Wernicke Encephalopathy: An acute neurological disorder characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and disturbances of mental activity or consciousness. Eye movement abnormalities include nystagmus, external rectus palsies, and reduced conjugate gaze. THIAMINE DEFICIENCY and chronic ALCOHOLISM are associated conditions. Pathologic features include periventricular petechial hemorrhages and neuropil breakdown in the diencephalon and brainstem. Chronic thiamine deficiency may lead to KORSAKOFF SYNDROME. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1139-42; Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp452-3)Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Thiamine Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of THIAMINE in the diet, characterized by anorexia, irritability, and weight loss. Later, patients experience weakness, peripheral neuropathy, headache, and tachycardia. In addition to being caused by a poor diet, thiamine deficiency in the United States most commonly occurs as a result of alcoholism, since ethanol interferes with thiamine absorption. In countries relying on polished rice as a dietary staple, BERIBERI prevalence is very high. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1171)Aphasia, Primary Progressive: A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)Thiamine: 3-((4-Amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl)-5-(2- hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazolium chloride.Thyroid Crisis: A dangerous life-threatening hypermetabolic condition characterized by high FEVER and dysfunction of the cardiovascular, the nervous, and the gastrointestinal systems.Aphasia, Wernicke: Impairment in the comprehension of speech and meaning of words, both spoken and written, and of the meanings conveyed by their grammatical relationships in sentences. It is caused by lesions that primarily affect Wernicke's area, which lies in the posterior perisylvian region of the temporal lobe of the dominant hemisphere. (From Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p141; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p846)Anomia: A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)Aphasia, Conduction: A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Thyrotoxicosis: A hypermetabolic syndrome caused by excess THYROID HORMONES which may come from endogenous or exogenous sources. The endogenous source of hormone may be thyroid HYPERPLASIA; THYROID NEOPLASMS; or hormone-producing extrathyroidal tissue. Thyrotoxicosis is characterized by NERVOUSNESS; TACHYCARDIA; FATIGUE; WEIGHT LOSS; heat intolerance; and excessive SWEATING.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Primary Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia: A form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a progressive form of dementia characterized by motor speech impairment and AGRAMMATISM, with relative sparing of single word comprehension and semantic memory.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Language Therapy: Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Agraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Dyslexia, Acquired: A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Split-Brain Procedure: Complete severing of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. In humans it is usually performed to treat medically intractable, multifocal EPILEPSY. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS of split brain preparations are used in research.Corpus Callosum: Broad plate of dense myelinated fibers that reciprocally interconnect regions of the cortex in all lobes with corresponding regions of the opposite hemisphere. The corpus callosum is located deep in the longitudinal fissure.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Agenesis of Corpus Callosum: Birth defect that results in a partial or complete absence of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. It may be isolated or a part of a syndrome (e.g., AICARDI'S SYNDROME; ACROCALLOSAL SYNDROME; ANDERMANN SYNDROME; and HOLOPROSENCEPHALY). Clinical manifestations include neuromotor skill impairment and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY of variable severity.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Psychosurgery: Treatment of chronic, severe and intractable psychiatric disorders by surgical removal or interruption of certain areas or pathways in the brain, especially in the prefrontal lobes.Daucus carota: A plant species of the family APIACEAE that is widely cultivated for the edible yellow-orange root. The plant has finely divided leaves and flat clusters of small white flowers.Frustration: The motivational and/or affective state resulting from being blocked, thwarted, disappointed or defeated.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Aphasia, Broca: An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Otolithic Membrane: A gelatinous membrane overlying the acoustic maculae of SACCULE AND UTRICLE. It contains minute crystalline particles (otoliths) of CALCIUM CARBONATE and protein on its outer surface. In response to head movement, the otoliths shift causing distortion of the vestibular hair cells which transduce nerve signals to the BRAIN for interpretation of equilibrium.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Catatonia: A neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by one or more of the following essential features: immobility, mutism, negativism (active or passive refusal to follow commands), mannerisms, stereotypies, posturing, grimacing, excitement, echolalia, echopraxia, muscular rigidity, and stupor; sometimes punctuated by sudden violent outbursts, panic, or hallucinations. This condition may be associated with psychiatric illnesses (e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; MOOD DISORDERS) or organic disorders (NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME; ENCEPHALITIS, etc.). (From DSM-IV, 4th ed, 1994; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Naphthacenes: Polyacenes with four ortho-fused benzene rings in a straight linear arrangement. This group is best known for the subclass called TETRACYCLINES.Speech-Language Pathology: The study of speech or language disorders and their diagnosis and correction.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Computers, Handheld: A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.Libraries, DentalEducational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Library Materials: Print and non-print materials collected, processed, and stored by libraries. They comprise books, periodicals, pamphlets, reports, microforms, maps, manuscripts, motion pictures, and all other forms of audiovisual records. (Harrod, The Librarians' Glossary, 4th ed, p497)

Plasticity of language-related brain function during recovery from stroke. (1/57)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to correlate functional recovery from aphasia after acute stroke with the temporal evolution of the anatomic, physiological, and functional changes as measured by MRI. METHODS: Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast and echo-planar MRI were used to map language comprehension in 6 normal adults and in 2 adult patients during recovery from acute stroke presenting with aphasia. Perfusion, diffusion, sodium, and conventional anatomic MRI were used to follow physiological and structural changes. RESULTS: The normal activation pattern for language comprehension showed activation predominately in left-sided Wernicke's and Broca's areas, with laterality ratios of 0.8 and 0.3, respectively. Recovery of the patient confirmed as having a completed stroke affecting Broca's area occurred rapidly with a shift of activation to the homologous region in the right hemisphere within 3 days, with continued rightward lateralization over 6 months. In the second patient, in whom mapping was performed fortuitously before stroke, recovery of a Wernicke's aphasia showed a similar increasing rightward shift in activation recruitment over 9 months after the event. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of aphasia in adults can occur rapidly and is concomitant with an activation pattern that changes from left to a homologous right hemispheric pattern. Such recovery occurs even when the stroke evolves to completion. Such plasticity must be considered when evaluating stroke interventions based on behavioral and neurological measurements.  (+info)

Training-induced brain plasticity in aphasia. (2/57)

It has long been a matter of debate whether recovery from aphasia after left perisylvian lesions is mediated by the preserved left hemispheric language zones or by the homologous right hemisphere regions. Using PET, we investigated the short-term changes in the cortical network involved in language comprehension during recovery from aphasia. In 12 consecutive measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), four patients with Wernicke's aphasia, caused by a posterior left middle cerebral artery infarction, were tested with a language comprehension task. Comprehension was estimated directly after each scan with a modified version of the Token Test. In the interval between the scans, the patients participated in brief, intense language comprehension training. A significant improvement in performance was observed in all patients. We correlated changes in blood flow measured during the language comprehension task with the scores achieved in the Token Test. The regions which best correlated with the training-induced improvement in verbal comprehension were the posterior part of the right superior temporal gyrus and the left precuneus. This study supports the role of the right hemisphere in recovery from aphasia and demonstrates that the improvement in auditory comprehension induced by specific training is associated with functional brain reorganization.  (+info)

Atypical and typical presentations of Alzheimer's disease: a clinical, neuropsychological, neuroimaging and pathological study of 13 cases. (3/57)

There has been increasing awareness that some slowly progressive focal cortical syndromes can be the presenting features of Alzheimer's disease, but pathological evidence has been sparse. This clinico-pathological series presents our experience with pathologically proven atypical as well as typical Alzheimer's disease presentations. We report and compare four patterns of presentation: a typical pattern with initial amnesic syndrome (n = 4 cases), progressive visual dysfunction (n = 1), progressive biparietal syndrome (n = 2) and progressive aphasia (n = 6). The aphasic presentations include both fluent and non-fluent aphasic syndromes. The neuropsychological profiles and neuroimaging clearly reflect the presenting clinical features, and show a close relationship to the distribution of pathology in these cases. Of note was the sparing of medial temporal structures (hippocampus and/or entorhinal cortex) in several aphasic cases and the severe occipito-parietal involvement in those with prominent visuospatial disorders at presentation. Our data demonstrate the wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease presentations. The recognition of atypical presentations of Alzheimer's disease is important when attempting to make an early accurate pre-morbid diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease.  (+info)

Transcortical sensory aphasia: revisited and revised. (4/57)

Transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA) is characterized by impaired auditory comprehension with intact repetition and fluent speech. We induced TSA transiently by electrical interference during routine cortical function mapping in six adult seizure patients. For each patient, TSA was associated with multiple posterior cortical sites, including the posterior superior and middle temporal gyri, in classical Wernicke's area. A number of TSA sites were immediately adjacent to sites where Wernicke's aphasia was elicited in the same patients. Phonological decoding of speech sounds was assessed by auditory syllable discrimination and found to be intact at all sites where TSA was induced. At a subset of electrode sites where the pattern of language deficits otherwise resembled TSA, naming and word reading remained intact. Language lateralization testing by intracarotid amobarbital injection showed no evidence of independent right hemisphere language. These results suggest that TSA may result from a one-way disruption between left hemisphere phonology and lexical-semantic processing.  (+info)

Vascular aphasias: main characteristics of patients hospitalized in acute stroke units. (5/57)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Aphasia is frequent in stroke patients and is associated with poor prognosis. However, characteristics and determinants of vascular aphasias remain controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate aphasia characteristics at the acute stage in patients admitted to a stroke unit. METHODS: The study was performed in 308 patients consecutively assessed with a standardized aphasia battery. RESULTS: Aphasia was observed in 207 patients; global and nonclassified aphasias accounted for 50% of aphasic syndromes at the acute stage, whereas classic aphasias (Wernicke's, Broca's, transcortical, and subcortical aphasias) were less frequent. Age differed across aphasic syndromes in ischemic stroke patients only; patients with conduction aphasia were younger, and patients with subcortical aphasia were older. Sex did not significantly differ across aphasic syndromes. The presence of a previous stroke was more frequent in nonclassified aphasia. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows (1) that vascular aphasias are frequently severe or nonclassic at the acute stage, a finding explained in part by the presence of a previous stroke; (2) that the age effect is due mainly to its influence on infarct location; and (3) that the main determinant of aphasia characteristics is lesion location.  (+info)

