Common name for several daisy-like plants (MATRICARIA; TRIPLEUROSPERMUM; ANTHEMIS; CHAMAEMELUM) native to Europe and Western Asia, now naturalized in the United States and Australia.
5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-flavone, one of the FLAVONES.
A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.
A group of 4-keto-FLAVONOIDS.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The common names of daisy or marguerite are easily confused with other plants. Some species in this genus have been reclassified to TANACETUM.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain arctiin and onopordopicrin.
A group of FLAVONOLS based on kaempferol. They are derived from naringenin and can be hydroxylated to QUERCETIN or reduced to leucopelargonidin.
A group of FLAVONOIDS characterized with a 4-ketone.
A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.
A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that has been found as a natural infection of the Brazilian guinea pig. Its host-tissue relationship is, in general, comparable to that of L. braziliensis.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is an ingredient of Banxia Houpu (DRUGS, CHINESE HERBAL).
17 beta-Hydroxy-4-androsten-3-ones. Testosterone derivatives formed by the substitution of one or more hydroxyl groups in any position.
A plant species of the family APIACEAE. The stalks are a food source.
A subtype of mitochondrial ADP, ATP translocase found primarily in FIBROBLASTS.
A plant genus of the family VIOLACEAE. Some species in this genus are called bouncing bet which is a common name more often used with SAPONARIA OFFICINALIS. Members contain macrocyclic peptides.
The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).
Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.
A genus of zygomycetous fungi of the family Cunninghamellaceae, order MUCORALES. Some species cause systemic infections in humans.
A plant genus of the family APIACEAE used for flavoring food.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
A plant genus of subsucculent annual or perennial plants in the family BALSAMINACEAE, order Geraniales.
An isoflavonoid derived from soy products. It inhibits PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE and topoisomerase-II (DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE II); activity and is used as an antineoplastic and antitumor agent. Experimentally, it has been shown to induce G2 PHASE arrest in human and murine cell lines and inhibits PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE.
Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE. The common names of beebalm or lemonbalm are also used for MONARDA.
The above-ground plant without the roots.
A colorless liquid extracted from oils of plants such as citronella, neroli, cyclamen, and tuberose. It is an intermediate step in the biological synthesis of cholesterol from mevalonic acid in vertebrates. It has a delicate odor and is used in perfumery. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Glucosides are glycosides that contain glucose as the sugar component, often forming part of the plant's defense mechanism and can have various pharmacological effects when extracted and used medically.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A group of 3-hydroxy-4-keto-FLAVONOIDS.
A flavonol glycoside found in many plants, including BUCKWHEAT; TOBACCO; FORSYTHIA; HYDRANGEA; VIOLA, etc. It has been used therapeutically to decrease capillary fragility.
Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced mutations independently of the mechanism involved.
A ubiquitous casein kinase that is comprised of two distinct catalytic subunits and dimeric regulatory subunit. Casein kinase II has been shown to phosphorylate a large number of substrates, many of which are proteins involved in the regulation of gene expression.
A tumor necrosis factor receptor subtype with specificity for TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR LIGAND SUPERFAMILY MEMBER 15. It is found in tissues containing LYMPHOCYTES and may play a role in regulating lymphocyte homeostasis and APOPTOSIS. The activated receptor signals via a conserved death domain that associates with specific TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS in the CYTOPLASM.
Sorbitan mono-9-octadecanoate poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) derivatives; complex mixtures of polyoxyethylene ethers used as emulsifiers or dispersing agents in pharmaceuticals.
Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.
Methylester of cellulose. Methylcellulose is used as an emulsifying and suspending agent in cosmetics, pharmaceutics and the chemical industry. It is used therapeutically as a bulk laxative.
Picrates are salts of picric acid, an explosive organic compound previously used as a yellow dye and antiseptic, which are now primarily used in chemical research and industrial applications. Please note that picrates should be handled with care due to their potential explosiveness when heated or subjected to friction.
Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.
The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.
5,7,4'-trihydroxy-flavone, one of the FLAVONES.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.
The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.
Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.
Cinnamates are organic compounds that contain a cinnamic acid moiety, widely used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries as esters, with various applications ranging from UV absorbers to local anesthetics and antimicrobial agents.
An inducibly-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes and INFLAMMATION. It is the target of COX2 INHIBITORS.
Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
A human liver tumor cell line used to study a variety of liver-specific metabolic functions.
Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.
Phenomena and pharmaceutics of compounds that inhibit the function of agonists (DRUG AGONISM) and inverse agonists (DRUG INVERSE AGONISM) for a specific receptor. On their own, antagonists produce no effect by themselves to a receptor, and are said to have neither intrinsic activity nor efficacy.
A subunit of NF-kappa B that is primarily responsible for its transactivation function. It contains a C-terminal transactivation domain and an N-terminal domain with homology to PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-REL.
A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glucose from a nucleoside diphosphate glucose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.
A protein-serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION in response to GROWTH FACTORS or INSULIN. It plays a major role in cell metabolism, growth, and survival as a core component of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Three isoforms have been described in mammalian cells.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.
A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.
Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.
Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells, such as ENTEROCYTES. These cells are valuable in vitro tools for studies related to intestinal cell function and differentiation.
Tumor necrosis factor receptor family members that are widely expressed and play a role in regulation of peripheral immune responses and APOPTOSIS. The receptors are specific for TNF-RELATED APOPTOSIS-INDUCING LIGAND and signal via conserved death domains that associate with specific TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS in the CYTOPLASM.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is closely related in structure to the INSULIN RECEPTOR. Although commonly referred to as the IGF-I receptor, it binds both IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. It is comprised of a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits which are derived from cleavage of a single precursor protein. The beta subunit contains an intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Any inflammation of the skin.
Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Membrane proteins encoded by the BCL-2 GENES and serving as potent inhibitors of cell death by APOPTOSIS. The proteins are found on mitochondrial, microsomal, and NUCLEAR MEMBRANE sites within many cell types. Overexpression of bcl-2 proteins, due to a translocation of the gene, is associated with follicular lymphoma.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
The period of the CELL CYCLE following DNA synthesis (S PHASE) and preceding M PHASE (cell division phase). The CHROMOSOMES are tetraploid in this point.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
A transmembrane-protein belonging to the TNF family of intercellular signaling proteins. It is a widely expressed ligand that activates APOPTOSIS by binding to TNF-RELATED APOPTOSIS-INDUCING LIGAND RECEPTORS. The membrane-bound form of the protein can be cleaved by specific CYSTEINE ENDOPEPTIDASES to form a soluble ligand form.
A protein serine-threonine kinase that catalyzes the PHOSPHORYLATION of I KAPPA B PROTEINS. This enzyme also activates the transcription factor NF-KAPPA B and is composed of alpha and beta catalytic subunits, which are protein kinases and gamma, a regulatory subunit.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
A family of intracellular tyrosine kinases that participate in the signaling cascade of cytokines by associating with specific CYTOKINE RECEPTORS. They act upon STAT TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS in signaling pathway referred to as the JAK/STAT pathway. The name Janus kinase refers to the fact the proteins have two phosphate-transferring domains.
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
3-Phenylchromones. Isomeric form of FLAVONOIDS in which the benzene group is attached to the 3 position of the benzopyran ring instead of the 2 position.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.
Inbred ICR mice are a strain of albino laboratory mice that have been selectively bred for consistent genetic makeup and high reproductive performance, making them widely used in biomedical research for studies involving reproduction, toxicology, pharmacology, and carcinogenesis.
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
A family of intracellular CYSTEINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that play a role in regulating INFLAMMATION and APOPTOSIS. They specifically cleave peptides at a CYSTEINE amino acid that follows an ASPARTIC ACID residue. Caspases are activated by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor form to yield large and small subunits that form the enzyme. Since the cleavage site within precursors matches the specificity of caspases, sequential activation of precursors by activated caspases can occur.
7,12-Dimethylbenzanthracene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon found in tobacco smoke that is a potent carcinogen.
A method used to study the lateral movement of MEMBRANE PROTEINS and LIPIDS. A small area of a cell membrane is bleached by laser light and the amount of time necessary for unbleached fluorescent marker-tagged proteins to diffuse back into the bleached site is a measurement of the cell membrane's fluidity. The diffusion coefficient of a protein or lipid in the membrane can be calculated from the data. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995).
A nuclear receptor coactivator with specificity for ESTROGEN RECEPTORS and PROGESTERONE RECEPTORS. It contains a histone acetyltransferase activity that may play a role in CHROMATIN REMODELING during the process of nuclear receptor-induced transcription. The coactivator has been found at elevated levels in certain HORMONE-DEPENDENT NEOPLASMS such as those found in BREAST CANCER.
The reproductive organs of plants.
Chromones are a class of chemical compounds that contain a benzopyran-4-one core structure, which are found in various natural and synthetic substances, including some medications used to treat asthma and allergies.
A family of enzymes accepting a wide range of substrates, including phenols, alcohols, amines, and fatty acids. They function as drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of UDPglucuronic acid to a variety of endogenous and exogenous compounds. EC 2.4.1.17.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A cyclin subtype that is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE. It stimulates the G2/M phase transition by activating CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Substances that possess antiestrogenic actions but can also produce estrogenic effects as well. They act as complete or partial agonist or as antagonist. They can be either steroidal or nonsteroidal in structure.
Hypoxia-inducible factor 1, alpha subunit is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is regulated by OXYGEN availability and is targeted for degradation by VHL TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN.
A family of protein serine/threonine kinases which act as intracellular signalling intermediates. Ribosomal protein S6 kinases are activated through phosphorylation in response to a variety of HORMONES and INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS. Phosphorylation of RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 by enzymes in this class results in increased expression of 5' top MRNAs. Although specific for RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 members of this class of kinases can act on a number of substrates within the cell. The immunosuppressant SIROLIMUS inhibits the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases.
A short pro-domain caspase that plays an effector role in APOPTOSIS. It is activated by INITIATOR CASPASES such as CASPASE 9. Isoforms of this protein exist due to multiple alternative splicing of its MESSENGER RNA.
A ubiquitously expressed protein kinase that is involved in a variety of cellular SIGNAL PATHWAYS. Its activity is regulated by a variety of signaling protein tyrosine kinase.
Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.
Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.
Protein encoded by the bcl-1 gene which plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is the result of bcl-1 rearrangement, a t(11;14) translocation, and is implicated in various neoplasms.
The main structural component of the LIVER. They are specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that are organized into interconnected plates called lobules.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
DEFENSINS found mainly in epithelial cells.
Inhibitors of SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES and sulfhydryl group-containing enzymes. They act as alkylating agents and are known to interfere in the translation process.
Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression through the CELL CYCLE. They ensure that the cell has completed, in the correct order and without mistakes, all the processes required to replicate the GENOME and CYTOPLASM, and divide them equally between two daughter cells. If cells sense they have not completed these processes or that the environment does not have the nutrients and growth hormones in place to proceed, then the cells are restrained (or "arrested") until the processes are completed and growth conditions are suitable.
Cytochromes of the c type that are found in eukaryotic MITOCHONDRIA. They serve as redox intermediates that accept electrons from MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX III and transfer them to MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX IV.
A family of signaling adaptor proteins that contain SRC HOMOLOGY DOMAINS. Many members of this family are involved in transmitting signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS to MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES.
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that mediates TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53-dependent CELL CYCLE arrest. p21 interacts with a range of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and associates with PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and CASPASE 3.
One of the six homologous soluble proteins that bind insulin-like growth factors (SOMATOMEDINS) and modulate their mitogenic and metabolic actions at the cellular level.
Phosphotransferases that catalyzes the conversion of 1-phosphatidylinositol to 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Many members of this enzyme class are involved in RECEPTOR MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION and regulation of vesicular transport with the cell. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases have been classified both according to their substrate specificity and their mode of action within the cell.
Morpholines are organic compounds containing a morpholine ring, which is a saturated six-membered heterocycle made up of four carbon atoms and two oxygen atoms (OCC1CCO), often used as functional groups in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and materials science due to their versatile chemical properties.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Inbred NZB mice are a strain of laboratory mice that spontaneously develop an autoimmune disease similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), characterized by the production of autoantibodies, immune complex deposition, and glomerulonephritis.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
A promyelocytic cell line derived from a patient with ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA. HL-60 cells lack specific markers for LYMPHOID CELLS but express surface receptors for FC FRAGMENTS and COMPLEMENT SYSTEM PROTEINS. They also exhibit phagocytic activity and responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli. (From Hay et al., American Type Culture Collection, 7th ed, pp127-8)
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
A cyclin B subtype that colocalizes with MICROTUBULES during INTERPHASE and is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A tripeptide with many roles in cells. It conjugates to drugs to make them more soluble for excretion, is a cofactor for some enzymes, is involved in protein disulfide bond rearrangement and reduces peroxides.
Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.
Ubiquitous, inducible, nuclear transcriptional activator that binds to enhancer elements in many different cell types and is activated by pathogenic stimuli. The NF-kappa B complex is a heterodimer composed of two DNA-binding subunits: NF-kappa B1 and relA.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
A large multisubunit complex that plays an important role in the degradation of most of the cytosolic and nuclear proteins in eukaryotic cells. It contains a 700-kDa catalytic sub-complex and two 700-kDa regulatory sub-complexes. The complex digests ubiquitinated proteins and protein activated via ornithine decarboxylase antizyme.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.
An increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme due to the presence of an inducer which acts to derepress the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
Quinolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a two-nitrogened benzene ring fused to a pyridine ring, which have been synthesized and used as building blocks for various medicinal drugs, particularly antibiotics and antimalarials.
A member of the Bcl-2 protein family and homologous partner of C-BCL-2 PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN. It regulates the release of CYTOCHROME C and APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR from the MITOCHONDRIA. Several isoforms of BCL2-associated X protein occur due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of the mRNA for this protein.
A family of inhibitory proteins which bind to the REL PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS and modulate their activity. In the CYTOPLASM, I-kappa B proteins bind to the transcription factor NF-KAPPA B. Cell stimulation causes its dissociation and translocation of active NF-kappa B to the nucleus.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
Components of a cell produced by various separation techniques which, though they disrupt the delicate anatomy of a cell, preserve the structure and physiology of its functioning constituents for biochemical and ultrastructural analysis. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p163)
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
(2S-(2 alpha,3 beta,4 beta))-2-Carboxy-4-(1-methylethenyl)-3-pyrrolidineacetic acid. Ascaricide obtained from the red alga Digenea simplex. It is a potent excitatory amino acid agonist at some types of excitatory amino acid receptors and has been used to discriminate among receptor types. Like many excitatory amino acid agonists it can cause neurotoxicity and has been used experimentally for that purpose.
A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).
A common neoplasm of early childhood arising from neural crest cells in the sympathetic nervous system, and characterized by diverse clinical behavior, ranging from spontaneous remission to rapid metastatic progression and death. This tumor is the most common intraabdominal malignancy of childhood, but it may also arise from thorax, neck, or rarely occur in the central nervous system. Histologic features include uniform round cells with hyperchromatic nuclei arranged in nests and separated by fibrovascular septa. Neuroblastomas may be associated with the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2099-2101; Curr Opin Oncol 1998 Jan;10(1):43-51)
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).
A CALCIUM-independent subtype of nitric oxide synthase that may play a role in immune function. It is an inducible enzyme whose expression is transcriptionally regulated by a variety of CYTOKINES.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that plays a role in APOPTOSIS. It is composed of two subunits: ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR NUCLEAR TRANSLOCATOR and HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1, ALPHA SUBUNIT.
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor.
A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.
A class of MOLECULAR CHAPERONES whose members act in the mechanism of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION by STEROID RECEPTORS.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
The artificial induction of GENE SILENCING by the use of RNA INTERFERENCE to reduce the expression of a specific gene. It includes the use of DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA, such as SMALL INTERFERING RNA and RNA containing HAIRPIN LOOP SEQUENCE, and ANTI-SENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES.
Addition of methyl groups. In histo-chemistry methylation is used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reaction between superoxide anions and hydrogen to yield molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme protects the cell against dangerous levels of superoxide. EC 1.15.1.1.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."
A large group of proteins that control APOPTOSIS. This family of proteins includes many ONCOGENE PROTEINS as well as a wide variety of classes of INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS such as CASPASES.
Drugs that bind to and activate excitatory amino acid receptors.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Exogenous and endogenous compounds which inhibit CYSTEINE ENDOPEPTIDASES.
An in situ method for detecting areas of DNA which are nicked during APOPTOSIS. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is used to add labeled dUTP, in a template-independent manner, to the 3 prime OH ends of either single- or double-stranded DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling, or TUNEL, assay labels apoptosis on a single-cell level, making it more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA FRAGMENTATION.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
A well-characterized basic peptide believed to be secreted by the liver and to circulate in the blood. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like, and mitogenic activities. This growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on GROWTH HORMONE. It is believed to be mainly active in adults in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR II, which is a major fetal growth factor.
A family of non-receptor, PROLINE-rich protein-tyrosine kinases.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
The aggregation of soluble ANTIGENS with ANTIBODIES, alone or with antibody binding factors such as ANTI-ANTIBODIES or STAPHYLOCOCCAL PROTEIN A, into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Enzymes that oxidize certain LUMINESCENT AGENTS to emit light (PHYSICAL LUMINESCENCE). The luciferases from different organisms have evolved differently so have different structures and substrates.
Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.
A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)
Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.

Increase in wild-type p53 stability and transactivational activity by the chemopreventive agent apigenin in keratinocytes. (1/264)

Apigenin, a naturally occurring, non-mutagenic flavonoid, has been shown to inhibit UV-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice when topically applied. In this report we have used the mouse keratinocyte 308 cell line, which contains a wild-type p53 gene, to study the effect of apigenin treatment on p53 protein levels and the expression of its downstream partner, p21/waf1. Cells were treated with 70 microM apigenin for various times and levels of p53 and p21/waf1 protein were assessed by western blot analysis. The level of p53 protein was induced 27-fold after 4 h of apigenin treatment and levels remained elevated through 10 h of exposure. After 24 h of exposure to 70 microM apigenin, p53 protein levels returned to control levels. p21/waf1 protein levels increased approximately 1. 5-2-fold after 4 h and remained elevated at 24 h. To investigate the mechanism of p53 protein accumulation, we compared the half-life of p53 protein in vehicle- and apigenin-treated cells. Cells were incubated for 4 h in the presence of apigenin, then cycloheximide was added to inhibit further protein synthesis and p53 protein levels were measured by western blot. The half-life of p53 protein was found to be increased an average of 8-fold in apigenin-treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (t(1/2) = 131 min versus 16 min in apigenin- versus vehicle-treated cells, respectively). The mechanism of p53 protein stabilization is currently being investigated. To determine whether p53 was transcriptionally active, we also performed gel mobility shift assays and transient transfection studies using a luciferase plasmid under the control of the p21/waf1 promoter. Both p53 DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activation peaked after 24 h of exposure to apigenin. These studies suggest that apigenin may exert anti-tumorigenic activity by stimulating the p53-p21/waf1 response pathway.  (+info)

Endogenous protein kinase CK2 participates in Wnt signaling in mammary epithelial cells. (2/264)

Protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase II) is a serine/threonine kinase overexpressed in many human tumors, transformed cell lines, and rapidly proliferating tissues. Recent data have shown that many cancers involve inappropriate reactivation of Wnt signaling through ectopic expression of Wnts themselves, as has been seen in a number of human breast cancers, or through mutation of intermediates in the Wnt pathway, such as adenomatous polyposis coli or beta-catenin, as described in colon and other cancers. Wnts are secreted factors that are important in embryonic development, but overexpression of certain Wnts, such as Wnt-1, leads to proliferation and transformation of cells. We report that upon stable transfection of Wnt-1 into the mouse mammary epithelial cell line C57MG, morphological changes and increased proliferation are accompanied by increased levels of CK2, as well as of beta-catenin. CK2 and beta-catenin co-precipitate with the Dvl proteins, which are Wnt signaling intermediates. A major phosphoprotein of the size of beta-catenin appears in in vitro kinase reactions performed on the Dvl immunoprecipitates. In vitro translated beta-catenin, Dvl-2, and Dvl-3 are phosphorylated by CK2. The selective CK2 inhibitor apigenin blocks proliferation of Wnt-1-transfected cells, abrogates phosphorylation of beta-catenin, and reduces beta-catenin and Dvl protein levels. These results demonstrate that endogenous CK2 is a positive regulator of Wnt signaling and growth of mammary epithelial cells.  (+info)

Flavopiridol binds to duplex DNA. (3/264)

