Aphasia, Primary Progressive: A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Primary Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia: A form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a progressive form of dementia characterized by motor speech impairment and AGRAMMATISM, with relative sparing of single word comprehension and semantic memory.Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive: A form of multiple sclerosis characterized by a progressive deterioration in neurologic function which is in contrast to the more typical relapsing remitting form. If the clinical course is free of distinct remissions, it is referred to as primary progressive multiple sclerosis. When the progressive decline is punctuated by acute exacerbations, it is referred to as progressive relapsing multiple sclerosis. The term secondary progressive multiple sclerosis is used when relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis evolves into the chronic progressive form. (From Ann Neurol 1994;36 Suppl:S73-S79; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)Anomia: A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)Aphasia, Broca: An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Agraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting: The most common clinical variant of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, characterized by recurrent acute exacerbations of neurologic dysfunction followed by partial or complete recovery. Common clinical manifestations include loss of visual (see OPTIC NEURITIS), motor, sensory, or bladder function. Acute episodes of demyelination may occur at any site in the central nervous system, and commonly involve the optic nerves, spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebellum. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)Apraxia, Ideomotor: A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Multiple Sclerosis: An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Aphasia, Conduction: A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)Frontotemporal Dementia: The most common clinical form of FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION, this dementia presents with personality and behavioral changes often associated with disinhibition, apathy, and lack of insight.Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Aphasia, Wernicke: Impairment in the comprehension of speech and meaning of words, both spoken and written, and of the meanings conveyed by their grammatical relationships in sentences. It is caused by lesions that primarily affect Wernicke's area, which lies in the posterior perisylvian region of the temporal lobe of the dominant hemisphere. (From Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p141; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p846)Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Multiple subtypes or forms are recognized based on presence or absence of TAU PROTEIN inclusions. FTLD includes three clinical syndromes: FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, semantic dementia, and PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE NONFLUENT APHASIA.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Acid Sensing Ion Channel Blockers: A subclass of sodium channel blockers that are specific for ACID-SENSING SODIUM CHANNELS.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Pick Disease of the Brain: A rare form of DEMENTIA that is sometimes familial. Clinical features include APHASIA; APRAXIA; CONFUSION; ANOMIA; memory loss; and personality deterioration. This pattern is consistent with the pathologic findings of circumscribed atrophy of the poles of the FRONTAL LOBE and TEMPORAL LOBE. Neuronal loss is maximal in the HIPPOCAMPUS, entorhinal cortex, and AMYGDALA. Some ballooned cortical neurons contain argentophylic (Pick) bodies. (From Brain Pathol 1998 Apr;8(2):339-54; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1057-9)Language Therapy: Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Neuroimaging: Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Echolalia: Involuntary ("parrot-like"), meaningless repetition of a recently heard word, phrase, or song. This condition may be associated with transcortical APHASIA; SCHIZOPHRENIA; or other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485)Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Diffusion Tensor Imaging: The use of diffusion ANISOTROPY data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging results to construct images based on the direction of the faster diffusing molecules.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Remission, Spontaneous: A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.Mental Status Schedule: Standardized clinical interview used to assess current psychopathology by scaling patient responses to the questions.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Aniline CompoundsAge of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Dyslexia, Acquired: A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.Speech Production Measurement: Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Nerve Degeneration: Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Supranuclear Palsy, Progressive: A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Names: Personal names, given or surname, as cultural characteristics, as ethnological or religious patterns, as indications of the geographic distribution of families and inbreeding, etc. Analysis of isonymy, the quality of having the same or similar names, is useful in the study of population genetics. NAMES is used also for the history of names or name changes of corporate bodies, such as medical societies, universities, hospitals, government agencies, etc.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.

Primary progressive aphasia : a case report. (1/119)

Primary progressive aphasia is due to focal left perisylvian degeneration and manifests with progressive decline in language function for two or more years. There is preservation of cognitive functions and activities of daily living continue to be normal. We report a case of progressive aphasia in a 65 year old lady.  (+info)

Atypical and typical presentations of Alzheimer's disease: a clinical, neuropsychological, neuroimaging and pathological study of 13 cases. (2/119)

There has been increasing awareness that some slowly progressive focal cortical syndromes can be the presenting features of Alzheimer's disease, but pathological evidence has been sparse. This clinico-pathological series presents our experience with pathologically proven atypical as well as typical Alzheimer's disease presentations. We report and compare four patterns of presentation: a typical pattern with initial amnesic syndrome (n = 4 cases), progressive visual dysfunction (n = 1), progressive biparietal syndrome (n = 2) and progressive aphasia (n = 6). The aphasic presentations include both fluent and non-fluent aphasic syndromes. The neuropsychological profiles and neuroimaging clearly reflect the presenting clinical features, and show a close relationship to the distribution of pathology in these cases. Of note was the sparing of medial temporal structures (hippocampus and/or entorhinal cortex) in several aphasic cases and the severe occipito-parietal involvement in those with prominent visuospatial disorders at presentation. Our data demonstrate the wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease presentations. The recognition of atypical presentations of Alzheimer's disease is important when attempting to make an early accurate pre-morbid diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease.  (+info)

Frontotemporal decreases in rCBF correlate with degree of dysnomia in primary progressive aphasia. (3/119)

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is an uncommon degenerative dementia characterized by gradual impairment of language function with initial sparing of the memory domain. Using semiquantitative 99mTc-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) brain SPECT as a measure of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), we investigated the relationship between reduced 99mTc-HMPAO uptake and the severity of dysnomia in PPA. METHODS: Seven right-handed patients with PPA had their dysnomia assessed by the Boston Naming Test (BNT), a subtest of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination. Neuroimaging studies, including 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT, CT, and MRI, were performed. Correlational analysis between reduced rCBF and BNT was performed. RESULTS: Brain SPECT showed a reduction in 99mTc-HMPAO uptake involving the frontal and temporal lobes in all 7 patients. CT and MRI showed mild to moderate cerebral atrophy in 4 patients. Low scores on the BNT correlated with low frontotemporal 99mTc-HMPAO (Spearman r = 0.97, P = 0.004) in the 5 patients with left-hemisphere involvement. CONCLUSION: Decreased rCBF to the frontotemporal region characterized the cerebral abnormalities associated with PPA. The finding of focal rCBF abnormalities in the right hemisphere of 2 right-handed women corroborates that PPA symptoms may arise from a "non-left-dominant"-hemisphere degenerative process. Our results support the usefulness of rCBF SPECT imaging as a diagnostic aid in PPA.  (+info)

The role of conceptual knowledge in object use evidence from semantic dementia. (4/119)

It has been reported that patients with semantic dementia function well in everyday life and sometimes show striking preservation of the ability to use objects, even those specific objects for which the patient has degraded conceptual information. To explore this phenomenon in nine cases of semantic dementia, we designed a set of semantic tests regarding 20 everyday objects and compared performance on these with the patients' ability to demonstrate the correct use of the same items. We also administered a test of mechanical problem solving utilizing novel tools, on which the patients had completely normal ability. All but the mildest affected patient showed significant deficits of naming and on the visually based semantic matching tasks. Object use was markedly impaired and, most importantly, correlated strongly with naming and semantic knowledge. In a small number of instances, there was appropriate use of an object for which the patient's knowledge on the semantic matching tasks was no better than chance; but this typically applied to objects with a rather obvious relationship between appearance and use, or was achieved by trial and error. The results suggest that object use is heavily dependent upon object-specific conceptual knowledge, supplemented to some degree by a combination of visual affordances and mechanical problem solving.  (+info)

Primary progressive aphasia: analisys of 16 cases. (5/119)

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is an intriguing syndrome, showing some peculiar aspects that differentiate it from classical aphasic pictures caused by focal cerebral lesions or dementia. The slow and progressive deterioration of language occurring in these cases provides an interesting model to better understand the mechanisms involved in the linguistic process. We describe clinical and neuroimaging aspects found in 16 cases of PPA. Our patients underwent language and neuropsychological evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). We observed a clear distinction in oral expression patterns; patients were classified as fluent and nonfluent. Anomia was the earliest and most evident symptom in both groups. Neuroimaging pointed to SPECT as a valuable instrument in guiding the differential diagnosis, as well as in making useful clinical and anatomical correlations. This report and a comparison to literature are an attempt to contribute to a better understanding of PPA.  (+info)

Evidence of bilateral temporal lobe involvement in primary progressive aphasia: a SPECT study. (6/119)

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is rare. Only limited series have been reported with SPECT or PET. Moreover, in the majority of studies, the left-to-right asymmetry ratio was used, leading to difficulties in right hemisphere analyzes. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with clinical criteria of PPA (Mesulam and Weintraub) were included and compared with 12 control subjects. Complete language examination was performed in all patients. SPECT was performed on a double-head gamma camera after intravenous injection of hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (22 patients and 12 control subjects) or ethylcysteinate dimer (7 patients). Nineteen regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on each hemisphere in all patients using the Talairach atlas. The perfusion index (PI = cortex-to-cerebellum ratio) was calculated for each ROI. Atrophy was quantified on MRI by consensus of 3 observers in 16 cortical ROIs. ANOVAs were used to compare the PI between (a). patients and control subjects, (b). patients with (n = 15) or without (n = 14) lexicosemantic abnormalities (LS+ vs. LS-) and patients with (n = 19) or without (n = 10) arthric disorders (A+ vs. A-), and (c). patients with or without atrophy. RESULTS: In the 29 patients, the PI was significantly lower in the left temporopolar, left lateral temporal, left Wernicke, left parietal, and right lateral temporal cortex when compared with control subjects (P < 0.001). In LS+ patients versus control subjects, the PI significantly decreased in the left temporal cortex (lateral temporal; medial temporal; temporopolar; Wernicke), left Broca, left parietal, and right lateral temporal cortex (P < 0.001). In addition, LS+ versus LS- comparison showed a significant decrease in the left lateral, left medial temporal, and left Broca cortex (P < 0.001). In comparison with control subjects, the PI was not significantly different in A+ patients, whereas in A- patients the PI was significantly decreased in the left and right lateral temporal cortex, left Wernicke, and left parietal cortex. Moreover, the PI significantly decreased in the left lateral temporal region in A+ patients compared with A- patients. Finally, in patients without atrophy, the PI significantly decreased in the right and left lateral temporal cortex and the left parietal cortex (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that right-handed patients with PPA present a decreased perfusion in the bilateral temporal cortex. Moreover, in these regions, morphologic abnormalities are preceded by perfusion abnormalities. Finally, our results show that large left temporal dysfunction occurs in patients with LS disorders.  (+info)

Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula. (7/119)

Progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) is a syndrome in which patients lose the ability to communicate fluently in the context of relative preservation of single word comprehension and non-linguistic cognitive abilities. Neuroimaging in case studies with PNFA has failed to identify a consistent neural substrate for the language disorder. In this study of a group of patients (n=10) whose presenting complaint was progressive dysfluency, resting cerebral metabolism was measured using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET and analysed with the technique of statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Regional atrophy was assessed with voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Seven patients had a 'pure' PNFA syndrome, while the remaining three had additional features of a more pervasive dementia. Compared with controls, the patients showed hypometabolism in several regions that, most notably, included the left anterior insula/frontal opercular region. The VBM analysis revealed only one small area of atrophy in the left peri-Sylvian region. Analysis of the pure PNFA cases (n=7) relative to controls yielded qualitatively similar results to those of the whole group, suggesting that these cases were also at risk of a more generalized dementia, a finding borne out in subsequent follow-up of two cases to date. The PNFA group was then compared with a group with Alzheimer's disease (n=10) whose clinical profile did not include non-fluent aphasic features. In this analysis, the only persisting hypometabolic region was that centred over the left anterior insula. VBM did not identify any regional differences in atrophy between PNFA and Alzheimer's disease. In the light of current theories of fluent language production, the findings offer anatomical evidence that the breakdown in fluency is due to a motor articulatory planning deficit (speech apraxia) combined with a variable degree of agrammatism.  (+info)

Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia. (8/119)

We performed a comprehensive cognitive, neuroimaging, and genetic study of 31 patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a decline in language functions that remains isolated for at least 2 years. Detailed speech and language evaluation was used to identify three different clinical variants: nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA; n = 11), semantic dementia (SD; n = 10), and a third variant termed logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA; n = 10). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on MRIs showed that, when all 31 PPA patients were analyzed together, the left perisylvian region and the anterior temporal lobes were atrophied. However, when each clinical variant was considered separately, distinctive patterns emerged: (1) NFPA, characterized by apraxia of speech and deficits in processing complex syntax, was associated with left inferior frontal and insular atrophy; (2) SD, characterized by fluent speech and semantic memory deficits, was associated with anterior temporal damage; and (3) LPA, characterized by slow speech and impaired syntactic comprehension and naming, showed atrophy in the left posterior temporal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 haplotype frequency was 20% in NFPA, 0% in SD, and 67% in LPA. Cognitive, genetic, and anatomical features indicate that different PPA clinical variants may correspond to different underlying pathological processes.  (+info)

*Body part as an object

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a syndrome characterized by a progressive language deficit without other features of ... Weintraub, S., Rubin, N. P., & Mesulam, M. M. (1990). Primary progressive aphasia. Longitudinal course, neuropsychological ... Patterns of limb apraxia in primary progressive aphasia. Brain and Cognition, 53(2), 403-407. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ ... It has been debated whether the existence of BPO errors can be used as a measure for aphasia or brain damage. In the studies ...

*Semantic dementia

... (SD), also known as semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), is a progressive neurodegenerative ... Henry, M.L.; Gorno-Tempini, M.L. (December 2010). "The logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia". Current Opinion in ... "Semantic variant Primary Progressive Aphasia". Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration. Retrieved 2017-12-18. Warrington, E ... Bonner, M.F.; Ash, S.; Grossman, M. (November 2010). "The new classification of primary progressive aphasia into semantic, ...

*Karalyn Patterson

"Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants". Neurology. 76 (11): 1006-14. doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31821103e6 ... Progressive fluent aphasia with temporal lobe atrophy". Brain. 115 (6): 1783-806. doi:10.1093/brain/115.6.1783. PMID 1486461. ...

*Learning to read

"Neural mechanisms of object naming and word comprehension in primary progressive aphasia". J. Neurosci. 32 (14): 4848-55. doi: ... Snowden JS, Kindell J, Thompson JC, Richardson AM, Neary D (March 2012). "Progressive aphasia presenting with deep dyslexia and ... Cherney LR (2004). "Aphasia, alexia, and oral reading". Top Stroke Rehabil. 11 (1): 22-36. doi:10.1310/VUPX-WDX7-J1EU-00TB. ... "Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum: Final Report" (PDF). DCSF Publications. Retrieved 14 November 2011. "Teaching ...

*Vasectomy

Rogalski E, Weintraub S, Mesulam MM (2013). "Are there susceptibility factors for primary progressive aphasia?". Brain Lang. ... An association between vasectomy and primary progressive aphasia, a rare variety of frontotemporal dementia, was reported. ... The primary long-term complications are chronic pain conditions or syndromes that can affect any of the scrotal, pelvic or ... researchers extracted primary themes from their interviews of "taking responsibility" and "vasectomy as an act of minor heroism ...

*Insular cortex

March 2004). "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Annals of Neurology. 55 (3): 335-46. doi ... Progressive expressive aphasia is the deterioration of normal language function that causes individuals to lose the ability to ... Nestor PJ, Graham NL, Fryer TD, Williams GB, Patterson K, Hodges JR (November 2003). "Progressive non-fluent aphasia is ...

*Woody Durham

Durham was diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia in January 2016. In June 2016, Durham wrote a letter that was posted on ...

*Dick Evey

On May 23, 2013, Evey died from dementia and primary progressive aphasia. From 2007 until his death, Evey was a recipient of ...

*Aaron Schroeder

His death came after a long battle with primary progressive aphasia, a rare form of dementia. Obituary, Los Angeles Times, ...

*Communication disorder

Conduction aphasia Anomic aphasia Global aphasia Primary progressive aphasias Progressive nonfluent aphasia Semantic dementia ... and primary progressive aphasias caused by progressive illnesses such as dementia. Acute aphasias Expressive aphasia also known ... Receptive aphasia also known as Wernicke's aphasia, receptive aphasia is a fluent aphasia that is categorized by damage to the ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Harciarek M, Kertesz A; Kertesz (September 2011). "Primary progressive aphasias ...

*Apraxia of speech

... was not distinguished from other motor speech disorders such as dysarthria and in particular primary progressive aphasia. Many ... Recent research has established the existence of primary progressive apraxia of speech caused by neuroanatomic motor atrophy. ... AOS and expressive aphasia (also known as Broca's aphasia) are commonly mistaken as the same disorder mainly because they often ... May 2012). "Characterizing a neurodegenerative syndrome: primary progressive apraxia of speech". Brain. 135 (Pt 5): 1522-36. ...

*Fred Plum

A resident of Manhattan, Plum died at age 86 in a hospice there on June 11, 2010, due to primary progressive aphasia, a form of ...

*David McFadden (poet)

In 2012, McFadden was diagnosed with logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia, a type of Alzheimer's disease that affects ...

*List of MeSH codes (C23)

... primary progressive aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100.166 --- receptive aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.150 ... aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100.100 --- expressive aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100.111 --- aphasia, ... chronic progressive external MeSH C23.888.592.636.447.690 --- supranuclear palsy, progressive MeSH C23.888.592.636.637 --- ... anomic aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.300 --- dyslexia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.300.200 --- Alexia (acquired dyslexia ...

*List of MeSH codes (C10)

... aphasia, conduction MeSH C10.597.606.150.500.800.100.155 --- primary progressive aphasia MeSH C10.597.606.150.500.800.100.166 ... primary progressive aphasia MeSH C10.228.140.380.165 --- creutzfeldt-jakob syndrome MeSH C10.228.140.380.230 --- dementia, ... progressive MeSH C10.292.562.775 --- ophthalmoplegia, chronic progressive external MeSH C10.292.562.775.500 --- kearns-sayer ... chronic progressive external MeSH C10.597.622.447.690 --- supranuclear palsy, progressive MeSH C10.597.622.669 --- paraplegia ...

*PPA

... examination Parahippocampal place area located within the parahippocampal gyrus Phenylpropanolamine Primary progressive aphasia ... Alliance Professional Photographers of America Professional Publishers Association Professional Putters Association Progressive ...

*Brain abscess

However, in the presence of the rapidly progressive course with fever, focal neurologic findings (hemiparesis, aphasia etc.) ... is indicated as a primary and adjunct treatment which provides four primary functions. Firstly, HBOT reduces intracranial ... The location of the primary lesion may be suggested by the location of the abscess: infections of the middle ear result in ... There is almost always a primary lesion elsewhere in the body that must be sought assiduously, because failure to treat the ...

*List of MeSH codes (F03)

... primary progressive aphasia MeSH F03.087.400.300 --- creutzfeldt-jakob syndrome MeSH F03.087.400.350 --- dementia, vascular ...

