A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.
A form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a progressive form of dementia characterized by motor speech impairment and AGRAMMATISM, with relative sparing of single word comprehension and semantic memory.
A form of multiple sclerosis characterized by a progressive deterioration in neurologic function which is in contrast to the more typical relapsing remitting form. If the clinical course is free of distinct remissions, it is referred to as primary progressive multiple sclerosis. When the progressive decline is punctuated by acute exacerbations, it is referred to as progressive relapsing multiple sclerosis. The term secondary progressive multiple sclerosis is used when relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis evolves into the chronic progressive form. (From Ann Neurol 1994;36 Suppl:S73-S79; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)
A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)
An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).
Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.
Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.
The most common clinical variant of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, characterized by recurrent acute exacerbations of neurologic dysfunction followed by partial or complete recovery. Common clinical manifestations include loss of visual (see OPTIC NEURITIS), motor, sensory, or bladder function. Acute episodes of demyelination may occur at any site in the central nervous system, and commonly involve the optic nerves, spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebellum. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)
A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)
Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.
A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.
The relationships between symbols and their meanings.
A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)
The most common clinical form of FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION, this dementia presents with personality and behavioral changes often associated with disinhibition, apathy, and lack of insight.
Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.
Impairment in the comprehension of speech and meaning of words, both spoken and written, and of the meanings conveyed by their grammatical relationships in sentences. It is caused by lesions that primarily affect Wernicke's area, which lies in the posterior perisylvian region of the temporal lobe of the dominant hemisphere. (From Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p141; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p846)
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Multiple subtypes or forms are recognized based on presence or absence of TAU PROTEIN inclusions. FTLD includes three clinical syndromes: FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, semantic dementia, and PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE NONFLUENT APHASIA.
A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.
A subclass of sodium channel blockers that are specific for ACID-SENSING SODIUM CHANNELS.
Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.
A rare form of DEMENTIA that is sometimes familial. Clinical features include APHASIA; APRAXIA; CONFUSION; ANOMIA; memory loss; and personality deterioration. This pattern is consistent with the pathologic findings of circumscribed atrophy of the poles of the FRONTAL LOBE and TEMPORAL LOBE. Neuronal loss is maximal in the HIPPOCAMPUS, entorhinal cortex, and AMYGDALA. Some ballooned cortical neurons contain argentophylic (Pick) bodies. (From Brain Pathol 1998 Apr;8(2):339-54; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1057-9)
Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.
An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.
Involuntary ("parrot-like"), meaningless repetition of a recently heard word, phrase, or song. This condition may be associated with transcortical APHASIA; SCHIZOPHRENIA; or other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485)
Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.
The use of diffusion ANISOTROPY data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging results to construct images based on the direction of the faster diffusing molecules.
The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.
The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.
Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.
A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)
A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.
Standardized clinical interview used to assess current psychopathology by scaling patient responses to the questions.
Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.
The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.
Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.
An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.
A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.
A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.
Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.
The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.
A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Personal names, given or surname, as cultural characteristics, as ethnological or religious patterns, as indications of the geographic distribution of families and inbreeding, etc. Analysis of isonymy, the quality of having the same or similar names, is useful in the study of population genetics. NAMES is used also for the history of names or name changes of corporate bodies, such as medical societies, universities, hospitals, government agencies, etc.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.

Primary progressive aphasia : a case report. (1/119)

Primary progressive aphasia is due to focal left perisylvian degeneration and manifests with progressive decline in language function for two or more years. There is preservation of cognitive functions and activities of daily living continue to be normal. We report a case of progressive aphasia in a 65 year old lady.  (+info)

Atypical and typical presentations of Alzheimer's disease: a clinical, neuropsychological, neuroimaging and pathological study of 13 cases. (2/119)

There has been increasing awareness that some slowly progressive focal cortical syndromes can be the presenting features of Alzheimer's disease, but pathological evidence has been sparse. This clinico-pathological series presents our experience with pathologically proven atypical as well as typical Alzheimer's disease presentations. We report and compare four patterns of presentation: a typical pattern with initial amnesic syndrome (n = 4 cases), progressive visual dysfunction (n = 1), progressive biparietal syndrome (n = 2) and progressive aphasia (n = 6). The aphasic presentations include both fluent and non-fluent aphasic syndromes. The neuropsychological profiles and neuroimaging clearly reflect the presenting clinical features, and show a close relationship to the distribution of pathology in these cases. Of note was the sparing of medial temporal structures (hippocampus and/or entorhinal cortex) in several aphasic cases and the severe occipito-parietal involvement in those with prominent visuospatial disorders at presentation. Our data demonstrate the wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease presentations. The recognition of atypical presentations of Alzheimer's disease is important when attempting to make an early accurate pre-morbid diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease.  (+info)