Flavopiridol, the first potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor to enter clinical trials, was recently found to be cytotoxic to noncycling cells. The present studies were performed to examine the hypothesis that flavopiridol, like several other antineoplastic agents that kill noncycling cells, might also interact with DNA. Consistent with this possibility, treatment of A549 human lung cancer cells with clinically achievable concentrations of flavopiridol resulted in rapid elevations of the DNA damage-responsive protein p53. In further studies, the binding of flavopiridol to DNA was examined in vitro by four independent techniques. Absorption spectroscopy revealed that addition of DNA to aqueous flavopiridol solutions resulted in a red shift of the flavopiridol lambda(max) from 311 to 344 nm, demonstrating an isosbestic point typical of changes seen with DNA-binding compounds. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated that flavopiridol binds to genomic DNA to a similar extent as ethidium bromide and Hoechst 33258. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that DNA caused extreme broadening of flavopiridol 1H nuclear magnetic resonance signals that could be reversed by addition of ethidium bromide or by DNA melting, suggesting that flavopiridol binds to (and likely intercalates into) duplex DNA. Equilibrium dialysis demonstrated that the equilibrium dissociation constant of the flavopiridol-DNA complex (5.4+/-3.4 x 10(-4) M) was in the same range observed for binding of the intercalators doxorubicin and pyrazoloacridine to DNA. Molecular modeling confirmed the feasibility of flavopiridol intercalation into DNA and analysis of the effects of flavopiridol in the National Cancer Institute tumor cell line panel using the COMPARE algorithm demonstrated that flavopiridol most closely resembles cytotoxic antineoplastic intercalators. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA might be a second target of flavopiridol, providing a potential explanation for the ability of this agent to kill noncycling cancer cells.  (+info)

Wortmannin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion by T84 cells. (4/264)

The time- and dose-dependent effects of wortmannin on transepithelial electrical resistance (Rte) and forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion in T84 monolayer cultures were studied. In both instances, maximal effects developed over 2 h and were stable thereafter. Inhibition of forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion, as measured by the short-circuit current (Isc) technique, had an IC50 of 200-500 nM, which is 100-fold higher than for inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but similar to the IC50 for inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Previous work demonstrated that 500 nM wortmannin did not inhibit the cAMP activation of apical membrane chloride channels. We show here that 500 nM wortmannin has no affect on basolateral Na/K/2Cl-cotransporter activity, but inhibits basolateral membrane Na/K-ATPase activity significantly. The MLCK inhibitors ML-7 and KT5926 were without affect on forskolin-stimulated Isc. Similarly, the p38- and MEK-specific MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and PD98059 did not reduce forskolin-stimulated Isc. In contrast, the non-specific MAPK inhibitor apigenin reduced forskolin-stimulated Isc and basolateral membrane Na/K-ATPase activity similar to wortmannin. In isolated membranes from T84 cells, wortmannin did not inhibit Na/K-ATPase enzymatic activity directly. We conclude that one or more MAPK may regulate the functional expression of basolateral membrane Na/K-ATPase by controlling the abundance of enzyme molecules in the plasma membrane.  (+info)

Flavonoids inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in B16 melanoma 4A5 cells. (5/264)

We investigated the growth inhibitory activity of several flavonoids, including apigenin, luteolin, kaempherol, quercetin, butein, isoliquiritigenin, naringenin, genistein, and daizein against B16 mouse melanoma 4A5 cells. Isoliquiritigenin and butein, belonging to the chalcone group, markedly suppressed the growth of B16 melanoma cells and induced cell death. The other flavonoids tested showed little growth inhibitory activity and scarcely caused cell death. In cells treated with isoliquiritigenin or butein, condensation of nuclei and fragmentation of nuclear DNA, which are typical phenomena of apoptosis, were observed by Hoechst 33258 staining and by agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. Flowcytometric analysis showed that isoliquiritigenin and butein increased the proportion of hypodiploid cells in the population of B16 melanoma cells. These results demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin and butein inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in B16 melanoma cells. Extracellular glucose decreased the proportion of hypodiploid cells that appeared as a result of isoliquiritigenin treatment. p53 was not detected in cells treated with either of these chalcones, however, protein of the Bcl-2 family were detected. The level of expression of Bax in cells treated with either of these chalcones was markedly elevated and the level of Bcl-XL decreased slightly. Isoliquiritigenin did not affect Bcl-2 expression, but butein down-regulated Bcl-2 expression. From these results, it seems that the pathway by which the chalcones induce apoptosis may be independent of p53 and dependent on proteins of the Bcl-2 family. It was supposed that isoliquiritigenin induces apoptosis in B16 cells by a mechanism involving inhibition of glucose transmembrane transport and promotion of Bax expression. On the other hand, it was suggested that butein induces apoptosis via down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and promotion of Bax expression. This mechanism differs from the isoliquiritigenin induction pathway.  (+info)

Structural determinants for activation and block of CFTR-mediated chloride currents by apigenin. (6/264)

Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is an activator of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated Cl(-) currents across epithelia at low concentrations and a blocker at high concentrations. We determined the roles of structural components of apigenin for both stimulation and block of Cl(-) currents across Calu-3 epithelia. The half-maximal binding affinity of apigenin for current stimulation (K(s)) was 9.1 +/- 1.3 microM, and the rank-order of molecular structures was 7-hydroxyl > pyrone = 4'-hydroxyl > 5-hydroxyl. Both the 7-hydroxyl and the 4'-hydroxyl served as H-bond acceptors, whereas the 5-hydroxyl was an H-bond donor. The half-maximal binding affinity of apigenin during current block was 74 +/- 11 microM. Blocked Cl(-) currents were structurally determined by 7-hydroxyl = 4'-hydroxyl > pyrone > 5-hydroxyl. Prestimulation of tissues with forskolin significantly affected activation kinetics and binding characteristics. After forskolin stimulation, K(s) was 4.1 +/- 0.9 microM, which was structurally determined by pyrone > all hydroxyls > single hydroxyls. In contrast, block of Cl(-) current by apigenin was not affected by forskolin stimulation. We conclude that apigenin binds to a stimulatory and an inhibitory binding site, which are distinguished by their affinities and the molecular interactions during binding.  (+info)

The neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens on amyloid beta protein-induced toxicity are mediated by abrogating the activation of caspase cascade in rat cortical neurons. (7/264)

Amyloid beta protein (Abeta) elicits a toxic effect on neurons in vitro and in vivo. In present study we attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which Abeta confers its neurotoxicity. The neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens on Abeta-mediated toxicity were also investigated. Cortical neurons treated with 5 microm Abeta-(25-35) for 40 h decreased the cell viability by 45.5 +/- 4.6% concomitant with the appearance of apoptotic morphology. 50 microm kaempferol and apigenin decreased the Abeta-induced cell death by 81.5 +/- 9.4% and 49.2 +/- 9.9%, respectively. Abeta increased the activity of caspase 3 by 10.6-fold and to a lesser extent for caspase 2, 8, and 9. The Abeta-induced activation of caspase 3 and release of cytochrome c showed a biphasic pattern. Apigenin abrogated Abeta-induced cytochrome c release, and the activation of caspase cascade. Kaempferol showed a similar effect but to a less extent. Kaempferol was also capable of eliminating Abeta-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These two events accounted for the remarkable effect of kaempferol on neuroprotection. Quercetin and probucol did not affect the Abeta-mediated neurotoxicity. However, they potentiated the protective effect of apigenin. Therefore, these results demonstrate that Abeta elicited activation of caspase cascades and reactive oxygen species accumulation, thereby causing neuronal death. The blockade of caspase activation conferred the major neuroprotective effect of phytoestrogens. The antioxidative activity of phytoestrogens also modulated their neuroprotective effects on Abeta-mediated toxicity.  (+info)

Suppression of inducible cyclooxygenase and nitric oxide synthase through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by flavonoids in mouse macrophages. (8/264)

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma transcription factor has been implicated in anti-inflammatory response. Of the compounds tested, apigenin, chrysin, and kaempferol significantly stimulated PPAR gamma transcriptional activity in a transient reporter assay. In addition, these three flavonoids strongly enhanced the inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase and inducible nitric oxide synthase promoter activities in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages which contain the PPAR gamma expression plasmids. However, these three flavonoids exhibited weak PPAR gamma agonist activities in an in vitro competitive binding assay. Limited protease digestion of PPAR gamma suggested these three flavonoids produced a conformational change in PPAR gamma and the conformation differs in the receptor bound to BRL49653 versus these three flavonoids. These results suggested that these three flavonoids might act as allosteric effectors and were able to bind to PPAR gamma and activate it, but its binding site might be different from the natural ligand BRL49653.  (+info)

Chamomile is a common name for several daisy-like plants that belong to the family Asteraceae, and more specifically to the genus Matricaria or Chamaemelum. The two most commonly used varieties are Matricaria recutita, also known as German chamomile, and Chamaemelum nobile, or Roman chamomile.

Chamomile has been used traditionally for medicinal purposes due to its rich phytochemistry, which includes various terpenoids, flavonoids, and other compounds. The most well-known active constituents are the volatile oils (including alpha-bisabolol, chamazulene, and farnesene) and the flavonoid apigenin.

Chamomile is often used in herbal teas, essential oils, and various dietary supplements for its calming, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, spasmolytic, and mild sedative properties. Some of its applications include:

1. Treatment of anxiety and insomnia: Chamomile is known to help promote relaxation and sleep, making it a popular natural remedy for people suffering from anxiety or insomnia.
2. Digestive health: Chamomile has been used traditionally to treat various gastrointestinal disorders, such as indigestion, bloating, gastritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), due to its antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory effects on the digestive tract.
3. Skin conditions: Chamomile is often found in skincare products and topical treatments for its soothing, anti-inflammatory, and vulnerary properties, which can help alleviate skin irritations, rashes, and inflammation.
4. Menstrual discomfort: Chamomile's antispasmodic and analgesic effects may provide relief from menstrual cramps and pain.
5. Respiratory health: Chamomile has been used to treat respiratory conditions, such as coughs, colds, bronchitis, and asthma, due to its anti-inflammatory and expectorant properties.
6. Oral health: The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of chamomile make it useful for maintaining oral hygiene and treating conditions like mouth ulcers, gum inflammation, and plaque buildup.

It is important to note that while chamomile has many potential health benefits, it may cause allergic reactions in some individuals, particularly those with sensitivities to ragweed, chrysanthemums, or daisies. Additionally, chamomile should not be consumed in large quantities during pregnancy, as it may stimulate uterine contractions and potentially lead to premature labor. Always consult a healthcare professional before starting any new herbal remedy, especially if you have pre-existing medical conditions or are taking medications.

Luteolin is a flavonoid, which is a type of plant pigment that has various beneficial effects on human health. It can be found in various fruits, vegetables, and herbs such as artichokes, peppers, celery, broccoli, peppermint, rosemary, and chamomile tea.

Luteolin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties in laboratory studies. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes and receptors that play a role in inflammation and cancer development. However, more research is needed to determine its effectiveness and safety as a treatment for various medical conditions.

Flavonoids are a type of plant compounds with antioxidant properties that are beneficial to health. They are found in various fruits, vegetables, grains, and wine. Flavonoids have been studied for their potential to prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer due to their ability to reduce inflammation and oxidative stress.

There are several subclasses of flavonoids, including:

1. Flavanols: Found in tea, chocolate, grapes, and berries. They have been shown to improve blood flow and lower blood pressure.
2. Flavones: Found in parsley, celery, and citrus fruits. They have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
3. Flavanonols: Found in citrus fruits, onions, and tea. They have been shown to improve blood flow and reduce inflammation.
4. Isoflavones: Found in soybeans and legumes. They have estrogen-like effects and may help prevent hormone-related cancers.
5. Anthocyanidins: Found in berries, grapes, and other fruits. They have antioxidant properties and may help improve vision and memory.

It is important to note that while flavonoids have potential health benefits, they should not be used as a substitute for medical treatment or a healthy lifestyle. It is always best to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

Flavones are a type of flavonoid, which is a class of plant and fungal metabolites. They are characterized by a phenylbenzopyrone structure, consisting of two benzene rings (A and B) linked through a heterocyclic pyrone ring (C). Flavones specifically have a double bond between the second and third carbon atoms in the C ring, which contributes to their planar structure.

Flavones are found in various plants, including fruits, vegetables, and herbs, and they have been studied for their potential health benefits. Some common flavones include luteolin, apigenin, and chrysin. These compounds have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties in laboratory studies, but more research is needed to determine their effectiveness and safety in humans.

I am not a doctor, but I can provide some information about chrysanthemums. Chrysanthemums are flowering plants that belong to the genus Chrysanthemum in the family Asteraceae. They are native to Asia and northeastern Europe and are particularly significant in East Asian cultures.

Chrysanthemums have been cultivated for centuries for their beautiful flowers, which come in a variety of colors including white, yellow, red, and purple. In some countries, chrysanthemums are considered symbolic of death and are used in funerals or on graves, while in others they represent life, joy, and longevity.

While chrysanthemums do not have a direct medical definition, some parts of the plant have been used in traditional medicine in various cultures. For example, chrysanthemum flowers are sometimes used to make teas that are believed to help with headaches, fever, and inflammation. However, it is important to note that the effectiveness of these remedies has not been scientifically proven, and chrysanthemums can cause allergic reactions or other adverse effects in some people. Therefore, it is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before using any herbal remedies.

"Carduus" is a genus of plants commonly known as thistles, which belong to the family Asteraceae. There are many different species within this genus, and they are native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. Some of these species have been introduced to other parts of the world, including North America, where they can be invasive and cause problems for native plants and animals.

The name "Carduus" comes from the Latin word for "thistle." These plants are often characterized by their prickly leaves and stems, as well as their distinctive purple or pink flower heads. Some species of Carduus have medicinal properties and have been used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of ailments, including digestive problems and skin conditions. However, it is important to note that the use of these plants for medicinal purposes should be done under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, as they can also have toxic effects if not used properly.

Kaempferol is not a medical term, but a chemical compound. It is a type of flavonoid, a class of plant pigments that are known for their antioxidant properties. Kaempferol can be found in various plants and foods such as tea, broccoli, kale, spinach, grapes, and some types of berries.

Medically, kaempferol has been studied for its potential health benefits due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and determine the appropriate dosages for medical use. It's important to note that consuming foods rich in kaempferol as part of a balanced diet is generally considered safe and beneficial for health.

Flavanones are a type of flavonoid, which is a class of plant pigments widely found in fruits, vegetables, and other plants. Flavanones are known for their antioxidant properties and potential health benefits. They are typically found in citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons, and grapefruits. Some common flavanones include hesperetin, naringenin, and eriodictyol. These compounds have been studied for their potential effects on cardiovascular health, cancer prevention, and neuroprotection, although more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Quercetin is a type of flavonoid antioxidant that is found in plant foods, including leafy greens, tomatoes, berries, and broccoli. It has been studied for its potential health benefits, such as reducing inflammation, protecting against damage to cells, and helping to reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. Quercetin is also known for its ability to stabilize mast cells and prevent the release of histamine, making it a popular natural remedy for allergies. It is available in supplement form, but it is always recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Leishmania enriettii is a species of protozoan parasite that belongs to the genus Leishmania. This genus includes several species that are known to cause different forms of leishmaniasis, a group of diseases that affect various organs and tissues in humans and animals.

Leishmania enriettii is primarily associated with causing cutaneous leishmaniasis, a skin infection characterized by the development of ulcers or lesions on the exposed parts of the body such as the face, arms, and legs. The parasite is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected female sandflies, which serve as vectors for the disease.

The parasite's life cycle involves two main stages: the promastigote stage, which occurs in the sandfly vector, and the amastigote stage, which occurs in the mammalian host. In the sandfly, the parasites multiply in the midgut and transform into infective promastigotes. When the infected sandfly bites a human or other mammalian host, it injects the promastigotes into the skin, where they are taken up by immune cells called macrophages. Once inside the macrophages, the parasites transform into amastigotes and multiply within the phagolysosome, an organelle within the macrophage that is responsible for breaking down foreign particles.

The clinical manifestations of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania enriettii are typically milder than those caused by other Leishmania species. The lesions tend to be smaller and heal more quickly, often without leaving scars. However, in some cases, the infection can lead to more severe forms of the disease, such as mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, which affects the mucous membranes of the nose, mouth, and throat.

Diagnosis of Leishmania enriettii infection is typically based on clinical symptoms, epidemiological data, and laboratory tests such as direct observation of parasites in tissue samples or detection of parasite DNA using molecular techniques. Treatment usually involves the use of antiparasitic drugs such as pentavalent antimonials, amphotericin B, or miltefosine.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

'Perilla frutescens' is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a plant species also known as the beefsteak plant or Chinese basil. While it doesn't have a specific medical definition, some components of this plant have been studied for their potential medicinal properties. For instance, Perilla frutescens contains rosmarinic acid and luteolin, which have been researched for their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects. However, it is essential to note that further research is required before any definitive medical claims can be made about the plant or its components.

I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. There is no such term as "Hydroxytestosterones" in medical or scientific literature. However, I can provide you with information about a related topic: Hydroxylation of Testosterone.

Testosterone, a natural androgenic steroid hormone, can undergo hydroxylation - the addition of a hydroxyl group (-OH) - at various positions in its chemical structure. These modified forms of testosterone are involved in different physiological processes and metabolic pathways in the body. Some examples include:

1. 6α-Hydroxytestosterone: A minor metabolite formed through the action of the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/δ5-4 isomerase (3β-HSD). Its role and significance in human physiology are not well understood.
2. 7α-Hydroxytestosterone: A minor metabolite formed through the action of the enzyme 7α-hydroxylase, which is primarily involved in bile acid synthesis.
3. 16α-Hydroxytestosterone: A metabolite that can be formed through the action of the enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD). This compound has been studied in relation to its potential role in breast cancer development and progression.
4. 2α,3α-Dihydroxytestosterone (Allotetrahydrocortisol): A metabolite formed through the action of the enzyme 5α-reductase and 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD). This compound is a minor metabolite in humans, but it plays a significant role in the metabolism of cortisol.

It's important to note that these hydroxylated forms of testosterone are typically present in much lower concentrations compared to testosterone itself and have distinct physiological roles.

'Apium graveolens' is the scientific name for a plant species that includes both cultivated celery and wild celery. Here is the medical/botanical definition:

Common Name: Celery (Cultivated)
Scientific Name: Apium graveolens L. var. dulce
Family: Apiaceae (Carrot family)

Description: A biennial or sometimes perennial herb, cultivated for its fleshy leafstalks, which are eaten raw or cooked. The leaves and seeds are also used as flavorings and in traditional medicine.

Cultivated celery has been selected for its enlarged leafstalks, while wild celery (Apium graveolens var. graveolens) is a marshland plant with aromatic, hollow stems, feathery leaves, and small, whitish flowers in umbels.

Native Range: Originally from the Mediterranean region, but now widely cultivated throughout the world.

Medicinal Uses: Celery seeds and extracts have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, including as a diuretic, an anti-inflammatory agent, and to treat kidney problems, arthritis, and gout. Some studies suggest that celery seeds may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and understand the risks.

Precautions: Celery can cause allergic reactions in some people, especially those with existing allergies to birch pollen or mugwort. Ingesting large amounts of celery seeds may have hormone-like effects due to a compound called apigenin, which could potentially interfere with certain medications and medical conditions. Pregnant women should avoid consuming excessive amounts of celery seeds, as they might stimulate the uterus and lead to premature labor or miscarriage.

Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 2 (ANT2) is a protein found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of cells. It is responsible for regulating the exchange of adenine nucleotides, specifically ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and ADP (adenosine diphosphate), between the mitochondrial matrix and the cytoplasm. This process plays a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism. ANT2 has also been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Mutations in the gene that encodes ANT2 have been associated with various diseases, including mitochondrial disorders and neurodegenerative conditions.

"Viola" is a term that has different meanings in various scientific and medical contexts. Here are some possible definitions related to medicine and biology:

1. Viola tricolor L. (Heartsease or Johnny-jump-up) - A species of flowering plant in the family Violaceae, which is used in herbal medicine for treating skin conditions, coughs, and respiratory issues.
2. Viola odorata L. (Sweet violet) - Another species of flowering plant in the family Violaceae, whose leaves and flowers are used to make teas, syrups, and other medicinal preparations for treating various ailments such as coughs, colds, and skin conditions.
3. In anatomy, "viola" is an archaic term that refers to the human uvula or the conical piece of soft tissue hanging down at the back of the throat.
4. Viola (musical instrument) - While not directly related to medicine, it's worth noting that "viola" is also a stringed musical instrument similar to a violin but slightly larger and with a deeper sound. In some contexts, such as music therapy, musical instruments can have therapeutic applications in healthcare settings.