*List of diseases (P)

... sclerosis Primary malignant lymphoma Primary muscular atrophy Primary orthostatic tremor Primary progressive aphasia Primary ... 2 Primary ciliary dyskinesia Primary craniosynostosis Primary cutaneous amyloidosis Primary granulocytic sarcoma Primary ... Griscelli syndrome Primary agammaglobulinemia Primary aldosteronism Primary alveolar hypoventilation Primary amenorrhea Primary ... Progressive spinal muscular atrophy Progressive supranuclear palsy atypical Progressive supranuclear palsy Progressive systemic ...

*Vasectomy

An association between vasectomy and primary progressive aphasia, a rare variety of frontotemporal dementia, was reported.[25] ... "Are there susceptibility factors for primary progressive aphasia?". Brain Lang. 127 (2): 135-8. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2013.02.004 ... The primary long-term complications are chronic pain conditions or syndromes that can affect any of the scrotal, pelvic or ... researchers extracted primary themes from their interviews of "taking responsibility" and "vasectomy as an act of minor heroism ...

*Aphasiology

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare disorder where people slowly lose their ability to talk, read, write, and comprehend what ... expressive aphasia (Broca's aphasia) and receptive aphasia (Wernicke's or sensory aphasia). Acute aphasias are often the result ... There are three variants: progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), and logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA ... Nov 2006). "Semantic dementia and fluent primary progressive aphasia: two sides of the same coin?". Brain. 129 (Pt 11): 3066-80 ...

*Anomic aphasia

Conduction aphasia Expressive aphasia Lists of language disorders Primary progressive aphasia Receptive aphasia "Anomic Aphasia ... Anomic aphasia (also known as dysnomia, nominal aphasia, and amnesic aphasia) is a mild, fluent type of aphasia where an ... Harciarek M, Kertesz A (September 2011). "Primary progressive aphasias and their contribution to the contemporary knowledge ... "Primary Progressive Aphasia in a Bilingual Woman". Neurocase. 12: 296-299. doi:10.1080/13554790601126047. Van Hout, Anne (June ...

*Jargon aphasia

Neologistic jargon aphasia and agraphia in primary progressive aphasia. Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2009;277(1-2):155 ... Rohrer JD, Rossor MN, Warren JD (February 2009). "Neologistic jargon aphasia and agraphia in primary progressive aphasia". J. ... Jargon aphasia is a type of fluent aphasia in which an individual's speech is incomprehensible, but appears to make sense to ... January 2010). "Prediction of pathology in primary progressive language and speech disorders". Neurology. 74 (1): 42-9. doi: ...

*Insular cortex

"Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Annals of Neurology. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002/ana. ... Progressive expressive aphasiaEdit. Progressive expressive aphasia is the deterioration of normal language function that causes ... "Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula". Brain. 126 (Pt 11): 2406 ...

*Progressive nonfluent aphasia

... which he called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) included patients with progressive non-fluent (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD ... Bonner MF, Ash S, Grossman M (November 2010). "The new classification of primary progressive aphasia into semantic, logopenic, ... Mesulam MM (October 2003). "Primary progressive aphasia-a language-based dementia". N. Engl. J. Med. 349 (16): 1535-42. doi: ... March 2004). "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Ann. Neurol. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002 ...

*Primary progressive aphasia

"Primary Progressive Aphasia - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2017-12-17. Mesulam M ( ... A third variant of primary progressive aphasia, logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA), is an atypical form of Alzheimer's disease ... Three classifications of primary progressive aphasia have been described. In the classical Mesulam criteria for primary ... Mesulam MM: Primary progressive aphasia-a language-based dementia. N Engl J Med 2003, 349:1535-1542 Dickerson, Bradford C. ( ...

*Nosebleed

Progressive Aphasias *Progressive nonfluent aphasia. *Semantic dementia. *Logopenic progressive aphasia. *Speech disturbances * ... al.], edited by Roger Jones ... [et (2004). Oxford textbook of primary medical care (repr. ed.). Oxford: Oxford University ...