Frontotemporal decreases in rCBF correlate with degree of dysnomia in primary progressive aphasia. (3/119)

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is an uncommon degenerative dementia characterized by gradual impairment of language function with initial sparing of the memory domain. Using semiquantitative 99mTc-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) brain SPECT as a measure of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), we investigated the relationship between reduced 99mTc-HMPAO uptake and the severity of dysnomia in PPA. METHODS: Seven right-handed patients with PPA had their dysnomia assessed by the Boston Naming Test (BNT), a subtest of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination. Neuroimaging studies, including 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT, CT, and MRI, were performed. Correlational analysis between reduced rCBF and BNT was performed. RESULTS: Brain SPECT showed a reduction in 99mTc-HMPAO uptake involving the frontal and temporal lobes in all 7 patients. CT and MRI showed mild to moderate cerebral atrophy in 4 patients. Low scores on the BNT correlated with low frontotemporal 99mTc-HMPAO (Spearman r = 0.97, P = 0.004) in the 5 patients with left-hemisphere involvement. CONCLUSION: Decreased rCBF to the frontotemporal region characterized the cerebral abnormalities associated with PPA. The finding of focal rCBF abnormalities in the right hemisphere of 2 right-handed women corroborates that PPA symptoms may arise from a "non-left-dominant"-hemisphere degenerative process. Our results support the usefulness of rCBF SPECT imaging as a diagnostic aid in PPA.  (+info)

The role of conceptual knowledge in object use evidence from semantic dementia. (4/119)

It has been reported that patients with semantic dementia function well in everyday life and sometimes show striking preservation of the ability to use objects, even those specific objects for which the patient has degraded conceptual information. To explore this phenomenon in nine cases of semantic dementia, we designed a set of semantic tests regarding 20 everyday objects and compared performance on these with the patients' ability to demonstrate the correct use of the same items. We also administered a test of mechanical problem solving utilizing novel tools, on which the patients had completely normal ability. All but the mildest affected patient showed significant deficits of naming and on the visually based semantic matching tasks. Object use was markedly impaired and, most importantly, correlated strongly with naming and semantic knowledge. In a small number of instances, there was appropriate use of an object for which the patient's knowledge on the semantic matching tasks was no better than chance; but this typically applied to objects with a rather obvious relationship between appearance and use, or was achieved by trial and error. The results suggest that object use is heavily dependent upon object-specific conceptual knowledge, supplemented to some degree by a combination of visual affordances and mechanical problem solving.  (+info)

Primary progressive aphasia: analisys of 16 cases. (5/119)

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is an intriguing syndrome, showing some peculiar aspects that differentiate it from classical aphasic pictures caused by focal cerebral lesions or dementia. The slow and progressive deterioration of language occurring in these cases provides an interesting model to better understand the mechanisms involved in the linguistic process. We describe clinical and neuroimaging aspects found in 16 cases of PPA. Our patients underwent language and neuropsychological evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). We observed a clear distinction in oral expression patterns; patients were classified as fluent and nonfluent. Anomia was the earliest and most evident symptom in both groups. Neuroimaging pointed to SPECT as a valuable instrument in guiding the differential diagnosis, as well as in making useful clinical and anatomical correlations. This report and a comparison to literature are an attempt to contribute to a better understanding of PPA.  (+info)

Evidence of bilateral temporal lobe involvement in primary progressive aphasia: a SPECT study. (6/119)