It's essential to clarify the specific meaning of "Viola" in the given medical or scientific context since it can refer to different things depending on the field.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Lamiaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically it is a family of flowering plants that includes many familiar herbs such as mint, rosemary, sage, basil, and lavender. These plants are often used in medicine, cooking, and for ornamental purposes. The Lamiaceae family is characterized by their square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped flowers.

Anticarcinogenic agents are substances that prevent, inhibit or reduce the development of cancer. They can be natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the process of carcinogenesis at various stages, such as initiation, promotion, and progression. Anticarcinogenic agents may work by preventing DNA damage, promoting DNA repair, reducing inflammation, inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death), or modulating immune responses.

Examples of anticarcinogenic agents include chemopreventive agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and retinoids; phytochemicals found in fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based foods; and medications used to treat cancer, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapies.

It is important to note that while some anticarcinogenic agents have been shown to be effective in preventing or reducing the risk of certain types of cancer, they may also have potential side effects and risks. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using any anticarcinogenic agent for cancer prevention or treatment purposes.

'Cunninghamella' is a genus of fungi that belongs to the family of Mucoraceae. These saprophytic fungi are commonly found in soil, decaying vegetation, and animal feces. They are known for their ability to produce various enzymes and metabolites, which can be useful in biotechnological applications. However, some species of Cunninghamella can also cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals.

"Petroselinum" is the genus name for a group of plants that include several types of parsley. The most common variety is often used as a herb in cooking and is known as "Petroselinum crispum." It is native to the Mediterranean region and is now grown worldwide. Parsley has a bright, fresh flavor and is often used as a garnish or added to recipes for additional flavor. In addition to its use as a culinary herb, parsley has also been used in traditional medicine for its potential diuretic and digestive properties. However, it's important to note that the scientific evidence supporting these uses is limited, and more research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Impatiens" is not a medical term. It is the name of a genus of flowering plants, also known as touch-me-nots or busy Lizzies. If you have any questions about a medical condition or term, I would be happy to try and help with that instead.

Genistein is defined as a type of isoflavone, which is a plant-derived compound with estrogen-like properties. It is found in soybeans and other legumes. Genistein acts as a phytoestrogen, meaning it can bind to estrogen receptors and have both weak estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects in the body.

In addition to its estrogenic activity, genistein has been found to have various biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. It has been studied for its potential role in preventing or treating a variety of health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of genistein supplementation.

Glycosides are organic compounds that consist of a glycone (a sugar component) linked to a non-sugar component, known as an aglycone, via a glycosidic bond. They can be found in various plants, microorganisms, and some animals. Depending on the nature of the aglycone, glycosides can be classified into different types, such as anthraquinone glycosides, cardiac glycosides, and saponin glycosides.

These compounds have diverse biological activities and pharmacological effects. For instance:

* Cardiac glycosides, like digoxin and digitoxin, are used in the treatment of heart failure and certain cardiac arrhythmias due to their positive inotropic (contractility-enhancing) and negative chronotropic (heart rate-slowing) effects on the heart.
* Saponin glycosides have potent detergent properties and can cause hemolysis (rupture of red blood cells). They are used in various industries, including cosmetics and food processing, and have potential applications in drug delivery systems.
* Some glycosides, like amygdalin found in apricot kernels and bitter almonds, can release cyanide upon hydrolysis, making them potentially toxic.

It is important to note that while some glycosides have therapeutic uses, others can be harmful or even lethal if ingested or otherwise introduced into the body in large quantities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Melissa" is not a medical term. It is a proper name, which is commonly used as a female given name in the English-speaking world. In botany, "Melissa" refers to a genus of aromatic herbs in the mint family, also known as lemon balm. The essential oil from this plant has been used in traditional medicine for its calming and soothing properties. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try to help if I can provide reliable and accurate information.

Aerial parts of plants refer to the above-ground portions of a plant, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. These parts are often used in medicine, either in their entirety or as isolated extracts, to take advantage of their medicinal properties. The specific components of aerial parts that are used in medicine can vary depending on the plant species and the desired therapeutic effects. For example, the leaves of some plants may contain active compounds that have anti-inflammatory or analgesic properties, while the flowers of others may be rich in antioxidants or compounds with sedative effects. In general, aerial parts of plants are used in herbal medicine to treat a wide range of conditions, including respiratory, digestive, and nervous system disorders, as well as skin conditions and infections.

Farnesol is a chemical compound classified as a sesquiterpene alcohol. It is produced by various plants and insects, including certain types of roses and citrus fruits, and plays a role in their natural defense mechanisms. Farnesol has a variety of uses in the perfume industry due to its pleasant, floral scent.

In addition to its natural occurrence, farnesol is also synthetically produced for use in various applications, including as a fragrance ingredient and as an antimicrobial agent in cosmetics and personal care products. It has been shown to have antibacterial and antifungal properties, making it useful for preventing the growth of microorganisms in these products.

Farnesol is not typically used as a medication or therapeutic agent in humans, but it may have potential uses in the treatment of certain medical conditions due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. However, more research is needed to fully understand its effects and safety profile in these contexts.

Glucosides are chemical compounds that consist of a glycosidic bond between a sugar molecule (typically glucose) and another non-sugar molecule, which can be an alcohol, phenol, or steroid. They occur naturally in various plants and some microorganisms.

Glucosides are not medical terms per se, but they do have significance in pharmacology and toxicology because some of them may release the sugar portion upon hydrolysis, yielding aglycone, which can have physiological effects when ingested or absorbed into the body. Some glucosides are used as medications or dietary supplements due to their therapeutic properties, while others can be toxic if consumed in large quantities.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Flavonols are a type of flavonoid, which is a class of plant and fungal metabolites. They are characterized by the presence of a 3-hydroxyflavone skeleton. Flavonols are found in a variety of plants and are known for their antioxidant properties. Some common dietary sources of flavonols include onions, kale, broccoli, apples, tea, and red wine. They have been studied for their potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Flavonols are also known to have anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and antimicrobial properties.

Rutin is a flavonoid, a type of plant pigment that is found in various plants and foods including citrus fruits, buckwheat, and asparagus. It has antioxidant properties and is known to help strengthen blood vessels and reduce inflammation. In medical terms, rutin may be mentioned in the context of discussing treatments for conditions related to these effects, such as varicose veins or hemorrhoids. However, it's important to note that while rutin has potential health benefits, more research is needed to fully understand its effects and proper dosages.

Antimutagenic agents are substances that prevent or reduce the frequency of mutations in DNA, which can be caused by various factors such as radiation, chemicals, and free radicals. These agents work by preventing the formation of mutations or by repairing the damage already done to the DNA. They can be found naturally in foods, such as antioxidants, or they can be synthesized in a laboratory. Antimutagenic agents have potential use in cancer prevention and treatment, as well as in reducing the negative effects of environmental mutagens.

Casein Kinase II (CK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is widely expressed in eukaryotic cells and is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. It is a heterotetrameric enzyme, consisting of two catalytic subunits (alpha and alpha') and two regulatory subunits (beta).

CK2 phosphorylates a wide range of substrates, including transcription factors, signaling proteins, and other kinases. It is known to play roles in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, and protein stability, among others. CK2 activity is often found to be elevated in various types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily Member 25 (TNFRSF25), also known as Death Receptor 3 (DR3) or APO-3, is a type of cell surface receptor that belongs to the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily (TNFRSF). These receptors are involved in various biological processes such as immune regulation, inflammation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

TNFRSF25 is composed of an extracellular domain that binds to its ligand, Tumor Necrosis Factor-like protein 1A (TL1A), and an intracellular domain that mediates signal transduction. The binding of TL1A to TNFRSF25 can activate several signaling pathways, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which regulate cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

In the context of tumors, TNFRSF25 has been found to be expressed in various types of cancer cells, including colorectal, gastric, and breast cancer. The activation of TNFRSF25 by TL1A can induce apoptosis in some cancer cells, suggesting that it may have potential as a therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, the role of TNFRSF25 in tumor development and progression is complex and context-dependent, and further research is needed to fully understand its functions and clinical relevance.

Polysorbates are a type of nonionic surfactant (a compound that lowers the surface tension between two substances, such as oil and water) commonly used in pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. They are derived from sorbitol and reacted with ethylene oxide to create a polyoxyethylene structure. The most common types of polysorbates used in medicine are polysorbate 20, polysorbate 40, and polysorbate 60, which differ in the number of oxyethylene groups in their molecular structure.

Polysorbates are often added to pharmaceutical formulations as emulsifiers, solubilizers, or stabilizers. They help to improve the solubility and stability of drugs that are otherwise insoluble in water, allowing for better absorption and bioavailability. Polysorbates can also prevent the aggregation and precipitation of proteins in injectable formulations.

In addition to their use in pharmaceuticals, polysorbates are also used as emulsifiers in food products such as ice cream, salad dressings, and baked goods. They help to mix oil and water-based ingredients together and prevent them from separating. In cosmetics, polysorbates are used as surfactants, solubilizers, and stabilizers in a variety of personal care products.

It is important to note that some people may have allergic reactions to polysorbates, particularly those with sensitivities to sorbitol or other ingredients used in their production. Therefore, it is essential to carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of using products containing polysorbates in individuals who may be at risk for adverse reactions.

Keratinocytes are the predominant type of cells found in the epidermis, which is the outermost layer of the skin. These cells are responsible for producing keratin, a tough protein that provides structural support and protection to the skin. Keratinocytes undergo constant turnover, with new cells produced in the basal layer of the epidermis and older cells moving upward and eventually becoming flattened and filled with keratin as they reach the surface of the skin, where they are then shed. They also play a role in the immune response and can release cytokines and other signaling molecules to help protect the body from infection and injury.

Methylcellulose is a semisynthetic, inert, viscous, and tasteless white powder that is soluble in cold water but not in hot water. It is derived from cellulose through the process of methylation. In medical contexts, it is commonly used as a bulk-forming laxative to treat constipation, as well as a lubricant in ophthalmic solutions and a suspending agent in pharmaceuticals.

When mixed with water, methylcellulose forms a gel-like substance that can increase stool volume and promote bowel movements. It is generally considered safe for most individuals, but like any medication or supplement, it should be used under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

I am not a medical expert, but I can provide some information that may be helpful. "Picrates" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. Instead, it is a term used in chemistry to refer to salts of picric acid (2,4,6-trinitrophenol), which was once used as a yellow dye and explosive.

Picric acid has been used historically in some medical applications, such as a component in certain topical antiseptics and in histological staining procedures. However, its use in modern medicine is quite limited due to its high sensitivity to impact, heat, and friction, which makes it potentially dangerous to handle.

Therefore, it's important to note that "picrates" is not a medical term per se but rather a chemical one, and any medical application of picric acid or its salts would be highly specialized and unlikely to be encountered in most healthcare settings.

"Hairless mice" is a term used to describe strains of laboratory mice that lack a functional fur coat. This condition is also known as "nude mice." The hairlessness in these mice is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the absence or underdevelopment of hair follicles and a weakened immune system.

Hairless mice are often used in scientific research because their impaired immune systems make them more susceptible to certain diseases, allowing researchers to study the progression and treatment of those conditions in a controlled environment. Additionally, their lack of fur makes it easier to observe and monitor skin conditions and wounds. These mice are also used as models for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS, and autoimmune disorders.

Drug synergism is a pharmacological concept that refers to the interaction between two or more drugs, where the combined effect of the drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects. This means that when these drugs are administered together, they produce an enhanced therapeutic response compared to when they are given separately.

Drug synergism can occur through various mechanisms, such as:

1. Pharmacodynamic synergism - When two or more drugs interact with the same target site in the body and enhance each other's effects.
2. Pharmacokinetic synergism - When one drug affects the metabolism, absorption, distribution, or excretion of another drug, leading to an increased concentration of the second drug in the body and enhanced therapeutic effect.
3. Physiochemical synergism - When two drugs interact physically, such as when one drug enhances the solubility or permeability of another drug, leading to improved absorption and bioavailability.

It is important to note that while drug synergism can result in enhanced therapeutic effects, it can also increase the risk of adverse reactions and toxicity. Therefore, healthcare providers must carefully consider the potential benefits and risks when prescribing combinations of drugs with known or potential synergistic effects.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

Biotransformation is the metabolic modification of a chemical compound, typically a xenobiotic (a foreign chemical substance found within an living organism), by a biological system. This process often involves enzymatic conversion of the parent compound to one or more metabolites, which may be more or less active, toxic, or mutagenic than the original substance.

In the context of pharmacology and toxicology, biotransformation is an important aspect of drug metabolism and elimination from the body. The liver is the primary site of biotransformation, but other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract can also play a role.

Biotransformation can occur in two phases: phase I reactions involve functionalization of the parent compound through oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis, while phase II reactions involve conjugation of the metabolite with endogenous molecules such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetate to increase its water solubility and facilitate excretion.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Polyphenols are a type of phytochemical, which are naturally occurring compounds found in plant-based foods. They contain multiple phenol units and can be classified into several subgroups, including flavonoids, stilbenes, tannins, and lignans. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immune-modulating properties. They are found in a wide variety of foods such as fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, chocolate, and cereals.

Apigenin is a flavonoid, which is a type of plant pigment that is responsible for the color of many fruits and vegetables. It is found in various plants such as chamomile, parsley, celery, and citrus fruits. Apigenin has been studied for its potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective effects. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and determine the safe and effective dosage for human use.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Prostatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the prostate gland, which can be benign or malignant. The term "neoplasm" simply means new or abnormal tissue growth. When it comes to the prostate, neoplasms are often referred to as tumors.

Benign prostatic neoplasms, such as prostate adenomas, are non-cancerous overgrowths of prostate tissue. They usually grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. While they can cause uncomfortable symptoms like difficulty urinating, they are generally not life-threatening.

Malignant prostatic neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous growths. The most common type of prostate cancer is adenocarcinoma, which arises from the glandular cells in the prostate. Prostate cancer often grows slowly and may not cause any symptoms for many years. However, some types of prostate cancer can be aggressive and spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the bones or lymph nodes.

It's important to note that while prostate neoplasms can be concerning, early detection and treatment can significantly improve outcomes for many men. Regular check-ups with a healthcare provider are key to monitoring prostate health and catching any potential issues early on.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

"Nude mice" is a term used in the field of laboratory research to describe a strain of mice that have been genetically engineered to lack a functional immune system. Specifically, nude mice lack a thymus gland and have a mutation in the FOXN1 gene, which results in a failure to develop a mature T-cell population. This means that they are unable to mount an effective immune response against foreign substances or organisms.

The name "nude" refers to the fact that these mice also have a lack of functional hair follicles, resulting in a hairless or partially hairless phenotype. This feature is actually a secondary consequence of the same genetic mutation that causes their immune deficiency.

Nude mice are commonly used in research because their weakened immune system makes them an ideal host for transplanted tumors, tissues, and cells from other species, including humans. This allows researchers to study the behavior of these foreign substances in a living organism without the complication of an immune response. However, it's important to note that because nude mice lack a functional immune system, they must be kept in sterile conditions and are more susceptible to infection than normal mice.

Inhibitory Concentration 50 (IC50) is a measure used in pharmacology, toxicology, and virology to describe the potency of a drug or chemical compound. It refers to the concentration needed to reduce the biological or biochemical activity of a given substance by half. Specifically, it is most commonly used in reference to the inhibition of an enzyme or receptor.

In the context of infectious diseases, IC50 values are often used to compare the effectiveness of antiviral drugs against a particular virus. A lower IC50 value indicates that less of the drug is needed to achieve the desired effect, suggesting greater potency and potentially fewer side effects. Conversely, a higher IC50 value suggests that more of the drug is required to achieve the same effect, indicating lower potency.

It's important to note that IC50 values can vary depending on the specific assay or experimental conditions used, so they should be interpreted with caution and in conjunction with other measures of drug efficacy.

Antineoplastic agents, phytogenic, also known as plant-derived anticancer drugs, are medications that are derived from plants and used to treat cancer. These agents have natural origins and work by interfering with the growth and multiplication of cancer cells, helping to slow or stop the spread of the disease. Some examples of antineoplastic agents, phytogenic include paclitaxel (Taxol), vincristine, vinblastine, and etoposide. These drugs are often used in combination with other treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and other medications to provide a comprehensive approach to cancer care.

Cinnamates are organic compounds that are derived from cinnamic acid. They contain a carbon ring with a double bond and a carboxylic acid group, making them aromatic acids. Cinnamates are widely used in the perfume industry due to their pleasant odor, and they also have various applications in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

In a medical context, cinnamates may be used as topical medications for the treatment of skin conditions such as fungal infections or inflammation. For example, cinnamate esters such as cinoxacin and ciclopirox are commonly used as antifungal agents in creams, lotions, and shampoos. These compounds work by disrupting the cell membranes of fungi, leading to their death.

Cinnamates may also have potential therapeutic benefits for other medical conditions. For instance, some studies suggest that cinnamate derivatives may have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective properties, making them promising candidates for the development of new drugs to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and determine their safety and efficacy in humans.

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever. COX-2 is primarily expressed in response to stimuli such as cytokines and growth factors, and its expression is associated with the development of inflammation.

COX-2 inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that selectively block the activity of COX-2, reducing the production of prostaglandins and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects. These medications are often used to treat pain and inflammation associated with conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, and headaches.

It's important to note that while COX-2 inhibitors can be effective in managing pain and inflammation, they may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, particularly when used at high doses or for extended periods. Therefore, it's essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

Antioxidants are substances that can prevent or slow damage to cells caused by free radicals, which are unstable molecules that the body produces as a reaction to environmental and other pressures. Antioxidants are able to neutralize free radicals by donating an electron to them, thus stabilizing them and preventing them from causing further damage to the cells.

Antioxidants can be found in a variety of foods, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains. Some common antioxidants include vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and selenium. Antioxidants are also available as dietary supplements.

In addition to their role in protecting cells from damage, antioxidants have been studied for their potential to prevent or treat a number of health conditions, including cancer, heart disease, and age-related macular degeneration. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of using antioxidant supplements.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Hep G2 cells are a type of human liver cancer cell line that were isolated from a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a patient with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. These cells have the ability to grow and divide indefinitely in culture, making them useful for research purposes. Hep G2 cells express many of the same markers and functions as normal human hepatocytes, including the ability to take up and process lipids and produce bile. They are often used in studies related to hepatitis viruses, liver metabolism, drug toxicity, and cancer biology. It is important to note that Hep G2 cells are tumorigenic and should be handled with care in a laboratory setting.

Phenols, also known as phenolic acids or phenol derivatives, are a class of chemical compounds consisting of a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to an aromatic hydrocarbon ring. In the context of medicine and biology, phenols are often referred to as a type of antioxidant that can be found in various foods and plants.

Phenols have the ability to neutralize free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Some common examples of phenolic compounds include gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and ellagic acid, among many others.

Phenols can also have various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and analgesic effects. However, some phenolic compounds can also be toxic or irritating to the body in high concentrations, so their use as therapeutic agents must be carefully monitored and controlled.

Drug antagonism is a type of interaction between two or more drugs, where one drug (known as the antagonist) reduces or blocks the effects of another drug (known as the agonist). This can occur through various mechanisms, such as binding to the same receptor site as the agonist and preventing it from activating the receptor, or by increasing the metabolism or excretion of the agonist.

Drug antagonism is often used in medical treatment to counteract the negative effects of certain drugs. For example, naloxone is an opioid antagonist that can be used to reverse the respiratory depression caused by opioid overdose. Similarly, flumazenil is a benzodiazepine antagonist that can be used to reverse the sedative effects of benzodiazepines in cases of overdose or adverse reactions.

However, drug antagonism can also lead to unintended consequences, such as when one medication reduces the effectiveness of another medication that a patient is taking for a different condition. Therefore, it is important for healthcare providers to be aware of potential drug interactions and to carefully monitor their patients' responses to medications.

Transcription Factor RelA, also known as NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) p65, is a protein complex that plays a crucial role in regulating the immune response to infection and inflammation, as well as cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation.

RelA is one of the five subunits that make up the NF-kB protein complex, and it is responsible for the transcriptional activation of target genes. In response to various stimuli such as cytokines, bacterial or viral antigens, and stress signals, RelA can be activated by phosphorylation and then translocate into the nucleus where it binds to specific DNA sequences called kB sites in the promoter regions of target genes. This binding leads to the recruitment of coactivators and the initiation of transcription.

RelA has been implicated in a wide range of biological processes, including inflammation, immunity, cell growth, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of NF-kB signaling and RelA activity has been associated with various diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases.

'Citrus' is a genus of flowering plants in the rue family, Rutaceae. It includes several species of shrubs and trees that produce fruits known as citrus fruits. Some common examples of citrus fruits are oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and pomelos. These fruits are popular for their juicy pulp and fragrant zest, which are used in a wide variety of culinary applications around the world.