*Transcortical sensory aphasia

Anomic aphasia Conduction aphasia Global aphasia Primary progressive aphasias Transcortical motor aphasia Broca's area ... receptive aphasia. However, transcortical sensory aphasia differs from receptive aphasia in that patients still have intact ... Transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA) is a kind of aphasia that involves damage to specific areas of the temporal lobe of the ... TSA is a fluent aphasia similar to Wernicke's aphasia, with the exception of a strong ability to repeat words and phrases. The ...
Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities. People with primary progressive aphasia may have trouble naming objects or may misuse word endings, verb tenses, conjunctions and pronouns. People with primary progressive aphasia can become mute and may eventually lose the ability to understand written or spoken language. Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal dementia, a cluster of related disorders that all originate in the frontal or temporal lobes of the brain.. Primary progressive aphasia specifically targets the language center of the brain - located in the brains left hemisphere. Brain scans typically show a marked shrinkage of the brains language center in people who have primary progressive aphasia. Brain activity also can be diminished.. Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, usually before the age of 65, and tend to worsen over time. Symptoms may vary by individual, depending on which portion of the ...
The Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) syndrome was firstly introduced in 1982. Recently, the primary progressive aphasias were classified into three clinical variants; non fluent/agrammatic, semantic and logopenic.
PDF. Thompson, C.K., Cho, S., Hsu, C.J., Wieneke, C., Weitner, B.B., Mesulam, M.M., & Weintraub, S. (2012). Dissociation between fluency and agrammatism in Primary Progressive Aphasia. Aphasiology, 26(1), 20-43. PMC3244141.. Mesulam, M.M., Wieneke, C., Thompson, C.K., Rogalski, E., & Weintraub, S. (2012). Quantitative classification of Primary Progressive Aphasia at early and mild impairment stages. Brain, 135(5), 1537-1553. PMC3577099.. Thompson, C.K., Cho, S., Price, C., Wieneke, C., Bonakdarpour, B., Weintraub, S., & Mesulam, M.M. (2012). Semantic interference during object naming in agrammatic and logopenic Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). Brain and Language, 120, 237-250. PMC3299898.. Rogalski, E., Cobia, D., Harrison, T.M., Wieneke, C., Thompson, C.K., Weintraub, S., & Mesulam, M.-M. (2011). Anatomy of language impairments in Primary Progressive Aphasia. Journal of Neruoscience, 31(9), 3344-3350. PMC3112000.. Hurley, R.S., Paller, K.A., Wieneke, C.A., Weintraub, S., Thompson, C.K., ...
Abstract: This thesis examines the feasibility of the ASL for Active Living Program as an intervention for clinical practice among individuals with memory loss and/or aphasia with associated depression. It strives to answer the following questions: First will an eight session RT intervention impact on symptoms of depression in individuals with mild memory loss and aphasia? Second, will participation in this intervention change levels of self-esteem? Third, to what extent will the older adult participants be able to learn and retain finger-spelling and vocabulary taught? Lastly, will participants be satisfied with this type of intervention? The first chapter reports the current trends of an aging society, as well as the increase in co-morbid disorders such as depression. The second chapter provides a thorough literature review which clearly identifies Mild Cognitive Impairment and Primary Progressive Aphasia as well as describes efficacy studies that provide the foundation for this study. The ...
The Language in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) aims to understand the behavioral, anatomical and physiological changes in people with PPA throughout the course of the illness. The researchers in this study want to increase awareness of PPA, educate others about this unique disorder, and to encourage more research to eventually develop therapies.. During the three-day research program, participants will be asked to undergo neuropsychological testing (paper and pencil tests that evaluate cognition), an MRI (a non-invasive brain-imaging procedure), an EEG (another non-invasive procedure that looks at brain waves when you think) and other computer and language testing batteries. Participants may be asked to return every two years to complete the same measures.. The study will recruit approximately 15 participants with PPA per year. For participants not living near Chicago, IL, flights and accommodations (for both the person with PPA and their companion) will be covered by the study. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Identification of an atypical variant of logopenic progressive aphasia. AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret. AU - Whitwell, Jennifer Lynn. AU - Duffy, Joseph R.. AU - Strand, Edythe A.. AU - Dean, Pamela M.. AU - Senjem, Matthew L.. AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.. AU - Josephs, Keith Anthony. PY - 2013/11. Y1 - 2013/11. N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine the association between aphasia severity and neurocognitive function, disease duration and temporoparietal atrophy in 21 individuals with the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA). We found significant correlations between aphasia severity and degree of neurocognitive impairment as well as temporoparietal atrophy; but not disease duration. Cluster analysis identified three variants of lvPPA: (1) subjects with mild aphasia and short disease duration (mild typical lvPPA); (2) subjects with mild aphasia and long disease duration (mild atypical lvPPA); and, (3) subjects with severe aphasia and relatively long ...
Accumulation of paired helical filament tau contributes to neurodegeneration in Alzheimers disease (AD). 18 F-flortaucipir is a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand sensitive to tau in AD, but its clinical utility will depend in part on its ability to predict cognitive symptoms in diverse dementia phenotypes associated with selective, regional uptake. We examined associations between 18 F-flortaucipir and cognition in 14 mildly-impaired patients (12 with cerebrospinal fluid analytes consistent with AD pathology) who had amnestic (n = 5) and non-amnestic AD syndromes, including posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, n = 5) and logopenic-variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, n = 4 ...
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia syndrome caused by neurodegenerative brain disease, with language impairment as the primary feature. Al...
Primary progressive aphasia is one of several forms of brain disease lost in the medical shadow of a much better known relative, Alzheimers disease.
We defined the neuropsychological and imaging features of the logopenic variant of PPA that in our experience represents 30% of all PPA cases. Our results suggested that the core cognitive deficit in LPA was a phonological loop disorder. Consistently, the imaging investigation showed involvement of GM and WM in the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal regions.. LPA is characterized by a decreased rate of spontaneous language production with frequent halts due to word-finding pauses. Phonemic paraphasias are common, but motor speech and grammar are spared. This pattern of language production is different from the fast output typical of early SemD patients, who usually fill word-finding pauses with circumlocutions and filler words. It is also distinct from the production deficit typical of PNFA, in which articulation deficits and agrammatism predominate.22 LPA patients, therefore, show a pattern of "intermediate" fluency distinct from the fluent SemDs and the nonfluent PNFAs, raising the ...
The signs and symptoms for frontotemporal dementia varies from one individual to another. It can easily be mistaken for a psychiatric disorder. Identifying the disease in an individual can be a challenge for the scientists and doctors. Frontotemporal dementia is generally broken down into three subgroups - a behavioral variant and two forms of primary progressive aphasia, the nonfluent variant and the semantic variant.. The behavioral variant is characterized by personality changes, a lack of restraint toward social conventions or behaviors (disinhibition), and a general lack of interest, enthusiasm or concern (apathy). This is the most common subtype of frontotemporal dementia.. Primary progressive aphasia is characterized by the slow onset and gradual progression of language difficulties. Individuals may have difficulty finding the right word or understanding certain words in written or spoken speech. The nonfluent variant is characterized by slow, deliberate, sometimes halting speech ...
Frontotemporal dementias are a group of disorders featuring progressive decline in behavior or language, with neurodegeneration of the frontal or temporal lobes. In this session, faculty will highlight current diagnostic and management approaches for the most common subtypes of frontotemporal dementia: behavioural variant FTD, nonfluent primary progressive aphasia, and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia. Recent developments in neuroimaging, genetics, and biomarkers related to FTD will be highlighted. Through case presentations, practical approaches to the assessment and management of patients with FTD symptoms will be discussed, including discussion of related disorders that can mimic FTD ...
Although commonly interpreted as a marker of episodic memory during neuropsychological exams, relatively little is known regarding the neurobehavior of "total learning" immediate recall scores. Medial temporal lobes are clearly associated with delayed recall performances, yet immediate recall may necessitate networks beyond traditional episodic memory. We aimed to operationalize cognitive and neuroanatomic correlates of total immediate recall in several aging syndromes. Demographically-matched neurologically normal adults (n=91), individuals with Alzheimers disease (n=566), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (PPA) (n=34), behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (n=97), semantic variant PPA (n=71), or nonfluent/agrammatic variant PPA (n=39) completed a neurocognitive battery, including the CVLT-Short Form trials 1-4 Total Immediate Recall; a majority subset also completed a brain MRI ...
AC (29) ADHD (30) affect (1) aging (22) Alzheimers (3) American Indians (1) anterior cinglate (1) APA (1) aphasia (5) apraxia (3) Aspergers (1) ATI (1) attention (56) attentional control (32) auditory (14) Auditory Neuroscience Lab (2) autism (6) automatic timing (8) background noise (1) basal ganglia (16) beat perception (4) beat production (4) biofeedback (1) book nook (21) BPR3 (1) brain structures (24) brain beat (1) brain carnival (34) brain clock (122) Brain Clock Blog (2) brain clock timing (2) brain facts (2) brain fitness (119) brain function (3) brain injury (25) brain location (28) Brain network integration (1) brain network segregation (1) brain networks (57) brain rhythm (20) brain structure (1) brain teasers (2) brain timing (1) brain training (14) brainstem (2) BRAMS lab (1) Brocas area (1) caffeine (1) CAPD (2) CAT (1) CBRM (1) cerebellum (17) cerebral palsy (2) CHC (1) CHC theory (11) CHC videos (1) circadian (4) classification (1) clinical disorders (3) clocks (1) CNTRICS (1) ...
Researchers from the University of Louisville say their latest study confirms gut bacteria play a role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinsons disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimers disease are characterized by misfolded proteins and inflammation of the brain. Scientists say they are unsure about the causes of 90 percent of cases recorded. In the ...
Speech Pathology Week (25 - 31 August) seeks to promote the work done by speech pathologists with the more than 1.2 million Australians who have a communication disability which impacts on daily life.
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
Family members eventually may need to consider long-term care options for the person with primary progressive aphasia. Family members may also need to plan the persons finances and help make legal decisions to prepare for more-serious stages of the condition.. Support groups may be available for you and the person with primary progressive aphasia or related conditions. Ask your social worker or other members of your treatment team about community resources or support groups.. ...
Three cases of slowly progressive speech and language disturbance were studied at various points post onset (three, five and 15 years respectively). Language, neuropsychological and brain imaging (computer tomography and positron emission tomography) evaluations were completed on all three patients. The data suggest that the syndrome of "progressive aphasia": 1) does not involve a uniform symptom complex; 2) does not necessarily develop into a full blown dementia syndrome; 3) varies greatly in rate of progression from case to case; 4) is associated with normal brain structure (on computer tomography); and 5) is associated with abnormal left temporal lobe metabolism as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). One patient had histological findings consistent with Alzheimers disease at necropsy.. ...
Alzheimers disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and usually occurs in old age. It is invariably fatal, generally within ten years of the first signs. Early signs of AD include unusual memory loss, particularly in remembering recent events and the names of people and things, logopenic primary progressive aphasia. As the disease progresses the patient exhibits more serious problems, becoming subject to mood swings and unable to perform complex activities such as driving. In the latter stages they forget how to do simple things such as brushing their hair and then require full-time care.. Histologically, familial AD is practically indistinguishable from other forms of the disease. Deposits of amyloid can be seen in sections of brain tissue. This amyloid protein forms plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that progress through the brain. Very rarely the plaque may be unique, or uncharacteristic of AD; this can happen when there is a mutation in one of the genes that creates a functional, ...
The meeting of the Memory Disorders Research Society in Chicago, held 9-11 October, opened with a session on two neurodegenerative syndromes: primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and semantic dementia (SD). Each of these syndromes bears some resemblance to the progression of Alzheimers disease, but with the key difference that memory is not initially impaired in these patients. Marsel Mesulam of Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, began with a characterization of the progression of PPA. In this disease, patients initially have difficulties in basic language functions such as finding names for objects or comprehending speech. These deficits are associated with brain damage occurring in the left hemisphere in perisylvian regions that looks at the cellular level somewhat similar to the damage associated with Alzheimers disease (Mesulam, 2001; Sobrido et al., 2003). John Hodges of the University of Cambridge presented a discussion of SD. Patients with this syndrome initially have difficulty ...
A probe conducted on the brain by researchers at the Northwestern University suggests that the long-held belief that Wernickes area is the prime area of language comprehension might not be accurate. Marek-Marsel Mesulam, lead probe author and director of Northwesterns Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimers Disease Center, performed language tests and brain MRIs on 72 patients with a uncommon form of language-affecting dementia called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in which Wernickes area is bruised. He observed that these patients did not exhibit the same trouble with word meaning as stroke victims with similar brain harm. PPA and stroke harm the brain differently; in PPA, cortical areas degenerate, but their underlying fiber pathways that are necessary for communication inbetween different language centers in the brain, remain intact. However, stroke damages large regions of brain. According to Mesulam, this strongly indicates that language comprehension is a sophisticated process that ...