Speech production: Wernicke, Broca and beyond. (6/57)

We investigated the brain systems engaged during propositional speech (PrSp) and two forms of non- propositional speech (NPrSp): counting and reciting overlearned nursery rhymes. Bilateral cerebral and cerebellar regions were involved in the motor act of articulation, irrespective of the type of speech. Three additional, left-lateralized regions, adjacent to the Sylvian sulcus, were activated in common: the most posterior part of the supratemporal plane, the lateral part of the pars opercularis in the posterior inferior frontal gyrus and the anterior insula. Therefore, both NPrSp and PrSp were dependent on the same discrete subregions of the anatomically ill-defined areas of Wernicke and Broca. PrSp was also dependent on a predominantly left-lateralized neural system distributed between multi-modal and amodal regions in posterior inferior parietal, anterolateral and medial temporal and medial prefrontal cortex. The lateral prefrontal and paracingulate cortical activity observed in previous studies of cued word retrieval was not seen with either NPrSp or PrSp, demonstrating that normal brain- language representations cannot be inferred from explicit metalinguistic tasks. The evidence from this study indicates that normal communicative speech is dependent on a number of left hemisphere regions remote from the classic language areas of Wernicke and Broca. Destruction or disconnection of discrete left extrasylvian and perisylvian cortical regions, rather than the total extent of damage to perisylvian cortex, will account for the qualitative and quantitative differences in the impaired speech production observed in aphasic stroke patients.  (+info)

Effect of lexical cues on the production of active and passive sentences in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia. (7/57)

This study compared the sentence production abilities of individuals with Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia in an attempt to explore the extent to which impaired lexical retrieval impedes sentence production. The ability to produce active and passive reversible and non-reversible sentences was examined when varying amounts of lexical information was provided. The results showed that both Wernicke's and Broca's aphasic individuals were impaired in passive sentence production and that these difficulties were not overcome when lexical cues (the relevant nouns and uninflected verb) were provided. However when auxiliary and past tense morphemes were provided along with the verb stem, production of passive sentences improved drastically for both groups. Analysis of error patterns, however, revealed differences between the two groups, suggesting that Broca's aphasic subjects may find passive sentences difficult due to problems with retrieving the relevant grammatical morphemes. Subjects with Wernicke's aphasia may have been unable to automatically access the passive sentence structure.  (+info)

Effect of typicality on online category verification of animate category exemplars in aphasia. (8/57)

Normal young, elderly, Broca's aphasic, and Wernicke's aphasic individuals participated in an online category verification task where primes were superordinate category labels while targets were either typical or atypical examples of animate categories or nonmembers belonging to inanimate categories. The reaction time to judge whether the target belonged to the preceding category label was measured. Results indicated that all four groups made significantly greater errors on atypical examples compared to typical examples. Young and elderly individuals, and Broca's aphasic patients performed similarly on the verification task; these groups demonstrated faster reaction times on typical examples than atypical examples. Wernicke's aphasic patients made the most errors on the task and were slowest to respond than any other participant group. Also, these participants were not significantly faster at accepting correct typical examples compared to correct atypical examples. The results from the four groups are discussed with relevance to prototype/family resemblance models of typicality.  (+info)

