elevated levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, or both. Hyperlipidemias can be inherited (primary) or caused by other medical conditions (secondary). They are a significant risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

There are two main types of lipids that are commonly measured in the blood: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, often referred to as "bad" cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, known as "good" cholesterol. High levels of LDL cholesterol can lead to the formation of plaques in the arteries, which can narrow or block them and increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. On the other hand, high levels of HDL cholesterol are protective because they help remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Triglycerides are another type of lipid that can be measured in the blood. Elevated triglyceride levels can also contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease, particularly when combined with high LDL cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol levels.

Hyperlipidemias are typically diagnosed through a blood test that measures the levels of various lipids and lipoproteins in the blood. Treatment may include lifestyle changes, such as following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, losing weight, and quitting smoking, as well as medication to lower lipid levels if necessary.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Immunodiffusion is a laboratory technique used in immunology to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a sample. It is based on the principle of diffusion, where molecules move from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until they reach equilibrium. In this technique, a sample containing an unknown quantity of antigen or antibody is placed in a gel or agar medium that contains a known quantity of antibody or antigen, respectively.

The two substances then diffuse towards each other and form a visible precipitate at the point where they meet and reach equivalence, which indicates the presence and quantity of the specific antigen or antibody in the sample. There are several types of immunodiffusion techniques, including radial immunodiffusion (RID) and double immunodiffusion (Ouchterlony technique). These techniques are widely used in diagnostic laboratories to identify and measure various antigens and antibodies, such as those found in infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergic reactions.

Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of lipids. It is responsible for breaking down triglycerides, which are the main constituent of dietary fats and chylomicrons, into fatty acids and glycerol. These products are then taken up by cells for energy production or storage.

LPL is synthesized in various tissues, including muscle and fat, where it is attached to the inner lining of blood vessels (endothelium). The enzyme is activated when it comes into contact with lipoprotein particles, such as chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), which transport triglycerides in the bloodstream.

Deficiencies or mutations in LPL can lead to various metabolic disorders, including hypertriglyceridemia, a condition characterized by high levels of triglycerides in the blood. Conversely, overexpression of LPL has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis due to excessive uptake of fatty acids by macrophages and their conversion into foam cells, which contribute to plaque formation in the arteries.

Triolein is a type of triglyceride, which is a kind of fat molecule. More specifically, triolein is the triglyceride formed from three molecules of oleic acid, a common monounsaturated fatty acid. It is often used in scientific research and studies involving lipid metabolism, and it can be found in various vegetable oils and animal fats.

Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IV is a genetic disorder characterized by an increased level of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) in the blood. This leads to elevated levels of triglycerides, which are a type of fat found in the blood. The condition is also sometimes referred to as "Fredrickson Type IV."

People with Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IV have an increased risk of developing pancreatitis, a potentially life-threatening inflammation of the pancreas, due to high levels of triglycerides. They may also have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to elevated levels of VLDL and other atherogenic lipoproteins.

The condition is usually inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a child has a 50% chance of inheriting the disorder if one parent has it. However, some cases may be caused by mutations in multiple genes or by environmental factors such as obesity, diabetes, and excessive alcohol consumption.

Treatment for Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IV typically involves lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, exercise, and dietary changes to reduce triglyceride levels. In some cases, medication may be necessary to control the condition.

Phosphatidylcholines (PtdCho) are a type of phospholipids that are essential components of cell membranes in living organisms. They are composed of a hydrophilic head group, which contains a choline moiety, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. Phosphatidylcholines are crucial for maintaining the structural integrity and function of cell membranes, and they also serve as important precursors for the synthesis of signaling molecules such as acetylcholine. They can be found in various tissues and biological fluids, including blood, and are abundant in foods such as soybeans, eggs, and meat. Phosphatidylcholines have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their role in maintaining healthy lipid metabolism and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of membrane proteins that utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to transport various substrates across extra- and intracellular membranes. These transporters play crucial roles in several biological processes, including detoxification, drug resistance, nutrient uptake, and regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis.

The structure of ABC transporters consists of two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) that bind and hydrolyze ATP, and two transmembrane domains (TMDs) that form the substrate-translocation pathway. The NBDs are typically located adjacent to each other in the cytoplasm, while the TMDs can be either integral membrane domains or separate structures associated with the membrane.

The human genome encodes 48 distinct ABC transporters, which are classified into seven subfamilies (ABCA-ABCG) based on their sequence similarity and domain organization. Some well-known examples of ABC transporters include P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1), and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

Dysregulation or mutations in ABC transporters have been implicated in various diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, neurological disorders, and cancer. In cancer, overexpression of certain ABC transporters can contribute to drug resistance by actively effluxing chemotherapeutic agents from cancer cells, making them less susceptible to treatment.

Hyperlipoproteinemias are medical conditions characterized by elevated levels of lipoproteins in the blood. Lipoproteins are particles that consist of proteins and lipids, which are responsible for transporting all fat molecules, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, around the body within the water outside cells. These lipids cannot dissolve in the blood, so they must be carried by these lipoprotein particles.

There are several types of hyperlipoproteinemias, classified based on the type of lipoprotein that is elevated and the pattern of inheritance. The most commonly recognized classification system is the Fredrickson classification, which includes five main types:

1. Type I - characterized by an excess of chylomicrons, a type of lipoprotein that carries dietary lipids, leading to extremely high levels of triglycerides in the blood. This rare disorder is usually caused by genetic mutations.
2. Type II - divided into two subtypes:
a. Type IIa - characterized by elevated LDL (low-density lipoprotein), or "bad" cholesterol, levels and often associated with premature cardiovascular disease. This condition can be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle choices, or both.
b. Type IIb - marked by increased levels of both LDL cholesterol and VLDL (very low-density lipoprotein), which leads to elevated triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood. This subtype can also be influenced by genetic factors, lifestyle choices, or both.
3. Type III - known as broad beta disease or remnant removal disease, this condition is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of remnant particles from VLDL and IDL (intermediate-density lipoprotein) metabolism, leading to increased levels of both cholesterol and triglycerides. This disorder can be caused by genetic mutations or secondary factors like diabetes, obesity, or hypothyroidism.
4. Type IV - characterized by elevated VLDL particles and high triglyceride levels in the blood. This condition is often associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and alcohol consumption.
5. Type V - marked by increased VLDL and chylomicrons (lipoprotein particles that transport dietary lipids) in the blood, leading to extremely high triglyceride levels. This rare condition can be caused by genetic factors or secondary factors like diabetes, obesity, alcohol consumption, or uncontrolled lipid absorption.

It is important to note that these types are not mutually exclusive and can coexist in various combinations. Additionally, lifestyle choices such as diet, exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption can significantly impact lipoprotein levels and contribute to the development of dyslipidemia (abnormal lipid levels).

Apolipoprotein E3 (ApoE3) is one of the three major isoforms of apolipoprotein E (ApoE), a protein involved in the metabolism of lipids, particularly cholesterol. ApoE is produced by the APOE gene, which has three common alleles: ε2, ε3, and ε4. These alleles result in three main isoforms of the protein: ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4.

ApoE3 is the most common isoform, found in approximately 77-78% of the population. It has a slightly different amino acid sequence compared to ApoE2 and ApoE4, which can affect its function. ApoE3 is thought to play a neutral or protective role in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular diseases, although some studies suggest that it may have a mildly favorable effect on lipid metabolism compared to ApoE4.

Clinical chemistry is a branch of medical laboratory science that deals with the chemical analysis of biological specimens such as blood, urine, and tissue samples to provide information about the health status of a patient. It involves the use of various analytical techniques and instruments to measure different chemicals, enzymes, hormones, and other substances in the body. The results of these tests help healthcare professionals diagnose and monitor diseases, evaluate therapy effectiveness, and make informed decisions about patient care. Clinical chemists work closely with physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers to ensure accurate and timely test results, which are crucial for proper medical diagnosis and treatment.

VLDL, or very low-density lipoproteins, are a type of lipoprotein that carries triglycerides and cholesterol from the liver to other parts of the body. Cholesterol is a fatty substance found in the blood, and VLDL contains both triglycerides and cholesterol.

Cholesterol itself cannot dissolve in the blood and needs to be transported around the body by lipoproteins, which are protein molecules that encapsulate and carry fat molecules, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, through the bloodstream. VLDL is one of several types of lipoproteins, including low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL).

Elevated levels of VLDL in the blood can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, a condition characterized by the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Therefore, maintaining healthy levels of VLDL and other lipoproteins is an important part of overall cardiovascular health.

Hypertriglyceridemia is a medical condition characterized by an elevated level of triglycerides in the blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood that can increase the risk of developing heart disease, especially when levels are very high.

In general, hypertriglyceridemia is defined as having triglyceride levels greater than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) of blood. However, the specific definition of hypertriglyceridemia may vary depending on individual risk factors and medical history.

Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, and certain medications. In some cases, it may also be a secondary consequence of other medical conditions such as diabetes or hypothyroidism. Treatment for hypertriglyceridemia typically involves lifestyle modifications such as dietary changes, increased exercise, and weight loss, as well as medication if necessary.

Cholesteryl ester transfer proteins (CETP) are a group of plasma proteins that play a role in the transport and metabolism of lipids, particularly cholesteryl esters and triglycerides, between different lipoprotein particles in the bloodstream. These proteins facilitate the transfer of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), while simultaneously promoting the transfer of triglycerides in the opposite direction, from VLDL and LDL to HDL.

The net effect of CETP activity is a decrease in HDL cholesterol levels and an increase in LDL and VLDL cholesterol levels. This shift in lipoprotein composition can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, as lower HDL cholesterol levels and higher LDL cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk for these conditions.

Inhibition of CETP has been investigated as a potential strategy for increasing HDL cholesterol levels and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, clinical trials with CETP inhibitors have shown mixed results, and further research is needed to determine their safety and efficacy in preventing cardiovascular events.

IDL, or intermediate-density lipoproteins, are a type of lipoprotein that is denser than low-density lipoproteins (LDL) but less dense than high-density lipoproteins (HDL). They are formed during the catabolism (breakdown) of VLDL (very low-density lipoproteins), another type of lipoprotein, by lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme that breaks down triglycerides in lipoproteins.

IDLs contain a higher proportion of cholesterol and apolipoprotein E (apoE) compared to VLDLs and LDLs. Some IDLs are taken up by the liver, while others are converted into LDL particles through the action of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which exchanges triglycerides in LDL for cholesterol esters in IDL.

Elevated levels of IDLs in the blood may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, as they can contribute to the formation and accumulation of plaque in the arteries. However, IDLs are not typically measured in routine clinical testing, and their role in disease is not as well understood as that of LDL or HDL.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Scavenger receptors, class B (SR-B) are a type of scavenger receptors that play a crucial role in the cellular uptake and metabolism of lipids, particularly modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL), high-density lipoproteins (HDL), and other lipid-soluble molecules. They are membrane-bound glycoproteins that contain an extracellular domain with a characteristic structure, including cysteine-rich repeats and transmembrane domains.

The best-characterized member of this class is SR-B1 (also known as CD36b, SCARB1), which is widely expressed in various tissues, such as the liver, steroidogenic organs, macrophages, and endothelial cells. SR-B1 selectively binds to HDL and facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters from HDL particles into cells while allowing HDL to maintain its structural integrity and continue its function in reverse cholesterol transport.

SR-B1 has also been implicated in the uptake and degradation of oxidized LDL, contributing to the development of atherosclerosis. Additionally, SR-B1 is involved in several other cellular processes, including innate immunity, inflammation, and angiogenesis.