Former Monty Python member Terry Jones, who also co-directed Monty Python and the Holy Grail and directed Monty Pythons Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life, has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia. Because the disease impacts his ability to communicate, Jones is no longer giving interviews and may eventually lead to complete inability to speak. In addition to his work with Monty Python, Jones has written several documentaries and books on history as well as the novelization of Douglas Adamss video game Starship Titanic ...
Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved OCREVUS
Terrible news for those of us suffering from primary progressive. Im beyond words... http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/080414/20080414006526.html?.v=1
Does anyone know if Novartis has published the protocol for the arm of the FTY 720 study involving primary progressive patients? Where I can look it up? The trial should start recruiting in January so surely the information is somewhere! ...
Mahoney CJ, Downey LE, Beck J, Liang Y, Mead S, Perry RJ, Warren JD. The Presenilin 1 P264L Mutation Presenting as non-Fluent/Agrammatic Primary Progressive Aphasia ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Apraxia of speech. T2 - An overview. AU - Ogar, Jennifer. AU - Slama, Hilary. AU - Dronkers, Nina. AU - Amici, Serena. AU - Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa. PY - 2005/12. Y1 - 2005/12. N2 - Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder that can occur in the absence of aphasia or dysarthria. AOS has been the subject of some controversy since the disorder was first named and described by Darley and his Mayo Clinic colleagues in the 1960s. A recent revival of interest in AOS is due in part to the fact that it is often the first symptom of neurodegenerative diseases, such as primary progressive aphasia and corticobasal degeneration. This article will provide a brief review of terminology associated with AOS, its clinical hallmarks and neuroanatomical correlates. Current models of motor programming will also be addressed as they relate to AOS and finally, typical treatment strategies used in rehabilitating the articulation and prosody deficits associated with AOS will be ...
I think the most difficult news to share, is the news for those who find themselves with the most disabling form of MS, the primary progressive sufferers. Unfortunately, this group may be the most under-served of the MS Community simply because...
Aphasia Registry - Opportunities to take part in Aphasia research.. Aphasia & Stroke Caregivers Guide - A range of US articles on Aphasia related topics.. Atrial Fibrillation Association (Australia) - Provides information, support and access to established, new or innovative treatments for Atrial Fibrillation. Australian Aphasia Association - Their official website.. Australian Aphasia Guide - 2011 Version available through the National Library of Australia. Books on Aphasia - Books available on line for purchase at The Book Depository (Free Shipping).. Build Your Own Aphasia Talk: Increasing Community Awareness of Aphasia - This resource was developed by Latrobe University in conjunction with the Australian Aphasia Association, it aims to address the poor community awareness of the condition aphasia.. Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE) in Aphasia Rehabilitation - A new Australia-wide research program on Aphasia.. Communication Problems Following a Stroke - Fact Sheet from Speech ...
Unscramble aphasia, Unscramble letters aphasia, Point value for aphasia, Word Decoder for aphasia, Word generator using the letters aphasia, Word Solver aphasia, Possible Scrabble words with aphasia, Anagram of aphasia
Aphasia usually results from lesions to the language-relevant areas of the temporal and parietal cortex of the brain, such as Brocas area, Wernickes area, and the neural pathways between them. These areas are almost always located in the left hemisphere, and in most people this is where the ability to produce and comprehendlanguage is found. However, in a very small number of people, language ability is found in the right hemisphere. In either case, damage to these language areas can be caused by a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other brain injury. Aphasia may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor or progressive neurological disease, e.g., Alzheimers or Parkinsons disease. It may also be caused by a sudden hemorrhagic event within the brain. Certain chronic neurological disorders, such as epilepsy or migraine, can also include transient aphasia as a prodromal or episodic symptom. Aphasia is also listed as a rare side effect of the fentanyl patch, an opioid used to control ...
When its time to talk with your doctor about PPMS, you may feel overwhelmed. Find out what you should ask - and how to move forward after your appointment.
Aphasia is a serious acquired communication disability, that affects approximately 30% of stroke survivors.1 It is chronic in nature: 50% of people diagnosed with aphasia have persistent communication problems 1 year after stroke.2 Aphasia compromises an individuals ability to undertake many activities of daily living, resulting in reduced mood and quality of life.3,4 In addition to the personal cost of aphasia, health-care costs for people with aphasia are the highest in stroke care.5 Therefore, the recent identification of recovery from aphasia as one of the top ten research priorities related to life after stroke is unsurprising.. ...
Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage to the area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension often the result of a stroke. If you have been diagnosed with aphasia, we invite you to join our weekly Aphasia Conversation Group. Here people with Aphasia and their caregivers can find a place to share thoughts, frustrations and successes with others facing similar challenges. These interactions also offer you the chance to gain the confidence and support necessary to move forward with recovery.. Aphasia Support Group Flyer. ...
The Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp Committee is made up of members from UBC, Douglas College, March of Dimes and the community. The Committee is represented by both healthcare professionals and people with aphasia to ensure that the Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp meets the needs of those living with aphasia in the community.
List of words make out of Aphasias. Anagrams of word Aphasias. Words made after scrabbling Aphasias. Word Creation helps in Anagrams and Puzzles.
Aphasia Toolbox revolutionized the treatment & recovery of aphasia, Dysphasia Speech, and Stroke Aphasia recovery; helping hundreds of people recover since 1976.
A blog written by someone who is inspired daily by people with aphasia, who provides treatment for people with aphasia, who conducts research with people with aphasia and their close friends and family members, and who is constantly learning ...
A blog written by someone who is inspired daily by people with aphasia, who provides treatment for people with aphasia, who conducts research with people with aphasia and their close friends and family members, and who is constantly learning ...
Participants are all family members providing substantial care for a relative with a primary progressive dementia such as Alzheimers disease or related conditions. The carers involved are all experiencing considerable difficulties with their own low mood or concern for the future to the extent that they could be classified as having a depressive disorder meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. ...
... : Aphasia refers to the loss or impairment of previously acquired abilities in language comprehension or production that cannot be explained by sensory or motor defects or by diffuse brain dysfunction
associative aphasia definition: aphasia where the lesion is presumed to be in the organization tracts linking the different language facilities when you look at the brain; persons have difficulty repeating…
Acquired epileptic aphasia (AEA) typically develops in healthy children who acutely or progressively lose receptive and expressive language ability coincident with the appearance of paroxysmal electroencephalographic (EEG) changes. In 1957, Landau and Kleffner initially described acquired epileptic aphasia and subsequently reluctantly agreed ...
... is a form of aphasia in which the subject has difficulty remembering or recognizing names which the subject should know well.
Eventbrite - Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation presents Aphasia CRE Seminar Series 2020 Registration - Wednesday, 29 January 2020 - Find event and ticket information.
Aphasia centers are designed to enhance quality of life by creating a community of people who are all living with aphasia. Typically, they offer conversation
Factors related to prognosis of acquired aphasia in children.: In a follow up study of 15 children with acquired aphasia, it was found that the persistent prese
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia ...
Its been compared to being in a foreign country and not knowing the language or spending 24 hours a day with a word on the tip of your tongue. Imagine hearing and understanding everyone around you, trying to speak, but being unable to form the words. Thats what aphasia sufferers deal with every single day.Frustrating, right? Whats also frustrating is the minimal level of awareness of the condition. Even with 2 million people affected - more people than
Watch full episodes of Aphasia - Bills Story and get the latest breaking news, exclusive videos and pictures, episode recaps and much more at TVGuide.com
WAYNE, NJ - Arden Courts of Wayne presents a free Lunch-n-Learn on Understanding Aphasia on Tuesday, September 17 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at located at their 800 Hamburg Turnpike in Wayne. ...
Descriptions of the sessions available at ASHA Professional Developments Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia online conference.
I wanted to share this with you. It is about a real guy who has suffered a stroke and the resulting aphasia. If you want to, head on over to the guys website http://www.aphasiathemovie.com/. Maybe if we can get enough people interested, we could bring him to Rochester. ...
The aim of this review was to investigate the evidence of interdisciplinary teamwork in the rehabilitation of stroke patients with aphasia. A total of 248 studies were read and nine included. The papers were analysed and ...
We are excited that you are interested in having your aphasia program listed on AphasiaAccess.org. Please take a moment to tell us more about your program.
Aphasia dating - Men looking for a man - Women looking for a woman. Find a man in my area! Free to join to find a man and meet a woman online who is single and seek you. Find single man in the US with footing. Looking for sympathy in all the wrong places? Now, try the right place.
Learn more about Aphasia at Grand Strand Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Learn more about Receptive Aphasia at Sky Ridge Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Keep up to date with whats happening in the world of education, training and skills. Receive details of offers and newly launched courses, and tips on effective online and blended learning practise by signing up to our monthly newsletter. We guarantee not to sell or pass on your details and you can unsubscribe at any time.. ...
Found this video about a few very well-known and accomplished people who have experienced hardships in their life and overcome them... its pretty inspirational! (It made me think of you Chris, being that you probably already know all of the stories in the video already ...
If you are interested in becoming a volunteer in the Aphasia and Neurolinguistics Research Lab, please complete an application.. ...
Versions: Xenial (4:5.8.8-0ubuntu1~ubuntu16.04~ppa1), Bionic (4:5.11.5-0ubuntu1~ubuntu18.04~ppa1), Artful (4:5.11.5-0ubuntu1~ubuntu17.10~ppa1 ...
Looking for online definition of Progressive nonfluent aphasia in the Medical Dictionary? Progressive nonfluent aphasia explanation free. What is Progressive nonfluent aphasia? Meaning of Progressive nonfluent aphasia medical term. What does Progressive nonfluent aphasia mean?
Enabling fluent speech in non-fluent aphasia is a TedX talk about a treatment for non-fluent aphasia. This is one of the treatments that we use at SpeechWorks Inc.. An Aphasiologist Has a Stroke is another extremely interesting TedX talk.. Association International Aphasie: learn about Aphasia in many languages, including French.. National Aphasia Association (U.S.A.): information about Aphasia for people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals. The NAA has an Aphasia Quiz, a good tool for educating people about aphasia.. Aphasia Institute (Canada): information about aphasia from a community-based centre. Aphasia Corner: aphasia simulations - helping family and friends, and people working with people with aphasia, to understand how aphasia feels; Aphasia Corner also has a community-written blog. Aphasia Recovery Connection: online support group connecting people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals - their FaceBook page quickly addresses questions about aphasia from lots of ...
BACKGROUND/AIMS: We developed and validated the Mini-Addenbrookes Cognitive Examination (M-ACE) in dementia patients. Comparisons were also made with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). METHOD: The M-ACE was developed using Mokken scaling analysis in 117 dementia patients [behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), n = 25; primary progressive aphasia (PPA), n = 49; Alzheimers disease (AD), n = 34; corticobasal syndrome (CBS), n = 9] and validated in an independent sample of 164 dementia patients (bvFTD, n = 23; PPA, n = 82; AD, n = 38; CBS, n = 21) and 78 controls, who also completed the MMSE. RESULTS: The M-ACE consists of 5 items with a maximum score of 30. Two cut-offs were identified: (1) ≤25/30 has both high sensitivity and specificity, and (2) ≤21/30 is almost certainly a score to have come from a dementia patient regardless of the clinical setting. The M-ACE is more sensitive than the MMSE and is less likely to have ceiling effects. CONCLUSION: The M-ACE is a brief and
Has one (or more) identified adult caregiver who is willing to provide written informed consent for his/her own participation; is able to read, understand, and speak the designated language at the study site; either lives with the subject or sees the subject for ≥2 hours/day ≥3 days/week; agrees to accompany the subject to each study visit; and is able to verify daily compliance with study ...
Background: Performance stability is an implicit assumption within theoretical explanations of aphasia. The assumption being that when completing language processing tasks, performance will be stable from moment to moment and day to day. Theoretically, aphasia is most commonly viewed within a modular framework. that is, language processing is carried out by specific, specialised language processing modules. Aphasia is thought to result when one of these modules is dammed leading to a unique pattern of performance results. Implicit to this view of aphasia is stability, once damaged, the module will no longer be accessed and any process using the module will be impaired. This theory of aphasia is widely held within both research and clinical communities and underlies many of our approaches to the assessment and treatment of aphasia. However more recently researchers have been expressing doubts about the validity of assuming stability in aphasia performance. Instead variability in performance is ...