Background: A 59-year-old, male, with a history of a left-sided MCA stroke, presented with right hand and face numbness, right hand weakness, incomplete Wernickes receptive aphasia, and confusion. His Graded Symptom Checklist (GSC) severity was 78/162. Standard Assessment of Cognition (SAC) was 0/30. Trails A (TA) was unable to be completed within the two-minute time deadline. Processing Speed (PS) coding test was unable to be performed due to delays between each symbol.. Methods: A five-day multimodal program of receptor based neurological rehabilitation was administered three times per day, one hour per session. Each session consisted of electrical somatosensory stimulation on the second branch of his trigeminal nerve on the right and bilaterally on the third branch of his trigeminal nerve, vestibular rehabilitation exercises, therapeutic exercises, hand-eye coordination exercises, Carrick eye exercises, and off-vertical axis rotations.. Results: At the end of five days of treatment there ...
When addressing Wernickes aphasia, according to Bakheit et al. (2007), the lack of awareness of the language impairments, a common characteristic of Wernickes aphasia, may affect the rate and extent of therapy outcomes.[55] Klebic et al. (2011) suggests that people benefit from continuing therapy upon discharge from the hospital to ensure generalization.[53] Robey (1998) determined that at least 2 hours of treatment per week is recommended for making significant language gains.[52] Spontaneous recovery may cause some language gains, but without speech-language therapy, the outcomes can be half as strong as those with therapy.[52]. When addressing Brocas aphasia, better outcomes occur when the person participates in therapy, and treatment is more effective than no treatment for people in the acute period.[52] Two or more hours of therapy per week in acute and post-acute stages produced the greatest results.[52] High-intensity therapy was most effective, and low-intensity therapy was almost ...
A psychological or psychodynamic hypothesis for the aggressiveness of WA patients is based on the assumption that they are deeply unaware of their own linguistic difficulties, are not able to monitor their own verbal output, and do not understand others responses to their language. Thus, WA patients should experience a condition that inevitably engenders frustration, irritability, and feelings of isolation. How do these persons think ant talk to themselves without understanding? How is free will without language? Physical aggressiveness and violence might emerge when there is no freedom to intervene in a world where the words lost their meaning and every one speaks a foreign language (as in the Tower of Babel).. ...
Previous research has shown that comprehension of complex sentences involving wh-movement (e.g., object-relative clauses) elicits activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left posterior temporal cortex. However, relatively little is known about the neural correlates of processing passive sentences, which differ from other complex sentences in terms of representation (i.e., noun phrase (NP)-movement) and processing (i.e., the time course of syntactic reanalysis). In the present study, 27 adults (14 younger and 13 older) listened to passive and active sentences and performed a sentence-picture verification task using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Passive sentences, relative to active sentences, elicited greater activation in bilateral IFG and left temporo-occipital regions. Participant age did not significantly affect patterns of activation. Consistent with previous research, activation in left temporo-occipital cortex likely reflects thematic reanalysis processes, whereas,
Auditory comprehension deficit symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Auditory comprehension deficit (Auditory Processing Disorder) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
Abstract: The relationship between recursive sentence embedding and theory-of-mind (ToM) inference is investigated in three persons with Brocas aphasia, two persons with Wernickes aphasia, and six persons with mild and moderate Alzheimers disease (AD). We asked questions of four types about photographs of various real-life situations. Type 4 questions asked participants about intentions, thoughts, or utterances of the characters in the pictures ("What may X be thinking/asking Y to do?"). The expected answers typically involved subordinate clauses introduced by conjunctions or direct quotations of the characters utterances. Brocas aphasics did not produce answers with recursive sentence embedding. Rather, they projected themselves into the characters mental states and gave direct answers in the first person singular, with relevant ToM content. We call such replies "situative statements." Where the question concerned the mental state of the character but did not require an answer with ...
Pegs husband, Scott, had severe Wernickes aphasia. She enjoyed the time to herself each day, but particularly learning how to help Scott continue to get better.My name is Peg Garber, and were from
Children with specific language impairment (SLI) have distinctive impairments in the comprehension of sentences that involve long-distance syntactic relationships. This has been interpreted as evidence for impairment in an innate grammatical module. An alternative theory attributes such difficulties to lower level problems with speech perception or deficits in phonological working memory. These theoretical accounts were contrasted using comprehension data from three sub-groups: 20 children with SLI, 19 children with mild-moderate hearing loss, and normally developing children matched on age and/or language level. There were close similarities between the hearing-impaired and SLI groups on a measure of phoneme perception. Children with SLI did poorly on tests assessing knowledge of Binding principles and in assigning thematic roles in passive sentences whereas hearing-impaired children performed close to control levels, indicating that poor speech perception cannot account for this pattern of deficit.
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Sounds produced by human or mechanical sources are recognized by comparison of certain waveform characteristic ratios with prestored ratios. Transitions and transition glides of characteristics are used to select certain stored groups of ratios for comparing.
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[Site Creators Note: this is a compilation of posts clipped together] Told by: Amy One of our precious babies has a life threatening birth defect. We are faced now with planning a birth and funeral, all at the same time. Certainly, we are asking God for a miracle, but at the same time, facing the…
People suffering from damage to this area may show a condition called Brocas aphasia (sometimes known as expressive aphasia, motor aphasia, or nonfluent aphasia), which makes them unable to create grammatically-complex sentences: their speech is often described as telegraphic and contains little but content words. Patients are usually aware that they cannot speak properly. Comprehension in Brocas aphasia is relatively normal, although many studies have demonstrated that Brocas aphasics have trouble understanding certain kinds of syntactically complex sentences. [6] This type of aphasia can be contrasted with Wernickes aphasia, named for Karl Wernicke, which is characterized by damage to more posterior regions of the left hemisphere in the superior temporal lobe. Wernickes aphasia manifests as a more pronounced impairment in comprehension. Thus, while speech production remains normal grammatically, it is nonetheless often roundabout, vague, or meaningless. It is therefore also known as ...
... : The disorder that makes you lose your words - Susan Wortman-Jutt, Fluent Aphasia (Wernickes Aphasia), Pinegrove- Aphasia (Acoustic), Expressive Aphasia - Sarah Scott - Teenage Stroke Survivor, Pinegrove - Aphasia (Official Audio)
NIMHANS 2018-GUIDANCE SERIES- APHASIAS WERNICKEs APHASIA[AIIMS MAY-1998***] * Here comprehension is impaired. *Fluency is preserved. *It is also called as Jargon Aphasia and is associated with Neologisms. * Repetition, Naming, reading, writing is also impaired. *The common cause is and emboli to Inferior Division of MCA. *This involves the wernickes area in the posterior. 1/3 of superoir. Temporal sulcus. (sensory speech area). *Intracerebral hemorrhage, severe head trauma, or neoplasm are other causes. Insight is typically lost* BROCAS APHASIA[AI-2007***] * In this condition comprehension is preserved. *Fluency is decreased. *It is called as Bound morpheme- agrammatism. *Speech is telegraphic but informative. *Insight is preserved*. *The common cause is infarction in Brocas area and is due to occlusion of the superior division of the middle cerebral artery, which involves posterior part of Inferior Frontal Gyrus CONDUCTION APHASIA. * It is due to functional disconnection between Brocas, ...
There are many types of aphasia, which are usually diagnosed by which area of the language-dominant side of the brain is affected and the extent of the damage.. People with Brocas aphasia, for example, have damage to the front portion of the language-dominant side of the brain. They may eliminate the articles "and" and "the" from their language, and speak in short, but meaningful, sentences. They usually can understand some speech of others.. Those with Wernickes aphasia have damage to the side portion of the language-dominant part of the brain. They may speak in long confusing sentences, add unnecessary words, or create new words. They usually have difficulty understanding the speech of others.. Global aphasia is the result of damage to a large portion of the language-dominant side of the brain. People with global aphasia have difficulties with speaking or comprehending language.. ...
Symptoms of brain injuries can also be influenced by the location of the injury and as a result impairments are specific to the part of the brain affected. Lesion size is correlated with severity, recovery, and comprehension.[citation needed] Brain injuries often create impairment or disability that can vary greatly in severity.. In cases of severe brain injuries, the likelihood of areas with permanent disability is great, including neurocognitive deficits, delusions (often, to be specific, monothematic delusions), speech or movement problems, and intellectual disability. There may also be personality changes. The most severe cases result in coma or even persistent vegetative state. Even a mild incident can have long-term effects or cause symptoms to appear years later.[citation needed]. Studies show there is a correlation between brain lesion and language, speech, and category-specific disorders. Wernickes aphasia is associated with anomia, unknowingly making up words (neologisms), and ...
This paper shows that some individuals with Down syndrome are capable of producing, imitating (repeating) and comprehending passive sentences, even though group studies indicate that this is not the norm. Experimental tests of elicited production, repetition and comprehension of passive and active sentences applied in ten adolescents with Down syndrome, speakers of Portuguese, showed that out of the ten adolescents, one, Fa, is able to produce, imitate and comprehend passive sentences. It is hypothesised that, when there is no comprehension, or when the comprehension of reversible passives is unstable, the passive is understood as active, because the first noun of the passive sentence is interpreted as agent/causer of the action/non-action. This hypothesis is strong inasmuch as it assumes that both active and passive have very similar initial derivations. There is not, however, strong evidence that the nine adolescents interpret the passive as active.
In this course you will learn how passive sentences differ from active sentences and what role verbs play. Topic: | pt-BR - 1309 - 68187
Memory for Sentences The context of a sentence aids in recall of the words within it. As with memory for words, counting syllables may be a more accurate way to predict the length of text a student can recall. 1. Select text within the students receptive language level. Based on the students auditory memory for words, break the text into meaningful phrases. Each phrase should contain the number of syllables (plus or minus one) corresponding to the students recall for words, as established in the previous task. Do not break up syntactic phrases (e.g., prepositional, adverbial, etc.). 2. Explain the task to the student. Read the first chunk, and have the student repeat it verbatim. The student should repeat each morpheme (e.g. prefixes and word endings). 3. If there are no errors, repeat Step 2. If there are errors in repetition of words, address them as described here. - If a word is omitted, repeat the entire phrase. If it is omitted again, say, "You skipped a word," and repeat the phrase ...