Other members of class B scavenger receptors include SR-BI, SR-B2 (also known as CLA-1 or LIMPII), SR-B3 (also known as CD36c or SCARB2), and SR-B4 (also known as CXorf24). These receptors have distinct expression patterns and functions but share structural similarities with SR-BI.

In summary, scavenger receptors, class B, are a group of membrane-bound glycoproteins that facilitate the cellular uptake and metabolism of lipids, particularly modified LDL and HDL particles. They play essential roles in maintaining lipid homeostasis and have implications in various pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis and inflammation.

Freeze-drying, also known as lyophilization, is a method of preservation that involves the removal of water from a frozen product by sublimation, which is the direct transition of a solid to a gas. This process allows for the preservation of the original shape and structure of the material while significantly extending its shelf life. In medical contexts, freeze-drying can be used for various purposes, including the long-term storage of pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and diagnostic samples. The process helps maintain the efficacy and integrity of these materials until they are ready to be reconstituted with water and used.

Ethinyl estradiol is a synthetic form of the hormone estrogen that is often used in various forms of hormonal contraception, such as birth control pills. It works by preventing ovulation and thickening cervical mucus to make it more difficult for sperm to reach the egg. Ethinyl estradiol may also be used in combination with other hormones to treat menopausal symptoms or hormonal disorders.

It is important to note that while ethinyl estradiol can be an effective form of hormonal therapy, it can also carry risks and side effects, such as an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, and breast cancer. As with any medication, it should only be used under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider.

In the context of medical and health sciences, particle size generally refers to the diameter or dimension of particles, which can be in the form of solid particles, droplets, or aerosols. These particles may include airborne pollutants, pharmaceutical drugs, or medical devices such as nanoparticles used in drug delivery systems.

Particle size is an important factor to consider in various medical applications because it can affect the behavior and interactions of particles with biological systems. For example, smaller particle sizes can lead to greater absorption and distribution throughout the body, while larger particle sizes may be filtered out by the body's natural defense mechanisms. Therefore, understanding particle size and its implications is crucial for optimizing the safety and efficacy of medical treatments and interventions.

An immunoassay is a biochemical test that measures the presence or concentration of a specific protein, antibody, or antigen in a sample using the principles of antibody-antigen reactions. It is commonly used in clinical laboratories to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions such as infections, hormonal disorders, allergies, and cancer.

Immunoassays typically involve the use of labeled reagents, such as enzymes, radioisotopes, or fluorescent dyes, that bind specifically to the target molecule. The amount of label detected is proportional to the concentration of the target molecule in the sample, allowing for quantitative analysis.

There are several types of immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioimmunoassay (RIA), fluorescence immunoassay (FIA), and chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Each type has its own advantages and limitations, depending on the sensitivity, specificity, and throughput required for a particular application.

Serum Amyloid A (SAA) protein is an acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, although it can also be produced by other cells in response to inflammation. It is a member of the apolipoprotein family and is found in high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in the blood. SAA protein levels increase rapidly during the acute phase response to infection, trauma, or tissue damage, making it a useful biomarker for inflammation.

In addition to its role as an acute phase protein, SAA has been implicated in several disease processes, including atherosclerosis and amyloidosis. In amyloidosis, SAA can form insoluble fibrils that deposit in various tissues, leading to organ dysfunction. There are four subtypes of SAA in humans (SAA1, SAA2, SAA3, and SAA4), with SAA1 and SAA2 being the most responsive to inflammatory stimuli.

Dietary fats, also known as fatty acids, are a major nutrient that the body needs for energy and various functions. They are an essential component of cell membranes and hormones, and they help the body absorb certain vitamins. There are several types of dietary fats:

1. Saturated fats: These are typically solid at room temperature and are found in animal products such as meat, butter, and cheese, as well as tropical oils like coconut and palm oil. Consuming a high amount of saturated fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and increase the risk of heart disease.
2. Unsaturated fats: These are typically liquid at room temperature and can be further divided into monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats, found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, can help lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol while maintaining levels of healthy HDL cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fats, found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and walnuts, have similar effects on cholesterol levels and also provide essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that the body cannot produce on its own.
3. Trans fats: These are unsaturated fats that have been chemically modified to be solid at room temperature. They are often found in processed foods such as baked goods, fried foods, and snack foods. Consuming trans fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and lower levels of healthy HDL cholesterol, increasing the risk of heart disease.

It is recommended to limit intake of saturated and trans fats and to consume more unsaturated fats as part of a healthy diet.

Electron microscopy (EM) is a type of microscopy that uses a beam of electrons to create an image of the sample being examined, resulting in much higher magnification and resolution than light microscopy. There are several types of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection electron microscopy (REM).

In TEM, a beam of electrons is transmitted through a thin slice of the sample, and the electrons that pass through the sample are focused to form an image. This technique can provide detailed information about the internal structure of cells, viruses, and other biological specimens, as well as the composition and structure of materials at the atomic level.

In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of the sample, and the electrons that are scattered back from the surface are detected to create an image. This technique can provide information about the topography and composition of surfaces, as well as the structure of materials at the microscopic level.

REM is a variation of SEM in which the beam of electrons is reflected off the surface of the sample, rather than scattered back from it. This technique can provide information about the surface chemistry and composition of materials.

Electron microscopy has a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and materials science, including the study of cellular structure and function, disease diagnosis, and the development of new materials and technologies.

Immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) is a laboratory technique used in the field of clinical pathology and immunology. It is a method for separating and identifying proteins, particularly immunoglobulins or antibodies, in a sample. This technique combines the principles of electrophoresis, which separates proteins based on their electric charge and size, with immunological reactions, which detect specific proteins using antigen-antibody interactions.

In IEP, a protein sample is first separated by electrophoresis in an agarose or agar gel matrix on a glass slide or in a test tube. After separation, an antibody specific to the protein of interest is layered on top of the gel and allowed to diffuse towards the separated proteins. This creates a reaction between the antigen (protein) and the antibody, forming a visible precipitate at the point where they meet. The precipitate line's position and intensity can then be analyzed to identify and quantify the protein of interest.

Immunoelectrophoresis is particularly useful in diagnosing various medical conditions, such as immunodeficiency disorders, monoclonal gammopathies (like multiple myeloma), and other plasma cell dyscrasias. It can help detect abnormal protein patterns, quantify specific immunoglobulins, and identify the presence of M-proteins or Bence Jones proteins, which are indicative of monoclonal gammopathies.

Hyperlipoproteinemia Type V is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an excess of lipids (fats) in the blood. It is caused by mutations in genes responsible for the metabolism of lipoproteins, which are particles that transport fat molecules, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, throughout the body.

In Hyperlipoproteinemia Type V, there is a significant increase in the levels of both chylomicrons (lipoprotein particles that carry dietary lipids) and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs, lipoprotein particles that carry endogenous lipids produced by the liver). This results in extremely high levels of triglycerides and moderately elevated levels of cholesterol in the blood.

Individuals with Hyperlipoproteinemia Type V are at an increased risk for developing pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), eruptive xanthomas (small, yellowish bumps on the skin caused by cholesterol deposits), and hepatosplenomegaly (enlargement of the liver and spleen). The diagnosis is typically made based on clinical presentation, family history, and laboratory tests that measure lipid levels. Treatment often involves dietary modifications, weight loss, exercise, and medications to lower lipid levels in the blood.

Abetalipoproteinemia is a rare inherited genetic disorder that affects the way the body absorbs and metabolizes fats and fat-soluble vitamins. It is caused by mutations in the genes responsible for producing proteins involved in the formation and transport of beta-lipoproteins, which are necessary for the absorption of dietary fats and cholesterol from the intestines.

Individuals with abetalipoproteinemia are unable to produce adequate levels of these lipoproteins, leading to a deficiency in fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and an accumulation of fats in the intestines. This results in various symptoms such as steatorrhea (fatty, foul-smelling stools), malabsorption, diarrhea, failure to thrive, and neurological issues due to vitamin E deficiency.

The disorder is typically diagnosed in infancy or early childhood and requires lifelong dietary management, including a low-fat diet and supplementation with fat-soluble vitamins. Early intervention can help prevent the progression of neurological symptoms and improve overall prognosis.

Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) is a type of phospholipid molecule that is commonly found in animal cell membranes. It is composed of two myristoyl fatty acid chains, a phosphate group, and a choline headgroup. DMPC has a gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature of around 23-25°C, which makes it a useful compound for studying the physical properties of lipid membranes and for creating model membrane systems in laboratory experiments.

Scavenger receptors are a class of cell surface receptors that play a crucial role in the recognition and clearance of various biomolecules, including modified self-molecules, pathogens, and apoptotic cells. These receptors are expressed mainly by phagocytic cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, but they can also be found on other cell types, including endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

Scavenger receptors have broad specificity and can bind to a wide range of ligands, including oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), polyanionic molecules, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The binding of ligands to scavenger receptors triggers various cellular responses, such as phagocytosis, endocytosis, signaling cascades, and the production of cytokines and chemokines.

Scavenger receptors are classified into several families based on their structural features and ligand specificity, including:

1. Class A (SR-A): This family includes SR-AI, SR-AII, and MARCO, which bind to oxLDL, bacteria, and apoptotic cells.
2. Class B (SR-B): This family includes SR-BI, CD36, and LIMPII, which bind to lipoproteins, phospholipids, and pathogens.
3. Class C (SR-C): This family includes DEC-205, MRC1, and LOX-1, which bind to various ligands, including apoptotic cells, bacteria, and oxLDL.
4. Class D (SR-D): This family includes SCARF1, which binds to PAMPs and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).
5. Class E (SR-E): This family includes CXCL16, which binds to chemokine CXCR6 and phosphatidylserine.

Scavenger receptors play a critical role in maintaining tissue homeostasis by removing damaged or altered molecules and cells, modulating immune responses, and regulating lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of scavenger receptor function has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, inflammation, infection, and cancer.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is commonly found in various natural oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and peanut oil. Its chemical formula is cis-9-octadecenoic acid, and it is a colorless liquid at room temperature with a slight odor. Oleic acid is an important component of human diet and has been shown to have various health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and improving immune function. It is also used in the manufacture of soaps, cosmetics, and other industrial products.

Gel chromatography is a type of liquid chromatography that separates molecules based on their size or molecular weight. It uses a stationary phase that consists of a gel matrix made up of cross-linked polymers, such as dextran, agarose, or polyacrylamide. The gel matrix contains pores of various sizes, which allow smaller molecules to penetrate deeper into the matrix while larger molecules are excluded.

In gel chromatography, a mixture of molecules is loaded onto the top of the gel column and eluted with a solvent that moves down the column by gravity or pressure. As the sample components move down the column, they interact with the gel matrix and get separated based on their size. Smaller molecules can enter the pores of the gel and take longer to elute, while larger molecules are excluded from the pores and elute more quickly.

Gel chromatography is commonly used to separate and purify proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules based on their size and molecular weight. It is also used in the analysis of polymers, colloids, and other materials with a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Arteriosclerosis is a general term that describes the hardening and stiffening of the artery walls. It's a progressive condition that can occur as a result of aging, or it may be associated with certain risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle.

The process of arteriosclerosis involves the buildup of plaque, made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances, in the inner lining of the artery walls. Over time, this buildup can cause the artery walls to thicken and harden, reducing the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the body's organs and tissues.