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is rare. Only limited series have been reported with SPECT or PET. Moreover, in the majority of studies, the left-to-right asymmetry ratio was used, leading to difficulties in right hemisphere analyzes. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with clinical criteria of PPA (Mesulam and Weintraub) were included and compared with 12 control subjects. Complete language examination was performed in all patients. SPECT was performed on a double-head gamma camera after intravenous injection of hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (22 patients and 12 control subjects) or ethylcysteinate dimer (7 patients). Nineteen regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on each hemisphere in all patients using the Talairach atlas. The perfusion index (PI = cortex-to-cerebellum ratio) was calculated for each ROI. Atrophy was quantified on MRI by consensus of 3 observers in 16 cortical ROIs. ANOVAs were used to compare the PI between (a). patients and control subjects, (b). patients with (n = 15) or without (n = 14) lexicosemantic abnormalities (LS+ vs. LS-) and patients with (n = 19) or without (n = 10) arthric disorders (A+ vs. A-), and (c). patients with or without atrophy. RESULTS: In the 29 patients, the PI was significantly lower in the left temporopolar, left lateral temporal, left Wernicke, left parietal, and right lateral temporal cortex when compared with control subjects (P < 0.001). In LS+ patients versus control subjects, the PI significantly decreased in the left temporal cortex (lateral temporal; medial temporal; temporopolar; Wernicke), left Broca, left parietal, and right lateral temporal cortex (P < 0.001). In addition, LS+ versus LS- comparison showed a significant decrease in the left lateral, left medial temporal, and left Broca cortex (P < 0.001). In comparison with control subjects, the PI was not significantly different in A+ patients, whereas in A- patients the PI was significantly decreased in the left and right lateral temporal cortex, left Wernicke, and left parietal cortex. Moreover, the PI significantly decreased in the left lateral temporal region in A+ patients compared with A- patients. Finally, in patients without atrophy, the PI significantly decreased in the right and left lateral temporal cortex and the left parietal cortex (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that right-handed patients with PPA present a decreased perfusion in the bilateral temporal cortex. Moreover, in these regions, morphologic abnormalities are preceded by perfusion abnormalities. Finally, our results show that large left temporal dysfunction occurs in patients with LS disorders.  (+info)

Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula. (7/119)

Progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) is a syndrome in which patients lose the ability to communicate fluently in the context of relative preservation of single word comprehension and non-linguistic cognitive abilities. Neuroimaging in case studies with PNFA has failed to identify a consistent neural substrate for the language disorder. In this study of a group of patients (n=10) whose presenting complaint was progressive dysfluency, resting cerebral metabolism was measured using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET and analysed with the technique of statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Regional atrophy was assessed with voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Seven patients had a 'pure' PNFA syndrome, while the remaining three had additional features of a more pervasive dementia. Compared with controls, the patients showed hypometabolism in several regions that, most notably, included the left anterior insula/frontal opercular region. The VBM analysis revealed only one small area of atrophy in the left peri-Sylvian region. Analysis of the pure PNFA cases (n=7) relative to controls yielded qualitatively similar results to those of the whole group, suggesting that these cases were also at risk of a more generalized dementia, a finding borne out in subsequent follow-up of two cases to date. The PNFA group was then compared with a group with Alzheimer's disease (n=10) whose clinical profile did not include non-fluent aphasic features. In this analysis, the only persisting hypometabolic region was that centred over the left anterior insula. VBM did not identify any regional differences in atrophy between PNFA and Alzheimer's disease. In the light of current theories of fluent language production, the findings offer anatomical evidence that the breakdown in fluency is due to a motor articulatory planning deficit (speech apraxia) combined with a variable degree of agrammatism.  (+info)

Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia. (8/119)

We performed a comprehensive cognitive, neuroimaging, and genetic study of 31 patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a decline in language functions that remains isolated for at least 2 years. Detailed speech and language evaluation was used to identify three different clinical variants: nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA; n = 11), semantic dementia (SD; n = 10), and a third variant termed logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA; n = 10). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on MRIs showed that, when all 31 PPA patients were analyzed together, the left perisylvian region and the anterior temporal lobes were atrophied. However, when each clinical variant was considered separately, distinctive patterns emerged: (1) NFPA, characterized by apraxia of speech and deficits in processing complex syntax, was associated with left inferior frontal and insular atrophy; (2) SD, characterized by fluent speech and semantic memory deficits, was associated with anterior temporal damage; and (3) LPA, characterized by slow speech and impaired syntactic comprehension and naming, showed atrophy in the left posterior temporal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 haplotype frequency was 20% in NFPA, 0% in SD, and 67% in LPA. Cognitive, genetic, and anatomical features indicate that different PPA clinical variants may correspond to different underlying pathological processes.  (+info)

