Complete loss of phonation due to organic disease of the larynx or to nonorganic (i.e., psychogenic) causes.
A variety of techniques used to help individuals utilize their voice for various purposes and with minimal use of muscle energy.
A disorder whose predominant feature is a loss or alteration in physical functioning that suggests a physical disorder but that is actually a direct expression of a psychological conflict or need.

Hysterical aphonia--an analysis of 25 cases. (1/9)

Hysteria is a common neurotic disorder in psychiatric practice. Many of its conversion symptoms have not been studied in detail. In the present prospective study in a tertiary care teaching hospital, 25 cases of hysterical aphonia were analysed. There were 17 females and 8 males. Mean age of presentation was 18.4 years in females and 21.2 years in males. Majority of patients were literate upto primary class, belonging to joint family and had urban background. Duration of symptoms was within 2 weeks. Most common precipitating factor was stress of examination or failure followed by quarrels with peers or spouse. In 20% cases, cause was not known. Comorbid psychiatric disorders were found in 80% cases, the most common being mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (36%) followed by generalized anxiety disorder (20%).  (+info)

Is hysteria still prevailing? A retrospective study of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. (2/9)

A retrospective study was conducted in a psychiatric setup of S.P. Medical College, Bikaner (Raj.) to assess the social demographic and clinical characteristics of hysterical patients. The illness was more common in female patients. Most of the patients were young, married and illiterate. Nearly half of them had faced some stress prior to onset of their illness. Fits of unconsciousness and aphonia were the commonest presentation in female and male patients respectively. Duration of stay was 2-3 days and most of the patient responded well to different treatment modalities.  (+info)

Progressive anarthria with secondary parkinsonism: a clinico-pathological case report. (3/9)

The pathological process and lesion topography in patients with the syndrome of progressive aphasia are heterogeneous and few necropsy examination cases have been investigated. This is a case report of a 53 year old right handed man with progressive anarthria and secondary Parkinsonism over a period of six years. Positron emission tomography (PET) showed a decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the frontal cortex, which was more pronounced on the left. Neuropathology disclosed a spongiform vacuolation in layer II of the frontal cortex, mostly in the Broca area, and neuronal loss in the substantia nigra. This original case reinforces the view that there are different entities of the syndrome of progressive aphasia which can be identified on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and anatomical data.  (+info)

Psychogenic aphonia: no fixation even after a lengthy period of aphonia. (4/9)

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Surgical voice restoration after total laryngectomy: an overview. (5/9)

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The modification and generalization of voice loudness in a fifteen-year-old retarded girl. (6/9)

A fifteen-year-old severely disturbed girl was treated for aphonia. Because of the extent of her withdrawal, the subject was conditioned in a laboratory setting and received tokens for speaking loudly enough to operate a voice-operated relay. Conditioning at first consisted of saying 100 monosyllabic words, with the possibility of reinforcement on each word. Later, the subject was required to say a polysyllabic word, and finally, five or six words per token. The subject was shaped to speak with normal loudness in the laboratory, and generalization to a reading situation in the laboratory was measured and observed to occur, at first for a few minutes, and later for a longer period. Generalization to a reading situation in the classroom did not occur, but the subject's voice loudness also increased in the classroom when several new reinforcement contingencies were put into effect there.  (+info)

Bulbar symptoms and episodic aphonia associated with atlanto-occipital subluxation in ankylosing spondylitis. (7/9)

A patient with intermittent aphonia associated with atlanto-occipital subluxation due to ankylosing spondylitis is presented and discussed. The only other case from the literature is reviewed and compared with our patient, where symptoms and signs of episodic low bulbar disease, presumably due to intermittent vascular insufficiency, were relieved by external bracing.  (+info)

Rehabilitation of paralytic dysphonia. (8/9)

Vocal rehabilitation has been successful for patients with paralytic dysphonia. At the discretion of the laryngologist, vocal rehabilitation is used alone or in combination with intracordal injection. Except for post-surgical patients, a complete diagnostic evaluation is advisable before vocal therapy is undertaken. During vocal rehabilitation, pitch, volume, quality, breath support and the vocal image are realigned to afford an optimal and efficient voice. For the 18 patients completing vocal therapy, the results were excellent in 14 and good in four. Vocal therapy was completed within six months for 11 patients; seven were treated for periods ranging from six months to a year.  (+info)

Aphonia is a medical term that refers to the inability or difficulty in producing sounds or voiced speech. This condition arises when the vocal cords in the larynx (voice box) fail to vibrate or function properly, often due to damage, inflammation, or paralysis of the vocal cord muscles.

There are several possible causes for aphonia, including:

1. Vocal cord trauma: Overuse, misuse, or injury to the vocal cords can result in swelling, inflammation, and temporary or permanent damage, leading to aphonia.
2. Vocal cord paralysis: Damage to the nerves that control the vocal cord muscles (recurrent laryngeal nerve) may cause one or both of the vocal cords to become paralyzed, resulting in aphonia. This can occur due to various reasons, such as surgery, trauma, tumors, or neurological disorders like multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.
3. Laryngitis: Inflammation of the larynx (laryngitis) caused by viral or bacterial infections can lead to aphonia due to swelling and irritation of the vocal cords.
4. Vocal cord lesions: Benign or malignant growths on the vocal cords, such as polyps, nodules, or cancer, can interfere with their ability to vibrate and produce sound, resulting in aphonia.
5. Neurological conditions: Certain neurological disorders, like cerebral palsy, myasthenia gravis, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), can affect the nerves controlling the vocal cords and lead to aphonia.
6. Psychological factors: In some cases, psychological conditions such as anxiety, stress, or depression may cause a person to experience temporary aphonia due to muscle tension in the larynx. This is known as a conversion disorder or functional aphonia.