Arteriosclerosis can affect any of the body's arteries, but it is most commonly found in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, the cerebral arteries that supply blood to the brain, and the peripheral arteries that supply blood to the limbs. When arteriosclerosis affects the coronary arteries, it can lead to heart disease, angina, or heart attack. When it affects the cerebral arteries, it can lead to stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). When it affects the peripheral arteries, it can cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the limbs, and in severe cases, gangrene and amputation.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Lipolysis is the process by which fat cells (adipocytes) break down stored triglycerides into glycerol and free fatty acids. This process occurs when the body needs to use stored fat as a source of energy, such as during fasting, exercise, or in response to certain hormonal signals. The breakdown products of lipolysis can be used directly by cells for energy production or can be released into the bloodstream and transported to other tissues for use. Lipolysis is regulated by several hormones, including adrenaline (epinephrine), noradrenaline (norepinephrine), cortisol, glucagon, and growth hormone, which act on lipases, enzymes that mediate the breakdown of triglycerides.

Sterol O-Acyltransferase (SOAT, also known as ACAT for Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in cholesterol homeostasis within cells. Specifically, it catalyzes the reaction of esterifying free cholesterol with fatty acyl-coenzyme A (fatty acyl-CoA) to form cholesteryl esters. This enzymatic activity allows for the intracellular storage of excess cholesterol in lipid droplets, reducing the levels of free cholesterol in the cell and thus preventing its potential toxic effects on membranes and proteins. There are two isoforms of SOAT, SOAT1 and SOAT2, which exhibit distinct subcellular localization and functions. Dysregulation of SOAT activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorders.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Callitrichinae is a subfamily of New World monkeys that includes marmosets and tamarins. These small primates are known for their claw-like nails (called "tegulae"), which they use for grooming and climbing, as well as their small size and social behavior. They are native to the forests of Central and South America. Some notable species in this subfamily include the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) and the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia).

High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are a type of lipoprotein that play a crucial role in the transportation and metabolism of cholesterol in the body. They are often referred to as "good cholesterol" because they help remove excess cholesterol from cells and tissues, transporting it back to the liver for excretion or recycling. This process is known as reverse cholesterol transport and helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels in the body.

Pre-beta HDLs are a specific subclass of HDL particles that are involved in the early stages of reverse cholesterol transport. These particles are smaller and denser than other HDL subclasses, and they have the unique ability to accept cholesterol from cells and tissues. Pre-beta HDLs are thought to be particularly efficient at initiating the reverse cholesterol transport process, making them an important component of healthy lipid metabolism.

It is worth noting that while pre-beta HDLs have been the subject of research interest due to their potential role in cardiovascular health, there is still much that is not fully understood about these particles. As such, a medical definition of "pre-beta HDL" may vary depending on the specific context and source of the information.

Lipase is an enzyme that is produced by the pancreas and found in the digestive system of most organisms. Its primary function is to catalyze the hydrolysis of fats (triglycerides) into smaller molecules, such as fatty acids and glycerol, which can then be absorbed by the intestines and utilized for energy or stored for later use.

In medical terms, lipase levels in the blood are often measured to diagnose or monitor conditions that affect the pancreas, such as pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), pancreatic cancer, or cystic fibrosis. Elevated lipase levels may indicate damage to the pancreas and its ability to produce digestive enzymes.

Liposomes are artificially prepared, small, spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that enclose an aqueous compartment. They can encapsulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, making them useful for drug delivery applications in the medical field. The lipid bilayer structure of liposomes is similar to that of biological membranes, which allows them to merge with and deliver their contents into cells. This property makes liposomes a valuable tool in delivering drugs directly to targeted sites within the body, improving drug efficacy while minimizing side effects.

LDL receptors (Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors) are cell surface receptors that play a crucial role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis within the body. They are responsible for recognizing and binding to LDL particles, also known as "bad cholesterol," which are then internalized by the cell through endocytosis.

Once inside the cell, the LDL particles are broken down, releasing their cholesterol content, which can be used for various cellular processes such as membrane synthesis and hormone production. The LDL receptors themselves are recycled back to the cell surface, allowing for continued uptake of LDL particles.

Mutations in the LDL receptor gene can lead to a condition called familial hypercholesterolemia, which is characterized by high levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood and an increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease.

Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is commonly found in various natural oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and grapeseed oil. Its chemical formula is cis-9-octadecenoic acid, and it is a colorless liquid at room temperature. Oleic acid is an important component of human diet and has been shown to have potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and improving immune function. It is also used in the manufacture of soaps, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the metabolism of cholesterol in the body. LCAT is an enzyme that helps to convert cholesterol into a form that can be easily transported in the bloodstream.

In LCAT deficiency, the activity of this enzyme is reduced or absent, leading to an accumulation of cholesterol in various tissues and organs of the body. This can result in a range of symptoms, including corneal opacities (clouding of the clear outer layer of the eye), hemolytic anemia (destruction of red blood cells), proteinuria (excess protein in the urine), and kidney failure.

There are two main types of LCAT deficiency: a complete form, known as fish-eye disease, which is characterized by corneal opacities but few other symptoms; and an incomplete form, known as LCAT deficiency with systemic involvement, which can affect multiple organs and systems of the body.

LCAT deficiency is caused by mutations in the LCAT gene, which provides instructions for making the LCAT enzyme. Inheritance is autosomal recessive, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the disorder.

Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a genetic disorder characterized by high levels of cholesterol and/or fats (lipids) in the blood. It is one of the most common inherited lipid disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 200 to 1 in 500 people.

FCH is caused by mutations in several genes involved in lipid metabolism, including the APOB, LDLR, and PCSK9 genes. These genetic defects lead to increased levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, or both in the blood.

Individuals with FCH may have elevated levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and/or triglycerides, which can increase their risk for premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The condition often presents in early adulthood and may manifest as mixed hyperlipidemia (high levels of both LDL cholesterol and triglycerides) or isolated hypercholesterolemia (high levels of LDL cholesterol only).

Familial combined hyperlipidemia is typically managed with lifestyle modifications, such as a heart-healthy diet, regular exercise, and weight management. Medications, such as statins, may also be prescribed to lower lipid levels and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular monitoring of lipid levels is essential for effective management and prevention of complications associated with FCH.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

CD36 is a type of protein found on the surface of certain cells in the human body, including platelets, white blood cells (monocytes and macrophages), and fat (adipose) cells. It is a type of scavenger receptor that plays a role in various biological processes, such as:

1. Fatty acid uptake and metabolism: CD36 helps facilitate the transport of long-chain fatty acids into cells for energy production and storage.
2. Inflammation and immune response: CD36 is involved in the recognition and clearance of foreign substances (pathogens) and damaged or dying cells, which can trigger an immune response.
3. Angiogenesis: CD36 has been implicated in the regulation of blood vessel formation (angiogenesis), particularly during wound healing and tumor growth.
4. Atherosclerosis: CD36 has been associated with the development and progression of atherosclerosis, a condition characterized by the buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in and on the artery walls. This is due to its role in the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) by macrophages, leading to the formation of foam cells and the development of fatty streaks in the arterial wall.
5. Infectious diseases: CD36 has been identified as a receptor for various pathogens, including malaria parasites, HIV, and some bacteria, which can use this protein to gain entry into host cells.

As an antigen, CD36 is a molecule that can be targeted by the immune system to produce an immune response. Antibodies against CD36 have been found in various diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and certain infections. Modulation of CD36 activity has been suggested as a potential therapeutic strategy for several conditions, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and infectious diseases.

I couldn't find a medical definition for the term "butter" in and of itself, as it is not a medical term. However, butter is a common food item that can be mentioned in a medical context. Butter is a dairy product made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk to separate the fat globules from the buttermilk. It is used as a spread, cooking fat, and ingredient in various foods.

In some cases, butter may be relevant in a medical setting due to its nutritional content. Butter is high in saturated fats and cholesterol, which can contribute to an increased risk of heart disease when consumed in excess. Therefore, individuals with certain medical conditions, such as high blood cholesterol levels or a history of heart disease, may be advised to limit their intake of butter and other high-fat dairy products.

Additionally, some people may have allergies or sensitivities to dairy products, including butter, which can cause symptoms such as hives, itching, swelling, difficulty breathing, or digestive problems. In these cases, avoiding butter and other dairy products is important for managing the allergy or sensitivity.

Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II, also known as Fredrickson Type II or Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia, is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and/or triglycerides in the blood. This condition can lead to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

The disorder is caused by mutations in several genes involved in lipid metabolism, including APOB, LDLR, PCSK9, and APOE. These genetic defects result in impaired clearance of LDL particles from the bloodstream, leading to their accumulation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Individuals with Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II typically have elevated levels of both LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, although some may only have one or the other elevated. The disorder can present at any age, but it is often diagnosed in adulthood during routine cholesterol screening.

Treatment for Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II typically involves lifestyle modifications such as a heart-healthy diet, regular exercise, and weight loss. Medications such as statins, ezetimibe, and PCSK9 inhibitors may also be prescribed to lower LDL cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Esterification is a chemical reaction that involves the conversion of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid into an ester, typically through the removal of a molecule of water. This reaction is often catalyzed by an acid or a base, and it is a key process in organic chemistry. Esters are commonly found in nature and are responsible for the fragrances of many fruits and flowers. They are also important in the production of various industrial and consumer products, including plastics, resins, and perfumes.

Glycoproteins are complex proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. These glycans are linked to the protein through asparagine residues (N-linked) or serine/threonine residues (O-linked). Glycoproteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found on the outer surface of cell membranes, in extracellular fluids, and as components of the extracellular matrix. The structure and composition of glycoproteins can vary significantly depending on their function and location within an organism.

An emulsion is a type of stable mixture of two immiscible liquids, such as oil and water, which are normally unable to mix together uniformly. In an emulsion, one liquid (the dispersed phase) is broken down into small droplets and distributed throughout the other liquid (the continuous phase), creating a stable, cloudy mixture.

In medical terms, emulsions can be used in various pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. For example, certain medications may be formulated as oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsions to improve their absorption, stability, or palatability. Similarly, some skincare products and makeup removers contain emulsifiers that help create stable mixtures of water and oils, allowing for effective cleansing and moisturizing.

Emulsions can also occur naturally in the body, such as in the digestion of fats. The bile salts produced by the liver help to form small droplets of dietary lipids (oil) within the watery environment of the small intestine, allowing for efficient absorption and metabolism of these nutrients.

"Salmonidae" is not a medical term. It is a biological term that refers to a family of fish which includes salmon, trout, char, grayling, and whitefish. These fish are often anadromous, meaning they are born in fresh water, migrate to the ocean, then return to fresh water to reproduce. They are important both commercially and recreationally as a source of food and sport fishing.

"Competitive binding" is a term used in pharmacology and biochemistry to describe the behavior of two or more molecules (ligands) competing for the same binding site on a target protein or receptor. In this context, "binding" refers to the physical interaction between a ligand and its target.

When a ligand binds to a receptor, it can alter the receptor's function, either activating or inhibiting it. If multiple ligands compete for the same binding site, they will compete to bind to the receptor. The ability of each ligand to bind to the receptor is influenced by its affinity for the receptor, which is a measure of how strongly and specifically the ligand binds to the receptor.

In competitive binding, if one ligand is present in high concentrations, it can prevent other ligands with lower affinity from binding to the receptor. This is because the higher-affinity ligand will have a greater probability of occupying the binding site and blocking access to the other ligands. The competition between ligands can be described mathematically using equations such as the Langmuir isotherm, which describes the relationship between the concentration of ligand and the fraction of receptors that are occupied by the ligand.

Competitive binding is an important concept in drug development, as it can be used to predict how different drugs will interact with their targets and how they may affect each other's activity. By understanding the competitive binding properties of a drug, researchers can optimize its dosage and delivery to maximize its therapeutic effect while minimizing unwanted side effects.