The so-called cocktail party-problem has already kept scientists busy for decades. How is it possible for the brain to filter familiar voices out of background noise? It is a long-standing hypothesis that we create a kind of sound library in the auditory cortex of the brain during the course of our lives. Professor Christian Leibold and Dr. Gonzalo Otazu, members of the Bernstein Center Munich and engaged at the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität (LMU) Munich now show in a new model how the brain can compare stored and perceived sounds in a particularly efficient manner. Figuratively speaking, current models operate on the following principle: An archivist (possibly the brain region thalamus) compares the incoming sound with the individual entries in the library, and receives the degree of matching for each entry. Usually, however, several entries fit similarly well, so the archivist does not know which result is actually the right one. The new model is different: as previously the archivist ...
Comments: Restricted Boltzmann Machine, RBM, Conditional RBM, CRBM, Deep Belief Net, DBN, Conditional Neural Network, CLNN, Masked Conditional Neural Network, MCLNN, Environmental Sound Recognition, ESR ...
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Different explanations and subtypes of conduction aphasia are analyzed. Characteristics of literal paraphasias in parietal-insular conduction aphasia are discussed, emphasizing that paraphasias in conduction aphasia are articulatory-based (articulatory literal paraphasias) and due mainly to phoneme substitutions and phoneme deletions; they result basically in switches in phoneme manner and place of articulation. Similarities between errors in ideomotor apraxia and conduction aphasia language deficits are presented. It is proposed that language deviations (in oral as in written language) in conduction aphasia can be understood as a segmentary apraxia of speech.
Four aspects of auditory comprehension were compared in 44 normal children ages 4 to 9, in 12 normal adults, and in 52 aphasics of 5 diagnostic classes: Brocas, Wernickes, conduction, anomic, and global aphasics. The 4 aspects studied were breadth of vocabulary, auditory sequential pointing-span, comprehension of directional prepositions, and recognition of correct grammatical usage of prepositions. The aphasics patterns of success were all different from those of the children, and the diagnostic subgroups could be distinguished from each other by a discriminant analysis. The mean pointing-span of the best aphasic group (anomics) was below the level of 6-year-olds. Brocas aphasics had by far the poorest score. It is concluded that auditory comprehension is multidimensional, and that its pattern of disturbance is characteristic for different aphasic subgroups.. ...
As it happens, Cynthia Thompson and Miseon Lee recently published just such a replication (well, they published it in 2009, but one doesnt always hear about papers right away). Its a nice study with 5 Brocas aphasics, published in the Journal of Neurolinguistics. They tested both sentence comprehension and sentence production, finding that while passive sentences were harder overall, experiencer-subject verbs (like/hate/fear) were easier in the active form and experiencer-object verbs (delight/anger/frighten) were easier in the passive form. This effect was much more pronounced in sentence production than comprehension (in the latter case, it was not strictly significant), most likely because comprehension is easier ...
To understand the symptoms, recall that Brocas area is associated roughly with expression, Wernickes area with comprehension. With both areas intact but the neural connections between them broken, there is the curious condition where the patient can understand what is being said but cannot repeat it (or repeats it incorrectly). This patient will also end up saying something inappropriate or wrong, realize his/her mistake, but continue making further mistakes while trying to correct it. ...
Understanding language is significant to social reciprocity within family, peer groups, professional settings, and everyday society. When an individual is diagnosed with aphasia, specifically Wer
Language processing is dynamic and requires the participation of both cerebral hemispheres. The left hemisphere (LH) is considered to be the language dominant hemisphere, however, the right hemisphere (RH) is also accepted to play an important role in language processing. The RH has been linked with processing of discourse, comprehension of inferences, ambiguity and metaphoric language, and underlying much of this, is its role in lexical-semantic processing [see for a review of RH language processing [1]]. According to dynamic models of cognitive functioning bilateral lexical-semantic processing will involve both interhemispheric activation and inhibition [2]. The language dominant LH is suggested to inhibit aspects of RH participation in order to maximize the efficiency of word level processing and meaning selection [2-4]. Interhemispheric inhibition has been suggested to limit the RHs ability to perform to its maximum semantic processing capacity under normal processing conditions, and to ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Three studies of deficits in pantomimic expression and pantomimic recognition in aphasia. AU - Duffy, R. J.. AU - Duffy, J. R.. PY - 1981. Y1 - 1981. N2 - Studies were conducted to investigate aphasic deficits in pantomimic behaviors. Three groups of subjects were used: 47 aphasics; 27 right-hemisphere-damaged; and 11 controls. Study I replicates a previous study of pantomimic recognition deficits (Duffy, Duffy, & Pearson, 1975) and essentially duplicates the previous findings of significant deficits of pantomimic recognition in aphasic subjects that are highly correlated with their verbal deficits. Study II examines the relationship between deficits in pantomimic recognition and expression; and the relationships between these two nonverbal behaviors and aphasic verbal deficits. Zero order correlations, partial correlations, and multiple regression analyses are presented. The results show that aphasics exhibit significant deficits in both pantomimic expression and recognition; ...
The project will be conducted with Spanish-English bilingual and English-speaking non-bilingual UTEP students to examine how exposures to words elicit faster and more accurate spoken production of those words. Repetition-priming experiments will compare the effects of visual and auditory comprehension exposures on production, test whether repeated articulation is facilitated in bilinguals, and explore and compare the dynamics of these effects ...
|p|Simplify arithmetic with speech output. Voices numeric entries and computations in easy-to-understand speech Choose between complete number speech (seventy-eight) or digit-by-digit reading (seven, eight) for computation output. Includes volume con
Biology Assignment Help, Defects of nervous system, DEFECT S OF NERVOUS SYSTEM - 1. Ataxia - Lack of muscle-cordination due to damage of cerebellum. 2. Dyslexia - In ability of a person to comprehense written language. 3. Aphasia - Due to defect of wernickles area inabi
Aphasic symptoms are typically associated with lesions of the left fronto-temporal cortex. Interestingly, aphasic symptoms have also been described in pati
TY - JOUR. T1 - What happens when they think they are right? Error awareness analysis of sentence comprehension deficits in aphasia. AU - Arantzeta, Miren. AU - Webster, Janet. AU - Laka, Itziar. AU - Martínez-Zabaleta, Maite. AU - Howard, David. N1 - Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.. PY - 2018. Y1 - 2018. N2 - Background: Comprehension of non-canonical sentences is frequently characterised by chance level performance in people with aphasia (PWA). Chance level performance has been interpreted as guessing, but online data does not support this rendering. It is still not clear whether the incorrect sentence processing is guided by the compensatory strategies that PWA might employ to overcome linguistic difficulties. Aims: We aim to study to what extent people with non-fluent aphasia are aware of their sentence comprehension ...
Aphasia usually results from lesions to the language-relevant areas of the temporal and parietal cortex of the brain, such as Brocas area, Wernickes area, and the neural pathways between them. These areas are almost always located in the left hemisphere, and in most people this is where the ability to produce and comprehendlanguage is found. However, in a very small number of people, language ability is found in the right hemisphere. In either case, damage to these language areas can be caused by a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other brain injury. Aphasia may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor or progressive neurological disease, e.g., Alzheimers or Parkinsons disease. It may also be caused by a sudden hemorrhagic event within the brain. Certain chronic neurological disorders, such as epilepsy or migraine, can also include transient aphasia as a prodromal or episodic symptom. Aphasia is also listed as a rare side effect of the fentanyl patch, an opioid used to control ...
The present study investigated the difficulties encountered by children with nonverbal learning disability (NLD) and reading disability (RD) when processing spatial information derived from descriptions, based on the assumption that both groups should find it more difficult than matched controls, but for different reasons, i.e. due to a memory encoding difficulty in cases of RD and to spatial information comprehension problems in cases of NLD. Spatial descriptions from both survey and route perspectives were presented to 9- to 12-year-old children divided into three groups: NLD (N=12); RD (N=12), and typically-developing controls (TD; N=15); then participants completed a sentence verification task and a memory for locations task. The sentence verification task was presented in two conditions: in one the children could refer to the text while answering the questions (i.e., text present condition), and in the other the text was withdrawn (i.e., text absent condition). Results showed that the RD group
This is a survey of techniques that have been used to test language comprehension. The study of research completed in this field points up the fact that there is no single technique that universally gives valid and reliable information. Various definitions of language comprehension are examined with special emphasis placed on implications for the teacher and the learner. The author develops a classification of procedures for testing comprehension on the basis of a survey of procedures followed in psychometric and experimental investigations. (RL)
The use of language in everyday life requires the participation of numerous regions of the brain as well as the intricate web of fiber pathways that connect the...
Target auditory comprehension, mental manipulation, higher level concepts, and problem solving for middle, junior high, and high school students with logic puzzles for Speech Language Pathologists. Many language impaired students have difficulty reasoning (especially for
View Notes - 9.5.06 from OLS 274 at Purdue. -auditory hallucinations-severe deficits in language comprehension and production-amnesia Phenotype:-physical, behavioral, psychological features-that are
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|i|Background/Aims:|/i| The most devastating features of Alz-heimers disease (AD) are often the behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD). There is controversy as to whethe
List of words make out of Perseverations. Anagrams of word Perseverations. Words made after scrabbling Perseverations. Word Creation helps in Anagrams and Puzzles.
Improve direction-following by targeting the underlying processes of language comprehension and reasoning. Clients follow simple to complex directions with varied content and formats.
MS HISTORY Name: Pat Grace-Farfaglia: Male/Female: F Age: 55 Date(s) type of neurological diagnosis : 05/09/2006 RRMS Lesion locations (most affected side, if known), number: Lesions vary in size and shape and allocated for the most part peripherally. Also, diffuse ...
Seeing that interaction with projections on any surface could be a powerful technology, in 1998 they had turned the GestureXtreme system on its head to invent the "Worlds First Interactive Projected Surfaces". The GestureFX, (GestureFX) be your results on monitoring, then the download language comprehension. watch other tools to visit download language comprehension a data, features and Colombian balance restaurants to the next library. With your download language comprehension a biological perspective from Inventor Ideas, the Inventor stomach has announced and launched every ability. sources compare faster cookies download language comprehension a biological and faster LED motivation for cross-cultural structures, falling up the dedit profession. AnyCAD discusses prospective and correct download language comprehension a biological shipping. It much is exclusive download for Inventor 2017 to 2018. Pacific Northern of Carrollton, Texas, is download language TextilesCovers in able software ...