Background: Individuals with aphasia are often excluded from studies exploring post-stroke cognition because so many of the standard cognitive assessments rely on language ability. Our primary objective was to examine the association between performance on cognitive tests and performance on comprehension and naming tests in post-stroke aphasia. Second, we aimed to determine the association between language performance and a real-life measure of cognition (Kettle Test). Third, we explored the feasibility of administering cognitive tests in aphasia.Methods: Thirty-six participants with post-stroke aphasia and 32 controls were assessed on a battery of pen-and-paper cognitive tests recommended in stroke. Auditory comprehension was measured using the Comprehensive Aphasia Test and naming was measured using the Boston Naming Test. Twenty-two community dwelling participants with aphasia and controls were also asked to complete the Kettle Test. Multiple linear regressions were used to explore the relationship
This chapter reviews the broad literature on approaches to treatment of aphasia. Behavioral interventions for aphasia are influenced by perspectives from neuroscience that emphasize that neuroplasticity in rehabilitation is experience-dependent and potent. Several principles of neuroplasticity are reviewed, and examples are described from the aphasia treatment literature. Additional principles are considered regarding influences of error production and feedback in aphasia rehabilitation outcomes. Adjuvant treatments then are described that are meant to enhance behavioral treatment outcomes through pharmacologic and neuromodulatory interventions. Finally, life participation approaches are highlighted that encourage use of multi-modality communication for daily life activities along with training of communication partners. An interdisciplinary process is emphasized in which many professionals work together to provide individuals with aphasia the maximum benefits in language recovery, communication skills,
Description of disease Aphasia, amnesic. Treatment Aphasia, amnesic. Symptoms and causes Aphasia, amnesic Prophylaxis Aphasia, amnesic
References up to date: Williams DR, de Silva R, Pavour DC et al. Characteristics of two distinct clinical phenotypes in pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy: Richardson syndrome and PSP - parkinsonism. Brain 2005; 128:1247-1258. Williams DR, Holton JL, Strand C. et al. Pathological tau burden and distribution distinguishes progressive supranuclear palsy-parkinsonism from Richardsons syndrome. Brain 2007; 130: 1566-1576. Mizusawa H, Mochizuki A , Ohkoshi N, et al. Progressive supranuclear palsy presenting with pure akinesia. Adv Neurol 1993; 60: 618-621. Josephs KA, Duffy JR, Strand EA et al. Clinicopathological and imaging correlates of progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech. Brain 2006; 129: April 13. Tsuboi Y, Josephs KA, Boeve BF et al. Increased tau burden in the cortices of progressive supranuclear palsy presenting with corticobasal syndrome. Mov Disord 2005; 20: 982-988 ...
Seeley et. al published a fascinating paper entitled "Unravelling Bolero: progressive aphasia, transmodal creativity and the right posterior neocortex" in Brain, 2008. I dont discuss a lot of papers as I think theyre dry and not everyone can get access, but I came across this one and found it curious. One way of approaching neurologic injury is to localize a disease process ("wheres the lesion?") and then see what deficits result. For example, a stroke in the motor strip of the brain will lead to contralateral weakness, and so it can be inferred that the affected anatomy has something to do with motor function. But the authors discuss an interesting idea: some lesions in the brain can stimulate new artistic or musical talents. Maurice Ravel was a French composer best known for his orchestral work "Bolero." Near the end of his career, he developed a progressive language and motor disorder. There are hypotheses that as his speech declined, his musical prowess heightened. The authors of this ...
Suffering from a stroke or caring for a loved one who has can be difficult in of itself. However, the recovery process can often be further complicated with the emergence of side effects as a result of brain injury caused by the stroke. Since the month of May is Stroke Awareness Month, I am setting a spotlight on one of the most frustrating of these possible side effects, aphasia. Aphasia is defined as the loss of ability to understand or express speech and often leads to difficulty speaking, understanding when others are speaking to you, writing, and sometimes reading, as well. Although aphasia is related to other sorts of brain injury or damage, stroke is still the leading cause.. Having a family member with aphasia has taught me a great deal about patience and effective communication and I honestly believe that it has given me the greatest lesson in how to actually listen to someone when they talk. Given that we often take our speech and the speech of others for granted, we are often at a ...
There are many types of aphasia. Some individuals have difficulty speaking; whereas, others may struggle to follow a conversation. Cases may be mild, severe, or anywhere in between. Symptoms may differ greatly, but the bottom line is that all people with aphasia will have some difficulty communicating. The symptoms of aphasia may be temporary or permanent, depending upon the amount of brain damage a child experiences ...
People with aphasia can do many things that they used to do. They can pursue familiar hobbies and interests. Their likes and dislikes will be about the same. However, they may be more oriented to pictures than to words. Here are some activities that people with aphasia enjoy Participating in the daily routine. Cooking, cleaning,…
Aphasia is challenging, isolating, and frustrating. Here you can find information to help you better understand aphasia, typical treatments, and assistive technology options. You are not alone: over one million people in the U.S. have aphasia.
RESULTS: CCSVI was present in 28 (18.9%) of the MS patients, in 2 (10%) of CIS patients, in 11 (6.4%) of the controls, and in 2 (5%) of the OND patients. A significant association between MS and CCSVI was found with an odds ratio of 3.41 (95% confidence interval 1.63-7.13; p = 0.001). CCSVI was significantly more frequent among MS subjects with a disease duration longer than 144 months (26.1% versus 12.6% of patients with duration shorter than 144 months; p = 0.03) and among patients with secondary progressive (SP) and primary progressive (PP) forms (30.2% and 29.4, respectively) than in patients with relapsing remitting (RR) MS (14.3%). A stronger association was found considering SP and PP forms (age adjusted OR = 4.7; 95% CI 1.83-12.0, p = 0.001); the association was weaker with the RR patients (age adjusted OR = 2.58; 95%CI 1.12-5.92; p = 0.02) or not significant in CIS group (age adjusted OR = 2.04; 95%CI 0.40-10.3; p = 0.4 ...
Treats addiction as a primary progressive disease that affects individuals physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. A 30 bed facility in Williamsburg, VA. ...
Aphasia is a language disorder that affects the ability to communicate. Its most often caused by strokes that occur in areas of the brain that control speech and language. Brain injuries resulting in aphasia may also arise from head trauma, brain tumors, or infections. Aphasia does not affect intelligence. Stroke survivors remain mentally alert, even though their speech…
Oculomotor aphasia symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Oculomotor aphasia (Apraxia) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
These monthly sessions offer effective rehabilitation for stroke survivors with aphasia. In this innovative program, customers participate in treatment sessions for three and a half hours a day, five days a week. After four weeks of therapy, participants achieve an average of 13% gain (as measured by the Western Aphasia Battery) and are able to achieve similar results with repeated participation.. Session times:. ...
This is a video of a woman who suffers from aphasia, and how art is helping her recovery. I found this interesting because it is a unique approach for helping those who suffer from aphasia ...
Cosponsors of H.Res.285 - 112th Congress (2011-2012): Expressing support for designation of June 2011 as National Aphasia Awareness Month and supporting efforts to increase awareness of aphasia.
In a study designed to differentiate why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not, investigators have found that a compensatory reorganization of language function to right hemispheric brain regions bodes ...
... is a language disorder caused by damage in a specific area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension.
Check out our latest paper #connectivity #rehabilitation #aphasia #graph theory in Brain and Language http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0093934X1500187X. ...
9781604062618 Our cheapest price for Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Language Disorders is $39.16. Free shipping on all orders over $35.00.
Having experienced a serious brain injury at just 26 years old, I developed aphasia. This is the story of my recovery, and how I relearned everything.
See how others experience receptive aphasia. Join the community to connect with others like you and learn about their real-world experiences.
This is a Finding Words story! I miss the life I used have but Ive become happy with the life I have now. I miss my old friends and my job as a scaffolding
THE TERMS OF THIS SECTION APPLY TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY MANDATORY APPLICABLE LAW. THIS SECTION IS NOT INTENDED AND DOES NOT OPERATE TO LIMIT OUR LIABILITY TO THE EXTENT WE MAY BE LIABLE TO YOU UNDER LAW (INCLUDING PURSUANT TO ANY STATUTORY RIGHTS WHICH APPLY TO YOU).. THE PRODUCTS SOLD ON THE STORE ARE SUBJECT TO ANY MANDATORY STATUTORY WARRANTIES AND, WHERE APPLICABLE, ONLY WARRANTED ACCORDING TO THE TERMS OF ANY LICENSE AGREEMENT OR MANUFACTURER WARRANTY THAT MAY ACCOMPANY THE PRODUCTS.. EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY GUARANTEED IN THE LICENSE AGREEMENT OR IN ANY MANUFACTURER GUARANTEE THAT MAY ACCOMPANY THE PRODUCT, NO GUARANTEE IS PROVIDED.. STEPS CONSULTING LTD MAKES NO SPECIFIC REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES AND PROVIDES NO ASSURANCE OF ANY CONDITION WITH REGARD TO THE PRODUCTS, INCLUDING REGARDING MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. STEPS CONSULTING LTD WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE PROTECTION AND BENEFIT OF ANY MANDATORY APPLICABLE LAW OR STATUTORY WARRANTIES WHICH APPLY TO ...
I am a 35yr old patient with Hereditary Hemochroamtosis which was diagnosed in 2003. I have undergone the treatment course and am under maintenance although a bit overdue at this time. My family hist...
RT @ARCaphasia: What a visionary Pat Arato was! A role model of a life well lived with purpose. Passion. Commitment. Making a difference!…. Feb 11, 2020 ...
Motivation: Numerous strategies predicting peptide binding to main histocompatibility organic (MHC) class I actually molecules have already been developed during the last years. which different prediction strategies provide divergent predictions concerning their binding capacity. Upon experimental binding validation, these peptides got into the standard study. Outcomes: The benchmark provides operate for 15 weeks and contains […]. Read More ». ...
For more information, please fill out the form below or contact Blanche S. Feero directly at 203.573.9303 or [email protected]
Amodel® PPA is stronger, stiffer and has higher thermal capabilities than standard polyamides. It is less sensitive to moisture and retains excellent mechanical properties - including fatigue and creep resistance - when exposed to a wide range of ope
Sandhoff disease. Santavuori-Haltia-Hagberg disease, see Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. SD, see Semantic dementia. Semantic dementia. Senile dementia of Lewy body type, see Dementia with Lewy bodies. Shy-Drager syndrome, see Multiple System Atrophy. Slowly Progressive Aphasia, see Primary Progressive Aphasia. Sphigolipidosis, see Gaucher disease. Sphingomyelinosis, see Niemann-Pick disease. Spielmeyer-Vogt-Sjögren disease, see Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Sporadic CJD, see Sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease. Sporadid Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease. Spino-cerebellar ataxia, see Ataxias. Steele-Richardson-Olszewsky syndrome, see Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Striatonigral degeneration, see Multiple System Atrophy. Subacute arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, see Binswangers disease. Syphilis. ...
A 54 year old female patient, born in 1959, was diagnosed suffering from primary progressive multiple sclerosis more than 10 years ago, and retrospectively symptoms started already in 1992. She underwent various operations (3 times) to correct a fixed kyphosis and 2 years ago started to suffer from increasing pains and muscle spasms. She was…
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click Continue well assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you wont see this message again. Click Find out more for information on how to change your cookie settings ...
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was 2-fold, first, to compare decision making in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) patients and healthy adults using the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART), and, second, to identify the regions of gray matter atrophy associated with bvFTD patients BART performance. BACKGROUND: Stimulus-reinforcement learning is required to evaluate the results of previously chosen actions to improve future decisions. Although there is a well established literature suggesting altered decision making in FTD patients and data from lesion studies suggest orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) involvement in decision making, there is very little research looking at the brain correlates of decision making in FTD populations specifically. METHOD: Twenty-seven bvFTD patients and 19 age-matched and education-matched normal controls completed the BART. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed on the magnetic resonance imaging scans of a subset of patients. RESULTS: Compared with healthy
Results The PPFG patient exhibited a robust improvement in gait and posture following PPN-DBS. When PPN stimulation was deactivated, postural stability and gait skills declined to pre-DBS levels, and fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography revealed hypoactive cerebellar and brainstem regions, which significantly normalised when PPN stimulation was reactivated. ...
Whilst MRI is routinely used for the assessment and diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, there is poor correspondence between clinical disability in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) patients and conventional MRI markers of disease activity (e.g., number of enhancing lesions). As PPMS patients show diffuse and global myelin loss, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of whole-brain myelin water fraction (MWF) imaging in PPMS. Specifically, we sought to use full-brain analysis techniques to: 1) determine the reproducibility of MWF estimates in PPMS brain; 2) compare MWF values in PPMS brain to healthy controls; and 3) establish the relationship between MWF and clinical disability, regionally and globally throughout the brain. Seventeen PPMS patients and seventeen age-matched controls were imaged using a whole-brain multi-component relaxation imaging technique to measure MWF. Analysis of MWF reduction was performed on three spatial levels: 1) histogram; 2) white matter skeleton; and 3
TY - JOUR. T1 - Aphasia Following Left Putaminal Hemorrhage at a Rehabilitation Hospital. AU - Maeshima, Shinichiro. AU - Okamoto, Sayaka. AU - Okazaki, Hideto. AU - Funahashi, Reisuke. AU - Hiraoka, Shigenori. AU - Hori, Hirokazu. AU - Yagihashi, Kei. AU - Fuse, Ikuko. AU - Tanaka, Shinichiro. AU - Asano, Naoki. AU - Sonoda, Shigeru. PY - 2018/3/1. Y1 - 2018/3/1. N2 - Objective: We aimed to clarify the relationship between aphasia and hematoma type/volume in patients with left putaminal hemorrhage admitted to a rehabilitation facility. Methods: We evaluated the relationship between the presence, type, and severity of aphasia and hematoma type/volume in 92 patients with putaminal hemorrhage aged 29-83 years. Hematoma type and volume were evaluated on the basis of CT images obtained at stroke onset. The Standard Language Test for Aphasia was conducted as part of the initial assessment. Results: Aphasia was observed in 79 of 92 patients. A total of 31 patients had fluent aphasia, while 48 had ...