Dietary cholesterol is a type of cholesterol that comes from the foods we eat. It is present in animal-derived products such as meat, poultry, dairy products, and eggs. While dietary cholesterol can contribute to an increase in blood cholesterol levels for some people, it's important to note that saturated and trans fats have a more significant impact on blood cholesterol levels than dietary cholesterol itself.

The American Heart Association recommends limiting dietary cholesterol intake to less than 300 milligrams per day for most people, and less than 200 milligrams per day for those with a history of heart disease or high cholesterol levels. However, individual responses to dietary cholesterol can vary, so it's essential to monitor blood cholesterol levels and adjust dietary habits accordingly.

Reference standards in a medical context refer to the established and widely accepted norms or benchmarks used to compare, evaluate, or measure the performance, accuracy, or effectiveness of diagnostic tests, treatments, or procedures. These standards are often based on extensive research, clinical trials, and expert consensus, and they help ensure that healthcare practices meet certain quality and safety thresholds.

For example, in laboratory medicine, reference standards may consist of well-characterized samples with known concentrations of analytes (such as chemicals or biological markers) that are used to calibrate instruments and validate testing methods. In clinical practice, reference standards may take the form of evidence-based guidelines or best practices that define appropriate care for specific conditions or patient populations.

By adhering to these reference standards, healthcare professionals can help minimize variability in test results, reduce errors, improve diagnostic accuracy, and ensure that patients receive consistent, high-quality care.

Iodine radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, which decays and emits radiation in the form of gamma rays. Some commonly used iodine radioisotopes include I-123, I-125, I-131. These radioisotopes have various medical applications such as in diagnostic imaging, therapy for thyroid disorders, and cancer treatment.

For example, I-131 is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer due to its ability to destroy thyroid tissue. On the other hand, I-123 is often used in nuclear medicine scans of the thyroid gland because it emits gamma rays that can be detected by a gamma camera, allowing for detailed images of the gland's structure and function.

It is important to note that handling and administering radioisotopes require specialized training and safety precautions due to their radiation-emitting properties.

Electrophoresis, Agar Gel is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze DNA, RNA, or proteins based on their size and electrical charge. In this method, the sample is mixed with agarose gel, a gelatinous substance derived from seaweed, and then solidified in a horizontal slab-like format. An electric field is applied to the gel, causing the negatively charged DNA or RNA molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode. The smaller molecules move faster through the gel than the larger ones, resulting in their separation based on size. This technique is widely used in molecular biology and genetics research, as well as in diagnostic testing for various genetic disorders.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, oils are typically defined as lipid-based substances that are derived from plants or animals. They are made up of molecules called fatty acids, which can be either saturated or unsaturated. Oils are often used in medical treatments and therapies due to their ability to deliver active ingredients through the skin, as well as their moisturizing and soothing properties. Some oils, such as essential oils, are also used in aromatherapy for their potential therapeutic benefits. However, it's important to note that some oils can be toxic or irritating if ingested or applied to the skin in large amounts, so they should always be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

"Anguilla" is a term that refers to a type of fish, rather than something related to medicine or human health. It is a species of eel that belongs to the Anguillidae family. Therefore, there is no medical definition for "Anguilla."

Atherosclerosis is a medical condition characterized by the buildup of plaques, made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood, on the inner walls of the arteries. This process gradually narrows and hardens the arteries, reducing the flow of oxygen-rich blood to various parts of the body. Atherosclerosis can affect any artery in the body, including those that supply blood to the heart (coronary arteries), brain, limbs, and other organs. The progressive narrowing and hardening of the arteries can lead to serious complications such as coronary artery disease, carotid artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and aneurysms, which can result in heart attacks, strokes, or even death if left untreated.

The exact cause of atherosclerosis is not fully understood, but it is believed to be associated with several risk factors, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, and a family history of the condition. Atherosclerosis can often progress without any symptoms for many years, but as the disease advances, it can lead to various signs and symptoms depending on which arteries are affected. Treatment typically involves lifestyle changes, medications, and, in some cases, surgical procedures to restore blood flow.

Chromatography, agarose is a type of chromatography technique that utilizes agarose gel as the stationary phase in the separation and analysis of biological molecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins. This method is commonly used in molecular biology for various applications, including DNA fragment separation, protein purification, and detection of specific nucleic acid sequences or proteins.

Agarose gel is a matrix made from agarose, a polysaccharide derived from seaweed. It has a porous structure with uniform pore size that allows for the size-based separation of molecules based on their ability to migrate through the gel under an electric field (in the case of electrophoresis) or by capillary action (in the case of capillary electrophoresis).

The charged molecules, such as DNA or proteins, interact with the agarose matrix and move through the gel at different rates depending on their size, charge, and shape. Smaller molecules can migrate more quickly through the pores of the gel, while larger molecules are retarded due to their inability to easily pass through the pores. This results in a separation of the molecules based on their physical properties, allowing for their analysis and characterization.

In summary, chromatography, agarose refers to the use of agarose gel as the stationary phase in the separation and analysis of biological molecules using various chromatography techniques, such as electrophoresis or capillary electrophoresis.

Hypolipidemic agents are a class of medications that are used to lower the levels of lipids (fats) in the blood, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides. These drugs work by reducing the production or increasing the breakdown of fats in the body, which can help prevent or treat conditions such as hyperlipidemia (high levels of fats in the blood), atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries), and cardiovascular disease.

There are several different types of hypolipidemic agents, including:

1. Statins: These drugs block the action of an enzyme called HMG-CoA reductase, which is necessary for the production of cholesterol in the liver. By reducing the amount of cholesterol produced, statins can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and increase HDL (good) cholesterol levels.
2. Bile acid sequestrants: These drugs bind to bile acids in the intestines and prevent them from being reabsorbed into the bloodstream. This causes the liver to produce more bile acids, which requires it to use up more cholesterol, thereby lowering LDL cholesterol levels.
3. Nicotinic acid: Also known as niacin, this drug can help lower LDL and VLDL (very low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels and increase HDL cholesterol levels. It works by reducing the production of fatty acids in the liver.
4. Fibrates: These drugs are used to treat high triglyceride levels. They work by increasing the breakdown of fats in the body and reducing the production of VLDL cholesterol in the liver.
5. PCSK9 inhibitors: These drugs block the action of a protein called PCSK9, which helps regulate the amount of LDL cholesterol in the blood. By blocking PCSK9, these drugs can help lower LDL cholesterol levels.

It's important to note that hypolipidemic agents should only be used under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider, as they can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

Centrifugation, Density Gradient is a medical laboratory technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their size, density, and shape. This method involves the use of a centrifuge and a density gradient medium, such as sucrose or cesium chloride, to create a stable density gradient within a column or tube.

The sample is carefully layered onto the top of the gradient and then subjected to high-speed centrifugation. During centrifugation, the particles in the sample move through the gradient based on their size, density, and shape, with heavier particles migrating faster and further than lighter ones. This results in the separation of different components of the mixture into distinct bands or zones within the gradient.

This technique is commonly used to purify and concentrate various types of biological materials, such as viruses, organelles, ribosomes, and subcellular fractions, from complex mixtures. It allows for the isolation of pure and intact particles, which can then be collected and analyzed for further study or use in downstream applications.

In summary, Centrifugation, Density Gradient is a medical laboratory technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their size, density, and shape using a centrifuge and a density gradient medium.

Hypobetalipoproteinemias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by low levels of betalipoproteins, including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and/or apolipoprotein B (apoB), in the blood. These conditions can lead to decreased absorption and transportation of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin E and A.

There are two main types of hypobetalipoproteinemias:

1. Type I (also known as Abetalipoproteinemia): This is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) gene. It results in almost undetectable levels of LDL, apoB, and chylomicrons in the blood. Symptoms typically appear in infancy or early childhood and include fat malabsorption, steatorrhea (fatty stools), and failure to thrive. Additionally, individuals with type I hypobetalipoproteinemia may develop neurological symptoms such as ataxia, neuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa due to vitamin E deficiency.
2. Type II (also known as Homozygous or Compound Heterozygous Hypobetalipoproteinemia): This is a less severe form of the disorder caused by mutations in the APOB gene, which encodes apolipoprotein B. It leads to reduced levels of LDL and apoB but not as dramatically low as in type I. Symptoms may include mild fat malabsorption, decreased blood cholesterol levels, and an increased risk of developing fatty liver disease (hepatic steatosis). Neurological symptoms are less common than in type I hypobetalipoproteinemia.

Early diagnosis and treatment of hypobetalipoproteinemias, particularly type I, are crucial to prevent severe complications associated with fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies and neurological damage. Treatment typically involves dietary modifications, including supplementation with high doses of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K).

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a highly sensitive analytical technique used in clinical and research laboratories to measure concentrations of various substances, such as hormones, vitamins, drugs, or tumor markers, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues. The method relies on the specific interaction between an antibody and its corresponding antigen, combined with the use of radioisotopes to quantify the amount of bound antigen.

In a typical RIA procedure, a known quantity of a radiolabeled antigen (also called tracer) is added to a sample containing an unknown concentration of the same unlabeled antigen. The mixture is then incubated with a specific antibody that binds to the antigen. During the incubation period, the antibody forms complexes with both the radiolabeled and unlabeled antigens.

After the incubation, the unbound (free) radiolabeled antigen is separated from the antibody-antigen complexes, usually through a precipitation or separation step involving centrifugation, filtration, or chromatography. The amount of radioactivity in the pellet (containing the antibody-antigen complexes) is then measured using a gamma counter or other suitable radiation detection device.

The concentration of the unlabeled antigen in the sample can be determined by comparing the ratio of bound to free radiolabeled antigen in the sample to a standard curve generated from known concentrations of unlabeled antigen and their corresponding bound/free ratios. The higher the concentration of unlabeled antigen in the sample, the lower the amount of radiolabeled antigen that will bind to the antibody, resulting in a lower bound/free ratio.

Radioimmunoassays offer high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, making them valuable tools for detecting and quantifying low levels of various substances in biological samples. However, due to concerns about radiation safety and waste disposal, alternative non-isotopic immunoassay techniques like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have become more popular in recent years.

Circular dichroism (CD) is a technique used in physics and chemistry to study the structure of molecules, particularly large biological molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. It measures the difference in absorption of left-handed and right-handed circularly polarized light by a sample. This difference in absorption can provide information about the three-dimensional structure of the molecule, including its chirality or "handedness."

In more technical terms, CD is a form of spectroscopy that measures the differential absorption of left and right circularly polarized light as a function of wavelength. The CD signal is measured in units of millidegrees (mdeg) and can be positive or negative, depending on the type of chromophore and its orientation within the molecule.

CD spectra can provide valuable information about the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, as well as the conformation of nucleic acids. For example, alpha-helical proteins typically exhibit a strong positive band near 190 nm and two negative bands at around 208 nm and 222 nm, while beta-sheet proteins show a strong positive band near 195 nm and two negative bands at around 217 nm and 175 nm.

CD spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the structural changes that occur in biological molecules under different conditions, such as temperature, pH, or the presence of ligands or other molecules. It can also be used to monitor the folding and unfolding of proteins, as well as the binding of drugs or other small molecules to their targets.

Electrophoresis is a laboratory technique used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to separate charged particles, such as DNA, RNA, or proteins, based on their size and charge. This technique uses an electric field to drive the movement of these charged particles through a medium, such as gel or liquid.

In electrophoresis, the sample containing the particles to be separated is placed in a matrix, such as a gel or a capillary tube, and an electric current is applied. The particles in the sample have a net charge, either positive or negative, which causes them to move through the matrix towards the oppositely charged electrode.