Citrus fruits are also known for their high vitamin C content and other health benefits. They contain various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids and carotenoids, which have antioxidant properties and may help protect against chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, citrus fruits are a good source of dietary fiber, which can aid in digestion and help regulate blood sugar levels.

In medical terms, citrus fruits may be recommended as part of a healthy diet to help prevent nutrient deficiencies and promote overall health. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergies or sensitivities to citrus fruits, which can cause symptoms like mouth irritation, hives, or anaphylaxis in severe cases. Additionally, citrus fruits can interact with certain medications, so it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare provider before making any significant changes to your diet.

Glucosyltransferases (GTs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a glucose molecule from an activated donor to an acceptor molecule, resulting in the formation of a glycosidic bond. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of complex carbohydrates, cell wall synthesis, and protein glycosylation. In some cases, GTs can also contribute to bacterial pathogenesis by facilitating the attachment of bacteria to host tissues through the formation of glucans, which are polymers of glucose molecules.

GTs can be classified into several families based on their sequence similarities and catalytic mechanisms. The donor substrates for GTs are typically activated sugars such as UDP-glucose, TDP-glucose, or GDP-glucose, which serve as the source of the glucose moiety that is transferred to the acceptor molecule. The acceptor can be a wide range of molecules, including other sugars, proteins, lipids, or small molecules.

In the context of human health and disease, GTs have been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as cancer, inflammation, and microbial infections. For example, some GTs can modify proteins on the surface of cancer cells, leading to increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Additionally, GTs can contribute to bacterial resistance to antibiotics by modifying the structure of bacterial cell walls or by producing biofilms that protect bacteria from host immune responses and antimicrobial agents.

Overall, Glucosyltransferases are essential enzymes involved in various biological processes, and their dysregulation has been associated with several human diseases. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of GTs is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these enzymes and treat related pathological conditions.

Protein-kinase B, also known as AKT, is a group of intracellular proteins that play a crucial role in various cellular processes such as glucose metabolism, apoptosis, cell proliferation, transcription, and cell migration. The AKT family includes three isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, which are encoded by the genes PKBalpha, PKBbeta, and PKBgamma, respectively.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT refer to the normal, non-mutated forms of these proteins that are involved in the regulation of cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, when these genes are mutated or overexpressed, they can become oncogenes, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer development.

Activation of c-AKT occurs through a signaling cascade that begins with the binding of extracellular ligands such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to their respective receptors on the cell surface. This triggers a series of phosphorylation events that ultimately lead to the activation of c-AKT, which then phosphorylates downstream targets involved in various cellular processes.

In summary, proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT are normal intracellular proteins that play essential roles in regulating cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, their dysregulation can contribute to cancer development and progression.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are highly reactive molecules containing oxygen, including peroxides, superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen. They are naturally produced as byproducts of normal cellular metabolism in the mitochondria, and can also be generated by external sources such as ionizing radiation, tobacco smoke, and air pollutants. At low or moderate concentrations, ROS play important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis, but at high concentrations, they can cause significant damage to cell structures, including lipids, proteins, and DNA, leading to oxidative stress and potential cell death.

Chlorhexidine is an antimicrobial agent used for its broad-spectrum germicidal properties. It is effective against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. It is commonly used as a surgical scrub, hand sanitizer, and healthcare disinfectant. Chlorhexidine is available in various forms, including solutions, gels, and sprays. It works by disrupting the microbial cell membrane, leading to the death of the organism. It is also used in mouthwashes and skin cleansers for its antimicrobial effects.

Stilbenes are a type of chemical compound that consists of a 1,2-diphenylethylene backbone. They are phenolic compounds and can be found in various plants, where they play a role in the defense against pathogens and stress conditions. Some stilbenes have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. One well-known example of a stilbene is resveratrol, which is found in the skin of grapes and in red wine.

It's important to note that while some stilbenes have been shown to have potential health benefits in laboratory studies, more research is needed to determine their safety and effectiveness in humans. It's always a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Caco-2 cells are a type of human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line that is commonly used in scientific research, particularly in the field of drug development and toxicology. These cells are capable of forming a monolayer with tight junctions, which makes them an excellent model for studying intestinal absorption, transport, and metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotic compounds.

Caco-2 cells express many of the transporters and enzymes that are found in the human small intestine, making them a valuable tool for predicting drug absorption and bioavailability in humans. They are also used to study the mechanisms of drug transport across the intestinal epithelium, including passive diffusion and active transport by various transporters.

In addition to their use in drug development, Caco-2 cells are also used to study the toxicological effects of various compounds on human intestinal cells. They can be used to investigate the mechanisms of toxicity, as well as to evaluate the potential for drugs and other compounds to induce intestinal damage or inflammation.

Overall, Caco-2 cells are a widely used and valuable tool in both drug development and toxicology research, providing important insights into the absorption, transport, metabolism, and toxicity of various compounds in the human body.

TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors are a group of cell surface proteins that belong to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily. There are four known TRAIL receptors, referred to as TRAIL-R1, TRAIL-R2, TRAIL-R3, and TRAIL-R4.

TRAIL receptors play a crucial role in the regulation of programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. TRAIL binding to its receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 can trigger the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to apoptotic cell death. This is an important mechanism for eliminating damaged or abnormal cells, including cancer cells.

On the other hand, TRAIL receptors TRAIL-R3 and TRAIL-R4 do not transmit apoptotic signals because they lack functional death domains. Instead, they act as decoy receptors that can bind to TRAIL and prevent it from interacting with TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, thereby inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

Abnormalities in the regulation of TRAIL receptor signaling have been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, targeting TRAIL receptors has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these diseases.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Anti-infective agents, local, are medications that are applied directly to a specific area of the body to prevent or treat infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. These agents include topical antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, and anti-parasitic drugs. They work by killing or inhibiting the growth of the infectious organisms, thereby preventing their spread and reducing the risk of infection. Local anti-infective agents are often used to treat skin infections, eye infections, and other localized infections, and can be administered as creams, ointments, gels, solutions, or drops.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

IGF-1R (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways related to cell growth, differentiation, and survival. IGF-1R is primarily activated by its ligands, IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1) and IGF-2 (Insulin-like Growth Factor 2). Upon binding of the ligand, IGF-1R undergoes autophosphorylation and initiates a cascade of intracellular signaling events, primarily through the PI3K/AKT and RAS/MAPK pathways. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate various cellular processes such as glucose metabolism, protein synthesis, DNA replication, and cell cycle progression. Dysregulation of IGF-1R has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and growth disorders.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Dermatitis is a general term that describes inflammation of the skin. It is often characterized by redness, swelling, itching, and tenderness. There are many different types of dermatitis, including atopic dermatitis (eczema), contact dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and nummular dermatitis.

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin condition that often affects people with a family history of allergies, such as asthma or hay fever. It typically causes dry, scaly patches on the skin that can be extremely itchy.

Contact dermatitis occurs when the skin comes into contact with an irritant or allergen, such as poison ivy or certain chemicals. This type of dermatitis can cause redness, swelling, and blistering.

Seborrheic dermatitis is a common condition that causes a red, itchy rash, often on the scalp, face, or other areas of the body where oil glands are located. It is thought to be related to an overproduction of oil by the skin's sebaceous glands.

Nummular dermatitis is a type of eczema that causes round, coin-shaped patches of dry, scaly skin. It is more common in older adults and often occurs during the winter months.

Treatment for dermatitis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, over-the-counter creams or lotions may be sufficient to relieve symptoms. Prescription medications, such as corticosteroids or immunosuppressants, may be necessary in more severe cases. Avoiding triggers and irritants can also help prevent flare-ups of dermatitis.

Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet (UV-Vis) is a type of spectrophotometry that measures how much ultraviolet (UV) and visible light is absorbed or transmitted by a sample. It uses a device called a spectrophotometer to measure the intensity of light at different wavelengths as it passes through a sample. The resulting data can be used to determine the concentration of specific components within the sample, identify unknown substances, or evaluate the physical and chemical properties of materials.

UV-Vis spectroscopy is widely used in various fields such as chemistry, biology, pharmaceuticals, and environmental science. It can detect a wide range of substances including organic compounds, metal ions, proteins, nucleic acids, and dyes. The technique is non-destructive, meaning that the sample remains unchanged after the measurement.

In UV-Vis spectroscopy, the sample is placed in a cuvette or other container, and light from a source is directed through it. The light then passes through a monochromator, which separates it into its component wavelengths. The monochromatic light is then directed through the sample, and the intensity of the transmitted or absorbed light is measured by a detector.

The resulting absorption spectrum can provide information about the concentration and identity of the components in the sample. For example, if a compound has a known absorption maximum at a specific wavelength, its concentration can be determined by measuring the absorbance at that wavelength and comparing it to a standard curve.

Overall, UV-Vis spectrophotometry is a versatile and powerful analytical technique for quantitative and qualitative analysis of various samples in different fields.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-bcl-2 are a group of proteins that play a role in regulating cell death (apoptosis). The c-bcl-2 gene produces one of these proteins, which helps to prevent cells from undergoing apoptosis. This protein is located on the membrane of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and it can inhibit the release of cytochrome c, a key player in the activation of caspases, which are enzymes that trigger apoptosis.

In normal cells, the regulation of c-bcl-2 protein helps to maintain a balance between cell proliferation and cell death, ensuring proper tissue homeostasis. However, when the c-bcl-2 gene is mutated or its expression is dysregulated, it can contribute to cancer development by allowing cancer cells to survive and proliferate. High levels of c-bcl-2 protein have been found in many types of cancer, including leukemia, lymphoma, and carcinomas, and are often associated with a poor prognosis.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

The G2 phase, also known as the "gap 2 phase," is a stage in the cell cycle that occurs after DNA replication (S phase) and before cell division (mitosis). During this phase, the cell prepares for mitosis by completing the synthesis of proteins and organelles needed for chromosome separation. The cell also checks for any errors or damage to the DNA before entering mitosis. This phase is a critical point in the cell cycle where proper regulation ensures the faithful transmission of genetic information from one generation of cells to the next. If significant DNA damage is detected during G2, the cell may undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) instead of dividing.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Streptococcus mutans is a gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, beta-hemolytic species of bacteria that's part of the normal microbiota of the oral cavity in humans. It's one of the primary etiological agents associated with dental caries, or tooth decay, due to its ability to produce large amounts of acid as a byproduct of sugar metabolism, which can lead to demineralization of tooth enamel and dentin. The bacterium can also adhere to tooth surfaces and form biofilms, further contributing to the development of dental caries.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a type II transmembrane protein and a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family. It binds to death receptors TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5), leading to the activation of extrinsic apoptosis pathway in sensitive cells. This protein is involved in immune surveillance against tumor cells, as it can selectively induce apoptosis in malignant or virus-infected cells while sparing normal cells. TRAIL also plays a role in inflammation and innate immunity.

I-kappa B kinase (IKK) is a protein complex that plays a crucial role in the activation of NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, cell survival, and proliferation.

The IKK complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, IKKα and IKKβ, and a regulatory subunit, IKKγ (also known as NEMO). Upon stimulation by various signals such as cytokines, pathogens, or stress, the IKK complex becomes activated and phosphorylates I-kappa B (IkB), an inhibitor protein that keeps NF-kB in an inactive state in the cytoplasm.

Once IkB is phosphorylated by the IKK complex, it undergoes ubiquitination and degradation, leading to the release and nuclear translocation of NF-kB, where it can bind to specific DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. Dysregulation of IKK activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of intracellular non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play a crucial role in the signaling of cytokines and growth factors. They are named after the Roman god Janus, who is depicted with two faces, because JAKs have two similar domains, which contain catalytic activity.

JAKs mediate signal transduction by phosphorylating and activating signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, leading to the regulation of gene expression. Dysregulation of JAK-STAT signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and inflammatory conditions.

There are four members of the JAK family: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2). Each JAK isoform has a distinct pattern of expression and functions in specific cell types and signaling pathways. For example, JAK3 is primarily expressed in hematopoietic cells and plays a critical role in immune function, while JAK2 is widely expressed and involved in the signaling of various cytokines and growth factors.

Inhibition of JAKs has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for several diseases. Several JAK inhibitors have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and myelofibrosis, among other conditions.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Isoflavones are a type of plant-derived compounds called phytoestrogens, which have a chemical structure similar to human estrogen. They are found in various plants, particularly in soybeans and soy products. Isoflavones can act as weak estrogens or anti-estrogens in the body, depending on the levels of natural hormones present. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits, including reducing menopausal symptoms, improving cardiovascular health, and preventing certain types of cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand their effects and safety.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Chinese herbal drugs, also known as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), refer to a system of medicine that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. It is based on the belief that the body's vital energy, called Qi, must be balanced and flowing freely for good health. TCM uses various techniques such as herbal therapy, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and exercise to restore balance and promote healing.

Chinese herbal drugs are usually prescribed in the form of teas, powders, pills, or tinctures and may contain one or a combination of herbs. The herbs used in Chinese medicine are typically derived from plants, minerals, or animal products. Some commonly used Chinese herbs include ginseng, astragalus, licorice root, and cinnamon bark.

It is important to note that the use of Chinese herbal drugs should be under the guidance of a qualified practitioner, as some herbs can interact with prescription medications or have side effects. Additionally, the quality and safety of Chinese herbal products can vary widely depending on the source and manufacturing process.

ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) is a strain of albino Swiss mice that are widely used in scientific research. They are an outbred strain, which means that they have been bred to maintain maximum genetic heterogeneity. However, it is also possible to find inbred strains of ICR mice, which are genetically identical individuals produced by many generations of brother-sister mating.

Inbred ICR mice are a specific type of ICR mouse that has been inbred for at least 20 generations. This means that they have a high degree of genetic uniformity and are essentially genetically identical to one another. Inbred strains of mice are often used in research because their genetic consistency makes them more reliable models for studying biological phenomena and testing new therapies or treatments.

It is important to note that while inbred ICR mice may be useful for certain types of research, they do not necessarily represent the genetic diversity found in human populations. Therefore, it is important to consider the limitations of using any animal model when interpreting research findings and applying them to human health.

Tumor suppressor protein p53, also known as p53 or tumor protein p53, is a nuclear phosphoprotein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer development and maintaining genomic stability. It does so by regulating the cell cycle and acting as a transcription factor for various genes involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death), DNA repair, and cell senescence (permanent cell growth arrest).

In response to cellular stress, such as DNA damage or oncogene activation, p53 becomes activated and accumulates in the nucleus. Activated p53 can then bind to specific DNA sequences and promote the transcription of target genes that help prevent the proliferation of potentially cancerous cells. These targets include genes involved in cell cycle arrest (e.g., CDKN1A/p21), apoptosis (e.g., BAX, PUMA), and DNA repair (e.g., GADD45).

Mutations in the TP53 gene, which encodes p53, are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. These mutations often lead to a loss or reduction of p53's tumor suppressive functions, allowing cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably and evade apoptosis. As a result, p53 has been referred to as "the guardian of the genome" due to its essential role in preventing tumorigenesis.

Caspases are a family of protease enzymes that play essential roles in programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. These enzymes are produced as inactive precursors and are activated when cells receive signals to undergo apoptosis. Once activated, caspases cleave specific protein substrates, leading to the characteristic morphological changes and DNA fragmentation associated with apoptotic cell death. Caspases also play roles in other cellular processes, including inflammation and differentiation. There are two types of caspases: initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8, -9, and -10) and effector caspases (caspase-3, -6, and -7). Initiator caspases are activated in response to various apoptotic signals and then activate the effector caspases, which carry out the proteolytic cleavage of cellular proteins. Dysregulation of caspase activity has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic injury, and cancer.

9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) is a synthetic, aromatic hydrocarbon that is commonly used in research as a carcinogenic compound. It is a potent tumor initiator and has been widely used to study chemical carcinogenesis in laboratory animals.

DMBA is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with two benzene rings fused together, and two methyl groups attached at the 9 and 10 positions. This structure allows DMBA to intercalate into DNA, causing mutations that can lead to cancer.

Exposure to DMBA has been shown to cause a variety of tumors in different organs, depending on the route of administration and dose. In animal models, DMBA is often applied to the skin or administered orally to induce tumors in the mammary glands, lungs, or digestive tract.

It's important to note that DMBA is not a natural compound found in the environment and is used primarily for research purposes only. It should be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions due to its carcinogenic properties.

Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) is a microscopy technique used to study the mobility and diffusion of molecules in biological samples, particularly within living cells. This technique involves the use of an intense laser beam to photobleach (or permanently disable) the fluorescence of a specific region within a sample that has been labeled with a fluorescent probe or dye. The recovery of fluorescence in this bleached area is then monitored over time, as unbleached molecules from adjacent regions move into the bleached area through diffusion or active transport.

The rate and extent of fluorescence recovery can provide valuable information about the mobility, binding interactions, and dynamics of the labeled molecules within their native environment. FRAP is widely used in cell biology research to investigate various processes such as protein-protein interactions, membrane fluidity, organelle dynamics, and gene expression regulation.

Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 3 (NCOA3), also known as AIB1 (Amplified in Breast Cancer 1), is a protein that functions as a coactivator for several nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate gene expression in response to various signals, such as hormones and vitamins.

NCOA3/AIB1 contains several functional domains, including an N-terminal basic helix-loop-helix Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) domain, two nuclear receptor interaction motifs, and a C-terminal activation domain. These domains enable NCOA3/AIB1 to interact with various nuclear receptors, recruit additional coactivators, and stimulate transcription of target genes.

NCOA3/AIB1 has been implicated in the development and progression of several types of cancer, including breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers. Amplification or overexpression of NCOA3/AIB1 has been observed in these cancers, leading to increased cell growth, survival, and metastasis. Additionally, NCOA3/AIB1 has been linked to endocrine resistance in breast cancer, making it a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Chromones are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzopyran ring, which is a structural component made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyran ring. They can be found in various plants and have been used in medicine for their anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitussive (cough suppressant) properties. Some chromones are also known to have estrogenic activity and have been studied for their potential use in hormone replacement therapy. Additionally, some synthetic chromones have been developed as drugs for the treatment of asthma and other respiratory disorders.

Glucuronosyltransferase (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) is an enzyme belonging to the family of glycosyltransferases. It plays a crucial role in the process of biotransformation and detoxification of various endogenous and exogenous substances, including drugs, hormones, and environmental toxins, in the liver and other organs.

The enzyme functions by transferring a glucuronic acid moiety from a donor molecule, uridine diphosphate glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcUA), to an acceptor molecule, which can be a variety of hydrophobic compounds. This reaction results in the formation of a more water-soluble glucuronide conjugate, facilitating the excretion of the substrate through urine or bile.

There are multiple isoforms of glucuronosyltransferase, classified into two main families: UGT1 and UGT2. These isoforms exhibit different substrate specificities and tissue distributions, allowing for a wide range of compounds to be metabolized through the glucuronidation pathway.

In summary, Glucuronosyltransferase is an essential enzyme in the detoxification process, facilitating the elimination of various substances from the body by conjugating them with a glucuronic acid moiety.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Cyclin B is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, specifically the transition from G2 phase to mitosis (M phase) in eukaryotic cells. Cyclin B binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), forming the complex known as M-phase promoting factor (MPF). This complex triggers the events leading to cell division, such as chromosome condensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, and spindle formation. The levels of cyclin B increase during the G2 phase and are degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) at the onset of anaphase, allowing the cell cycle to progress into the next phase.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a type of short, double-stranded RNA molecule that plays a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNAi pathway is a natural cellular process that regulates gene expression by targeting and destroying specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, thereby preventing the translation of those mRNAs into proteins.

SiRNAs are typically 20-25 base pairs in length and are generated from longer double-stranded RNA precursors called hairpin RNAs or dsRNAs by an enzyme called Dicer. Once generated, siRNAs associate with a protein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which uses one strand of the siRNA (the guide strand) to recognize and bind to complementary sequences in the target mRNA. The RISC then cleaves the target mRNA, leading to its degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis.

SiRNAs have emerged as a powerful tool for studying gene function and have shown promise as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and genetic disorders. However, their use as therapeutics is still in the early stages of development, and there are challenges associated with delivering siRNAs to specific cells and tissues in the body.

I apologize for any confusion, but "plants" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "plants" refers to a large and diverse group of organisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, which is the process of converting sunlight into chemical energy. Plants are typically characterized by having cells with cell walls containing cellulose, chloroplasts containing the pigment chlorophyll, and the ability to synthesize their own food through photosynthesis.