Primary progressive aphasia | B-health blogPrimary progressive aphasia | B-health blog

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities. People with primary progressive ... Primary progressive aphasia. August 5, 2008. Mental disordersfrontotemporal dementia, neurological syndrome, Primary ... Some people with primary progressive aphasia may have less trouble with written language than with spoken language.. Risk ... Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, usually before the age of 65, and tend to worsen over time. Symptoms ...
more infohttp://bhealthblog.com/primary-progressive-aphasia/

The Ravel case; possible link between non fluent Primary Progressive Aphasia and basal ganglia dysfunction | Atlas of ScienceThe Ravel case; possible link between non fluent Primary Progressive Aphasia and basal ganglia dysfunction | Atlas of Science

Recently, the primary progressive aphasias were classified into three clinical variants; non fluent/agrammatic, semantic and ... The Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) syndrome was firstly introduced in 1982. ... The Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) syndrome was firstly introduced in 1982. Recently, the primary progressive aphasias were ... The Ravel case; possible link between non fluent Primary Progressive Aphasia and basal ganglia dysfunction. ...
more infohttp://atlasofscience.org/the-ravel-case-possible-link-between-non-fluent-primary-progressive-aphasia-and-basal-ganglia-dysfunction/

Search of: Primary progressive aphasia - List Results - ClinicalTrials.govSearch of: 'Primary progressive aphasia' - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov

132 Studies found for: Primary progressive aphasia. Also searched for Aphasia, primary progressive, Frontotemporal dementia, ... rTMS for the Treatment of Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Randomized Controlled Trial. *Aphasia, Primary Progressive ... Assessment of Hyperphosphorylated Tau PET Binding in Primary Progressive Aphasia. *Primary Progressive Aphasia ... Rehabilitation and Prophylaxis of Anomia in Primary Progressive Aphasia. *Aphasia, Primary Progressive ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=%22Primary+progressive+aphasia%22&show_rss=Y&sel_rss=new14

Rare Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, Attacks Brains Language Center - The New York TimesRare Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, Attacks Brain's Language Center - The New York Times

Primary progressive aphasia is one of several forms of brain disease lost in the medical shadow of a much better known relative ... Riedner might have a condition called primary progressive aphasia, or P.P.A., a form of dementia affecting the brains language ... The Personal Health column on Tuesday, about primary progressive aphasia, a type of dementia that affects the brains language ... The progression occurs in the course of years rather than months, and the primary nature of the aphasia is demonstrated by ...
more infohttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/03/health/03brody.html?ref=personalhealth&pagewanted=all&_r=0

Primary progressive aphasia - WikipediaPrimary progressive aphasia - Wikipedia

"Primary Progressive Aphasia - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2017-12-17. Mesulam M ( ... A third variant of primary progressive aphasia, logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA), is an atypical form of Alzheimers disease ... Three classifications of primary progressive aphasia have been described. In the classical Mesulam criteria for primary ... Mesulam MM: Primary progressive aphasia-a language-based dementia. N Engl J Med 2003, 349:1535-1542 Dickerson, Bradford C. ( ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_progressive_aphasia

Language in Primary Progressive Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govLanguage in Primary Progressive Aphasia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

primary progressive aphasia. frontotemporal dementia. semantic dementia. progressive nonfluent aphasia. progressive aphasia. ... Primary Progressive Aphasia Semantic Dementia Progressive Non-fluent Aphasia ... Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) Research Program at Northwestern University Publications: Mesulam MM. Slowly progressive ... Aphasia. Aphasia, Primary Progressive. Pick Disease of the Brain. Frontotemporal Dementia. Speech Disorders. Communication ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT00537004?recrs=abc&cond=%22Language+Disorders%22

Primary progressive aphasia Archives - Progressive Radio NetworkPrimary progressive aphasia Archives - Progressive Radio Network

DiseaseMagnetic resonance imagingNeurodegenerationParkinsons diseasePositron emission tomographyPrimary progressive aphasia ...
more infohttps://prn.fm/tag/primary-progressive-aphasia/

Visual and statistical analysis of 18F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia | SpringerLinkVisual and statistical analysis of 18F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia | SpringerLink

Purpose Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose ( ... Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 positron emission tomography in progressive apraxia of speech and primary progressive aphasia. Arch ... Primary progressive aphasia: a tale of two syndromes and the rest. Neurology 2012;78:1670-7.CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle ... Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology 2011;76:1006-14.CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00259-015-2994-9

Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variantsClassification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants

Primary progressive aphasia. Ann Neurol 2001;49:425-432 [PubMed]. 33. Mesulam MM. Primary progressive aphasia: a language-based ... "slowly progressive aphasia," subsequently renamed primary progressive aphasia (PPA).4 Warrington5 described a progressive ... Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. M.L. Gorno-Tempini, MD, PhD,. A.E. Hillis, MD, S. Weintraub, ... Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia. Ann Neurol 2004;55:335-346 [PMC free article] [PubMed] ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3059138/?lang=en-ca

The logopenic/phonological variant of primary progressive aphasia | NeurologyThe logopenic/phonological variant of primary progressive aphasia | Neurology