The rate at which the particles move through the matrix depends on their size and charge. Larger particles move more slowly than smaller ones, and particles with a higher charge-to-mass ratio move faster than those with a lower charge-to-mass ratio. By comparing the distance that each particle travels in the matrix, researchers can identify and quantify the different components of a mixture.

Electrophoresis has many applications in molecular biology and medicine, including DNA sequencing, genetic fingerprinting, protein analysis, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Secondary protein structure refers to the local spatial arrangement of amino acid chains in a protein, typically described as regular repeating patterns held together by hydrogen bonds. The two most common types of secondary structures are the alpha-helix (α-helix) and the beta-pleated sheet (β-sheet). In an α-helix, the polypeptide chain twists around itself in a helical shape, with each backbone atom forming a hydrogen bond with the fourth amino acid residue along the chain. This forms a rigid rod-like structure that is resistant to bending or twisting forces. In β-sheets, adjacent segments of the polypeptide chain run parallel or antiparallel to each other and are connected by hydrogen bonds, forming a pleated sheet-like arrangement. These secondary structures provide the foundation for the formation of tertiary and quaternary protein structures, which determine the overall three-dimensional shape and function of the protein.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Dansyl compounds are fluorescent compounds that contain a dansyl group, which is a chemical group made up of a sulfonated derivative of dimethylaminonaphthalene. These compounds are often used as tracers in biochemical and medical research because they emit bright fluorescence when excited by ultraviolet or visible light. This property makes them useful for detecting and quantifying various biological molecules, such as amino acids, peptides, and proteins, in a variety of assays and techniques, including high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and fluorescence microscopy.

The dansyl group can be attached to biological molecules through chemical reactions that involve the formation of covalent bonds between the sulfonate group in the dansyl compound and amino, thiol, or hydroxyl groups in the target molecule. The resulting dansylated molecules can then be detected and analyzed using various techniques.

Dansyl compounds are known for their high sensitivity, stability, and versatility, making them valuable tools in a wide range of research applications. However, it is important to note that the use of dansyl compounds requires careful handling and appropriate safety precautions, as they can be hazardous if mishandled or ingested.

Genetic polymorphism refers to the occurrence of multiple forms (called alleles) of a particular gene within a population. These variations in the DNA sequence do not generally affect the function or survival of the organism, but they can contribute to differences in traits among individuals. Genetic polymorphisms can be caused by single nucleotide changes (SNPs), insertions or deletions of DNA segments, or other types of genetic rearrangements. They are important for understanding genetic diversity and evolution, as well as for identifying genetic factors that may contribute to disease susceptibility in humans.

Dyslipidemia is a condition characterized by an abnormal amount of cholesterol and/or triglycerides in the blood. It can be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle habits such as poor diet and lack of exercise, or other medical conditions such as diabetes or hypothyroidism.

There are several types of dyslipidemias, including:

1. Hypercholesterolemia: This is an excess of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also known as "bad" cholesterol, in the blood. High levels of LDL cholesterol can lead to the formation of plaque in the arteries, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke.
2. Hypertriglyceridemia: This is an excess of triglycerides, a type of fat found in the blood, which can also contribute to the development of plaque in the arteries.
3. Mixed dyslipidemia: This is a combination of high LDL cholesterol and high triglycerides.
4. Low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol: HDL cholesterol, also known as "good" cholesterol, helps remove LDL cholesterol from the blood. Low levels of HDL cholesterol can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Dyslipidemias often do not cause any symptoms but can be detected through a blood test that measures cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Treatment typically involves lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and quitting smoking. In some cases, medication may also be necessary to lower cholesterol or triglyceride levels.

Beta 2-glycoprotein I, also known as apolipoprotein H, is a plasma protein that belongs to the family of proteins called immunoglobulin-binding proteins. It has a molecular weight of approximately 44 kDa and is composed of five domains with similar structures.

Beta 2-glycoprotein I is primarily produced in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream, where it plays a role in several physiological processes, including coagulation, complement activation, and lipid metabolism. It has been identified as an autoantigen in certain autoimmune disorders, such as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), where autoantibodies against beta 2-glycoprotein I can cause blood clots, miscarriages, and other complications.

In medical terminology, the definition of "beta 2-glycoprotein I" is as follows:

A plasma protein that belongs to the family of immunoglobulin-binding proteins and has a molecular weight of approximately 44 kDa. It is primarily produced in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream, where it plays a role in several physiological processes, including coagulation, complement activation, and lipid metabolism. Autoantibodies against beta 2-glycoprotein I are associated with certain autoimmune disorders, such as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), where they can cause blood clots, miscarriages, and other complications.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Coronary artery disease, often simply referred to as coronary disease, is a condition in which the blood vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of fatty deposits called plaques. This can lead to chest pain (angina), shortness of breath, or in severe cases, a heart attack.

The medical definition of coronary artery disease is:

A condition characterized by the accumulation of atheromatous plaques in the walls of the coronary arteries, leading to decreased blood flow and oxygen supply to the myocardium (heart muscle). This can result in symptoms such as angina pectoris, shortness of breath, or arrhythmias, and may ultimately lead to myocardial infarction (heart attack) or heart failure.

Risk factors for coronary artery disease include age, smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, and a family history of the condition. Lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, and managing stress can help reduce the risk of developing coronary artery disease. Medical treatments may include medications to control blood pressure, cholesterol levels, or irregular heart rhythms, as well as procedures such as angioplasty or bypass surgery to improve blood flow to the heart.

The acute-phase reaction is a complex series of physiological responses that occur in response to tissue injury, infection, or stress. It is characterized by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from activated immune cells, including macrophages and neutrophils.

These cytokines trigger a range of systemic effects, including fever, increased heart rate and respiratory rate, decreased appetite, and changes in white blood cell count. They also stimulate the production of acute-phase proteins (APPs) by the liver, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and serum amyloid A.

The acute-phase reaction is an important part of the body's immune response to injury or infection, helping to promote healing and fight off pathogens. However, excessive or prolonged activation of the acute-phase reaction can contribute to the development of chronic inflammatory conditions and diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Hypercholesterolemia is a medical term that describes a condition characterized by high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Specifically, it refers to an abnormally elevated level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also known as "bad" cholesterol, which can contribute to the development of fatty deposits in the arteries called plaques. Over time, these plaques can narrow and harden the arteries, leading to atherosclerosis, a condition that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular complications.

Hypercholesterolemia can be caused by various factors, including genetics, lifestyle choices, and underlying medical conditions. In some cases, it may not cause any symptoms until serious complications arise. Therefore, regular cholesterol screening is essential for early detection and management of hypercholesterolemia. Treatment typically involves lifestyle modifications, such as a healthy diet, regular exercise, and weight management, along with medication if necessary.

Phospholipid transfer proteins (PLTPs) are a group of proteins found in the bloodstream that play a crucial role in the distribution and metabolism of phospholipids, which are key components of cell membranes. These proteins facilitate the transfer of phospholipids between different lipoprotein particles, such as high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), in a process known as non-vesicular lipid transport.

PLTPs can also modulate the size, composition, and function of these lipoprotein particles, which has implications for lipid metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. Additionally, PLTPs have been implicated in various physiological processes, including cell signaling, membrane trafficking, and host defense mechanisms.

It is worth noting that while PLTPs are important regulators of lipid metabolism, their precise role in human health and disease is still an area of active research.

Clusterin is a protein that is widely expressed in many tissues and body fluids, including the tears, blood plasma, seminal fluid, milk, and cerebrospinal fluid. It is also known as apolipoprotein J or sulfated glycoprotein 2. Clusterin has diverse functions, including cell-cell communication, lipid transport, and protection against oxidative stress.

In the context of medicine and disease, clusterin has been studied for its potential role in several pathological processes, such as neurodegeneration, inflammation, cancer, and aging. In particular, clusterin has been implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, including prostate, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. It is thought to contribute to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis by promoting cell survival, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy.

Therefore, clusterin has been considered as a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment, and several strategies have been developed to inhibit its expression or activity. However, more research is needed to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of clusterin in health and disease, and to translate these findings into effective clinical interventions.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Placental lactogen is a hormone produced by the placenta during pregnancy in humans and some other mammals. It is similar in structure to human growth hormone and prolactin, and has both growth-promoting and lactogenic (milk-producing) properties. Placental lactogen plays an important role in regulating maternal metabolism during pregnancy, promoting the growth and development of the fetus, and preparing the mother's body for lactation after birth. It helps to stimulate the growth of the mammary glands and the production of milk by increasing the availability of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids in the mother's bloodstream. Placental lactogen also helps to regulate the mother's insulin sensitivity, which can affect her energy levels and the growth of the fetus.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Sepharose is not a medical term itself, but it is a trade name for a type of gel that is often used in medical and laboratory settings. Sepharose is a type of cross-linked agarose gel, which is derived from seaweed. It is commonly used in chromatography, a technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their physical or chemical properties.

Sepharose gels are available in various forms, including beads and sheets, and they come in different sizes and degrees of cross-linking. These variations allow for the separation and purification of molecules with different sizes, charges, and other properties. Sepharose is known for its high porosity, mechanical stability, and low non-specific binding, making it a popular choice for many laboratory applications.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

The Radioisotope Dilution Technique is a method used in nuclear medicine to measure the volume and flow rate of a particular fluid in the body. It involves introducing a known amount of a radioactive isotope, or radioisotope, into the fluid, such as blood. The isotope mixes with the fluid, and samples are then taken from the fluid at various time points.

By measuring the concentration of the radioisotope in each sample, it is possible to calculate the total volume of the fluid based on the amount of the isotope introduced and the dilution factor. The flow rate can also be calculated by measuring the concentration of the isotope over time and using the formula:

Flow rate = Volume/Time

This technique is commonly used in medical research and clinical settings to measure cardiac output, cerebral blood flow, and renal function, among other applications. It is a safe and reliable method that has been widely used for many years. However, it does require the use of radioactive materials and specialized equipment, so it should only be performed by trained medical professionals in appropriate facilities.

Perfusion, in medical terms, refers to the process of circulating blood through the body's organs and tissues to deliver oxygen and nutrients and remove waste products. It is a measure of the delivery of adequate blood flow to specific areas or tissues in the body. Perfusion can be assessed using various methods, including imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and perfusion scintigraphy.

Perfusion is critical for maintaining proper organ function and overall health. When perfusion is impaired or inadequate, it can lead to tissue hypoxia, acidosis, and cell death, which can result in organ dysfunction or failure. Conditions that can affect perfusion include cardiovascular disease, shock, trauma, and certain surgical procedures.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Hyperlipoproteinemia Type III, also known as Broad Beta Disease or Remnant Hyperlipidemia, is a genetic disorder characterized by an increased level of chylomicron remnants and intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL) in the blood. This results in elevated levels of both low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, and triglycerides, and decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol. The condition can lead to premature atherosclerosis and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in the APOE gene, which encodes the apolipoprotein E protein, leading to abnormal clearance of lipoproteins from the blood.