In a medical or biological context, you might be thinking of "plant-based" or "phytomedicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as a form of medicine or treatment. Phytomedicines have been used for thousands of years in many traditional systems of medicine, and some plant-derived compounds have been found to have therapeutic benefits in modern medicine as well. However, "plants" itself does not have a medical definition.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Estrogen receptor modulators (ERMs) are a class of medications that act on the estrogen receptors in the body. They can have mixed estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects, depending on the target tissue. In some tissues, ERMs behave as estrogen agonists, activating the estrogen receptor and mimicking the effects of estrogen. In other tissues, they act as estrogen antagonists, blocking the effects of estrogen.

ERMs are often used in hormone replacement therapy and to treat certain types of breast cancer. Tamoxifen is a well-known example of an ERM that is commonly used to treat estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. It works by blocking the effects of estrogen on cancer cells, thereby slowing or stopping the growth of the tumor. Other examples of ERMs include raloxifene and toremifene.

While ERMs can be effective in treating certain conditions, they can also have side effects, including an increased risk of blood clots, hot flashes, and mood changes. It is important for individuals taking ERMs to be monitored by a healthcare provider to manage any potential side effects and ensure that the medication is working effectively.

Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the body's response to low oxygen levels, also known as hypoxia. HIF-1 is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits: an alpha subunit (HIF-1α) and a beta subunit (HIF-1β).

The alpha subunit, HIF-1α, is the regulatory subunit that is subject to oxygen-dependent degradation. Under normal oxygen conditions (normoxia), HIF-1α is constantly produced in the cell but is rapidly degraded by proteasomes due to hydroxylation of specific proline residues by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing proteins (PHDs). This hydroxylation reaction requires oxygen as a substrate, and under hypoxic conditions, the activity of PHDs is inhibited, leading to the stabilization and accumulation of HIF-1α.

Once stabilized, HIF-1α translocates to the nucleus, where it heterodimerizes with HIF-1β and binds to hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs) in the promoter regions of target genes. This binding results in the activation of gene transcription programs that promote cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels. These adaptive responses include increased erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, glucose metabolism, and pH regulation, among others.

Therefore, HIF-1α is a critical regulator of the body's response to hypoxia, and its dysregulation has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases (RSKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play a crucial role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. They are so named because they phosphorylate and regulate the function of the ribosomal protein S6, which is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit involved in protein synthesis.

RSKs are activated by various signals, including growth factors, hormones, and mitogens, through a cascade of phosphorylation events involving several upstream kinases such as MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Once activated, RSKs phosphorylate a wide range of downstream targets, including transcription factors, regulators of translation, and cytoskeletal proteins, thereby modulating their activities and functions.

There are four isoforms of RSKs in humans, namely RSK1, RSK2, RSK3, and RSK4, which share a common structural organization and functional domains, including an N-terminal kinase domain, a C-terminal kinase domain, and a linker region that contains several regulatory motifs. Dysregulation of RSKs has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and diabetes, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

Caspase-3 is a type of protease enzyme that plays a central role in the execution-phase of cell apoptosis, or programmed cell death. It's also known as CPP32 (CPP for ced-3 protease precursor) or apopain. Caspase-3 is produced as an inactive protein that is activated when cleaved by other caspases during the early stages of apoptosis. Once activated, it cleaves a variety of cellular proteins, including structural proteins, enzymes, and signal transduction proteins, leading to the characteristic morphological and biochemical changes associated with apoptotic cell death. Caspase-3 is often referred to as the "death protease" because of its crucial role in executing the cell death program.

Protein Kinase C-delta (PKC-δ) is a specific isoform of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. PKC-δ is involved in several cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. It is activated by second messengers like diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), and its activation leads to the phosphorylation of specific target proteins, thereby modulating their functions. Aberrant regulation of PKC-δ has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Preclinical drug evaluation refers to a series of laboratory tests and studies conducted to determine the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is tested in humans. These studies typically involve experiments on cells and animals to evaluate the pharmacological properties, toxicity, and potential interactions with other substances. The goal of preclinical evaluation is to establish a reasonable level of safety and understanding of how the drug works, which helps inform the design and conduct of subsequent clinical trials in humans. It's important to note that while preclinical studies provide valuable information, they may not always predict how a drug will behave in human subjects.

Thiocyanates are chemical compounds that contain the thiocyanate ion (SCN-), which consists of a sulfur atom, a carbon atom, and a nitrogen atom. The thiocyanate ion is formed by the removal of a hydrogen ion from thiocyanic acid (HSCN). Thiocyanates are used in various applications, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and industrial chemicals. In medicine, thiocyanates have been studied for their potential effects on the thyroid gland and their use as a treatment for cyanide poisoning. However, excessive exposure to thiocyanates can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, as well as potential impacts on thyroid function.

Cyclin D1 is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells divide and grow. Specifically, Cyclin D1 is involved in the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It does this by forming a complex with and acting as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, which phosphorylates and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). This allows the E2F transcription factors to be released and activate the transcription of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

Overexpression of Cyclin D1 has been implicated in the development of various types of cancer, as it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, Cyclin D1 is an important target for cancer therapy, and inhibitors of CDK4/6 have been developed to treat certain types of cancer that overexpress Cyclin D1.

Hepatocytes are the predominant type of cells in the liver, accounting for about 80% of its cytoplasmic mass. They play a key role in protein synthesis, protein storage, transformation of carbohydrates, synthesis of cholesterol, bile salts and phospholipids, detoxification, modification, and excretion of exogenous and endogenous substances, initiation of formation and secretion of bile, and enzyme production. Hepatocytes are essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Beta-defensins are a group of small, cationic host defense peptides that play an important role in the innate immune system. They have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against various pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Beta-defensins are produced by epithelial cells, phagocytes, and other cell types in response to infection or inflammation. They function by disrupting the membranes of microbes, leading to their death. Additionally, beta-defensins can also modulate the immune response by recruiting immune cells to the site of infection and regulating inflammation. Mutations in beta-defensin genes have been associated with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.

Amino acid chloromethyl ketones (AACMKs) are a class of chemical compounds that are widely used in research and industry. They are derivatives of amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins, with a chloromethyl ketone group (-CO-CH2Cl) attached to the side chain of the amino acid.

In the context of medical research, AACMKs are often used as irreversible inhibitors of enzymes, particularly those that contain active site serine or cysteine residues. The chloromethyl ketone group reacts with these residues to form a covalent bond, which permanently inactivates the enzyme. This makes AACMKs useful tools for studying the mechanisms of enzymes and for developing drugs that target specific enzymes.

However, it is important to note that AACMKs can also be highly reactive and toxic, and they must be handled with care in the laboratory. They have been shown to inhibit a wide range of enzymes, including some that are essential for normal cellular function, and prolonged exposure can lead to cell damage or death. Therefore, their use is typically restricted to controlled experimental settings.

Cell cycle checkpoints are control mechanisms that regulate the cell cycle and ensure the accurate and timely progression through different phases of the cell cycle. These checkpoints monitor specific cellular events, such as DNA replication and damage, chromosome separation, and proper attachment of the mitotic spindle to the chromosomes. If any of these events fail to occur properly or are delayed, the cell cycle checkpoints trigger a response that can halt the cell cycle until the problem is resolved. This helps to prevent cells with damaged or incomplete genomes from dividing and potentially becoming cancerous.

There are three main types of cell cycle checkpoints:

1. G1 Checkpoint: Also known as the restriction point, this checkpoint controls the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It monitors the availability of nutrients, growth factors, and the integrity of the genome before allowing the cell to proceed into DNA replication.
2. G2 Checkpoint: This checkpoint regulates the transition from the G2 phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. It checks for completion of DNA replication and absence of DNA damage before allowing the cell to enter mitosis.
3. Mitotic (M) Checkpoint: Also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint, this checkpoint ensures that all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle before anaphase begins. It prevents the separation of sister chromatids until all kinetochores are correctly attached and tension is established between them.

Cell cycle checkpoints play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability, preventing tumorigenesis, and ensuring proper cell division. Dysregulation of these checkpoints can lead to various diseases, including cancer.

Cytochromes c are a group of small heme proteins found in the mitochondria of cells, involved in the electron transport chain and play a crucial role in cellular respiration. They accept and donate electrons during the process of oxidative phosphorylation, which generates ATP, the main energy currency of the cell. Cytochromes c contain a heme group, an organic compound that includes iron, which facilitates the transfer of electrons. The "c" in cytochromes c refers to the type of heme group they contain (cyt c has heme c). They are highly conserved across species and have been widely used as a molecular marker for evolutionary studies.

SHC (Src homology 2 domain containing) signaling adaptor proteins are a family of intracellular signaling molecules that play a crucial role in the transduction of signals from various cell surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). These proteins contain several conserved domains, including Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domains, which enable them to bind to specific phosphorylated tyrosine residues on activated receptors or other signaling molecules.

Once bound to the activated receptor, SHC proteins recruit and interact with various downstream signaling proteins, such as growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) and son of sevenless (SOS), thereby initiating intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately regulate diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. There are three main isoforms of SHC proteins in humans: p66Shc, p52Shc, and p46Shc, which differ in their structural organization and functional properties.

Abnormal regulation of SHC signaling adaptor proteins has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying SHC-mediated signaling pathways may provide valuable insights into the development of novel therapeutic strategies for these disorders.

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, also known as CDKN1A or p21/WAF1/CIP1, is a protein that regulates the cell cycle. It inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that play crucial roles in controlling the progression of the cell cycle.

The binding of p21 to CDKs prevents the phosphorylation and activation of downstream targets, leading to cell cycle arrest. This protein is transcriptionally activated by tumor suppressor protein p53 in response to DNA damage or other stress signals, and it functions as an important mediator of p53-dependent growth arrest.

By inhibiting CDKs, p21 helps to ensure that cells do not proceed through the cell cycle until damaged DNA has been repaired, thereby preventing the propagation of potentially harmful mutations. Additionally, p21 has been implicated in other cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Dysregulation of p21 has been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP-3) is a protein that binds to and regulates the bioavailability and activity of Insulin-like Growth Factors (IGFs), specifically IGF-1 and IGF-2. It plays a crucial role in the growth, development, and homeostasis of various tissues and organs by modulating IGF signaling. IGFBP-3 is the most abundant IGF binding protein in circulation and has a longer half-life than IGFs, allowing it to act as a reservoir and transport protein for IGFs. Additionally, IGFBP-3 has been found to have IGF-independent functions, including roles in cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and tumor suppression.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. They phosphorylate the 3-hydroxyl group of the inositol ring in phosphatidylinositol and its derivatives, which results in the production of second messengers that regulate various cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival.

PI3Ks are divided into three classes based on their structure and substrate specificity. Class I PI3Ks are further subdivided into two categories: class IA and class IB. Class IA PI3Ks are heterodimers consisting of a catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, or p110δ) and a regulatory subunit (p85α, p85β, p55γ, or p50γ). They are primarily activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Class IB PI3Ks consist of a catalytic subunit (p110γ) and a regulatory subunit (p101 or p84/87). They are mainly activated by G protein-coupled receptors.

Dysregulation of PI3K signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, PI3Ks have emerged as important targets for drug development in these areas.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Morpholines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom in the ring. They are widely used as intermediates in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and dyes. If you have any questions about a medical issue or term, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

'NZB mice' is a term used to refer to an inbred strain of laboratory mice that are genetically identical to each other and have been used extensively in biomedical research. The 'NZB' designation stands for "New Zealand Black," which refers to the coat color of these mice.

NZB mice are known to spontaneously develop an autoimmune disease that is similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by an overactive immune system. This makes them a valuable model for studying the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of SLE, as well as for testing new therapies and treatments.

It's important to note that while NZB mice are an inbred strain, they may still exhibit some variability in their disease phenotype due to genetic modifiers or environmental influences. Therefore, researchers often use large cohorts of mice and standardized experimental conditions to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of their findings.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

HL-60 cells are a type of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. They are named after the hospital where they were first isolated, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and the 60th culture attempt to grow these cells.

HL-60 cells have the ability to differentiate into various types of blood cells, such as granulocytes, monocytes, and macrophages, when exposed to certain chemical compounds or under specific culturing conditions. This makes them a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms of cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

HL-60 cells are also often used in toxicity studies, drug discovery and development, and research on cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. They can be easily grown in the lab and have a stable genotype, making them ideal for use in standardized experiments and comparisons between different studies.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Heterologous transplantation is a type of transplantation where an organ or tissue is transferred from one species to another. This is in contrast to allogeneic transplantation, where the donor and recipient are of the same species, or autologous transplantation, where the donor and recipient are the same individual.

In heterologous transplantation, the immune systems of the donor and recipient are significantly different, which can lead to a strong immune response against the transplanted organ or tissue. This is known as a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), where the immune cells in the transplanted tissue attack the recipient's body.

Heterologous transplantation is not commonly performed in clinical medicine due to the high risk of rejection and GVHD. However, it may be used in research settings to study the biology of transplantation and to develop new therapies for transplant rejection.

Cyclin B1 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, specifically the transition from G2 phase to mitosis (M phase) in eukaryotic cells. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), also known as CDC2. During the G2 phase, Cyclin B1 levels accumulate and upon reaching a certain threshold, it binds to CDK1 to form the maturation promoting factor (MPF). The activation of MPF triggers the onset of mitosis by promoting nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, and other events required for cell division. After the completion of mitosis, Cyclin B1 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, allowing the cell cycle to progress back into G1 phase.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are large molecules found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of a hydrophilic polysaccharide called the O-antigen, a core oligosaccharide, and a lipid portion known as Lipid A. The Lipid A component is responsible for the endotoxic activity of LPS, which can trigger a powerful immune response in animals, including humans. This response can lead to symptoms such as fever, inflammation, and septic shock, especially when large amounts of LPS are introduced into the bloodstream.

Glutathione is a tripeptide composed of three amino acids: cysteine, glutamic acid, and glycine. It is a vital antioxidant that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular health and function. Glutathione helps protect cells from oxidative stress by neutralizing free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can damage cells and contribute to aging and diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and dementia. It also supports the immune system, detoxifies harmful substances, and regulates various cellular processes, including DNA synthesis and repair.

Glutathione is found in every cell of the body, with particularly high concentrations in the liver, lungs, and eyes. The body can produce its own glutathione, but levels may decline with age, illness, or exposure to toxins. As such, maintaining optimal glutathione levels through diet, supplementation, or other means is essential for overall health and well-being.

"Intraperitoneal injection" is a medical term that refers to the administration of a substance or medication directly into the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the organs contained within it. This type of injection is typically used in clinical settings for various purposes, such as delivering chemotherapy drugs, anesthetics, or other medications directly to the abdominal organs.

The procedure involves inserting a needle through the abdominal wall and into the peritoneal cavity, taking care to avoid any vital structures such as blood vessels or nerves. Once the needle is properly positioned, the medication can be injected slowly and carefully to ensure even distribution throughout the cavity.

It's important to note that intraperitoneal injections are typically reserved for situations where other routes of administration are not feasible or effective, as they carry a higher risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or injury to surrounding organs. As with any medical procedure, it should only be performed by trained healthcare professionals under appropriate clinical circumstances.

NF-κB (Nuclear Factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) is a protein complex that plays a crucial role in regulating the immune response to infection and inflammation, as well as in cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation. It is composed of several subunits, including p50, p52, p65 (RelA), c-Rel, and RelB, which can form homodimers or heterodimers that bind to specific DNA sequences called κB sites in the promoter regions of target genes.

Under normal conditions, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by inhibitory proteins known as IκBs (inhibitors of κB). However, upon stimulation by various signals such as cytokines, bacterial or viral products, and stress, IκBs are phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and degraded, leading to the release and activation of NF-κB. Activated NF-κB then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to κB sites and regulates the expression of target genes involved in inflammation, immunity, cell survival, and proliferation.

Dysregulation of NF-κB signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as cancer, chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, targeting NF-κB signaling has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these diseases.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

The proteasome endopeptidase complex is a large protein complex found in the cells of eukaryotic organisms, as well as in archaea and some bacteria. It plays a crucial role in the degradation of damaged or unneeded proteins through a process called proteolysis. The proteasome complex contains multiple subunits, including both regulatory and catalytic particles.

The catalytic core of the proteasome is composed of four stacked rings, each containing seven subunits, forming a structure known as the 20S core particle. Three of these rings are made up of beta-subunits that contain the proteolytic active sites, while the fourth ring consists of alpha-subunits that control access to the interior of the complex.

The regulatory particles, called 19S or 11S regulators, cap the ends of the 20S core particle and are responsible for recognizing, unfolding, and translocating targeted proteins into the catalytic chamber. The proteasome endopeptidase complex can cleave peptide bonds in various ways, including hydrolysis of ubiquitinated proteins, which is an essential mechanism for maintaining protein quality control and regulating numerous cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and stress response.

In summary, the proteasome endopeptidase complex is a crucial intracellular machinery responsible for targeted protein degradation through proteolysis, contributing to various essential regulatory functions in cells.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and other molecules from genes in neoplastic cells, or cells that are part of a tumor or cancer. In a normal cell, gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that the right genes are turned on or off at the right time. However, in cancer cells, this regulation can be disrupted, leading to the overexpression or underexpression of certain genes.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation can be affected by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and signals from the tumor microenvironment. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes (genes that promote cancer growth and development) or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (genes that prevent cancer).

Understanding neoplastic gene expression regulation is important for developing new therapies for cancer, as targeting specific genes or pathways involved in this process can help to inhibit cancer growth and progression.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGFA) is a specific isoform of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. It is a well-characterized signaling protein that plays a crucial role in angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels. VEGFA stimulates the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, thereby contributing to the growth and development of new vasculature. This protein is essential for physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing, but it has also been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. The regulation of VEGFA expression and activity is critical to maintaining proper vascular function and homeostasis.

Enzyme induction is a process by which the activity or expression of an enzyme is increased in response to some stimulus, such as a drug, hormone, or other environmental factor. This can occur through several mechanisms, including increasing the transcription of the enzyme's gene, stabilizing the mRNA that encodes the enzyme, or increasing the translation of the mRNA into protein.

In some cases, enzyme induction can be a beneficial process, such as when it helps the body to metabolize and clear drugs more quickly. However, in other cases, enzyme induction can have negative consequences, such as when it leads to the increased metabolism of important endogenous compounds or the activation of harmful procarcinogens.

Enzyme induction is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology, as it can affect the efficacy and safety of drugs and other xenobiotics. It is also relevant to the study of drug interactions, as the induction of one enzyme by a drug can lead to altered metabolism and effects of another drug that is metabolized by the same enzyme.

A "colony count" is a method used to estimate the number of viable microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, in a sample. In this technique, a known volume of the sample is spread onto the surface of a solid nutrient medium in a petri dish and then incubated under conditions that allow the microorganisms to grow and form visible colonies. Each colony that grows on the plate represents an individual cell (or small cluster of cells) from the original sample that was able to divide and grow under the given conditions. By counting the number of colonies that form, researchers can make a rough estimate of the concentration of microorganisms in the original sample.

The term "microbial" simply refers to microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Therefore, a "colony count, microbial" is a general term that encompasses the use of colony counting techniques to estimate the number of any type of microorganism in a sample.

Colony counts are used in various fields, including medical research, food safety testing, and environmental monitoring, to assess the levels of contamination or the effectiveness of disinfection procedures. However, it is important to note that colony counts may not always provide an accurate measure of the total number of microorganisms present in a sample, as some cells may be injured or unable to grow under the conditions used for counting. Additionally, some microorganisms may form clusters or chains that can appear as single colonies, leading to an overestimation of the true cell count.

Anti-inflammatory agents are a class of drugs or substances that reduce inflammation in the body. They work by inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which are released during an immune response and contribute to symptoms like pain, swelling, redness, and warmth.

There are two main types of anti-inflammatory agents: steroidal and nonsteroidal. Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs) include corticosteroids, which mimic the effects of hormones produced by the adrenal gland. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a larger group that includes both prescription and over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While both types of anti-inflammatory agents can be effective in reducing inflammation and relieving symptoms, they differ in their mechanisms of action, side effects, and potential risks. Long-term use of NSAIDs, for example, can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney damage, and cardiovascular events. Corticosteroids can have significant side effects as well, particularly with long-term use, including weight gain, mood changes, and increased susceptibility to infections.

It's important to use anti-inflammatory agents only as directed by a healthcare provider, and to be aware of potential risks and interactions with other medications or health conditions.

Quinolines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a bicyclic structure made up of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. They have a wide range of applications, but they are perhaps best known for their use in the synthesis of various medications, including antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Quinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, work by inhibiting the bacterial enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. They are commonly used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections.

Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells. They are commonly used to prevent and treat malaria.