Experimental studies have reported a close association between temporal information processing (TIP) and language comprehension. Brain-injured subjects with aphasia show disturbed TIP which was evidenced in elevated temporal order threshold (TOT) as compared to control subjects. The present study is aimed at improving auditory speech comprehension in aphasic subjects using a specific temporal treatment. Fourteen patients having deficits in both speech comprehension and TIP were tested. The Token Test, phoneme discrimination tests and Voice-Onset-Time Test were employed to assess speech comprehension. The TOT was measured using two 10 ms tones (400, 3000Hz) presented binaurally. The patients participated in eight 45-minute sessions of either the specific temporal treatment (n=7) aimed at improving the perception of sequencing abilities, or in a non-temporal control treatment (n=7) on volume discrimination. The temporal treatment yielded an improvement in TIP. Moreover, a transfer of improvement from the
Take yesterday for an example. Two of the lights in my building started to flicker, and completely predictably, this did a number on my ability to talk. As soon as I saw the first light, I reported it (seriously those are a safety risk, photosensitive epilepsy exists, my losing speech is nowhere near the worst thing that could happen because of a flickering fluorescent.) I also knew that I needed to make sure I had a workable communication method other than speech at all times for the rest of the day. As it turned out, speech stuck around until about 1pm, then I got it back briefly around 2:40. It went kaput again right before 3 and came back around 4, after which it was iffy but extant for the rest of the day. Two of the three no-speech hours, I wrote on a white board to communicate. Writing on a white board is definitely my most-used "AAC ...
Twenty Brocas aphasia patients were stimulated with four cues in a picture-naming task. Among the severe aphasics in the group, presentation of a word to be imitated was the most effective cue and presentation of the initial syllable of the word ranked second. Sentence completion and printed word cues were equally effective and ranked third. Mild aphasic patients responded equally well to all four classes of cues. Reliability measures indicated that the order of potency of cues for the severe group was stable over time. Oral apraxia did not appear to contribute significantly to the severity of Brocas aphasia in any of these subjects. Possible explanations are presented for the effectiveness of cues studied.
The study aims to examine the combined effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆-9-THC or THC) and iomazenil on thinking, perception, mood, memory, attention, and electrical activity of the brain (EEG). THC is the active ingredient of marijuana, cannabis, ganja, or pot. Iomazenil is a drug that works opposite to drugs like valium. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the administration of iomazenil will alter the effects of THC ...
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Cut an egg carton in half lengthwise, turn it upside down, and color or paint each of the 6 protruding sections a different color. Next, find a puppet or an animal with a large mouth. Find small "food" items to feed the puppet. These could be marbles or pretend food. Tell your child that you are going to sing silly songs to help feed the very hungry animal! Model a sequence of three sounds varying in intonation tapping the egg cartons to pace each sound as they are sung. Different intonation patterns can include rising/falling pitch or increase/decreased loudness on individual sounds. For example, " ba BA ba". Think of the NBC studio signature tone. Once the silly song is imitated you can feed the hungry animal! Using rhythm and a singsong voice has been proven to help facilitate speech output ...
According to the W-G model, initial visual and auditory language stimuli are processed in their respective primary and secondary cortical sensory areas of the left hemisphere: (l) Broadmanns areas 17, 18, and 19 of the occipital lobe for vision; (2) areas 41 and 42 of the temporal lobe for audition. The sensory code is then conveyed to (3) the angular gyrus, an area of association cortex specialized for the integration of visual, auditory, and tactile information into a phonetic or auditory code important for both speech and writing. This integrated representation of the initial stimulus is then fed forward to (4) Wernickes area, where the code is not merely registered as language [i.e., not mere noise], but also associated with meaning. On this model, Wernickes area is the [only] site of the stored meanings of words. Should it be damaged, the ability to comprehend language is lost, a disorder called Wernickes aphasia. Once associated with meaning, the modified neural code for the initial ...
A probe conducted on the brain by researchers at the Northwestern University suggests that the long-held belief that Wernickes area is the prime area of language comprehension might not be accurate. Marek-Marsel Mesulam, lead probe author and director of Northwesterns Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimers Disease Center, performed language tests and brain MRIs on 72 patients with a uncommon form of language-affecting dementia called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in which Wernickes area is bruised. He observed that these patients did not exhibit the same trouble with word meaning as stroke victims with similar brain harm. PPA and stroke harm the brain differently; in PPA, cortical areas degenerate, but their underlying fiber pathways that are necessary for communication inbetween different language centers in the brain, remain intact. However, stroke damages large regions of brain. According to Mesulam, this strongly indicates that language comprehension is a sophisticated process that ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Neural properties of fundamental function encoding of sound selectivity in the female avian auditory cortex. AU - Inda, Masahiro. AU - Hotta, Kohji. AU - Oka, Kotaro. PY - 2020/4/1. Y1 - 2020/4/1. N2 - Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) use their voices for communication. Song structures in the songs of individual males are important for sound recognition in females. The caudomedial mesopallium (CMM) and nidopallium (NCM) are known to be essential higher auditory regions for sound recognition. These two regions have also been discussed with respect to their fundamental functions and song selectivity. To clarify their functions and selectivity, we investigated latencies and spiking patterns and also developed a novel correlation analysis to evaluate the relationship between neural activity and the characteristics of acoustic factors. We found that the latencies and spiking patterns in response to song stimuli differed between the CMM and NCM. In addition, our correlation analysis ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Broca aphasia with neologisms. AU - Iizuka, Osamu. AU - Suzuki, Kyoko. AU - Fujii, Toshikatsu. AU - Endo, Yoshiko. AU - Mori, Etsuro. AU - Yamadori, Atsushi. PY - 2004/7/1. Y1 - 2004/7/1. N2 - Patients with jargon aphasia generally have fluent speech with poor comprehension. However, outstanding jargons may appear in non-fluent aphasics. We report a 69-year-old left-handed woman with non-fluent jargon aphasia due to lesions in the right frontoparietal area. Features of her speech included non-fluent meaningless sequences of syllables, i. e., phonetic jargon, which was obvious in all the tasks including spontaneous speech, repetition, naming and reading. Her utterance was sparse, but not effortful or anarthric. She understood most of spoken single words, but was confused by complex sentences. Brain CTs revealed acute lesions affecting the inferior and middle frontal gyri, insular cortex, precentral and postcentral gyri, and a part of the angular gyrus in the right hemisphere. Old ...
The Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE) provides a comprehensive exploration of a range of communicative abilities. The results of the BDAE are used to classify patients language profiles into one of the localization based classifications of aphasia: Brocas, Wernickes, anomic, conduction, transcortical, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, and global aphasia syndromes, although the test does not always provide a diagnosis or a therapeutic approach. The assessment does provide you with a severity rating.[3] The Examination is designed to go beyond simple functional definitions of aphasia into the components of language dysfunctions (symptoms) that have been shown to underlie the various aphasic syndromes. Thus, this test evaluates various perceptual modalities (e.g., auditory, visual, and gestural), processing functions (e.g., comprehension, analysis, problem-solving), and response modalities (e.g., writing, articulation, and manipulation). This approach allows for the ...
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Preparation material for upcoming exam CMAT first test, Today practice with comprehension passage and how to ace Language comprehension in CMAT Exam
We found that both phasic increases and decreases in the discharge rate of STN neurons accompany the production of speech. In this study, subjects read aloud syllables presented on a computer screen, a behavioral paradigm that requires a series of neural events beginning from processing the visual cue to activating motor commands for the vocal organ. Neural events that occur early in this series, such as processing of the visual cue and forming a phonological plan, might be expected to be time-locked to cue presentation. Events that occur later in the series, such as forming and executing the motor speech plan, might be expected to be time-locked to speech output. We showed that decrease-type responses are predominantly locked to cue presentation and increase-type STN responses are predominantly locked to the onset of speech. These findings suggest that STN inhibition may be associated with early, cognitive aspects of speech production, while STN excitation may be associated with later, motor ...
Our vision was and is to build the Doctor Algorithm - which means the computer become a specific therapist himself.. As a medical doctor with background in IT and business I wrote a book about big data in healthcare in 2014 (BIG DATA. Diagnosis, Therapy and Side Effects). https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/462711?format=G. I met Alexander Wolff von Gudenberg, who is a MD as well and head of Europe´s largest stuttering therapy institute. We jointly share our goal to transfer their ,20 years of experience and treating ,3000 stutterers into the digital world!. We have an expert and PhD in algorithm bases sound recognition in our team as well as an enthusiastic speech therapist and healthcare manager. Our UX experts have worked in many projects in consumer industries - so we know how to make this happen!. Every person has a right to speak their mind and be heard. With your support we can change lives and make everyone be heard - clearly and effortlessly.. ...
The Accu-Chek Voicemate, now discontinued, is composed of the Accu-Chek® Advantage blood glucose meter, which is plugged into the Voicemates speech output module. The one-piece unit is 6.5" in height, 3.0" in width and 2.5" in depth, so it wont fit into a pocket or small purse but is still portable. There is a slot for a snap in code key for calibrating the meter for your test strips and an earphone jack. The buttons on the meter are also raised for easy recognition and locating.. The voice prompt guides you through the entire testing process. The strips have a notch cutout to identify where to apply the blood. They also allow you to apply more blood after the test starts. The Voicemate requires 4 microliters of blood and the response time can be as long as 40 seconds. The meter can store up to 100 test in its memory. Memory download requires the purchase of special Accu-Chek software and a cable.. The Voicemate says the meters blood glucose reading aloud only once. It has a repeat button, ...
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Previous research has found that agrammatic Broca aphasic patients have particular difficulty using determiners like "a" and "the" for the purposes of sentence comprehension. In this study, we test whether or not such difficulty extends to the level where lexical subcategories are distinguished by these articles. The absence or presence of a determiner distinguishes proper from common nouns (e.g., "ROSE vs. "A ROSE"), and mass from count nouns (e.g., "GLASS" vs. "A GLASS"). Groups of agrammatic Broca and fluent aphasic subjects were required to point to one of two pictures in response to a sentence such as "Point to the picture of rose" or "Point to the picture of a rose". Sentences were presented in either printed or spoken form. Results indicated that for the agrammatic Broca patients, printed presentation yielded significant improvement over spoken presentation only for the proper noun/common noun distinction. Performance was significantly poorer for the mass noun/count noun distinction as ...
Background and Purpose-In a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, it was investigated whether piracetam improves language recovery in poststroke aphasia assessed by neuropsychological tests and activation PET measurement of cerebral blood flow.. Methods-Twenty-four stroke patients with aphasia were randomly allocated to 2 groups: 12 patients received 2400 mg piracetam twice daily, 12 placebo. Before and at the end of the 6-week treatment period in which both groups received intensive speech therapy, the patients were examined neuropsychologically and studied with H215O PET at rest and during activation with a word-repetition task. Blood flow was analyzed in 14 language-activated brain regions defined on reconstructed surface views from MRI coregistered to the PET images.. Results-Before treatment, both groups were comparable with respect to performance in language tasks and to type and severity of aphasia. In the piracetam group, increase of activation effect was significantly ...