... D Apolipoprotein E Apolipoprotein F Apolipoprotein H - a misnomer Apolipoprotein L Apolipoprotein M ... HuGENet Review Apolipoprotein AI Mutations and Information Apolipoproteins. Apo A1, B, C2. Apolipoproteins information This ... Apolipoprotein A (Apo-AI, Apo-A2, Apo-A4, and Apo-A5) Apolipoprotein B (Apo-B48 and Apo B-100) Apolipoprotein C (ApoC-I, apo ... Apolipoprotein F (apoF) is one of the minor apolipoprotein in blood plasma and it is a lipid transfer inhibit protein to ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOL1 gene. Two transcript variants encoding two different ... APOL1 is a member of a family of apolipoproteins which also includes six other proteins and it is a member of bcl2 genes which ... G2 is an in-frame deletion of the two amino acid residues, N388 and Y389.[citation needed] Apolipoprotein L1 (apoL1) is a minor ... particles that also contain apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) and the hemoglobin-binding, haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). The APOL1 ...
Identification of apolipoprotein D, apolipoprotein A-IV, apolipoprotein E, and apolipoprotein A-I". The Journal of Biological ... Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) is a component of HDL that has no marked similarity to other apolipoprotein sequences. It has a high ... "Entrez Gene: APOD apolipoprotein D". Muffat J, Walker DW (January 2010). "Apolipoprotein D: an overview of its role in aging ... Apolipoproteins+D at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Applied Research on Apolipoproteins ...
Apolipoprotein+H at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Apolipoprotein H and Applied Research ... The first four domains found in Apolipoprotein H resemble each other, however the fifth one appears to be different. This ... PDBe-KB provides an overview of all the structure information available in the PDB for Human Apolipoprotein H (B2G1) (Articles ... β2-glycoprotein 1, also known as beta-2 glycoprotein 1 and Apolipoprotein H (Apo-H), is a 38 kDa multifunctional plasma protein ...
The gene, APOE, is mapped to chromosome 19 in a cluster with apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) and the apolipoprotein C2 (APOC2). The ... "Genetic studies of human apolipoproteins. X. The effect of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism on quantitative levels of ... Apolipoprotein E (Apo-E) is a protein involved in the metabolism of fats in the body of mammals. A subtype is implicated in the ... Apolipoprotein E enhances proteolytic break-down of this peptide, both within and between cells. The isoform APOE-ε4 is not as ...
... is the primary apolipoprotein of chylomicrons, VLDL, Lp(a), IDL, and LDL particles (LDL-commonly known as "bad ... Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOB gene. It is commonly used to detect risk of ... Su Q, Tsai J, Xu E, Qiu W, Bereczki E, Santha M, Adeli K (2009). "Apolipoprotein B100 acts as a molecular link between lipid- ... MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Apolipoprotein B100 Cromwell WC, Otvos JD, Keyes MJ, Pencina MJ, Sullivan L, Vasan RS, Wilson PW, ...
... (Apo-AI) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOA1 gene. As the major component of HDL particles, ... The encoded apolipoprotein AI, is a 28.1 kDa protein composed of 243 amino acids; 21 peptides have been observed through mass ... Apolipoprotein AI has also been isolated as a prostacyclin (PGI2) stabilizing factor, and thus may have an anticlotting effect ... Apolipoprotein AI is the major protein component of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in plasma. Chylomicrons secreted ...
... (Apo L) is found in high-density lipoprotein complexes that plays a central role in cholesterol transport. The ... reproducible up-regulation of several members of the apolipoprotein L family located in a high-susceptibility locus for ...
In the field of molecular biology, apolipoprotein C is a family of four low molecular weight apolipoproteins, designated as C-I ... In the fasting state, the C apolipoproteins are mainly associated with HDL. During absorption of dietary fat, the C ... v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Apolipoproteins, All stub articles, Protein stubs) ... Mahley RW, Innerarity TL, Rall SC, Weisgraber KH (December 1984). "Plasma lipoproteins: apolipoprotein structure and function ...
... is the first chondroitine sulphate chain containing apolipoprotein. Apolipoproteins are proteins that binds to ... APOO is a member of the apolipoprotein family. The human, apolipoprotein O is a 198 amino acids protein that contains a 23 ... Apolipoprotein O also known as protein FAM121B is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOO gene. ... 2009). "Gene-centric association signals for lipids and apolipoproteins identified via the HumanCVD BeadChip". Am. J. Hum. ...
... (Apo-CII, or Apoc-II), or apolipoprotein C2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOC2 gene. The ... 1989). "A nonsense mutation in the apolipoprotein C-IIPadova gene in a patient with apolipoprotein C-II deficiency". J. Clin. ... Connelly PW, Maguire GF, Little JA (1988). "Apolipoprotein CIISt. Michael. Familial apolipoprotein CII deficiency associated ... "Entrez Gene: APOC2 apolipoprotein C-II". Jackson RL, Baker HN, Gilliam EB, Gotto AM (1977). "Primary structure of very low ...
... , also known as apolipoprotein C4, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOC4 gene. APOC4 is a ... "Entrez Gene: apolipoprotein C-IV". Allan CM, Walker D, Segrest JP, Taylor JM (July 1995). "Identification and characterization ... 2008). "Expression of apolipoprotein C-IV is regulated by Ku antigen/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma complex ... 2002). "Regulated expression of the apolipoprotein E/C-I/C-IV/C-II gene cluster in murine and human macrophages. A critical ...
... is an autosomal dominant disorder resulting from a missense mutation which reduces the affinity of ...
In autoimmune disease, anti-apolipoprotein H (AAHA) antibodies, also called anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies, comprise a ...
... also known as apo-CIII, and apolipoprotein C3, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOC3 gene. ... Karathanasis SK (Oct 1985). "Apolipoprotein multigene family: tandem organization of human apolipoprotein AI, CIII, and AIV ... Apolipoprotein+C-III at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Human APOC3 genome location and ... Zannis VI, Cole FS, Jackson CL, Kurnit DM, Karathanasis SK (Jul 1985). "Distribution of apolipoprotein A-I, C-II, C-III, and E ...
Myklebost O, Rogne S (August 1986). "The gene for human apolipoprotein CI is located 4.3 kilobases away from the apolipoprotein ... "Two copies of the human apolipoprotein C-I gene are linked closely to the apolipoprotein E gene". The Journal of Biological ... Apolipoprotein C-I is a protein component of lipoproteins that in humans is encoded by the APOC1 gene. The protein encoded by ... "Entrez Gene: APOC1 apolipoprotein C-I". Puppione DL, Ryan CM, Bassilian S, Souda P, Xiao X, Ryder OA, Whitelegge JP (March 2010 ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOA2 gene. It is the second most abundant protein of the ... "Entrez Gene: APOA2 apolipoprotein A-II". Pussinen PJ, Jauhiainen M, Metso J, Pyle LE, Marcel YL, Fidge NH, Ehnholm C (Jan 1998 ... Brewer HB, Lux SE, Ronan R, John KM (May 1972). "Amino acid sequence of human apoLp-Gln-II (apoA-II), an apolipoprotein ... The protein is found in plasma as a monomer, homodimer, or heterodimer with apolipoprotein D. ApoA-II regulates many steps in ...
The apolipoprotein B (apoB) 5′ UTR cis regulatory element is an RNA element located in the 5′ UTR of the human apoB mRNA. This ... Page for Apolipoprotein B (apoB) 5′ UTR cis-regulatory element at Rfam v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... Pontrelli L, Sidiropoulos KG, Adeli K (June 2004). "Translational control of apolipoprotein B mRNA: regulation via cis elements ...
1996). Apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer's Disease. Research and Perspectives in Alzheimer's Disease. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer ... "Maestre CV" (PDF). Maestre, Gladys Elena (1996). Apolipoproteins and Alzheimer's disease (Thesis). OCLC 36257436. Staff, M. D. ... "The apolipoprotein ?4 allele in patients with Alzheimer's disease". Annals of Neurology. 34 (5): 752-754. doi:10.1002/ana. ... "Apolipoprotein E and alzheimer's disease: Ethnic variation in genotypic risks". Annals of Neurology. 37 (2): 254-259. doi: ...
... apolipoprotein D; beta-lactoglobulin; complement component C8 gamma chain; crustacyanin; epididymal-retinoic acid binding ...
Apolipoprotein A-I Milano (also ETC-216, now MDCO-216) is a naturally occurring mutated variant of the apolipoprotein A1 ... Weisgraber KH, Rall SC, Bersot TP, Mahley RW, Franceschini G, Sirtori CR (25 February 1983). "Apolipoprotein A-IMilano. ...
Kim DH, Iijima H, Goto K, Sakai J, Ishii H, Kim HJ, Suzuki H, Kondo H, Saeki S, Yamamoto T (Jun 1996). "Human apolipoprotein E ... Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays an important role in phospholipid and cholesterol homeostasis. After binding ApoER2, ApoE is ... Riddell DR, Sun XM, Stannard AK, Soutar AK, Owen JS (2001). "Localization of apolipoprotein E receptor 2 to caveolae in the ... Herz J (June 2009). "Apolipoprotein E receptors in the nervous system". Curr. Opin. Lipidol. 20 (3): 190-6. doi:10.1097/MOL. ...
Apolipoprotein M is an apolipoprotein and member of the lipocalin protein family that in humans is encoded by the APOM gene. It ... "The signal peptide anchors apolipoprotein M in plasma lipoproteins and prevents rapid clearance of apolipoprotein M from plasma ... "Entrez Gene: APOM apolipoprotein M". Christoffersen C, Ahnström J, Axler O, Christensen EI, Dahlbäck B, Nielsen LB (July 2008 ... Overview of all the structural information available in the PDB for UniProt: O95445 (Human Apolipoprotein M) at the PDBe-KB. v ...
Xu, Ning; Dahlbäck, Björn (1999). "A Novel Human Apolipoprotein (ApoM)". Journal of Biological Chemistry. 274 (44): 31286-31290 ... "Endothelium-protective sphingosine-1-phosphate provided by HDL-associated apolipoprotein M". Proceedings of the National ...
"Genetic studies of human apolipoproteins. XVIII. apolipoprotein polymorphisms in Australian Aborigines", Human Biology, 63 (2 ...
"Entrez Gene: APOL3 apolipoprotein L, 3". Gaudet RG, Zhu S, Halder A, Kim BH, Bradfield CJ, Huang S, et al. (2021). "A human ... Apolipoprotein L3 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOL3 gene. Expressed in the gut, it has antibiotic properties ... This gene is a member of the apolipoprotein L gene family. The encoded protein is found in the cytoplasm, where it may affect ... Duchateau PN, Pullinger CR, Cho MH, Eng C, Kane JP (April 2001). "Apolipoprotein L gene family: tissue-specific expression, ...
Gain of toxic Apolipoprotein E4 effects in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons Is Ameliorated by a Small-Molecule Structure Corrector. ... Alzheimer's disease and apolipoprotein E (apoE). Uncovered the molecular pathways that link apoE and Alzheimer's disease, and ...
Apolipoprotein L2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOL2 gene. This gene is a member of the apolipoprotein L gene ... "Entrez Gene: APOL2 apolipoprotein L, 2". "The Human Protein atlas Gene: APOL2 apolipoprotein L, 2". Liao W, Goh FY, Betts RJ, ... "The Human Protein atlas Gene: APOL2 apolipoprotein L, 2". Rao SK, Pavicevic Z, Du Z, Kim JG, Fan M, Jiao Y, Rosebush M, Samant ... "Nextprot Gene: APOL2 apolipoprotein L, 2". Luo, Audrey; Jung, Jeesun; Longley, Martha; Rosoff, Daniel B.; Charlet, Katrin; ...
Apolipoprotein L6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the APOL6 gene. This gene is a member of the apolipoprotein L gene ... "Entrez Gene: APOL6 apolipoprotein L, 6". Human APOL6 genome location and APOL6 gene details page in the UCSC Genome Browser. ... Liu Z, Lu H, Jiang Z, Pastuszyn A, Hu CA (Jan 2005). "Apolipoprotein l6, a novel proapoptotic Bcl-2 homology 3-only protein, ... Page NM, Butlin DJ, Lomthaisong K, Lowry PJ (May 2001). "The human apolipoprotein L gene cluster: identification, ...
The HDL donates apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) and apolipoprotein E (APOE) to the nascent chylomicron and, thus, converts it to a ... The main apolipoprotein component is ApoB48. While circulating in blood, chylomicrons exchange components with high-density ... The triglycerides are then combined with phospholipids, cholesteryl esters, and apolipoprotein B48 (ApoB48) to form a nascent ... These triglycerides, along with phospholipids and cholesterol, are added to apolipoprotein B48 to form immature chylomicrons. ...
Apolipoprotein D Apolipoprotein E Apolipoprotein F Apolipoprotein H - a misnomer Apolipoprotein L Apolipoprotein M ... HuGENet Review Apolipoprotein AI Mutations and Information Apolipoproteins. Apo A1, B, C2. Apolipoproteins information This ... Apolipoprotein A (Apo-AI, Apo-A2, Apo-A4, and Apo-A5) Apolipoprotein B (Apo-B48 and Apo B-100) Apolipoprotein C (ApoC-I, apo ... Apolipoprotein F (apoF) is one of the minor apolipoprotein in blood plasma and it is a lipid transfer inhibit protein to ...
Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) is a protein that plays a role in moving cholesterol around your body. It is a form of low ... Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) is a protein that plays a role in moving cholesterol around your body. It is a form of low ... Apolipoprotein measurements may provide more detail about your risk for heart disease, but the added value of this test beyond ... Regulation and clearance of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. In: Ballantyne CM, ed. Clinical Lipidology: A Companion ...
SpectraCell Laboratories now offers apolipoprotein E genotyping. This test determines a persons genetic risk for heart disease ... Tags: Apolipoprotein, Blood, Cardiology, Cholesterol, Diet, Doctor, Fasting, Gene, Genes, Genetic, Genetics, Genotyping, G- ... Effective immediately, SpectraCell Laboratories now offers apolipoprotein E genotyping. This test determines a persons genetic ...
Beta apolipoproteins. Beta apolipoproteins are the largest of the apolipoproteins. They are critically important for the ... Apolipoprotein B-100 deficiency. Intestinal steatosis despite apolipoprotein B-48 synthesis. J Clin Invest. 1985 Aug. 76(2):403 ... CMs, VLDL, and LDL carry apolipoproteins on their surface; these apolipoproteins have lipid-soluble segments, the beta ... The 2 beta apolipoproteins are B-100 and B-48. ApoB-100 is carried on VLDL and the lipoproteins derived from its metabolism, ...
LBXAPB - Apolipoprotein (B) (mg/dL). Variable Name: LBXAPB. SAS Label: Apolipoprotein (B) (mg/dL). English Text: Apolipoprotein ... LBDAPBSI - Apolipoprotein (B) (g/L). Variable Name: LBDAPBSI. SAS Label: Apolipoprotein (B) (g/L). English Text: Apolipoprotein ... Apolipoprotein B (ApoB_G) Data File: ApoB_G.xpt First Published: January 2014. Last Revised: NA ... Apolipoprotein B is the main protein component of LDL and accounts for approximately 95% of the total protein content of LDL. ...
Macrophage-derived apolipoprotein (apo) E and multimers of a synthetic apo E-peptide display monokine-like functions by ...
This interventional study aims to evaluate and compare levels of apolipoproteins among vitamin D deficient subjects at baseline ... while apolipoprotein C1 significantly increased only in females (p , 0.01). In addition, apolipoprotein B significantly ... Sex-specific expression of apolipoprotein levels following replenishment of vitamin D J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2018 Jun:180: ... Serum 25(OH)D, lipid profile and apolipoproteins (A1, A2, B, C1, C2, C3, E and H) were analyzed using commercially available ...
Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the major genetic risk factor of Alzheimers disease (AD), is associated with enhanced brain ... Apolipoprotein E4 enhances brain inflammation by modulation of the NF-kappaB signaling cascade Neurobiol Dis. 2005 Dec;20(3): ... Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the major genetic risk factor of Alzheimers disease (AD), is associated with enhanced brain ...
Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is a lipid-transport protein abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system. APOE- ... Role of apolipoprotein E in neurodegenerative diseases Vo Van Giau,1 Eva Bagyinszky,1 Seong Soo A An,1 SangYun Kim2 1Department ... Effect of apolipoprotein E variants on plasma lipids and apolipoproteins in the Orang Asli (Aborigines) of Malaysia. Hum ... Apolipoprotein E2-Dunedin (228 Arg replaced by Cys): an apolipoprotein E2 variant with normal receptor-binding activity. J ...
This disparity has been attributed to coding variants (G1 and G2) in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1); however, there is little ... African polymorphisms in the gene for Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) confer a survival advantage against lethal trypanosomiasis but ...
Apolipoprotein E4 Reduction with Antisense Oligonucleotides Decreases Neurodegeneration in a Tauopathy Model. Ann Neurol. 2021 ...
Apolipoprotein E-e4 from Neuroscience News features breaking science news from research labs, scientists and colleges around ...
Bioss Anti-Apolipoprotein E Polyclonal, Catalog # BS-4892R. Tested in Western Blot (WB), Immunocytochemistry (ICC/IF), ... Protein Aliases: Apo-E; ApoE4; Apolipoprotein; Apolipoprotein E; apolipoprotein E3; apolipoprotein E4; Apoprotein; B2G1; BG; ... Cite Apolipoprotein E Polyclonal Antibody. The following product was used in this experiment: Apolipoprotein E Polyclonal ... Apo E (Apolipoprotein E) plays an important role in the metabolism of lipids in the plasma, and is also is a constituent of ...
... *Authors: *Tomohiro Aoki ... Aoki T, Moriwaki T, Takagi Y, Kataoka H, Yang J, Nozaki K and Hashimoto N: The efficacy of apolipoprotein E deficiency in ... Aoki, T., Moriwaki, T., Takagi, Y., Kataoka, H., Yang, J., Nozaki, K., & Hashimoto, N. (2008). The efficacy of apolipoprotein E ... Aoki, T., Moriwaki, T., Takagi, Y., Kataoka, H., Yang, J., Nozaki, K., Hashimoto, N.The efficacy of apolipoprotein E ...
View Mouse/Rat Apolipoprotein H/ApoH Antibody (AF6575) datasheet. ... Background: Apolipoprotein H/ApoH. Apolipoprotein H (ApoH), also known as beta 2‑Glycoprotein I/ beta 2-GPI, is a variably ... Detects mouse and rat Apolipoprotein H/ApoH in Western blots and detects recombinant mouse Apolipoprotein H/ApoH in direct ... Reviews for Mouse/Rat Apolipoprotein H/ApoH Antibody. There are currently no reviews for this product. Be the first to review ...
Apolipoprotein C-III: understanding an emerging cardiovascular risk factor Esther M. M. Ooi; Esther M. M. Ooi ... Esther M. M. Ooi, P. Hugh R. Barrett, Dick C. Chan, Gerald F. Watts; Apolipoprotein C-III: understanding an emerging ... ApoC-III (apolipoprotein C-III), an important regulator of lipoprotein metabolism, is strongly associated with ...
The very low density of some particles has been attributed to an association of the virus with apolipoprotein B (apoB) positive ... The nature of the association of HCV particles with lipoproteins remains elusive and the role of apolipoproteins in the ...
46-802) can be used to detect Human Apolipoprotein B Antibody in ELISA and WB. ... ADDITIONAL NAMES: APOB, apolipoprotein B (including Ag(x) antigen), FLDB, apoB-100, apoB-48, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein ... 1: Benn M, Nordestgaard BG, Jensen JS, Tybjaerg-Hansen A. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke. J Clin ...
Mouse Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) ELISA Kit from Cusabio. Cat#: CSB-E16506m. US, UK & Europe Distribution. Online Order or ... Mouse Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) ELISA Kit , CSB-E16506m Cusabio Elisa Mouse Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) ELISA Kit , CSB- ... Mouse Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) ELISA Kit , CSB-E16506m. Rating Required Select Rating. 1 star (worst). 2 stars. 3 stars ( ... Mouse Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) ELISA Kit is Available at Gentaur Genprice with the fastest delivery. ...
Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) is a protein that plays a role in moving cholesterol around your body. It is a form of low ... Apolipoprotein measurements may provide more detail about your risk for heart disease, but the added value of this test beyond ...
Apolipoprotein E-deficient (KOE) mice were challenged with a high-fat diet for 4 weeks. The effect of different doses of NAM on ... Vitamin B3 impairs reverse cholesterol transport in Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice La vitamina B3 altera el transporte reverso ... Overexpression of human apolipoprotein A-II in transgenic mice does not impair macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol ... Human apolipoprotein A-II determines plasma triglycerides by regulating lipoprotein lipase activity and high-density ...
Lipoprotein(a), apolipoprotein E genotype, and risk of Alzheimers disease Message subject: (Your Name) has forwarded a page to ...
Erratum - Association between Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Clinical Outcome after Ischemic Stroke, Intracerebral ... Erratum - Association between Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Clinical Outcome after Ischemic Stroke, Intracerebral ... This is an erratum to: Association between Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Clinical Outcome after Ischemic Stroke, ... In the article "Association between Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Clinical Outcome after Ischemic Stroke, Intracerebral ...
... high purity Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) from human plasma for manufacturing of diagnostic controls, calibrators, standards and ... Buy Human Apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB-100) from Lee Biosolutions.. Custom preparations, technical support, bulk quantities and ...
There is some evidence that apolipoprotein E (apoE) binds to Aß peptide and modulates its aggregation into plaques. ApoE has ...
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Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the main protein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), reduces the risk for ... Adsorption of apolipoprotein A-I to biological membranes. A statistical mechanical model. Eitan Gross(a) ...
This ELISA kit is a 1.5 hour solid-phase ELISA designed for the quantitative determination of the targets. This ELISA kit for research use only, not for therapeutic or diagnostic applications!
Epistatic Interactions between apolipoprotein E and hemoglobin S Genes in regulation of malaria parasitemia.. Rougeron V, Woods ... Apolipoprotein E is a monomeric protein secreted by the liver and responsible for the transport of plasma cholesterol and ... Epistatic Interactions between apolipoprotein E and hemoglobin S Genes in regulation of malaria para... ...
  • Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in the transport and uptake of cholesterol by way of its high affinity interaction with lipoprotein receptors, including the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent findings with apoA1 and apoE suggest that the tertiary structures of these two members of the human exchangeable apolipoprotein gene family are related. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is a lipid-transport protein abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system. (dovepress.com)
  • The apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is located on chromosome 19 and encodes a glycoprotein that is 299 amino acids long. (dovepress.com)
  • The relation of hypercholesterolemia and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) to cerebral aneurysm formation, has been unclear until now. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Genetic analysis of families with Alzheimer disease has revealed a disease-associated variant of the APOE gene, which encodes apolipoprotein E, a transporter of lipids in the blood and central nervous system. (columbia.edu)
  • Methods: Aortic plaque deposition was assessed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic apolipoprotein E (Apoe) knockout (KO) and At 2 r (also known as Agtr2)/Apoe double-KO (DKO) mice. (monash.edu)
  • How is the Apolipoprotein-E (APOE) test performed? (redcliffelabs.com)
  • To investigate whether blood lipid response to dietary fat and fibre vary according to the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene locus. (uea.ac.uk)
  • Objective - Apolipoprotein E (apoE) reduces mouse atherosclerosis progression independent of plasma cholesterol level effects. (mssm.edu)
  • Description: This is Double-antibody Sandwich Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Rat Apolipoprotein E (APOE) in serum, plasma, tissue homogenates, cell lysates, cell culture supernates and other biological fluids. (tissue-cell-culture.com)
  • Description: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the Double-antibody Sandwich method for detection of Rat Apolipoprotein E (APOE) in samples from Serum, plasma, tissue homogenates, cell lysates, cell culture supernates and other biological fluids with no significant corss-reactivity with analogues from other species. (tissue-cell-culture.com)
  • The analyst should use the special sampling weights in this file to analyze Apolipoprotein B (ApoB). (cdc.gov)
  • Buy Human Apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB-100) from Lee Biosolutions. (leebio.com)
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) due to a founder variant in Apolipoprotein B (ApoB R3500Q ) is reported in 12% of the Pennsylvania Amish community. (clinicforspecialchildren.org)
  • Apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels are used to evaluate the risk for cardiovascular disease. (healthmatters.io)
  • Low apoB levels may indicate Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome (abetalipoproteinemia), a very rare genetic condition characterized by apolipoprotein B deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Apolipoprotein B (apoB) is a structural protein that constitutes a major component of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), the intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL). (medscape.com)