Conclusions: Logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) is a distinctive variant of primary progressive aphasia. Cognitive and ... progressive nonfluent aphasia; PPA = primary progressive aphasia; Rey-O = Rey-Osterrieth; SemD = semantic dementia; VBM = voxel ... Since Mesulams original description of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in 1982,1 it has become clear that progressive ... The logopenic/phonological variant of primary progressive aphasia. M. L. Gorno-Tempini, S. M. Brambati, V. Ginex, J. Ogar, N. F ...
more infohttps://n.neurology.org/content/71/16/1227?ijkey=6ef5c9d7c5bd8f9b61e488cd8e4ee1b8b078d563&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Multimodal predictors for Alzheimer disease in nonfluent primary progressive aphasia | NeurologyMultimodal predictors for Alzheimer disease in nonfluent primary progressive aphasia | Neurology

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) represents a group of clinical syndromes that involve progressive decline in language ... Patients with logopenic progressive aphasia (A) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (B) demonstrated frontotemporal atrophy (red ... AD is thought to cause logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA), and FTLD may cause progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA). We sought ... Table 2 Demographic and neuropsychological features of logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) and progressive nonfluent aphasia ( ...
more infohttps://n.neurology.org/content/75/7/595?ijkey=525879141c70aa345d6deaf385c2e9d3a8fc96bb&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia | Image | Radiopaedia.orgFronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia | Image | Radiopaedia.org

... agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia Modality: Nuclear medicine ... agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia. From the case: Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary ... View full size version of Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia ... See the case: Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/images/4506440?lang=us

A recreation therapy twist to sign language: an intervention for primary progressive aphasia., NC DOCKS (North Carolina Digital...A recreation therapy twist to sign language: an intervention for primary progressive aphasia., NC DOCKS (North Carolina Digital...

Primary Progressive Aphasia, Recreation Therapy, Sign Language. Subjects. Older people.. Aphasia $x Psychological aspects.. ... A recreation therapy twist to sign language: an intervention for primary progressive aphasia.. UNCG Author/Contributor (non- ... A recreation therapy twist to sign language: an intervention for primary progressive aphasia.. PDF (Portable Document Format). ... provides a thorough literature review which clearly identifies Mild Cognitive Impairment and Primary Progressive Aphasia as ...
more infohttp://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?id=3703

Longitudinal treatment of primary progressive aphasia: a case study  - The Aphasiology ArchiveLongitudinal treatment of primary progressive aphasia: a case study - The Aphasiology Archive

Murray, Laura L. (1998) Longitudinal treatment of primary progressive aphasia: a case study. [Journal (Paginated)] ... to describe the evolving treatment regimen provided to a woman with a 4 year history of non-fluent primary progressive aphasia ...
more infohttp://aphasiology.pitt.edu/1130/

Sentence Comprehension and Production in Stroke-induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA): The Northwestern Assessment of...Sentence Comprehension and Production in Stroke-induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA): The Northwestern Assessment of...

Sentence Comprehension and Production in Stroke-induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA): The Northwestern Assessment of ... and 32 with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) [15 agrammatic (PPA-G); 17 logopenic (PPA-L)], using the Northwestern Assessment ... Sentence Comprehension and Production in Stroke-induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA): The Northwestern Assessment of ...
more infohttp://aphasiology.pitt.edu/2302/

Functional disability in primary progressive aphasia - Nuffield Department of Clinical NeurosciencesFunctional disability in primary progressive aphasia - Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

... nonfluent aphasia, and the more recently defined logopenic variant; (2) to draw relations between functional disability, ... In primary progressive aphasia (PPA), assessment of language predominates over assessment of functional impairment in ... Background: In primary progressive aphasia (PPA), assessment of language predominates over assessment of functional impairment ... nonfluent aphasia, and the more recently defined logopenic variant; (2) to draw relations between functional disability, ...
more infohttps://www.ndcn.ox.ac.uk/publications/480952

Most recent papers with the keyword Primary progressive aphasia | Read by QxMDMost recent papers with the keyword Primary progressive aphasia | Read by QxMD

BACKGROUND: Although primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by progressive loss of language and communication ... Primary progressive aphasia is a language-based dementia that initially spares other cognitive domains; however, aphasia ... Rates of Amyloid Imaging Positivity in Patients With Primary Progressive Aphasia.. Miguel A Santos-Santos, Gil D Rabinovici, ... Impaired Interoceptive Accuracy in Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia.. Charles R Marshall, Chris J D Hardy, Lucy L ...
more infohttps://www.readbyqxmd.com/keyword/12085

Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo ClinicDiagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic

Primary progressive aphasia cant be cured, and there are no medications to treat it. However, some therapies might help ... MRI scans can help diagnose primary progressive aphasia, detect shrinking of certain areas of the brain and show which area of ... Support groups may be available for you and the person with primary progressive aphasia or related conditions. Ask your social ... To diagnose primary progressive aphasia, your doctor will review your symptoms and order tests. ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/primary-progressive-aphasia/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350504?p=1

RPBG Speech Pathology launches Primary Progressive Aphasia Therapy GroupRPBG Speech Pathology launches Primary Progressive Aphasia Therapy Group

You are here » Home » About us » News » RPBG Speech Pathology launches Primary Progressive Aphasia Therapy Group ... To coincide with the beginning of Speech Pathology Week, the RPBG Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) Therapy Group has launched ... For people suffering from PPA, language impairment is the primary symptom. Speech pathology plays an important role in ...
more infohttps://bhs.health.wa.gov.au/About-us/News/RPBG-Speech-Pathology-launches-Primary-Progressive-Aphasia-Therapy-Group

Determinants of Neurodegenerative Decline in Primary Progressive Aphasia - Emily RogalskiDeterminants of Neurodegenerative Decline in Primary Progressive Aphasia - Emily Rogalski

... with language impairment as the primary feature. Al... ... Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia ... 2016) Am I looking at a cat or a dog? Gaze in the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia is subject to excessive ... 2016) Eye movements as probes of lexico-semantic processing in a patient with primary progressive aphasia. Neurocase 22:65-75 ... Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia syndrome caused by neurodegenerative brain disease, with language ...
more infohttp://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-NS075075-03

Austin Health Research Online: Primary progressive aphasia: a case report.Austin Health Research Online: Primary progressive aphasia: a case report.

Primary progressive aphasia is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by deterioration in language function ... We describe a case of primary progressive aphasia in a Vietnamese man with corresponding changes on positron emission ... Aphasia, Primary Progressive.radionuclide imaging.therapy. Humans. Language Disorders.therapy. Male. Positron-Emission ...
more infohttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10453

Neuroimaging in the differential diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia : illustrative case series in the light of new...Neuroimaging in the differential diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia : illustrative case series in the light of new...

Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive language disorder associated with atrophy of the dominant ... primary progressive aphasia, frontotemporal dementia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon-emission computerized ... Neuroimaging in the differential diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia : illustrative case series in the light of new ... Neuroimaging in the differential diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia : illustrative case series in the light of new ...
more infohttps://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/43173

Progressive nonfluent aphasia - WikipediaProgressive nonfluent aphasia - Wikipedia

... which he called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) included patients with progressive non-fluent (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD ... Bonner MF, Ash S, Grossman M (November 2010). "The new classification of primary progressive aphasia into semantic, logopenic, ... Mesulam MM (October 2003). "Primary progressive aphasia-a language-based dementia". N. Engl. J. Med. 349 (16): 1535-42. doi: ... March 2004). "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Ann. Neurol. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002 ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_nonfluent_aphasia

Dysexecutive Symptoms in Primary Progressive Aphasia: Beyond Diagnostic Criteria | Laboratoire LINGUADysexecutive Symptoms in Primary Progressive Aphasia: Beyond Diagnostic Criteria | Laboratoire LINGUA

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative condition in which the most prominent clinical feature ... Dysexecutive Symptoms in Primary Progressive Aphasia: Beyond Diagnostic Criteria. Joël Macoir, Monica Lavoie, Robert Laforce, ... Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative condition in which the most prominent clinical feature ... aphasia assessment atrophy brain executive function executive functions humans language language impairment longitudinal ...
more infohttps://lingualab.ca/fr/publication/macoir-dysexecutive-2017/
  • Early LPA involves impairments in naming and sentence repetition, and thus can resemble Conduction aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conduction aphasia is characterized by disproportionately impaired repetition with otherwise fluent speech. (bmj.com)
  • Signs and symptoms may or may not be present in individuals with aphasia and may vary in severity and level of disruption to communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two individuals with aphasia performed the eyetracking task on the same schedule without intervening language treatment. (frontiersin.org)
  • Heiss WD, Kessler J, Thiel A, Ghaemi M, Karbe H. Differential capacity of left and right hemispheric areas for compensation of poststroke aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, Berthier et al observed the effect of memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) on chronic poststroke aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • People who have aphasia may have difficulty speaking and finding the "right" words to complete their thoughts. (webmd.com)
  • With expressive aphasia, the person knows what he or she wants to say, yet has difficulty communicating it to others. (webmd.com)
  • Worsening communication difficulty without significant changes in thinking and behavior for a year or two is a hallmark of primary progressive aphasia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • This includes difficulty making or understanding speech ( aphasia ). (cdc.gov)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is the term used for language difficulty that develops gradually. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Individuals with Broca aphasia often have difficulty understanding syntactically complex or semantically reversible sentences (e.g., 'touch your nose after you touch your foot') but have little trouble understanding simple, semantically nonreversible sentences. (bmj.com)
  • Transcortical sensory aphasia usually results from ischemia involving the watershed area between the left MCA and left posterior cerebral artery territory. (bmj.com)
  • We run focus groups and support groups such as the PCA support group for patients and carers with posterior variant of disease and the PPA support group for those with primary progressive aphasia. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • A few early trials indicate benefit from transcranial magnetic stimulation and direct curent transcortical stimulation in patients with aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • Transcortical aphasia is characterized by relatively spared repetition. (bmj.com)