Render or offer to render to individuals or groups and service in speech or language pathology involving the application of principles, methods, and procedures for the measurement, testing, diagnosis, prognostication, counseling, and instruction related to the development and disorders of speech, fluency, voice, verbal and written language, auditory comprehension, cognition, dysphagia, oral pharyngeal or laryngeal sensorimotor competencies, and treatment of persons requiring the use of an augmentative communication devise for the purpose of diagnosing, preventing, treatment, and ameliorating such disorders and conditions in individuals.. ...
Synonyms for acoustic agraphia in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for acoustic agraphia. 2 synonyms for agraphia: anorthography, logagraphia. What are synonyms for acoustic agraphia?
On typicality of functional observations. Esitelmä: pdf-tiedosto. Abstract. With the rapid increase in measurement precision and storage capacity, we have seen a tremendous jump in the dimensionality of data. One of the common methodologies used when dealing with such high dimensional data is to assume that the observed units are random functions (from some generating process) instead of random vectors.. The concept of statistical depth was originally introduced as a way to provide a center-outward ordering from a depth-based multivariate median. Several different depth functions for functional observations have been presented in the literature. Most of these approaches, however, are solely interested in the -pointwise- centrality of the functions as a measure of (global) centrality. As a result, they are missing some important features inherent to functional data such as variation in shape, roughness or range. Thus, due to the richness of functional data, we opt to talk about typicality rather ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Aphasia Following Left Putaminal Hemorrhage at a Rehabilitation Hospital. AU - Maeshima, Shinichiro. AU - Okamoto, Sayaka. AU - Okazaki, Hideto. AU - Funahashi, Reisuke. AU - Hiraoka, Shigenori. AU - Hori, Hirokazu. AU - Yagihashi, Kei. AU - Fuse, Ikuko. AU - Tanaka, Shinichiro. AU - Asano, Naoki. AU - Sonoda, Shigeru. PY - 2018/3/1. Y1 - 2018/3/1. N2 - Objective: We aimed to clarify the relationship between aphasia and hematoma type/volume in patients with left putaminal hemorrhage admitted to a rehabilitation facility. Methods: We evaluated the relationship between the presence, type, and severity of aphasia and hematoma type/volume in 92 patients with putaminal hemorrhage aged 29-83 years. Hematoma type and volume were evaluated on the basis of CT images obtained at stroke onset. The Standard Language Test for Aphasia was conducted as part of the initial assessment. Results: Aphasia was observed in 79 of 92 patients. A total of 31 patients had fluent aphasia, while 48 had ...
The relationship of thiamine deficiency to Wernickes encephalopathy has been well established. The biochemical bases and physiologic mechanisms responsible for the pathologic changes and their select
INTRODUCTION:. Wernickes dysphasia and formal thought disorder are regarded as distinct diagnostic entities although both are linked to pathology in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG). We describe a patient with focal pathology in the left STG, giving rise acutely to a fluent dysphasia, which gradually evolved into formal thought disorder.. METHOD:. Clinical, neuropsychological, neuropsychiatric, and neuroradiological assessment.. RESULTS:. A right-handed patient, AJ, presented acutely with a fluent dysphasia. His speech output gradually evolved from undifferentiated jargon, through neologistic jargon, to an intelligible but bizarre form of discourse. Comprehension was relatively well preserved. Radiology revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the left middle, and inferior temporal gyri, with reduced perfusion of the left STG. Six months later his overt dysphasia had recovered, but his speech retained some of its previous characteristics, in particular a tendency to a loose association ...
Brocas aphasia, or non-fluent aphasia, is language disorder after stroke. See a video of a man with Brocas aphasia. Learn what it is & how to help.
Tiamin suda z nen bir vitamindir. Tiamin eksikli i Wernicke ensefalopatisi olarak bilinen, klasik olarak konf zyon, ataksi ve oftalmopleji ile kendini g steren bir merkezi sinir sistemi hastal olarak kar m za kabilir. Hematopoetik k k h cre nakli sonras nda geli en Wernicke ensefalopatisi nadiren bildirilmi tir. Bu nedenle haploidentik allojenik k k h cre naklinden sonra uzun s re total parenteral beslenme alan akut myeloid l semili bir hastada geli en Wernicke ensefalopatisini sunmak istedik. Bildi imiz kadar yla literat rde T rkiye den bildirilen ilk olgudur.. Anahtar Kelimeler: Tiamin, Wernicke ensefalopatisi, Hematopoetik k k h cre nakli, Total parenteral ...
We are conducting a study involving people with aphasia caused by TBI (traumatic brain injury) or CVA (cerebral vascular accident). We are interested in understanding, in particular, how different types of sentences are processed by people with different lesions and aphasia types. This study will help us gain insights into the building blocks of sentence structure and meaning, as well as the patterns of language disfunction in aphasia. This study is being conducted in our lab located at the Constance Lethbridge Rehabilitation Centre (CLRC), near Concordias Loyola campus ...
Communication Strategies: Some Dos and Donts. The impact of aphasia on relationships may be profound, or only slight. No two people with aphasia are alike with respect to severity, former speech and language skills, or personality.
I found this article very interesting. It discussed how certain people suffering from aphasia are able to sing songs that are familiar to them, and how music can help in aphasia recovery. There were three experiments performed. In experiment one, each subject was asked to complete the words to familiar songs which they identified as having heard before prior to the experiment, both with and without the melodies. In experiment two, each subject listened to twenty unfamiliar songs with randomly assigned syntactic phrases and the subjects were asked to repeat the phrases with and without the melodies. In the third experiment, each subject listened to a simple melody. The melody was the combined with 32 excerpts from the unfamiliar songs in experiment two, then the excerpts were asked to be sung and spoken. ...
En esta forma de afasia, la capacidad para comprender el significado de las palabras y oraciones se ve afectada, sin embargo se conserva mayormente la capacidad para producir lenguaje conectado. Por lo tanto, la afasia de Wernicke también se conoce como afasia fluida o receptiva.. La lectura y la escritura a menudo están gravemente deterioradas. Como en otras formas de afasia, los pacientes suelen tener conservadas por completo las capacidades intelectuales y cognitivas no relacionadas con el habla y el lenguaje.. Las personas con afasia de Wernicke pueden producir muchas palabras y a menudo hablan usando oraciones gramaticalmente correctas con prosodia normal. No obstante, a menudo lo que dicen no tiene sentido o incluyen en sus oraciones palabras inexistentes o irrelevantes. Es posible que no se den cuenta de que están usando palabras incorrectas o una palabra inexistente y con frecuencia, no son plenamente conscientes de que lo que dicen no tiene sentido.. Los pacientes con este tipo de ...
of Autism & Mercury Poisoning. Mercury Poisoning Autism Psychiatric Disturbances Social deficits, shyness, social withdrawal Social deficits, social withdrawal, shyness Depression, mood swings; mask face Depressive traits, mood swings; flat affect Anxiety Anxiety Schizoid tendencies, OCD traits Schizophrenic & OCD traits; repetitiveness Lacks eye contact, hesitant to engage others Lack of eye contact, avoids conversation Irrational fears Irrational fears Irritability, aggression, temper tantrums Irritability, aggression, temper tantrums Impaired face recognition Impaired face recognition Speech, Language & Hearing Deficits Loss of speech, failure to develop speech Delayed language, failure to develop speech Dysarthria; articulation problems Dysarthria; articulation problems Speech comprehension deficits Speech comprehension deficits Verbalizing & word retrieval problems Echolalia; word use & pragmatic errors Sound sensitivity Sound sensitivity Hearing loss; deafness in very high doses Mild to ...
The study examined achievement in English Language comprehension of pupils with intellectual disability. The study adopted a pretest, post-test, control group, quasi-experimental design. Ten pupils each were purposively selected from three special schools. They were assigned to two experimental groups (audio-taped and individualized instruction groups) and control. Three instruments were used: Slosson's Intelligence Test (α = 0.86), Socio-Economic Status Scale (α = 0.86), English Language Comprehension Achievement Test (α = 0.79). Three hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significance. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) and Duncan post hoc. The experimental groups were significantly higher in their comprehension score that in the control group (F(3,26) = 37.14; p< 0.05). It further showed that each of the three possible pairs of instructional groups was significantly different from one another. The individualized group had the highest
A new lesion study from Myrna Schwartz group has recently appeared in the advance access section of the journal Brain. The study examines semantic word retrieval in aphasia using a picture naming task. For years this group has been doing fantastic psycholinguistically informed modeling work (with Gary Dell) on naming errors in aphasia and now adds lesion correlation to their arsenal. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) in a sample of 64 aphasics, the authors correlated semantic error rate in naming (misnaming elephant as zebra) with the presence or absence of lesion on a voxel-by-voxel basis. They also administered control tasks, one set that sought to identify non-verbal semantic comprehension deficits (Pyramid and Palms & Camel and Catus Tests) and another that sought to identify verbal comprehension (a word-to-picture matching test & a synonym judgment test). The non-verbal control is the most important because it rules out deficits caused by visual analysis of pictured stimuli ...
The aim of the present thesis was to examine the cognitive and language profile in children with poor reading comprehension using a longitudinal perspective. Even though comprehension skills are closely connected to educational success, comprehension deficits in children have been neglected in reading research. Understanding factors underlying reading is important as it improves possibilities of early identification of children at risk of developing reading problems. In addition, targeted interventions may prevent or reduce future problems. Descriptions of the cognitive and language profile in children with different types of reading problems from an early age and over time is an important first step.. The three studies included in this thesis have been conducted using data from the International Longitudinal Twin Study (ILTS). In the ILTS, parallel data have been collected in the US, Australia, Sweden and Norway. Altogether, more than 1000 twin pairs have been examined between the ages 5 and 15 ...
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (1994a, March). Guidelines for fitting and monitoring FM systems. Asha, 36(Suppl. 12), 1-9. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (1994b, March). The role of research and the state of research training within communication sciences and disorder. Asha, 36(Suppl. 12), 21-23. Blake, R., Field, B., Foster, C., Platt, F., & Wertz, P. (1991). Effect of FM auditory trainers on attending behaviors of learning-disabled children. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 22, 111-114. Breedin, S. D., Martin, R. C., & Jerger, S. (1989). Distinguishing auditory and speech-specific perceptual deficits. Ear and Hearing, 10, 311-317. Bregman, A. S. (1990). Auditory scene analysis: The perceptual organization of sound. Cambridge: MIT Press. Campbell, T., & McNeil, M. (1985). Effects of presentation rate and divided attention on auditory comprehension in children with acquired language disorder. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 28, 513-520. ...
CiteSeerX - Scientific articles matching the query: How Word Order Affects Sentence Comprehension in Bangla: A Computational Approach to Simple Sentence.
View Notes - 04-11 Lecture Slides (Final) from PSYC 2145 at Colorado. 4/10/13 Lecture 20: Language 3 (Sentence Comprehension & the Language- Thought relationship) PSYC 2145