It is important to note that quinolines have been associated with serious side effects, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, nerve damage, and abnormal heart rhythms. As with any medication, it is important to use quinolines only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and to follow their instructions carefully.

BCL-2-associated X protein, often abbreviated as BAX, is a type of protein belonging to the BCL-2 family. The BCL-2 family of proteins plays a crucial role in regulating programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. Specifically, BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein, which means that it promotes cell death.

BAX is encoded by the BAX gene, and it functions by forming pores in the outer membrane of the mitochondria, leading to the release of cytochrome c and other pro-apoptotic factors into the cytosol. This triggers a cascade of events that ultimately leads to cell death.

Dysregulation of BAX and other BCL-2 family proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. For example, reduced levels of BAX have been observed in some types of cancer, which may contribute to tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy. On the other hand, excessive activation of BAX has been linked to neuronal death in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

I-kappa B (IκB) proteins are a family of inhibitory proteins that play a crucial role in regulating the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a key transcription factor involved in inflammation, immune response, and cell survival. In resting cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by binding to IκB proteins, which prevents NF-κB from translocating into the nucleus and activating its target genes.

Upon stimulation of various signaling pathways, such as those triggered by proinflammatory cytokines, bacterial or viral components, and stress signals, IκB proteins become phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and subsequently degraded by the 26S proteasome. This process allows NF-κB to dissociate from IκB, translocate into the nucleus, and bind to specific DNA sequences, leading to the expression of various genes involved in immune response, inflammation, cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

There are several members of the IκB protein family, including IκBα, IκBβ, IκBε, IκBγ, and Bcl-3. Each member has distinct functions and regulatory mechanisms in controlling NF-κB activity. Dysregulation of IκB proteins and NF-κB signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

According to the medical definition, ultraviolet (UV) rays are invisible radiations that fall in the range of the electromagnetic spectrum between 100-400 nanometers. UV rays are further divided into three categories: UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (100-280 nm).

UV rays have various sources, including the sun and artificial sources like tanning beds. Prolonged exposure to UV rays can cause damage to the skin, leading to premature aging, eye damage, and an increased risk of skin cancer. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and are associated with skin aging, while UVB rays primarily affect the outer layer of the skin and are linked to sunburns and skin cancer. UVC rays are the most harmful but fortunately, they are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere and do not reach the surface.

Healthcare professionals recommend limiting exposure to UV rays, wearing protective clothing, using broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, and avoiding tanning beds to reduce the risk of UV-related health problems.

Subcellular fractions refer to the separation and collection of specific parts or components of a cell, including organelles, membranes, and other structures, through various laboratory techniques such as centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. These fractions can be used in further biochemical and molecular analyses to study the structure, function, and interactions of individual cellular components. Examples of subcellular fractions include nuclear extracts, mitochondrial fractions, microsomal fractions (membrane vesicles), and cytosolic fractions (cytoplasmic extracts).

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

Kainic acid is not a medical term per se, but it is a compound that has been widely used in scientific research, particularly in neuroscience. It is a type of excitatory amino acid that acts as an agonist at certain types of receptors in the brain, specifically the AMPA and kainate receptors.

Kainic acid is often used in research to study the effects of excitotoxicity, which is a process that occurs when nerve cells are exposed to excessive amounts of glutamate or other excitatory neurotransmitters, leading to cell damage or death. Kainic acid can induce seizures and other neurological symptoms in animals, making it a valuable tool for studying epilepsy and related disorders.

While kainic acid itself is not a medical treatment or diagnosis, understanding its effects on the brain has contributed to our knowledge of neurological diseases and potential targets for therapy.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis, in response to diverse stimuli such as mitogens, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and environmental stresses. They are highly conserved across eukaryotes and consist of a three-tiered kinase module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks), MAPK kinases (MKKs or MAP2Ks), and MAPKs.

Activation of MAPKs occurs through a sequential phosphorylation and activation cascade, where MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which in turn phosphorylate and activate MAPKs at specific residues (Thr-X-Tyr or Ser-Pro motifs). Once activated, MAPKs can further phosphorylate and regulate various downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases.

There are four major groups of MAPKs in mammals: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5/BMK1. Each group of MAPKs has distinct upstream activators, downstream targets, and cellular functions, allowing for a high degree of specificity in signal transduction and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAPK signaling pathways has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

Neuroblastoma is defined as a type of cancer that develops from immature nerve cells found in the fetal or early postnatal period, called neuroblasts. It typically occurs in infants and young children, with around 90% of cases diagnosed before age five. The tumors often originate in the adrenal glands but can also arise in the neck, chest, abdomen, or spine. Neuroblastoma is characterized by its ability to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, including bones, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and skin. The severity and prognosis of neuroblastoma can vary widely, depending on factors such as the patient's age at diagnosis, stage of the disease, and specific genetic features of the tumor.

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin, composed mainly of stratified squamous epithelium. It forms a protective barrier that prevents water loss and inhibits the entry of microorganisms. The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and its cells are nourished by diffusion from the underlying dermis. The bottom-most layer of the epidermis, called the stratum basale, is responsible for generating new skin cells that eventually move up to replace dead cells on the surface. This process of cell turnover takes about 28 days in adults.

The most superficial part of the epidermis consists of dead cells called squames, which are constantly shed and replaced. The exact rate at which this happens varies depending on location; for example, it's faster on the palms and soles than elsewhere. Melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells, are also located in the epidermis, specifically within the stratum basale layer.

In summary, the epidermis is a vital part of our integumentary system, providing not only physical protection but also playing a crucial role in immunity and sensory perception through touch receptors called Pacinian corpuscles.

Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II (NOS2), also known as Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. Unlike other isoforms of NOS, NOS2 is not constitutively expressed and its expression can be induced by various stimuli such as cytokines, lipopolysaccharides, and bacterial products. Once induced, NOS2 produces large amounts of NO, which plays a crucial role in the immune response against invading pathogens. However, excessive or prolonged production of NO by NOS2 has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as inflammation, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the cellular response to low oxygen levels, also known as hypoxia. It is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits: HIF-1α and HIF-1β.

Under normoxic conditions (adequate oxygen supply), HIF-1α is constantly produced but rapidly degraded by proteasomes due to the action of prolyl hydroxylases, which mark it for destruction in the presence of oxygen. However, under hypoxic conditions, the activity of prolyl hydroxylases is inhibited, leading to the stabilization and accumulation of HIF-1α.

Once stabilized, HIF-1α translocates to the nucleus and forms a complex with HIF-1β. This complex then binds to hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs) in the promoter regions of various genes involved in angiogenesis, glucose metabolism, erythropoiesis, cell survival, and other processes that help cells adapt to low oxygen levels.

By activating these target genes, HIF-1 plays a critical role in regulating the body's response to hypoxia, including promoting the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), enhancing anaerobic metabolism, and inhibiting cell proliferation and apoptosis under low oxygen conditions. Dysregulation of HIF-1 has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and ischemic disorders.

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify the chemical components of a mixture or compound. It works by ionizing the sample, generating charged molecules or fragments, and then measuring their mass-to-charge ratio in a vacuum. The resulting mass spectrum provides information about the molecular weight and structure of the analytes, allowing for identification and characterization.

In simpler terms, mass spectrometry is a method used to determine what chemicals are present in a sample and in what quantities, by converting the chemicals into ions, measuring their masses, and generating a spectrum that shows the relative abundances of each ion type.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases (PTGS), also known as Cyclooxygenases (COX), are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin G2 and H2, which are further metabolized to produce various prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These lipid mediators play crucial roles in several physiological processes such as inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting. There are two major isoforms of PTGS: PTGS-1 (COX-1) and PTGS-2 (COX-2). While COX-1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues and involved in homeostatic functions, COX-2 is usually induced during inflammation and tissue injury. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exert their therapeutic effects by inhibiting these enzymes, thereby reducing the production of prostaglandins and thromboxanes.

Pathologic neovascularization is the abnormal growth of new blood vessels in previously avascular tissue or excessive growth within existing vasculature, which occurs as a result of hypoxia, inflammation, or angiogenic stimuli. These newly formed vessels are often disorganized, fragile, and lack proper vessel hierarchy, leading to impaired blood flow and increased vascular permeability. Pathologic neovascularization can be observed in various diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and chronic inflammation. This process contributes to disease progression by promoting tumor growth, metastasis, and edema formation, ultimately leading to tissue damage and organ dysfunction.

HSP90 (Heat Shock Protein 90) refers to a family of highly conserved molecular chaperones that are expressed in all eukaryotic cells. They play a crucial role in protein folding, assembly, and transport, thereby assisting in the maintenance of proper protein function and cellular homeostasis. HSP90 proteins are named for their increased expression during heat shock and other stress conditions, which helps protect cells by facilitating the refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins that can accumulate under these circumstances.

HSP90 chaperones are ATP-dependent and consist of multiple domains: a N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD), a middle domain, and a C-terminal dimerization domain. They exist as homodimers and interact with a wide range of client proteins, including transcription factors, kinases, and steroid hormone receptors. By regulating the activity and stability of these client proteins, HSP90 chaperones contribute to various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and stress response. Dysregulation of HSP90 function has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases, making it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Gene knockdown techniques are methods used to reduce the expression or function of specific genes in order to study their role in biological processes. These techniques typically involve the use of small RNA molecules, such as siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) or shRNAs (short hairpin RNAs), which bind to and promote the degradation of complementary mRNA transcripts. This results in a decrease in the production of the protein encoded by the targeted gene.

Gene knockdown techniques are often used as an alternative to traditional gene knockout methods, which involve completely removing or disrupting the function of a gene. Knockdown techniques allow for more subtle and reversible manipulation of gene expression, making them useful for studying genes that are essential for cell survival or have redundant functions.

These techniques are widely used in molecular biology research to investigate gene function, genetic interactions, and disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that gene knockdown can have off-target effects and may not completely eliminate the expression of the targeted gene, so results should be interpreted with caution.

Methylation, in the context of genetics and epigenetics, refers to the addition of a methyl group (CH3) to a molecule, usually to the nitrogenous base of DNA or to the side chain of amino acids in proteins. In DNA methylation, this process typically occurs at the 5-carbon position of cytosine residues that precede guanine residues (CpG sites) and is catalyzed by enzymes called DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs).

DNA methylation plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and suppression of repetitive elements. Hypermethylation or hypomethylation of specific genes can lead to altered gene expression patterns, which have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

In summary, methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that influences genomic stability, gene regulation, and cellular function by introducing methyl groups to DNA or proteins.

Medical Definition:

Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide radicals (O2-) into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This essential antioxidant defense mechanism helps protect the body's cells from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are produced during normal metabolic processes and can lead to oxidative stress when their levels become too high.

There are three main types of superoxide dismutase found in different cellular locations:
1. Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD or SOD1) - Present mainly in the cytoplasm of cells.
2. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD or SOD2) - Located within the mitochondrial matrix.
3. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD or SOD3) - Found in the extracellular spaces, such as blood vessels and connective tissues.

Imbalances in SOD levels or activity have been linked to various pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and aging-related disorders.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

A seizure is an uncontrolled, abnormal firing of neurons (brain cells) that can cause various symptoms such as convulsions, loss of consciousness, altered awareness, or changes in behavior. Seizures can be caused by a variety of factors including epilepsy, brain injury, infection, toxic substances, or genetic disorders. They can also occur without any identifiable cause, known as idiopathic seizures. Seizures are a medical emergency and require immediate attention.

Apoptosis regulatory proteins are a group of proteins that play an essential role in the regulation and execution of apoptosis, also known as programmed cell death. This process is a normal part of development and tissue homeostasis, allowing for the elimination of damaged or unnecessary cells. The balance between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins determines whether a cell will undergo apoptosis.

Pro-apoptotic proteins, such as BAX, BID, and PUMA, promote apoptosis by neutralizing or counteracting the effects of anti-apoptotic proteins or by directly activating the apoptotic pathway. These proteins can be activated in response to various stimuli, including DNA damage, oxidative stress, and activation of the death receptor pathway.

Anti-apoptotic proteins, such as BCL-2, BCL-XL, and MCL-1, inhibit apoptosis by binding and neutralizing pro-apoptotic proteins or by preventing the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, which is a key step in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

Dysregulation of apoptosis regulatory proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, understanding the role of these proteins in apoptosis regulation is crucial for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Excitatory amino acid agonists are substances that bind to and activate excitatory amino acid receptors, leading to an increase in the excitation or activation of neurons. The most common excitatory amino acids in the central nervous system are glutamate and aspartate.

Agonists of excitatory amino acid receptors can be divided into two main categories: ionotropic and metabotropic. Ionotropic receptors, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), and kainite receptors, are ligand-gated ion channels that directly mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission. Metabotropic receptors, on the other hand, are G protein-coupled receptors that modulate synaptic activity through second messenger systems.

Excitatory amino acid agonists have been implicated in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including learning and memory, neurodevelopment, and neurodegenerative disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease. They are also used in research to study the functions of excitatory amino acid receptors and their roles in neuronal signaling. However, due to their potential neurotoxic effects, the therapeutic use of excitatory amino acid agonists is limited.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Cysteine proteinase inhibitors are a type of molecule that bind to and inhibit the activity of cysteine proteases, which are enzymes that cleave proteins at specific sites containing the amino acid cysteine. These inhibitors play important roles in regulating various biological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and programmed cell death (apoptosis). They can also have potential therapeutic applications in diseases where excessive protease activity contributes to pathology, such as cancer, arthritis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Examples of cysteine proteinase inhibitors include cystatins, kininogens, and serpins.

In situ nick-end labeling (ISEL, also known as TUNEL) is a technique used in pathology and molecular biology to detect DNA fragmentation, which is a characteristic of apoptotic cells (cells undergoing programmed cell death). The method involves labeling the 3'-hydroxyl termini of double or single stranded DNA breaks in situ (within tissue sections or individual cells) using modified nucleotides that are coupled to a detectable marker, such as a fluorophore or an enzyme. This technique allows for the direct visualization and quantification of apoptotic cells within complex tissues or cell populations.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a hormone that plays a crucial role in growth and development. It is a small protein with structural and functional similarity to insulin, hence the name "insulin-like." IGF-I is primarily produced in the liver under the regulation of growth hormone (GH).

IGF-I binds to its specific receptor, the IGF-1 receptor, which is widely expressed throughout the body. This binding activates a signaling cascade that promotes cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. In addition, IGF-I has anabolic effects on various tissues, including muscle, bone, and cartilage, contributing to their growth and maintenance.

IGF-I is essential for normal growth during childhood and adolescence, and it continues to play a role in maintaining tissue homeostasis throughout adulthood. Abnormal levels of IGF-I have been associated with various medical conditions, such as growth disorders, diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

Focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinases (FAKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play crucial roles in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. They are primarily localized at focal adhesions, which are specialized structures formed at the sites of integrin-mediated attachment of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM).

FAKs consist of two major domains: an N-terminal FERM (4.1 protein, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The FERM domain is responsible for the interaction with various proteins, including integrins, growth factor receptors, and cytoskeletal components, while the kinase domain possesses enzymatic activity that phosphorylates tyrosine residues on target proteins.

FAKs are activated in response to various extracellular signals, such as ECM stiffness, growth factors, and integrin engagement. Once activated, FAKs initiate a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately regulate cell behavior. Dysregulation of FAK signaling has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases.

In summary, focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinases are essential regulators of cellular processes that localize to focal adhesions and modulate intracellular signaling pathways in response to extracellular cues.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Immunoprecipitation (IP) is a research technique used in molecular biology and immunology to isolate specific antigens or antibodies from a mixture. It involves the use of an antibody that recognizes and binds to a specific antigen, which is then precipitated out of solution using various methods, such as centrifugation or chemical cross-linking.

In this technique, an antibody is first incubated with a sample containing the antigen of interest. The antibody specifically binds to the antigen, forming an immune complex. This complex can then be captured by adding protein A or G agarose beads, which bind to the constant region of the antibody. The beads are then washed to remove any unbound proteins, leaving behind the precipitated antigen-antibody complex.

Immunoprecipitation is a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and signal transduction pathways. It can also be used to detect and quantify specific proteins in biological samples, such as cells or tissues, and to identify potential biomarkers of disease.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Luciferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of their substrates, leading to the emission of light. This bioluminescent process is often associated with certain species of bacteria, insects, and fish. The term "luciferase" comes from the Latin word "lucifer," which means "light bearer."

The most well-known example of luciferase is probably that found in fireflies, where the enzyme reacts with a compound called luciferin to produce light. This reaction requires the presence of oxygen and ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which provides the energy needed for the reaction to occur.

Luciferases have important applications in scientific research, particularly in the development of sensitive assays for detecting gene expression and protein-protein interactions. By labeling a protein or gene of interest with luciferase, researchers can measure its activity by detecting the light emitted during the enzymatic reaction. This allows for highly sensitive and specific measurements, making luciferases valuable tools in molecular biology and biochemistry.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that originates from the bone marrow - the soft, inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. It is characterized by an abnormal production of white blood cells, known as leukocytes or blasts. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are several types of leukemia, classified based on the specific type of white blood cell affected and the speed at which the disease progresses:

1. Acute Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress rapidly, with symptoms developing over a few weeks or months. They involve the rapid growth and accumulation of immature, nonfunctional white blood cells (blasts) in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) - Originates from lymphoid progenitor cells, primarily affecting children but can also occur in adults.
- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) - Develops from myeloid progenitor cells and is more common in older adults.

2. Chronic Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress slowly, with symptoms developing over a period of months to years. They involve the production of relatively mature, but still abnormal, white blood cells that can accumulate in large numbers in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) - Affects B-lymphocytes and is more common in older adults.
- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) - Originates from myeloid progenitor cells, characterized by the presence of a specific genetic abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome. It can occur at any age but is more common in middle-aged and older adults.

Treatment options for leukemia depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors. Treatments may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine, a type of small signaling protein involved in immune response and inflammation. It is primarily produced by activated macrophages, although other cell types such as T-cells, natural killer cells, and mast cells can also produce it.

TNF-α plays a crucial role in the body's defense against infection and tissue injury by mediating inflammatory responses, activating immune cells, and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in certain types of cells. It does this by binding to its receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, which are found on the surface of many cell types.

In addition to its role in the immune response, TNF-α has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, as well as cancer, where it can promote tumor growth and metastasis.

Therapeutic agents that target TNF-α, such as infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept, have been developed to treat these conditions. However, these drugs can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects, so their use must be carefully monitored.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

A xenograft model antitumor assay is a type of preclinical cancer research study that involves transplanting human tumor cells or tissues into an immunodeficient mouse. This model allows researchers to study the effects of various treatments, such as drugs or immune therapies, on human tumors in a living organism.

In this assay, human tumor cells or tissues are implanted into the mouse, typically under the skin or in another organ, where they grow and form a tumor. Once the tumor has established, the mouse is treated with the experimental therapy, and the tumor's growth is monitored over time. The response of the tumor to the treatment is then assessed by measuring changes in tumor size or weight, as well as other parameters such as survival rate and metastasis.

Xenograft model antitumor assays are useful for evaluating the efficacy and safety of new cancer therapies before they are tested in human clinical trials. They provide valuable information on how the tumors respond to treatment, drug pharmacokinetics, and toxicity, which can help researchers optimize dosing regimens and identify potential side effects. However, it is important to note that xenograft models have limitations, such as differences in tumor biology between mice and humans, and may not always predict how well a therapy will work in human patients.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Ovarian neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the ovary, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various cell types within the ovary, including epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian neoplasms are often classified based on their cell type of origin, histological features, and potential for invasive or metastatic behavior.

Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are the most common type and can be further categorized into several subtypes, such as serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and Brenner tumors. Some of these epithelial tumors have a higher risk of becoming malignant and spreading to other parts of the body.

Germ cell ovarian neoplasms arise from the cells that give rise to eggs (oocytes) and can include teratomas, dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumors, and embryonal carcinomas. Stromal ovarian neoplasms develop from the connective tissue cells supporting the ovary and can include granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas.

It is essential to diagnose and treat ovarian neoplasms promptly, as some malignant forms can be aggressive and potentially life-threatening if not managed appropriately. Regular gynecological exams, imaging studies, and tumor marker tests are often used for early detection and monitoring of ovarian neoplasms. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, depending on the type, stage, and patient's overall health condition.

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that are an essential part of the immune system. They are large, specialized cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, as well as damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are found throughout the body, including in the bloodstream, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, and connective tissues. They play a critical role in inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair and remodeling.