  • Some evidence has shown that the capacity of the apoB/apoA-I ratio in assessing cardiovascular risk is strong and may be better than the use of apolipoprotein B alone. (medscape.com)
  • Apolipoproteins are proteins that bind lipids (oil-soluble substances such as fats, cholesterol and fat soluble vitamins) to form lipoproteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Different lipoproteins contain different classes of apolipoproteins, which influence their function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA1) is the major structural protein component of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), although it is present in other lipoproteins in smaller amounts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA4) is present in chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and HDL. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein B plays a particularly important role in lipoprotein transport being the primary organizing protein of many lipoproteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC3) plays an important role in lipid metabolism specific in regulating the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs). (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation and clearance of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Other apolipoproteins (A, C, D, E, and their subtypes) are soluble and are exchanged between lipoproteins during metabolism. (medscape.com)
  • Apolipoprotein AI (Apo AI) is one of the apoproteins of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). (southtees.nhs.uk)
  • Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) is a building block of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDLs), and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). (healthmatters.io)
  • The A apolipoproteins are the main form of protein found in high density lipoproteins (HDL), although APO A-I is also present in chylomicrons. (randox.com)
  • Apolipoprotein-E is a protein responsible for producing lipoproteins, which carry cholesterol and other fats through the bloodstream. (redcliffelabs.com)
  • However, because of their detergent-like (amphipathic) properties, apolipoproteins and other amphipathic molecules (such as phospholipids) can surround the lipids, creating a lipoprotein particle that is itself water-soluble, and can thus be carried through body fluids (i.e., blood, lymph). (wikipedia.org)
  • Apo E (Apolipoprotein E) plays an important role in the metabolism of lipids in the plasma, and is also is a constituent of various plasma lipoprotein-lipid particles. (thermofisher.com)
  • Major lipids, apolipoproteins, and risk of vascular disease. (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONTEXT: Associations of major lipids and apolipoproteins with the risk of vascular disease have not been reliably quantified. (ox.ac.uk)
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess major lipids and apolipoproteins in vascular risk. (ox.ac.uk)
  • These structures consist of an outer monolayer of protein (an Apolipoprotein) and polar lipids (phospholipids and unesterified cholesterol) plus an inner core of neutral lipids (triglycerides and cholesterol esters). (randox.com)
  • Apolipoprotein M (apoM) participates in the lipid metabolism and exhibit anti‑atherosclerotic functions and it is presented in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). (wikipedia.org)
  • these apolipoproteins have lipid-soluble segments, the beta apolipoproteins, which remain part of the lipoprotein throughout its metabolism. (medscape.com)
  • ApoC-III (apolipoprotein C-III), an important regulator of lipoprotein metabolism, is strongly associated with hypertriglyceridaemia and the progression of CVD. (portlandpress.com)
  • Members of the apolipoprotein gene cluster (APOA1/C3/A4/A5) on human chromosome 11q23 play an important role in lipid metabolism. (doe.gov)
  • LDL and its major protein, apolipoprotein B, play an essential role in lipid transport and metabolism. (healthmatters.io)
  • The apolipoproteins interact with a series of enzymes and tissue receptors and are therefore responsible for further metabolism and catabolism of the micelle. (randox.com)
  • Mouse Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) ELISA Kit is Available at Gentaur Genprice with the fastest delivery. (joplink.net)
  • Description: A sandwich ELISA kit for detection of Apolipoprotein H from Human in samples from blood, serum, plasma, cell culture fluid and other biological fluids. (bestpractice-life.pl)
  • Description: A sandwich quantitative ELISA assay kit for detection of Rat Apolipoprotein H (APOH) in samples from serum, plasma or other biological fluids. (bestpractice-life.pl)
  • Description: A sandwich quantitative ELISA assay kit for detection of Rat Apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) in samples from serum, plasma, tissue homogenates, cell lysates, cell culture supernates or other biological fluids. (gkts.net)
  • In lipid transport, apolipoproteins function as structural components of lipoprotein particles, ligands for cell-surface receptors and lipid transport proteins, and cofactors for enzymes (e.g. apolipoprotein C-II for lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA1) for lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase). (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) is a protein that plays a role in moving cholesterol around your body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • These particles consist of a core of cholesterol esters and triglycerides surrounded by a monolayer of free cholesterol, phospholipids, and proteins (apolipoproteins). (medscape.com)
  • Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the main protein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), reduces the risk for atherosclerosis by removing cholesterol from the membrane of foam cells. (edpsciences.org)
  • Apolipoprotein E is a monomeric protein secreted by the liver and responsible for the transport of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. (edu.au)
  • Ala-Korpela, M 2019, ' The culprit is the carrier, not the loads: cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease ', International Journal of Epidemiology , vol. 48, no. 5, pp. 1389-1392. (bris.ac.uk)
  • Apolipoprotein A is a protein carried in HDL ('good') cholesterol. (healthmatters.io)
  • Studies have shown that the ratio of apolipoprotein A-1:apolipoprotein B may correlate better with increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) than total cholesterol, and LDL:HDL ratio. (healthmatters.io)
  • The present study aimed to examine the association between discordant apolipoprotein B ( Apo B ) with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) or non- high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the Chinese population and to determine whether adding information on Apo B to LDL-C and HDL-C improves CVD risk prediction. (bvsalud.org)
  • Description: This is Double-antibody Sandwich Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Dog Apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) in serum, plasma and other biological fluids. (gkts.net)
  • Hundreds of genetic polymorphisms of the apolipoproteins have been described, and many of them alter their structure and function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Benn M, Nordestgaard BG, Jensen JS, Tybjaerg-Hansen A. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke. (prosci-inc.com)
  • We tried to identify the interaction between dietary quality indices and apolipoprotein B Ins/Del and EcoR1 polymorphisms on cardio-metabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). (researchsquare.com)
  • Background: We have previously demonstrated that estrogen could significantly enhance expression of apolipoprotein M (apoM), whereas the molecular basis of its mechanism is not fully elucidated yet. (lu.se)
  • Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the major genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with enhanced brain inflammation. (nih.gov)
  • Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). (lu.se)
  • Apolipoprotein F (apoF) is one of the minor apolipoprotein in blood plasma and it is a lipid transfer inhibit protein to inhibit cholesteryl ester transfer protein-mediated transfers of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to stabilizing lipoprotein structure and solubilizing the lipid component, apolipoproteins interact with lipoprotein receptors and lipid transport proteins, thereby participating in lipoprotein uptake and clearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein H (ApoH), also known as beta 2‑Glycoprotein I/ beta 2-GPI, is a variably glycosylated member of the complement control superfamily of proteins with a molecular weight of aproximately 50 kDa (1, 2). (rndsystems.com)
  • The following product was used in this experiment: Apolipoprotein E Polyclonal Antibody from Thermo Fisher Scientific, catalog # BS-4892R. (thermofisher.com)
  • PVDF membrane was probed with 0.25 µg/mL of Sheep Anti-Mouse/Rat Apolipoprotein H/ApoH Antigen Affinity-purified Polyclonal Antibody (Catalog # AF6575) followed by HRP-conjugated Anti-Sheep IgG Secondary Antibody (Catalog # HAF016 ). (rndsystems.com)
  • Detects mouse and rat Apolipoprotein H/ApoH in Western blots and detects recombinant mouse Apolipoprotein H/ApoH in direct ELISAs. (rndsystems.com)
  • In direct ELISAs, approximately 40% cross-reactivity with recombinant human Apolipoprotein H/ApoH is observed. (rndsystems.com)
  • Detection of Rat and Mouse Apolipoprotein H/ApoH by Western Blot. (rndsystems.com)
  • A specific band was detected for Apolipoprotein H/ApoH at approximately 50-60 kDa (as indicated). (rndsystems.com)
  • Description: This is Double-antibody Sandwich Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Human Apolipoprotein H (APOH) in serum, plasma and other biological fluids. (bestpractice-life.pl)
  • Description: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the Double-antibody Sandwich method for detection of Human Apolipoprotein H (APOH) in samples from Serum, plasma and other biological fluids with no significant corss-reactivity with analogues from other species. (bestpractice-life.pl)
  • In the article "Association between Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Clinical Outcome after Ischemic Stroke, Intracerebral Hemorrhage, and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage" [Cerebrovasc Dis 2022;51:313-322. (karger.com)
  • Aoki T, Moriwaki T, Takagi Y, Kataoka H, Yang J, Nozaki K and Hashimoto N: The efficacy of apolipoprotein E deficiency in cerebral aneurysm formation. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Inhalation exposure of gas-metal arc stainless steel welding fume increased atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E knockout mice. (cdc.gov)
  • Apolipoprotein A4's (APOA4's) functions on HDL in humans are not well understood. (jci.org)
  • The intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the concentration of Apolipoprotein B in the sample. (cdc.gov)
  • A unique feature of APOA4 is that it is an intestinal apolipoprotein secreted on HDL and chylomicrons. (jci.org)
  • Apolipoprotein AI is used in the evaluation of risk for atherosclerotic disease and the detection of Tangier disease. (southtees.nhs.uk)
  • Para cumplir este objetivo, la Sociedad creó la publicación Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis. (elsevier.es)
  • Apolipoprotein B is the main protein component of LDL and accounts for approximately 95% of the total protein content of LDL. (cdc.gov)
  • Apolipoprotein measurements may provide more detail about your risk for heart disease, but the added value of this test beyond a lipid panel is unknown. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In this way, apolipoprotein A can help to lower your risk for cardiovascular disease. (healthmatters.io)
  • Apolipoprotein Particle and Cardiovascular Risk Prediction (from a Prospective Cohort Study). (bvsalud.org)
  • Apolipoprotein D (apoD) is a soluble carrier protein of lipophilic molecules in neurons and glial cells within the central and peripheral nervous system and apoD can also modulate the stability and oxidation status of these molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nous avons réalisé un essai en double aveugle contre placebo sur 50 patients atteints de diabète de type 2 randomisés pour recevoir 2 g/jour d'acides gras oméga 3 purifiés ou un placebo pendant 10 semaines. (who.int)
  • Adsorption of apolipoprotein A-I to biological membranes. (edpsciences.org)
  • In addition, apolipoprotein B significantly decreased only in females (p = 0.002). (nih.gov)
  • Epistatic Interactions between apolipoprotein E and hemoglobin S Genes in regulation of malaria para. (edu.au)
  • The apolipoprotein e-test is typically done by drawing a blood sample from a vein in the arm. (redcliffelabs.com)