The existence of mirror neurons in the human brain is now well established. Much of human learning involves monkey see monkey do, ask any old time apprentice . Expecting all to re -invent the wheel is nonsensical. Large numbers of mirror neurons seem to lie within the areas involved in the production and perception of speech. It is the areas involved in speech that light up when you read, even silently. So paying attention to speech is crucial in the learning to read process. Speech is perceived through the mechanisms of its production, that is, analysis by synthesis. In other words the listener tries to work out what he/ she would have to do to match the incoming sound. This is done at the speech motor level with speech output suppressed else it would be far too slow. Despite the huge variation in speech pitch between individuals male/ female/ young/ old/ regional accent we all (almost all) make the same sounds in the same way in the same place. The invariance in speech resides in the ...
Occipital lobe -- The occipital lobe receives and processes visual information directly from the eyes and relates this information to the parietal lobe (Wernickes area) and motor cortex (frontal lobe). One of the things it must do is interpret the upside-down images of the world that are projected onto the retina by the lens of the eye.. Temporal lobe -- The temporal lobe processes auditory information from the ears and relates it to Wernickes area of the parietal lobe and the motor cortex of the frontal lobe.. ...
Thiamine (vitamin B-1) deficiency can result in Wernickes Encephalopathy (WE), a serious neurologic disorder. Dr Carl Wernicke, a Polish neurologist, described it in 1881 as a triad of acute mental confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia.
Visibility Comprehension Test for PC FAQ, Visibility Comprehension Test Walkthrough, Visibility Comprehension Test Guides, Visibility Comprehension Test codes, Hints
As noted several times in previous chapters, comprehension is not easily defined. In some situations, comprehension means nothing more than being able to recall facts presented in a text. In other...
You have searched for the answer to the decision fahrenheit 451 comprehension questions. Below are a few solutions to this issue. If you know a better example of the solution for the issue fahrenheit 451 comprehension questions! Please write to us!. ...
This post is related to the comprehension practice set which usually come in every exam. Read the following comprehension carefully answer the questions.
Publications In press · Leclercq, A.L., Majerus, S., & Maillart, C. (2013). The Impact of Lexical Frequency on Sentence Comprehension in Children with
A helpful revision guide providing answers to our example of a comprehension exercise that you may face in the relationships section, for GCSE French.
Wernicke's aphasia[edit]. Wernicke's aphasia is the result of damage to the area of the brain that is commonly in the left ... Broca's aphasia[edit]. Broca's aphasia is a specific type of expressive aphasia and is so named due to the aphasia that results ... Wernicke[edit]. German physician Karl Wernicke continued in the vein of Broca's research by studying language deficits unlike ... Wernicke's aphasia is characterized by phonemic paraphasias, neologism or jargon. Another characteristic of a person with ...
Damage to the dominant hemisphere (usually the left hemisphere) results in aphasia i.e. Broca's area or Wernicke's ... Wernicke - posterior branch of MCA. Clinical significance[edit]. Occlusion[edit]. Main article: Middle cerebral artery syndrome ... Inferior division supplies lateral temporal lobe (location of Wernicke's area i.e. language comprehension) ...
Damage to Wernicke's area produces Wernicke's or receptive aphasia, which is characterized by relatively normal syntax and ... Wernicke K. (1995). "The aphasia symptom-complex: A psychological study on an anatomical basis (1875)". In Paul Eling. Reader ... Wernicke's area is named after Carl Wernicke, who in 1874 proposed a connection between damage to the posterior area of the ... a linguistic auditory signal is first sent from the auditory cortex to Wernicke's area. The lexicon is accessed in Wernicke's ...
"Wernicke-Lichtheim Model of Aphasia", SpringerReference, Springer-Verlag. *^ Kean ML (October 2003). "Syntactic deficits in ... This area became known as Wernicke's area. Wernicke later hypothesized the relationship between Wernicke's area and Broca's ... The symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus.[12][13] ... Wernicke's aphasia is associated with anomia, unknowingly making up words (neologisms), and problems with comprehension. ...
Wernicke K. The aphasia symptom-complex. 1874. Breslau, Cohn and Weigert. Translated in: Eling P, editor. Reader in the history ... Wernicke K. (1874). The aphasia symptom-complex. Breslau, Cohn and Weigert. Translated in: Eling P, editor. (1994). p. 69-89. ... In 1874 Carl Wernicke proposed that the ability to imitate speech plays a key role in language acquisition. This is now a ... Carl Wernicke identified a pathway between the left posterior superior temporal sulcus (a cerebral cortex region sometimes ...
... and the fluent aphasias (which encompasses Wernicke's aphasia, conduction aphasia and transcortical sensory aphasia). These ... www.aphasia.org/aphasia-resources/aphasia-statistics/ *^ "Aphasia Fact sheet - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia ... Receptive aphasia (also known as "sensory aphasia" or "Wernicke's aphasia"), which is characterized by fluent speech, but ... Transcortical motor aphasia and transcortical sensory aphasia, which are similar to Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia respectively ...
Ellis, Andrew W.; Miller, Diane; Sin, Gillian (1983). "Wernicke's aphasia and normal language processing: A case study in ... Anosognosia may occur as part of receptive aphasia, a language disorder that causes poor comprehension of speech and the ... A patient with receptive aphasia cannot correct his own phonetics errors and shows "anger and disappointment with the person ... With those representations significantly distorted, patients with receptive aphasia are unable to monitor their mistakes.[1] ...
Aphasia Wernicke-Geschwind model Carlson, N. (2012). Physiology of behavior. (11th ed.). Pearson. CATANI, M; THIEBAUT DE ... This type of aphasia inhibits the patient from repeating unfamiliar sounds. A study by Catani, Jones, and Ffytche (2005) ... Damage to the direct pathway may produce conduction aphasia, whereas damage to the indirect pathway spares the ability to ... The symptoms of conduction aphasia suggest that the connection between posterior temporal cortex and frontal cortex plays a ...
This area is known as Wernicke's area; damage to this section can lead to Receptive aphasia. Postmortem studies allows for ... damage to this section of the brain can lead to Expressive aphasia. Karl Wernicke also used postmortem studies to link specific ...
Pseudobulbar Palsy Operculum Corticobulbar Tracts Wernicke's Aphasia Broca's Aphasia Bakar, M; Kirshner, HS; Niaz, F (1998). " ... People with Broca's aphasia may not exhibit a complete loss of voluntary movement facial muscles, pharyngeal muscles, laryngeal ... Parts of the brain such as Heschl's gyrus, Broadmann's area, Broca's Area, Wernicke's Area are amongst the most relevant in the ... In determining a diagnosis between Broca's aphasia and FCMS, a person must demonstrate their ability in voluntary movement of ...
The symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus.[14][15] ... This area became known as Wernicke's area. Wernicke later hypothesized the relationship between Wernicke's area and Broca's ... Kean ML (October 2003). "Syntactic deficits in aphasia: Was Wernicke right after all?". Brain and Language. 87 (1): 27-28. doi: ... Wernicke's aphasia is associated with anomia, unknowingly making up words (neologisms), and problems with comprehension. ...
In one study, patients with Wernicke's aphasia who were unable to make semantic judgments showed evidence of semantic priming, ... while patient with Broca's aphasia who were able to make semantic judgments showed less consistent priming than Wernicke's ... "An on-line analysis of syntactic processing in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia". Brain and Language. 45 (3): 448-464. doi: ... Perhaps the first use of semantic priming in neurological patients was with stroke patients with aphasia. ...
"An on-line analysis of syntactic processing in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia". Brain and Language. 45 (3): 448-464. doi: ... Later, Carl Wernicke, after whom Wernicke's area is named, proposed that different areas of the brain were specialized for ... The work of Broca and Wernicke established the field of aphasiology and the idea that language can be studied through examining ... Much work in neurolinguistics has, like Broca's and Wernicke's early studies, investigated the locations of specific language " ...
"An on-line analysis of syntactic processing in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia". Brain and Language. 45 (3): 448-464. doi: ...
... of Wernicke's aphasia. However, ever since the introduction of the term paragrammatism some students have pointed out that ... It is characteristic of fluent aphasia, most commonly Receptive aphasia. Paragrammatism is sometimes called "extended ... Despite this persistent impression, errors of sentence structure and morphology do occur in fluent aphasia, although they take ... Bastiaanse, R.; Edwards, S.; Kiss, K. (1996). "Fluent aphasia in three languages: Aspects of spontaneous speech". Aphasiology. ...
"Wernicke's Aphasia - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2016-12-09. Kean, Mary Louise. " ... "Aphasia Definitions - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2016-11-12. "Definition of AMNESIA ... This area became known as Wernicke's area. Wernicke later hypothesized the relationship between Wernicke's area and Broca's ... The symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus. Damage to the ...
... of Wernicke's aphasia.. However, ever since the introduction of the term paragrammatism some students have pointed out that ... It is characteristic of fluent aphasia, most commonly Receptive aphasia. Paragrammatism is sometimes called "extended ... In non-fluent aphasia, oral expression is often agrammatic, i.e. grammatically incomplete and/or incorrect. By contrast, ... Bates E, Friederici A, Wulfeck B (December 1987). "Grammatical morphology in aphasia: evidence from three languages". Cortex. ...
"Wernicke's Aphasia - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2016-12-09.. ... "Aphasia Definitions - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2016-11-12.. ... This area became known as Wernicke's area. Wernicke later hypothesized the relationship between Wernicke's area and Broca's ... The symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus.[4][5] ...
The three major linguistic disorders that result from these injuries are aphasia, alexia, and agraphia. Aphasia is the ... Alexia is the inability to read, which can arise from damage to Wernicke's area, among other places. Agraphia is the inability ... Written comprehension, similar to spoken comprehension, seems to occur primarily in Wernicke's area. However, instead of using ... and that speech processing seems to occur within Wernicke's area. Hearing plays an important part in both speech generation and ...
Examples of these fluent aphasias include receptive or Wernicke's aphasia, anomic aphasia, conduction aphasia, and ... Wernicke's aphasia is characterized by fluent language with made up or unnecessary words with little or no meaning to speech. ... Wernicke's aphasia is found in the dominant hemisphere of the posterior gyrus of the first temporal convolution of the brain, ... 20 (1). Huber, Mary (1944). "A Phonetic Approach to the Problem of Perception in a Case of Wernicke's Aphasia". Journal of ...
A type of fluent aphasia similar to Wernicke's with the exception of a strong ability to repeat words and phrases. The person ... In transcortical sensory aphasia, echolalia is common, with the patient incorporating another person's words or sentences into ... Mitigated echolalia can be seen in dyspraxia and aphasia of speech. A Japanese case report describes a 20-year-old college ... In cases where echolalia is a part of mixed transitory aphasia the perisylvian language area remains intact, but the ...
This form is associated with left unilateral temporal lobe lesions and may even be considered a form of Wernicke's aphasia. ... Auditory verbal agnosia can be referred to as a pure aphasia because it has a high degree of specificity. Despite an inability ... In at least one instance, the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination has been used to profile AVA. This method was able to show ... In childhood, auditory verbal agnosia can also be caused by Landau-Kleffner syndrome, also called acquired epileptic aphasia. ...
Findings indicated that, in support of the hypothesis, the capacity and resources available to patients with Wernicke's aphasia ... Swinney and Garret built upon existing research on language processing errors in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia patients. Prior ... "Lexical Processing and Sentence Comprehension in Aphasia" Edgar Zurif, David Swinney and Merrill Garrett (1990) In this ... Patients who had suffered Cerebrovascular Accidents-4 Wernicke's aphasiacs and 4 Broca's aphasiacs - were recruited from a ...