Treatment for aphonia depends on the underlying cause and may include voice therapy, medication, surgery, or other interventions. In cases of functional aphonia, addressing the psychological factors through counseling or relaxation techniques can help alleviate symptoms.

"Voice training" is not a term that has a specific medical definition in the field of otolaryngology (ear, nose, and throat medicine) or speech-language pathology. However, voice training generally refers to the process of developing and improving one's vocal skills through various exercises and techniques. This can include training in breath control, pitch, volume, resonance, articulation, and interpretation, among other aspects of vocal production. Voice training is often used to help individuals with voice disorders or professionals such as singers and actors to optimize their vocal abilities. In a medical context, voice training may be recommended or overseen by a speech-language pathologist as part of the treatment plan for a voice disorder.

Conversion disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by the presence of neurological symptoms, such as blindness, paralysis, or difficulty swallowing, that cannot be explained by a medical condition. These symptoms are thought to be caused by psychological factors, such as stress or trauma, and may be a way for the individual to express emotional distress or avoid certain situations.

The symptoms of conversion disorder are typically dramatic and can interfere significantly with a person's daily life. They may include:

* Loss of or alteration in physical senses (such as blindness, deafness, or loss of touch)
* Weakness or paralysis in a part or all of the body
* Difficulty swallowing or speaking
* Seizures or convulsions
* Inability to move certain parts of the body
* Tremors or shaking
* Loss of consciousness

It is important to note that conversion disorder is not a fake or intentional condition. Rather, it is a genuine medical condition that requires treatment. Treatment typically involves addressing any underlying psychological issues and helping the individual develop more effective ways of coping with stress and emotional distress.

Aphonia can also be caused by and is often accompanied by fear. Psychogenic aphonia is often seen in patients with underlying ... "Aphonia natural treatment". 2019-01-19. Roper, T. A. (2014). Clinical Skills - Page 162: Aphonia means "no sound". OUP Oxford. ... "Aphonia: Causes, Treatment". Muscle Tension Aphonia Video Example (Articles with short description, Short description matches ... Aphonia is defined as the inability to produce voiced sound. Damage to the nerve may be the result of surgery (e.g., ...
... Aph o*ny, n. [NL. aphonia, Gr. ?, fr. ? voiceless; a priv. + ? voice: cf. F. aphonie.] (Med.) Loss of voice or vocal ... Aphony - (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Aphony >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 aphony aphony aphonia Sgm: N 1 dumbness dumbness &c. & ... Aphony. Aphonia A*pho"ni*a, Aphony Aph"o*ny, n. [NL. aphonia, Gr. ?, fr. ? voiceless; a priv. + ? voice: cf. F. aphonie.] (Med ... Aphonia - A*pho ni*a, Aphony Aph o*ny, n. [NL. aphonia, Gr. ?, fr. ? voiceless; a priv. + ? voice: cf. F. aphonie.] (Med.) Loss ...
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A three to four day aphonia may be normal, but if it lasts longer it is time to intervene. If it is a question of aphonia or ... How to prevent and treat aphonia in cats. When we have a pet, it is our moral duty and not only to take care of its health, ... If your cat suffers from aphonia, it can also be a temporary problem but it is good to get to the bottom of the matter and not ... Equally fundamental is to understand what are the reasons that led the cat to this condition of aphonia. Here are the causes ...
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Every slight cold produces aphonia.. She received a dose of Phosph. CM., February 28, 1883. Had no return of cramp till August ...
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After two weeks he lost his voice or in other words he had a dissociative reaction of psychogenic aphonia. Still he was not ... Psychogenic aphonia is a conversion symptom, which arises following an unconscious psychological conflict. There were many ...
Frequency not reported: Vocal cord paralysis, aphonia/dysphonia/hoarseness, trigeminal neuralgia/facial pain, myoclonus, ...
https://www.futureofcapitalism.com/2010/01/what-a-phony. President Obama is at the point with me that I like him better if I ...
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Other manifestations include salivation, muscle twitching, diaphoresis, pleuritic chest pain, dysphagia, aphonia, and ...
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Common examples of conversion symptoms include blindness, paralysis, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), aphonia, amnesia ...
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Dysphonia or aphonia. Dysphonia is the impairment or inability to phonate. As a result, the voice becomes hoarse. In extreme ...
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Recurrent aphonia in schoolchildren. by GAVIN THOMAS August 7, 2019, 4:22 pm. ...
Symphonic Aphony is a dreamt concert, in which fragments of a musical and cinematic discourse are stitched together through ...
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  • Trouble speaking is also called aphonia or dysphonia. (buoyhealth.com)
  • Natural herbal remedy used for the relief of sore throat, coughs, hoarseness and aphonia. (kedaiubatminkang.com)
  • Aphonia - complete loss of voice. (nih.gov)
  • Other complaints included vocal fatigue(10%) and two cases had aphonia. (journalcra.com)