Macrophages originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter the tissues, they differentiate into macrophages, which have a larger size and more specialized functions than monocytes. Macrophages can change their shape and move through tissues to reach sites of infection or injury. They also produce cytokines, chemokines, and other signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Macrophages have a variety of surface receptors that allow them to recognize and respond to different types of foreign substances and signals from other cells. They can engulf and digest foreign particles, bacteria, and viruses through a process called phagocytosis. Macrophages also play a role in presenting antigens to T cells, which are another type of immune cell that helps coordinate the immune response.

Overall, macrophages are crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis, defending against infection, and promoting wound healing and tissue repair. Dysregulation of macrophage function has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Mitosis is a type of cell division in which the genetic material of a single cell, called the mother cell, is equally distributed into two identical daughter cells. It's a fundamental process that occurs in multicellular organisms for growth, maintenance, and repair, as well as in unicellular organisms for reproduction.

The process of mitosis can be broken down into several stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. During prophase, the chromosomes condense and become visible, and the nuclear envelope breaks down. In prometaphase, the nuclear membrane is completely disassembled, and the mitotic spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes at their centromeres.

During metaphase, the chromosomes align at the metaphase plate, an imaginary line equidistant from the two spindle poles. In anaphase, sister chromatids are pulled apart by the spindle fibers and move toward opposite poles of the cell. Finally, in telophase, new nuclear envelopes form around each set of chromosomes, and the chromosomes decondense and become less visible.

Mitosis is followed by cytokinesis, a process that divides the cytoplasm of the mother cell into two separate daughter cells. The result of mitosis and cytokinesis is two genetically identical cells, each with the same number and kind of chromosomes as the original parent cell.

Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptors are cell surface receptors that bind to tumor necrosis factor cytokines. They play crucial roles in the regulation of a variety of immune cell functions, including inflammation, immunity, and cell survival or death (apoptosis).

There are two major types of TNF receptors: TNFR1 (also known as p55 or CD120a) and TNFR2 (also known as p75 or CD120b). TNFR1 is widely expressed in most tissues, while TNFR2 has a more restricted expression pattern and is mainly found on immune cells.

TNF receptors have an intracellular domain called the death domain, which can trigger signaling pathways leading to apoptosis when activated by TNF ligands. However, they can also activate other signaling pathways that promote cell survival, differentiation, and inflammation. Dysregulation of TNF receptor signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) is a group of enzymes that catalyze the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. There are three distinct isoforms of NOS, each with different expression patterns and functions:

1. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS or NOS1): This isoform is primarily expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes.
2. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS or NOS2): This isoform is induced by various stimuli such as cytokines, lipopolysaccharides, and hypoxia in a variety of cells including immune cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. iNOS produces large amounts of NO, which functions as a potent effector molecule in the immune response, particularly in the defense against microbial pathogens.
3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS or NOS3): This isoform is constitutively expressed in endothelial cells and produces low levels of NO that play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasodilation, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation.

Overall, NOS plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, immune response, cardiovascular function, and respiratory regulation. Dysregulation of NOS activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Tyrosine is an non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be synthesized by the human body from another amino acid called phenylalanine. Its name is derived from the Greek word "tyros," which means cheese, as it was first isolated from casein, a protein found in cheese.

Tyrosine plays a crucial role in the production of several important substances in the body, including neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, which are involved in various physiological processes, including mood regulation, stress response, and cognitive functions. It also serves as a precursor to melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair, and eye color.

In addition, tyrosine is involved in the structure of proteins and is essential for normal growth and development. Some individuals may require tyrosine supplementation if they have a genetic disorder that affects tyrosine metabolism or if they are phenylketonurics (PKU), who cannot metabolize phenylalanine, which can lead to elevated tyrosine levels in the blood. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation regimen.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Actin is a type of protein that forms part of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells, and is also found in various other cell types. It is a globular protein that polymerizes to form long filaments, which are important for many cellular processes such as cell division, cell motility, and the maintenance of cell shape. In muscle cells, actin filaments interact with another type of protein called myosin to enable muscle contraction. Actins can be further divided into different subtypes, including alpha-actin, beta-actin, and gamma-actin, which have distinct functions and expression patterns in the body.

Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a soluble cytokine that is primarily produced by the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, especially CD4+ Th1 cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of the immune response against viral and intracellular bacterial infections, as well as tumor cells. IFN-γ has several functions, including activating macrophages to enhance their microbicidal activity, increasing the presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of T cells and NK cells, and inducing the production of other cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, IFN-γ has direct antiproliferative effects on certain types of tumor cells and can enhance the cytotoxic activity of immune cells against infected or malignant cells.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from glandular epithelial cells. These cells line the inside of many internal organs, including the breasts, prostate, colon, and lungs. Adenocarcinomas can occur in any of these organs, as well as in other locations where glands are present.

The term "adenocarcinoma" is used to describe a cancer that has features of glandular tissue, such as mucus-secreting cells or cells that produce hormones. These cancers often form glandular structures within the tumor mass and may produce mucus or other substances.

Adenocarcinomas are typically slow-growing and tend to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. They can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these treatments. The prognosis for adenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and age.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (free radicals) and the body's ability to detoxify them or repair the damage they cause. This imbalance can lead to cellular damage, oxidation of proteins, lipids, and DNA, disruption of cellular functions, and activation of inflammatory responses. Prolonged or excessive oxidative stress has been linked to various health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related diseases.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Breast neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the breast tissue that can be benign or malignant. Benign breast neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors or growths, while malignant breast neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Breast neoplasms can arise from different types of cells in the breast, including milk ducts, milk sacs (lobules), or connective tissue. The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which starts in the milk ducts and can spread to other parts of the breast and nearby structures.

Breast neoplasms are usually detected through screening methods such as mammography, ultrasound, or MRI, or through self-examination or clinical examination. Treatment options for breast neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapy.