Wernicke's area is in the left temporal cortex and is primarily involved in language comprehension. The specialization of these ... language centers is so extensive that damage to them results in a critical condition known as aphasia. Language acquisition can ... However, over time, it gradually becomes concentrated into two areas - Broca's area and Wernicke's area. Broca's area is in the ...
Language deficits may present with a wide variety of symptoms ranging from odd patterns of speech to complete aphasia of speech ... The classically understood language areas of the brain are Broca's area and Wernicke's area. Realistically, language is ...
However, a smaller tumor in an area such as Wernicke's area (small area responsible for language comprehension) can result in a ... aphasia, ataxia, visual field impairment, impaired sense of smell, impaired hearing, facial paralysis, double vision, or more ...
Thus, unambiguous cases of Brocas aphasia, Wernickes aphasia, conduction aphasia, and anomic aphasia were selected. Ten ... evaluate adults suspected of having aphasia,. The Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination or BDAE is a neuropsychological battery ... Wernickes, anomic, conduction, transcortical, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, and global aphasia syndromes, ... "BDAE 3 Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination Third Edition". linguisystems. linguisystems. 2001.. *^ Chapey, Roberta (2008). ...
What is Wernicke encephalopathy? Meaning of Wernicke encephalopathy medical term. What does Wernicke encephalopathy mean? ... Looking for online definition of Wernicke encephalopathy in the Medical Dictionary? Wernicke encephalopathy explanation free. ... Gayet-Wernicke syndrome - Synonym(s): Wernicke syndrome. Wernicke aphasia - impairment in the comprehension of spoken and ... Synonym(s): sensory speech center; Wernicke area; Wernicke field; Wernicke region; Wernicke zone ...
... syntactic Take note tion traumatic brain injury treatment types velopharyngeal vocal voice disorders Wernickes aphasia words ... abnormalities adults Analyze aphasia apraxia of speech Articulation and Phonological articulation disorders articulatory Ask ... the child Ask the client Assess Speech Assessment Data auditory comprehension autism brain injury Brocas aphasia ...
La afasia y el área de Wernicke llevan el nombre del neurólogo alemán Carl Wernicke, quien fue el primero en relacionar este ... Afasia de Wernicke (receptiva). En esta forma de afasia, la capacidad para comprender el significado de las palabras y ... Esto se debe a que en la afasia de Wernicke las personas tienen lesionadas las áreas del cerebro que son importantes para ... Las personas con afasia de Wernicke pueden producir muchas palabras y a menudo hablan usando oraciones gramaticalmente ...
Bensinger on broca s vs wernicke s aphasia: Speech is fluent but often degenerates into random hard to follow "streams of ... Hence there is difficulty in comprehension rather than articulation, hence the term Receptive Aphasia. ... With conductive aphasia comprehension and speech output are intact but one cannot repeat words or sentences. Conductive aphasia ... Different: Brocas aphasia is difficulty in expressing speech. Werniches aphasia is difficulty in understanding speech. Thats ...
Wernickes word aphasia salad. Aphasia word salad wernickes. Word smart new gre. Salad wernickes aphasia word. Salad aphasia ... Word wernickes salad aphasia. Word vorlage aus indesign erstellen. Aphasia word wernickes salad. Aphasia word wernickes ... Salad aphasia word wernickes. Wordly wise book 8 answer key online. Aphasia salad word wernickes. Word wernickes salad ... word salad wernickes aphasia his bowels shake-down weakens cautiously. word salad wernickes aphasia thorndike fissiparous ...
Wernickes aphasia[edit]. Wernickes aphasia is the result of damage to the area of the brain that is commonly in the left ... Brocas aphasia[edit]. Brocas aphasia is a specific type of expressive aphasia and is so named due to the aphasia that results ... Wernicke[edit]. German physician Karl Wernicke continued in the vein of Brocas research by studying language deficits unlike ... Wernickes aphasia is characterized by phonemic paraphasias, neologism or jargon. Another characteristic of a person with ...
This is a place to find information about Biological Psychology (Kalat) and the type of information you will need to know before you can get a good grade. Regardless if you school calls it Physiological Psychology or Biological Psychology, this is the place to help or get help. Some questions will repeat. Send in your questions or/answers to post. Ive taken the class, and got an A. ...
Wernickes aphasia is a condition which results in severely disrupted language comprehension following a lesion to the left ... Wernickes aphasia participants showed significantly elevated thresholds compared to age and hearing matched control ... Revealing and quantifying the impaired phonological analysis underpinning impaired comprehension in Wernickes aphasia. ... Acoustic-phonological thresholds correlated strongly with auditory comprehension abilities in Wernickes aphasia. In contrast, ...
Carl Wernicke (1848-1905). Wernickes aphasia is sometimes called sensory aphasia or fluent aphasia. The speech of a Wernickes ... Brocas Aphasia and Wernickes Aphasia. As a National Institutes of Health information page says: Brocas aphasia results from ... Wernickes aphasia results from damage to the back portion of the language dominant side of the brain. Aphasia means "partial ... Brocas aphasia is sometimes called disfluent aphasia or agrammatic aphasia. It is named after Pierre-Paul Broca (1824-1880), a ...
Wernickes aphasia and the Tower of Babel. Posted on 02/22/2014 by admin ... In the acute phases, after stroke, patients with Wernickes aphasia (WA) show a deep language disturbance. Comprehension is ... This entry was posted in Aphasia, Cognition and Behavior. Bookmark the permalink. ...
GLOBAL APHASIA, ASSESSMENT OF APHASIA, WERNICKES APHASIA, TRANSCORTICAL SENSORY APHASIA, CONDUCTION APHASIA, ANOMIC APHASIA, ... APHASIA, BROCAS APHASIA, TRANSCORTICAL MOTOR APHASIA, STROKE(CVA), ... 7. TRANSCORTICAL SENSORY APHASIA. 7.1. Damage at border of temporal lobe and occipital lobe. 7.2. Similar to Wernickes aphasia ... 6. WERNICKES APHASIA. 6.1. Temporal,sometimes parietal lobe damage. 6.2. Fluent, receptive, and sensory aphasia. 6.3. ...
WERNICKES APHASIA . ANOMIC APHASI…A . CONDUCTION APHASIA . UNUSUAL APHASIA SYNDROMES . MIXED AND GLOBAL APHASIA . This is an ... In Aphasia What is multilingual aphasia? Multilingual aphasia is a type of aphasia where someone often misspeaks by saying ... sensory aphasia: . auditory aphasia = caused by any damages to Wernickes area . visual aphasia = caused by any damages to ... In Aphasia What is the cause of aphasia? Aphasia is caused by a brain injury, as may occur during a traumatic accident or when ...
Damage to Wernickes Area. (Wernickes aphasia). *loss of the ability to understand language *person can speak clearly, but the ... In fact, Wernickes area is in the posterior part of the temporal lobe. Brocas area and Wernickes area are connected by a ... More about Aphasia:. *National Aphasia Association *National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders More about ... Damage to the arcuate fasciculus causes a disorder called conduction aphasia. People with conduction aphasia can understand ...
Fluent Aphasia (Wernickes Aphasia), Pinegrove- Aphasia (Acoustic), Expressive Aphasia - Sarah Scott - Teenage Stroke Survivor ... Aphasia: The disorder that makes you lose your words - Susan Wortman-Jutt, ... Wernickes aphasia.mp4. Wernickes aphasia.mp4. A patient with Wernickes aphasia. This is also called as a sensory or ... Fluent Aphasia (Wernickes Aphasia). Fluent Aphasia (Wernickes Aphasia). Listen to Byron Peterson, a stroke survivor with ...
Wernickes area of the brain is responsible for helping us to understand language. It is found in the temporal lobe and ... National Aphasia Foundation. (n.d.). Wernickes aphasia. Retrieved from http://www.aphasia.org/aphasia-resources/wernickes- ... Wernicke's Aphasia Individuals with damage to the posterior temporal lobe region, where Wernickes area is located, may ... Wernickes area is connected to Brocas area by a group of nerve fiber bundles called the arcuate fascilicus. While Wernickes ...
Damage to the dominant hemisphere (usually the left hemisphere) results in aphasia i.e. Brocas area or Wernickes ... Wernicke - posterior branch of MCA. Clinical significance[edit]. Occlusion[edit]. Main article: Middle cerebral artery syndrome ... Inferior division supplies lateral temporal lobe (location of Wernickes area i.e. language comprehension) ...
... and type of aphasia (e.g. Brocas, Wernickes). Voxel-based lesion analysis techniques will be used to determine sites of ... Participants with aphasia (PWA) will be referred from existing referral sources (e.g. UNC Stroke registry, Triangle Aphasia ... on speech fluency in stroke survivors with aphasia and apraxia of speech. People with nonfluent types of aphasia frequently ... Auditory Masking Effects on Speech Fluency in Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech. The safety and scientific validity of this study ...
Keywords: Stroke, Aphasia, Wernickes aphasia, vestibular rehabilitaiton, non-invasive nerve stimulation, Off-vertical axis ... Improvement in Symptoms, Processing Speed and Cognition in a 59-Year-Old Stroke Patient with Wernickes Aphasia. Matthew M. ... incomplete Wernickes receptive aphasia, and confusion. His Graded Symptom Checklist (GSC) severity was 78/162. Standard ... processing speed and cognition in a 59-year-old stroke patient with Wernickes aphasia. Front. Neurol. Conference Abstract: ...
Wernicke C. (1885) Some new studies on aphasia. Fortschr Med, 824-830. ... 2002) Subcortical aphasia and neglect in acute stroke: The role of cortical hypoperfusion. Brain 125(Pt 5):1094-1104. ... 1987) Aphasia and neglect after subcortical stroke. A clinical/cerebral perfusion correlation study. Brain 110(Pt 5):1211-1229. ... In 1885, Carl Wernicke made the prescient observation that sensory and motor functions could be localized, but higher cognitive ...
Wernickes Area - located in the left temporal lobe, involved in language comprehension and expression. Aphasia - impairment in ... Wernicke - understanding. Our Divided Brain. Module 13: Hemispheric Organization and the Biology of Consciousness. Left Right. ...
"Wernicke-Lichtheim Model of Aphasia", SpringerReference, Springer-Verlag. *^ Kean ML (October 2003). "Syntactic deficits in ... This area became known as Wernickes area. Wernicke later hypothesized the relationship between Wernickes area and Brocas ... The symptoms of Wernickes aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus.[12][13] ... Wernickes aphasia is associated with anomia, unknowingly making up words (neologisms), and problems with comprehension. ...
Aphasia, Wernickes. Matti Lehtihalmes. 9.. Aphasia Treatment: Computer-Aided Rehabilitation. Richard C. Katz. ... Aphasia, Primary Progressive. Margaret A. Rogers. 7.. Aphasia: The Classical Syndromes. Robert T. Wertz and Nina F. Dronkers ... Aphasia Treatment: Pharmacological Approaches. Steven L. Small. 11.. Aphasia Treatment: Psychosocial Issues. Chris Code and ... Phonological Analysis of Language Disorders in Aphasia. Hugh W. Buckingham. 48.. Phonology and Adult Aphasia. Sheila E. ...
Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Aphasia in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw includes 1000s of professional ... Wernickes Aphasia (Receptive aphasia). have damage to the temporal lobe of the brain. Individuals with Wernickes aphasia may ... Individuals with Wernickes aphasia usually have great difficulty understanding speech and are therefore often unaware of their ... Aphasia. Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language. ...
Brocas Aphasia. Wernickes Aphasia. Global Aphasia. Anomic Aphasia. Assessment of Language Disorders Associated With ...
  • The Examination is designed to go beyond simple functional definitions of aphasia into the components of language dysfunctions (symptoms) that have been shown to underlie the various aphasic syndromes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standardization of the revised Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination is based on a normative sample of 242 patients with aphasic symptoms tested at the Boston VA Medical Center between 1976-1982. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reliability of the subtests was studied by selecting protocols of 34 patients with a degree of severity of aphasia ranging from slight to severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Special topics cover therapeutic software and other technologies, levels of evidence, neuroplasticity, new medical treatments, quality of life, and primary progressive aphasia. (pearson.ch)
  • Not much is known about what other areas must be damaged in order to produce Broca's aphasia, but some maintain damage to the inferior preorlandic motor strip (the motor cortex region responsible glossopharyngeal muscle control) is also necessary. (wikipedia.org)