... apigenin 8-C-glucoside) Isovitexin (apigenin 6-C-glucoside) Rhoifolin (apigenin 7-O-neohesperidoside) Schaftoside (apigenin 6-C ... Dried parsley can contain about 45 mg apigenin/gram of the herb, and dried chamomile flower about 3-5 mg/gram. The apigenin ... The naturally occurring glycosides formed by the combination of apigenin with sugars include: Apiin (apigenin 7-O-apioglucoside ... Apigenin is found in many fruits and vegetables, but parsley, celery, celeriac, and chamomile tea are the most common sources. ...
In enzymology, an apigenin 4'-O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.75) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction S-adenosyl-L- ... Kuroki G, Poulton JE (1981). "The para-O-methylation of apigenin to acacetin by cell-free extracts of Robinia pseudoacacia L". ... apigenin), whereas its two products are S-adenosylhomocysteine and 4'-methoxy-5,7-dihydroxyflavone (acacetin). This enzyme ...
Damiana's anxiolytic properties might be due to apigenin. The extract from damiana has been found to suppress aromatase ... apigenin; α-pinene; β-carotene; β-pinene; tannins; thymol; and hexacosanol. In total, 22 flavonoids, maltol glucoside, ...
Some of the metabolites separated include: acacetin-7-O-rutinoside; apigenin 7-O-rutinoside; chlorogenic acid; ...
Apigenin chamomile, celery, parsley. Chrysin Passiflora caerulea, Pleurotus ostreatus, Oroxylum indicum. Diosmetin Vicia. ...
Ali, Fahad; Naz, Falaq; Jyoti, Smita; Siddique, Yasir Hasan (3 June 2017). "Health functionality of apigenin: A review". ... Venigalla, Madhuri; Gyengesi, Erika; Münch, Gerald (August 2015). "Curcumin and Apigenin - novel and promising therapeutics ... apigenin (and chamomile), ginger, herbal infusions (notably lemon balm, rosemary, peppermint and caffeinated drinks), rhodiola ... "The Therapeutic Potential of Apigenin". International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 20 (6): 1305. doi:10.3390/ijms20061305. ...
Apigenin (also contained in chamomile and an aromatase inhibitor), lemon balm, and gotu kola are also under investigation. Some ... "The Therapeutic Potential of Apigenin". International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 20 (6): 1305. doi:10.3390/ijms20061305. ...
the apigenin-6-C-glucoside. In this case, the prefix 'iso' does not imply an isoflavonoid (the position of the B-ring on the C- ... Vitexin, the 8-C-glucoside of apigenin Isoorientin, the 3'-OH derivative "Pharmacological studies of Passiflora sp. and their ...
Such and similar dietary supplements may contribute to prevention or treatment, with candidate substances including apigenin, ... Shankar, Eswar; Goel, Aditi; Gupta, Karishma; Gupta, Sanjay (1 December 2017). "Plant Flavone Apigenin: an Emerging Anticancer ... Shukla, Sanjeev; Gupta, Sanjay (1 June 2010). "Apigenin: A Promising Molecule for Cancer Prevention". Pharmaceutical Research. ... "Apigenin as an anticancer agent". Phytotherapy Research. 34 (8): 1812-1828. doi:10.1002/ptr.6647. ISSN 0951-418X. PMID 32059077 ...
... is a biflavonoid (bis-apigenin coupled at 8 and 3′ positions, or 3′,8″-biapigenin) constituent of a number of ... Apigenin Xiong, Xifeng (22 December 2021). "Insights Into Amentoflavone: A Natural Multifunctional Biflavonoid". Frontiers in ...
Dried parsley can contain about 45 mg/gram apigenin. The apigenin content of fresh parsley is reportedly 215.5 mg/100 grams, ... Parsley is a source of flavonoids and antioxidants, especially luteolin, apigenin, folate, vitamin K, vitamin C, and vitamin A ... Meyer, H.; Bolarinwa, A.; Wolfram, G. & Linseisen, J. (2006). "Bioavailability of apigenin from apiin-rich parsley in humans" ( ... Shankar E, Goel A, Gupta K, Gupta S (2017). "Plant flavone apigenin: An emerging anticancer agent". Current Pharmacology ...
... the flavonoids apigenin, quercetin, patuletin, and luteolin; and coumarin. Chamomile, a relative of ragweed, can cause allergy ...
In plant synthesis the enzyme apigenin 4′-O-methyltransferase uses S-adenosyl methionine and 5,7,4′-trihydroxyflavone (apigenin ... Acacetin is a 4′-O-methylated flavone of the parent compound apigenin, found in Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust), Turnera ... methoxylated apigenin) Zhao, J; Dasmahapatra, AK; Khan, SI; Khan, IA (December 2008). "Anti-aromatase activity of the ... to produce S-adenosylhomocysteine and 4′-methoxy-5,7-dihydroxyflavone (acacetin). Genkwanin (methoxylated apigenin) ...
Apigenin and chrysin are also transformed by C. elegans and produce apigenin 7-sulfate, apigenin 7,4′-disulfate, chrysin 7- ... Ibrahim, A. R. S. (2005). "Biotransformation of Chrysin and Apigenin by Cunninghamella elegans". Chemical & Pharmaceutical ...
Other constituents include baicalin, apigenin, oroxylin A, and scutellarein. Estimates of the number of species in the genus ...
The glycoside moiety at carbon-7 of apigenin, O-β-D-apiofuranosyl(→)2-β-D-glucosyl, is carried by several other flavones in ... Apiin is a natural flavonoid, a diglycoside of the flavone apigenin found in the winter-hardy plants parsley and celery, and in ... Apiose H. Meyer; A. Bolarinwa; G. Wolfram; J. Linseisen (2006). "Bioavailability of Apigenin from Apiin-Rich Parsley in Humans ...
Various species contain apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, other flavonoids and ecdysteroids. Species Serratula alata Desf. ...
Flavonoids found in Scorzonera include apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin. Other secondary metabolites reported from ...
Heartsease plants contain aglycones[clarification needed] apigenin, chrysoeriol, isorhamnetin, kaempferol. V. tricolor is one ...
V. I. Lutskii, A. S. Gromova and N. A. Tyukavkina (1971). "Aromadendrin, apigenin, and kaempferol from the wood of Pinus ...
The flavonoid apigenin has been shown to strongly inhibit SASP production. SASP can aid in signaling to immune cells for ...
... also has active properties such as camphor, leutiolin, and apigenin. A new hygrine-like compound has been found ...
... and apoptosis induction by apigenin, bisabolol, and protocatechuic acid". Journal of Medicinal Food. 14 (3): 276-283. doi: ...
CYP93G1 of the CYP450 superfamily in rice then desaturates naringenin into apigenin. After this step, it is proposed that ... flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) changes apigenin into tricetin. Upon formation of tricetin, 3'-O-methyltransferase and 5'-O ...
The flavonoid apigenin has been shown to reduce gene expression of IκBζ. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000144802 - Ensembl ...
Yarrow can be used for dying wool as it contains apigenin and luteolin. Depending on the mordant the color may be green to ... apigenin, rutin, hyperoside. The several varieties and subspecies include: Achillea millefolium subsp. millefolium A. m. subsp ...
The flavones genistein and apigenin may explain the cannabis-like effects of Zornia latifolia. "Zornia latifolia". Germplasm ...
Chuang CM, Monie A, Wu A, Hung CF (May 2009). "Combination of apigenin treatment with therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination generates ...
Other flavonoids present in P. incarnata include chrysin, apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol, and isovitexin. The main ...
Dong J, Qiu J, Wang J, Li H, Dai X, Zhang Y, Wang X, Tan W, Niu X, Deng X, Zhao S (October 2012). "Apigenin alleviates the ...
... apigenin 8-C-glucoside) Isovitexin (apigenin 6-C-glucoside) Rhoifolin (apigenin 7-O-neohesperidoside) Schaftoside (apigenin 6-C ... Dried parsley can contain about 45 mg apigenin/gram of the herb, and dried chamomile flower about 3-5 mg/gram. The apigenin ... The naturally occurring glycosides formed by the combination of apigenin with sugars include: Apiin (apigenin 7-O-apioglucoside ... Apigenin is found in many fruits and vegetables, but parsley, celery, celeriac, and chamomile tea are the most common sources. ...
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L-theanine, Magnesium L-threonate Apigenin. Weird dreams woke myself up yelling shut the fuck up ... L-theanine, Magnesium L-threonate Apigenin. Weird dreams woke myself up yelling shut the fuck up ... L-theanine, Magnesium L-threonate Apigenin. Weird dreams woke myself up yelling shut the fuck up ... L-theanine, Magnesium L-threonate Apigenin. Weird dreams woke myself up yelling shut the fuck up ...
Likewise, it was detected that apigenin had limited synergistic interaction with antibiotics.. Conclusions:. The obtained ... Eumkeb G, Chukrathok S. Synergistic activity and mechanism of action of ceftazidime and apigenin combination against ... Synergistic antimicrobial activity of apigenin against oral pathogens. Int J Eng Res Sci. 2016;2:27-37. ... Antimicrobial synergistic effects of apigenin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, myricetin and luteolin in combination with some ...
These effects of apigenin are dose-dependent and correlate with the suppression of MMP-9 mRNA expression levels. PMA caused ... We found that apigenin could inhibit PMA-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was ... We found that apigenin markedly inhibits the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced increase in MMP-9 expression and ... These results showed apigenin might inhibit the invasion and migration abilities of Caski cells by reducing the MMP-9 ...
Apigenin is seen in the blood stream only 24 h after ingestion, with a relatively longer half-life of 91.8 h. Apigenin is also ... Though apigenin is a relatively small molecule that has been shown to cross the BBB, the intranasal delivery of apigenin, which ... Further, apigenin derivatives are also produced by O- or C-glycosylation, methylation, and hydroxylation of apigenin (Table 1. ... Beneficial aspects of apigenin activity help to ameliorate inflammation-mediated cardiac injury, indicating a role for apigenin ...
Apigenin is a strong metal ion antioxidant, which can reduce its participation in free ... Apigenin of the role. October 18th 2022 0 Comments Apigenin is a substance with relatively high nutritional content, and it ... Apigenin can inhibit lipid peroxidation.. 3. Anti-tumor effect. Apigenin has anti-tumor effect. It can inhibit tumor cell ... Apigenin is also a very potent anticancer compound. It is highly selective for cancer cells and can induce apoptosis of cancer ...
Extra-Strength Gold and Yellow Colors from Nature. Discount Qty Pricing! LABEL INFORMATION QTY Pricing: QTY 1:... View full product details » ...
Kaempferol and Apigenin. The effect of two flavonoids, kaempferol and apigenin, in combination with MSCs on anterior cruciate ... Kaempferol & Apigenin. Estakhri et al. 2020 [54]. (in vivo). -. ACTL-induced OA in Sprague Dawley rats (6 groups, n = 10/group ... Cotreatment with MSCs, kaempferol, and apigenin significantly decreased the expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 catabolic enzymes; ... Taken together, these results indicate that the combination treatment of apigenin, kaempferol, and MSCs accelerates ...
Hver kapsel inneholder 250 mg apigenin. Oppdag fordelene med Apigenin-tilskudd! Antioksidantkraft: Apigenin er kjent for sin ... Endelig har apigenin også vist seg å støtte et sunt hjerte. Mange apigenin-produkter på markedet lagres ikke godt og mister ... Studier har vist at apigenin alene kan doble NAD+ nivåene i kroppen, uten tilskudd av NAD+ boostere! Når apigenin hjelper til ... Kreftforebygging: Apigenin har vist seg å ha potensielle anti-kreftegenskaper og kan bidra til å hemme veksten av kreftceller. ...
... ... anti-glycative and anti-degenerative actions of two flavones apigenin and luteolin and a flavonol quercetin, in function of ... anti-glycative and anti-degenerative actions of two flavones apigenin and luteolin and a flavonol quercetin, in function of ...
Apigenin CAS 520-36-5 Integrity management, service first, quality assurance, ZSpharmac is dedicated to serving you. ... Apigenin and the two glucopyranosides of apigenin can put in antidiabetic impacts in the body. Apigenin exerts its anti- ... Apigenin is commonly used in cosmetics: Apigenins absorption of ultraviolet rays is focused in the B area (wavelength in ... Apigenin in addition protects against the production of interleukin-4. Apigenin similarly inhibits TNFα altitude by impeding NF ...
Apigenin & TMG Save 25% when you buy as a bundle! ... Apigenin. While NMN can help rejuvenate our NAD levels, we must ... Apigenin is a flavonoid compound found in certain foods and has been studied for its potential health benefits, including ... Apigenin acts to suppress CD38 activity within cells, thereby fostering a rise in NAD+ levels. ... Introducing our ultimate stack to boost NAD levels: NMN Apigenin TMG Save 25% when you buy as a bundle! NMN... ...
What are the effects of apigenin? Apigenin is recommended for supplementation of the population. What is apigenin used for? ... What are the effects of apigenin?. *Apigenin is a kind of flavonoid substance. Apigenin can inhibit the proliferation of ... Apigenin contains a lot of minerals and vitamins, so apigenin has a wide range of antioxidant effects. Apigenin is also a metal ... What is apigenin?. Apigenin is a naturally occurring flavonoid, which exists in a variety of plants in the form of plant yellow ...
Also available in 60 servings Per capsule: Apigenin 300mg ... Apigenin is found in numerous commonplace plants including ... Decrease quantity for NICE SUPPLEMENTS CO APIGENIN 300MG Increase quantity for NICE SUPPLEMENTS CO APIGENIN 300MG ... A common natural flavanoid, Apigenin is found in numerous commonplace plants including Chamomile, Parsley and Celery. ...
What is apigenin good for?. Apigenin powder is a bioflavonoid and a very effective anticancer compound.. Apigenins many ... Riotto is a leading wholesale chamomile extract apigenin bulk powder manufacturer from China, our Apigenin features of ... Wholesale chamomile extract apigenin bulk powder manufacturer. You are here: Home1 / 2 / Nutritional Ingredients3 / Wholesale ... Apigenin has gained particular interest in recent years as a beneficial and health promoting agent because of its low intrinsic ...
After ACP was introduced, AP was given to the apigenin group. We gathered blood and intestinal tissue. Following AP delivery, ... An Experimental Rat Model of Acute Pancreatitis and the Effect of Apigenin. ... Apigenin (A), Control (C), and Sham (S) (Ap). The abdominal wall was closed and a laparotomy was performed on the S group. The ... the studys goal was to determine the impact of apigenin (AP) on acute pancreatitis (ACP). We employed 126 male Wistar rats and ...
Chemical structure of apigenin. Why Might Apigenin Be Beneficial?. There is evidence that anxiety can accelerate the ageing ... What Is The Evidence Behind Apigenin Supplementation?. Unfortunately, there have not been many animal studies of apigenin, and ... Apigenin is a compound found in a wide variety of herbs (particularly in chamomile) as well as some fruits and vegetables. It ... At lower doses, apigenin can suppress inflammation, which is a major hallmark of ageing. It also has potential as a potent ...
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Apigenin exerts its inflammatory properties by mediating the inhibition of the proliferation of interferon gamma-secreting Th1 ... apigenin, and methyl-prednisolone-acetate. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that apigenin 3-acetate, apigenin, and methyl- ... Apigenin-3 Acetate versus Apigenin and Methyl-Prednisolone in Multiple Sclerosis. By MDNewsline DailyJune 27, 2023No Comments ... Apigenin 3-acetate, apigenin, and methyl-prednisolone-acetate significantly downregulated T-box transcription factor (T-bet) ...
title = "Acute exposure of apigenin induces hepatotoxicity in Swiss mice",. abstract = "Apigenin, a dietary flavonoid, is ... Acute exposure of apigenin induces hepatotoxicity in Swiss mice. / Singh, Prabhat; Mishra, Shrawan Kumar; Noel, Sanjeev et al. ... Acute exposure of apigenin induces hepatotoxicity in Swiss mice. PloS one. 2012 Feb 16;7(2):e31964. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone. ... Acute exposure of apigenin induces hepatotoxicity in Swiss mice. Prabhat Singh, Shrawan Kumar Mishra, Sanjeev Noel, Sharad ...
Name: Cryptotanshinone CAS No.: 35825-57-1 Biological Activity Major tanshinone isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza that exhibits mu... Ships from China.
Amygdalin is a glycoside initially isolated from the seeds of the tree Prunus dulcis, also known as bitter almonds, Amygdalin is a... Ships from China.
Apigenin and Naringenin: Natural Sources, Pharmacology and Role in Cancer Prevention. $275.00. Select options ...
Selenium and Apigenin. - Life Extension Mix contains three potent forms of selenium (SelenoExcell, Se-methyl-selenocysteine and ...
Apigenin displayed a radiosensitizing effect in human tumor cells in which the cancer cell treated with apigenin showed a ... Ju, S.M.; Kang, J.G.; Bae, J.S.; Pae, H.O.; Lyu, Y.S.; Jeon, B.H. The flavonoid apigenin ameliorates cisplatin-induced ... Furthermore, apigenin ameliorated inflammation through the reduction of p53 activation in human renal proximal tubular ... Vegetables also contain a variety of phenolics; for instance, parsley and celery possess apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin, and ...
Celery Seed Extract, find complete details about Celery Seed Extract, Celery Seed Extract, Celery Juice Powder, Apigenin - Hunan Huakang Biotech Inc.,
The flavone apigenin can exert both its anti-oxidant potetial via the usual enzymatic ROS scavenging system and the ... Apigenin improves spatial working memory in Wistar rats.. ● Apigenin promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by activating peroxisome ... Keywords: Rat, Apigenin, Neuronal loss, Mitochondria, Biogenesis, PGC-1alpha Full-Text [PDF 384 kb] , Abstract (HTML) ● ... Apigenin prevents neurodegeneration by inducing PGC-1α.. Plain Language Summary In this correspondence, a comment to a recent ...
Apixaban ≥98% (HPLC); CAS Number: 503612-47-3; Synonyms: 1-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-[4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide,4,5,6,7-Tetrahydro-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-[4-(2-oxo-1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide,BMS 562247,BMS-562247,BMS562247; find Sigma-Aldrich-SML3285 MSDS, related peer-reviewed papers, technical documents, similar products & more at Sigma-Aldrich
  • These effects of apigenin are dose-dependent and correlate with the suppression of MMP-9 mRNA expression levels. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • What are the effects of apigenin? (meetsupplement.com)
  • Although the beneficial effects of apigenin on different cells and tissues have been investigated ( 10 , 11 ), there is no report yet concerning the effect of apigenin on growth and quality of embryos. (ijfs.ir)
  • To evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of apigenin, we used H 2 O 2 and actinomycin D in the culture medium to create ROS and apoptosis. (ijfs.ir)
  • Methods In this study we evaluated and compare antioxidant, anti-glycative and anti-degenerative actions of two flavones apigenin and luteolin and a flavonol quercetin, in function of their hydroxyl groups arrangement. (unict.it)
  • Sixteen compounds were identified and quantified, in which three were chlorogenic acid derivatives and eleven apigenin and luteolin derivatives. (rsc.org)
  • The flavonoids diversity showed a significant content of luteolin and its derivatives, except for Landoltia punctata that had significant apigenin content. (rsc.org)
  • Beyond apigenin and luteolin, celery contains other plant compounds that have powerful antioxidant properties. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Mechanism is due to essential oil containing bisabolol constituents and the flavonoids apigenin and luteolin. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Apigenin is particularly abundant in the flowers of chamomile plants, constituting 68% of total flavonoids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apigenin has gained particular interest in recent years as a beneficial and health promoting agent because of its low intrinsic toxicity and because of its striking effects on normal versus cancer cells, compared with other structurally-related flavonoids. (riottobotanicals.com)
  • Key findings: Among five flavonoids isolated from GFF, only apigenin potently inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. (kist.re.kr)
  • Apigenin is a plant-derived compound belonging to the flavonoids category and bears protective effects on different cells. (ijfs.ir)
  • Apigenin is a plant-derived compound belonging to the flavonoids category presented in various fruits and vegetables, such as parsley, onion, celery, chamomile and orange ( 3 ). (ijfs.ir)
  • Apigenin has special interest for the development of chemopreventive agents against cancer because it is a widely distributed plant flavonoid that has antitumor properties. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Apigenin er et naturlig forekommende flavonoid, som hemmer CD38, og igjen øker NAD+ nivåene. (sweetmood.no)
  • Apigenin is a naturally occurring flavonoid, which exists in a variety of plants in the form of plant yellow pigment, mainly from the umbelliferaceae plant, and other plants such as chamomile, bee flower, Perilla, verbena, yarrow also found its presence. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin is a kind of flavonoid substance. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin is a naturally occurring flavonoid compound that exists in a selection of plants in the form of plant yellow pigments. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin is a flavonoid compound found in certain foods and has been studied for its potential health benefits, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. (longevitybox.co.uk)
  • Apigenin, a dietary flavonoid, is reported to have several therapeutic effects in different diseases including cancer. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The characterization results showed that isolate F1 was a flavonoid group, Apigenin compound, while isolate F2 was a steroid group, Squalene compound. (phcogj.com)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of apigenin on the number of viable and apoptotic blastomeres, the zona pellucida (ZP) thickness and hatching rate of pre-implantation mouse embryos exposed to H2O2 and actinomycin D. (ijfs.ir)
  • The flavone apigenin can exert both its antioxidant potential via the usual enzymatic reactive oxygen species scavenging system and the mitochondrial biogenesis via the peroxisome Proliferator-activated receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) mitochondrial Transcription Factor A (TFAM) Nuclear Respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) pathway. (ac.ir)
  • reported that the flavone apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) improves spatial working memory in adult male Wistar rats (Nikbakht et al. (ac.ir)
  • At the dose used by the authors, 50 mg/ kg by oral gavage every day, the flavone apigenin can induce the early expression of procaspase-3, which is crucial for the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis initiators, such as TFAM and NRF-1 (Kim, Ha, Yang, & Son, 2018). (ac.ir)
  • Riotto is a leading wholesale chamomile extract apigenin bulk powder manufacturer from China, our Apigenin features of instantly dissolved and easy to use. (riottobotanicals.com)
  • Buy Celery Seed Extract, Celery Juice Powder, Apigenin Product on Hunan Huakang Biotech Inc. (huakangsw.com)
  • This product is prepared in a non-greasy gel base, as well as biotin are other ingredients such apigenin, biotinoyl tripeptide-1 and ginkgo extract which help strengthen the hair follicle and produces a synergistic action on it. (nih.gov)
  • Apigenin is found in many fruits and vegetables, but parsley, celery, celeriac, and chamomile tea are the most common sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • The apigenin content of fresh parsley is reportedly 215.5 mg/100 grams, which is much higher than the next highest food source, green celery hearts providing 19.1 mg/100 grams. (wikipedia.org)
  • The naturally occurring glycosides formed by the combination of apigenin with sugars include: Apiin (apigenin 7-O-apioglucoside), isolated from parsley and celery Apigetrin (apigenin 7-glucoside), found in dandelion coffee Vitexin (apigenin 8-C-glucoside) Isovitexin (apigenin 6-C-glucoside) Rhoifolin (apigenin 7-O-neohesperidoside) Schaftoside (apigenin 6-C-glucoside 8-C-arabinoside) Some foods contain relatively high amounts of apigenin: Amentoflavone Merck Index, 11th Edition, 763. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apigenin Apigenin can be said to be the stem of wild celery, which contains the protein content of the leaves is far more than we usually eat celery. (meetsupplement.com)
  • The role of apigenin has been far greater than our common celery, its nutrients can meet the needs of the human body, can be said to be more helpful to health. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin, as the name suggests, can be extracted from celery. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Studies have shown that celery leaves contain twice as much apigenin as celery root, so try not to discard celery leaves when eating celery. (meetsupplement.com)
  • A common natural flavanoid, Apigenin is found in numerous commonplace plants including Chamomile, Parsley and Celery. (stromsportsireland.ie)
  • Celery contains a plant compound called apigenin, which plays a role in traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, and antioxidant agent. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • By assessing the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-18 (IL-18), resistin (R), and CD45 in blood and high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in intestinal tissue using a rat experimental model, the study's goal was to determine the impact of apigenin (AP) on acute pancreatitis (ACP). (digiwire.co.in)
  • Impact of apigenin and seashell nano-additives on the antifungal and roughness behavior of a soft denture liner. (bvsalud.org)
  • So, in this study, we evaluated for the first time the impact of apigenin on some morphological indicators of pre-implantation mouse embryos including ZP thickness, viable and apoptotic blastomere quantity and hatching rate. (ijfs.ir)
  • have reportedly shown that apigenin improves obesity and obesity induced inflammation [ 8 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • According to the authors of a 2016 review , lab tests have shown that apigenin may contribute to apoptosis, a kind of programmed cell death, which could make it useful as a cancer treatment. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • earns more insightful clues about the activity of apigenin in the prevention of the rat hippocampus neuronal loss caused by the Aβ25-35 injection. (ac.ir)
  • Significance: These findings suggest that apigenin can prevent 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation by the inhibition of the mitotic clonal expansion and the adipogenesis related factors and upregulation of the expression of multiple C/EBPβ inhibitors. (kist.re.kr)
  • The results suggest that apigenin may protect mouse embryos against H2O2 and actinomycin D. So that it increases the number of viable blastomeres and decreases the number of apoptotic blastomeres, which may cause expanding the blastocysts, thinning of the ZP thickness and increasing the rate of hatching in mouse embryos. (ijfs.ir)
  • Apigenin exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through the influence of lipopolysaccharide by inhibiting NO synthase and COX2 enzymes in macrophages. (herb-extract-supplier.com)
  • Apigenin exerts its anti-inflammatory effect with the impact of lipopolysaccharide by avoiding NO synthase and COX2 enzyme in macrophages. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin exerts its inflammatory properties by mediating the inhibition of the proliferation of interferon gamma-secreting Th1 cells. (mdnewsline.com)
  • Apigenin exerts its antioxidant role also by inducing the activation of PGC-1α, which in turn can attenuate hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death by upregulating Nrf-2 via GSK3β inactivation mediated by activated p38 (Choi et al. (ac.ir)
  • We found that apigenin markedly inhibits the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced increase in MMP-9 expression and activity in several cancer cell lines. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Apigenin inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, a key cause of aortic atherosclerosis and other vascular disorders. (herb-extract-supplier.com)
  • Apigenin similarly inhibits TNFα altitude by impeding NF-kb transcription and potentially TNFα-induced upregulation of add-on particle 1. (zspharmac.com)
  • Like other bioflavonoids, apigenin reduces oxidative stress, induces cell cycle inhibition, increases the efficacy of liver detoxification enzymes, and to some extent acts as an anti-inflammatory. (herb-extract-supplier.com)
  • 2019). According to the authors, apigenin induces a protective effect against neurotoxicity caused by the amyloid fragment β-25-35 in a rodent Alzheimer disease model (Nikbakht et al. (ac.ir)
  • Apigenin can inhibit lipid peroxidation. (herb-extract-supplier.com)
  • Apigenin is also a metal ion chelating agent, which can reduce its participation in the reaction of free radicals by chelating with metal ions, thereby reducing the generation of oxygen free radicals and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin as an anti-inflammatory compound acts as a protective agent in several disorders via inhibition of key inflammatory mediators, signaling pathways, and molecules. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Apigenin also ameliorated renal dysfunction in diabetic rats by suppressing inflammation through reduced secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 via MAPK inhibition. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Apigenin served as a potent therapy against UC in C57BL/6 mice through the inhibition of inflammatory cytokines,and COX-2, and through the reduction in immune cell infiltration in colon tissues [ 11 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Like other bioflavonoids, apigenin can minimize oxidative tension, cause cell cycle inhibition, rise liver detoxing enzymes, and act as an anti-inflammatory somewhat. (zspharmac.com)
  • Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that apigenin 3-acetate, apigenin, and methyl-prednisolone-acetate reduced Th1 cell proliferation to approximately 41%, 26%, and 33%, respectively, when compared to the inhibition of Th1 cell proliferation by dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). (mdnewsline.com)
  • Apigenin has antioxidant effect, can reduce the generation of oxygen free radicals, inhibit the reaction of lipid peroxide, and delay the aging of human body. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin is one of the known bioflavonoid compounds with high selectivity in inducing selective apoptosis of cancer cells in vivo. (herb-extract-supplier.com)
  • Apigenin is among the widely known bioflavonoid compounds that has high selectivity in causing careful apoptosis of cancer cells in vivo. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin contains a lot of minerals and vitamins, so apigenin has a wide range of antioxidant effects. (meetsupplement.com)
  • 2019). According to the authors, besides the antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties of apigenin that may prevent neurodegenerative damages in the hippocampal area, further mechanisms can be addressed. (ac.ir)
  • 2017). This phenomenon would mean that apigenin can exert both its antioxidant potential via the usual enzymatic reactive oxygen species scavenging system and the mitochondrial biogenesis via the PGC-1α/TFAM/NRF-1 pathway. (ac.ir)
  • Apigenin, an antioxidant in chamomile tea, may support better sleep. (straitstimes.com)
  • Apigenin" Encyclopedia , https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/14229 (accessed December 06, 2023). (encyclopedia.pub)
  • In conclusion, these results suggested the oxidative stress induced liver damage which may be due to the regulation of multiple genes by Apigenin at higher doses in Swiss mice. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Apigenin protects DNA from oxidative stress by binding to nucleic acids. (ijfs.ir)
  • There were no significant differences in the outcomes related to necrosis and early and late apoptosis of PBMCs derived from MS patients when the cells were treated with methyl-prednisolone-acetate, apigenin-3-acetate, and apigenin when compared with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). (mdnewsline.com)
  • Moreover, apigenin prevents cell apoptosis by suppressing ROS compounds ( 6 ) and decreasing the expression of caspase-3, caspase-9 and TNF-α ( 7 ). (ijfs.ir)
  • Apigenin, also known as apigenin, is a polyphenol substance and a bioflavonoid compound that we can find in a variety of plants. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin powder is a bioflavonoid and a very effective anticancer compound. (riottobotanicals.com)
  • Dried parsley can contain about 45 mg apigenin/gram of the herb, and dried chamomile flower about 3-5 mg/gram. (wikipedia.org)
  • In diabetic rats, apigenin reduces metabolic inflammation by successfully polarizing infiltrating macrophages to an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype by binding and activating PPAR-γ and the subsequent suppression of the NF-κB pathway [ 8 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • If you are looking to buy apigenin powder, please don't hesitate to contact us. (riottobotanicals.com)
  • Apigenin puts in neuroprotective results versus excitotoxicity and prevents calcium build-up in neural mitochondria. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin can reduce anxiety in sufficient doses, and thus may have neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing benefits. (gowinglife.com)
  • Apigenin calms, improves memory, improves sleep and improves learning. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin improves spatial working memory in Wistar rats. (ac.ir)
  • Apigenin has also been reported to attenuate inflammation and the resultant pathological alterations in rats fed with a high fat, fructose diet [ 9 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • We employed 126 male Wistar rats and put them into three groups: Apigenin (A), Control (C), and Sham (S) (Ap). (digiwire.co.in)
  • One study also found apigenin lowered blood glucose in diabetic rats. (gowinglife.com)
  • In a 2009 study , researchers gave rats apigenin and found that it stimulated nerve cell generation and improved the ability to learn and remember. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Finally, a flavanone synthase (FNS) enzyme oxidizes naringenin to apigenin. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2019). The Therapeutic Potential of Apigenin. (gowinglife.com)
  • These properties are comparable to the therapeutic potential of apigenin-3-acetate and the standard treatment with methyl-prednisolone-acetate. (mdnewsline.com)
  • Role of apigenin in chronic inflammatory diseases. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Apigenin has been shown to inhibit an important inflammatory biomarker, CD38, in a metabolic syndrome model, as well as decrease adipose tissue mass and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines [ 7 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Apigenin can also reduce inflammation via a number of other mechanisms, including reducing the production of inflammatory mediators and preventing the migration of inflammatory cells into tissues. (gowinglife.com)
  • Apigenin has different biological activities such as anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and anti-tumorigenic properties ( 4 , 5 ). (ijfs.ir)
  • In 2015, researchers behind a study in mice concluded that apigenin and apigenin-rich diets reduced the expression of certain inflammatory proteins. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • As the health effects of polyphenols depend on intake and bioavailability, the biological activities of apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone), an abundantly occurring flavone have, been extensively studied [ 1 ] [ 2 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • However, due to the poor water solubility and intestinal absorption of apigenin, its oral bioavailability is low, and its activity in vivo is low, which limits its application to some extent. (meetsupplement.com)
  • These results showed apigenin might inhibit the invasion and migration abilities of Caski cells by reducing the MMP-9 expression through suppressing the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Apigenin acts to suppress CD38 activity within cells, thereby fostering a rise in NAD+ levels. (longevitybox.co.uk)
  • At lower doses, apigenin can suppress inflammation, which is a major hallmark of ageing. (gowinglife.com)
  • Apigenin and the two glucopyranosides of apigenin can put in antidiabetic impacts in the body. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin also protects our heart and controls our blood pressure. (meetsupplement.com)
  • Apigenin in addition protects against the production of interleukin-4. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin is recommended for supplementation of the population. (meetsupplement.com)
  • What Is The Evidence Behind Apigenin Supplementation? (gowinglife.com)
  • Even though there is a relatively large and convincing amount of evidence to support the health benefits of apigenin, there is unfortunately a scarcity of human trials to support supplementation. (gowinglife.com)
  • Supplementation with apigenin is therefore unlikely to be detrimental, and has a reasonable chance of being beneficial. (gowinglife.com)
  • As a result, apigenin has gained a lot of interest in the past few years as a potential therapeutic agent to treat various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders [ 6 ] ( Figure 1 ). (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Apigenin is a substance with relatively high nutritional content, and it also has a certain effect of curing diseases. (herb-extract-supplier.com)
  • Apigenin can inhibit the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, thereby preventing hypertension, arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. (meetsupplement.com)
  • In the present study, Apigenin was administered intraperitoneally to Swiss mice at doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The study aims to assess apigenin and seashell nano-additives for their antifungal efficacy and their impact on the surface roughness of a soft denture liner . (bvsalud.org)
  • Apigenin prevents neurodegeneration in rat hippocampus. (ac.ir)
  • Apigenin prevents neurodegeneration by inducing PGC-1α. (ac.ir)
  • Apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), found in many plants, is a natural product belonging to the flavone class that is the aglycone of several naturally occurring glycosides. (wikipedia.org)
  • We found that apigenin could inhibit PMA-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was involved in the down-regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) at mRNA levels. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Apigenin is a compound found in a wide variety of herbs (particularly in chamomile) as well as some fruits and vegetables. (gowinglife.com)
  • In experiments using human cells, apigenin has been found to have a variety of anti-cancer effects. (gowinglife.com)
  • 3. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of methyl-prednisolone-acetate and apigenin 3-acetate was found to be 2.5 µM and 80 µM, respectively. (mdnewsline.com)
  • Increase in ALT, AST, ALP, ROS, ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH) and LPO, altered enzyme activities along with damaged histoarchitecture in the liver of 100 or 200 mg/kg Apigenin treated animals were found. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • DSpace at KIST: Apigenin isolated from Daphne genkwa Siebold et Zucc. (kist.re.kr)
  • It is primarily derived from the Umbelliferae plant Apigenin, and various other plants such as chamomile, lemon balm, perilla, and horsewhip. (zspharmac.com)
  • Apigenin is consisted of in the components of natural teas offered daily, generally from the dried out blossoms of Matricaria chamomile. (zspharmac.com)