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities. People with primary progressive aphasia may have trouble naming objects or may misuse word endings, verb tenses, conjunctions and pronouns. People with primary progressive aphasia can become mute and may eventually lose the ability to understand written or spoken language. Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal dementia, a cluster of related disorders that all originate in the frontal or temporal lobes of the brain.. Primary progressive aphasia specifically targets the language center of the brain - located in the brains left hemisphere. Brain scans typically show a marked shrinkage of the brains language center in people who have primary progressive aphasia. Brain activity also can be diminished.. Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, usually before the age of 65, and tend to worsen over time. Symptoms may vary by individual, depending on which portion of the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Preferential Disruption of Auditory Word Representations in Primary Progressive Aphasia with the Neuropathology of FTLD-TDP Type A. AU - Mesulam, Marek-Marsel. AU - Nelson, Matthew J.. AU - Hyun, Jungmoon. AU - Rader, Benjamin. AU - Hurley, Robert S.. AU - Rademakers, Rosa. AU - Baker, Matthew C.. AU - Bigio, Eileen H. AU - Weintraub, Sandra. PY - 2019/3/1. Y1 - 2019/3/1. N2 - Four patients with primary progressive aphasia displayed a greater deficit in understanding words they heard than words they read, and a further deficiency in naming objects orally rather than in writing. All four had frontotemporal lobar degeneration-Transactive response DNA binding protein Type A neuropathology, three determined postmortem and one surmised on the basis of granulin gene (GRN) mutation. These features of language impairment are not characteristic of any currently recognized primary progressive aphasia variant. They can be operationalized as manifestations of dysfunction centered on a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Examining the value of lexical retrieval treatment in primary progressive aphasia. T2 - Two positive cases. AU - Henry, M. L.. AU - Rising, K.. AU - DeMarco, A. T.. AU - Miller, B. L.. AU - Gorno-Tempini, M. L.. AU - Beeson, P. M.. PY - 2013/11/1. Y1 - 2013/11/1. N2 - Individuals with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) suffer a gradual decline in communication ability as a result of neurodegenerative disease. Language treatment shows promise as a means of addressing these difficulties but much remains to be learned with regard to the potential value of treatment across variants and stages of the disorder. We present two cases, one with semantic variant of PPA and the other with logopenic PPA, each of whom underwent treatment that was unique in its focus on training self-cueing strategies to engage residual language skills. Despite differing language profiles and levels of aphasia severity, each individual benefited from treatment and showed maintenance of gains as well as ...
This information comes to us from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration. Logopenic variant Primary Progressive Aphasia Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a language disorder that involves changes in the ability to speak, read, write and understand what others are saying. It is associated with a disease process that causes atrophy in the frontal and temporal…
TY - JOUR. T1 - Primary progressive aphasia. T2 - A 25-year retrospective. AU - Mesulam, Marek-Marsel. PY - 2007/10/1. Y1 - 2007/10/1. N2 - The diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is made in any patient in whom a language impairment (aphasia), caused by a neurodegenerative disease (progressive), constitutes the most salient aspect of the clinical picture (primary). The language impairment can be fluent or nonfluent and may or may not interfere with word comprehension. Memory for recent events is relatively preserved although memory scores obtained in verbally mediated tests may be abnormal. Lesser changes in behavior and object recognition may be present but are not the leading factors that bring the patient to medical attention. This selective clinical pattern is most conspicuous in the initial stages of the disease. Progressive nonfluent aphasia and some types of semantic dementia can be considered subtypes of PPA. Initially brought to the attention of contemporary literature 25 ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Naming and comprehension in primary progressive aphasia. T2 - The influence of grammatical word class. AU - Hillis, Argye E.. AU - Heidler-Gary, Jennifer. AU - Newhart, Melissa. AU - Chang, Shannon. AU - Ken, Lynda. AU - Bak, Thomas H.. PY - 2006/2/1. Y1 - 2006/2/1. N2 - Background: Various clinical types of primary progressive aphasia have been associated with distinct areas of atrophy and pathological changes. Therefore, differences in the patterns of language deterioration in the various types might reveal the types of language processes and representations that depend on the areas of brain that are disproportionately affected. Aims: To test the hypotheses (1) that individuals with progressive nonfluent aphasia (associated with left posterior, inferior frontal, and insular atrophy) show progressive motor speech impairment and disproportionate deterioration in naming actions relative to objects, and (2) that individuals with semantic dementia (associated with anterior and ...
The Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) syndrome was firstly introduced in 1982. Recently, the primary progressive aphasias were classified into three clinical variants; non fluent/agrammatic, semantic and logopenic.
The term primary progressive aphasia (PPA) describes a group of neurodegenerative disorders with predominant speech and language dysfunction as their main feature. There are three main variants - the semantic variant, the nonfluent or agrammatic variant and the logopenic variant - each with specific linguistic deficits and different neuroanatomical involvement. There are currently no curative treatments or symptomatic pharmacological therapies. However, speech and language therapists have developed several impairment-based interventions and compensatory strategies for use in the clinic. Unfortunately, multiple barriers still need to be overcome to improve access to care for people with PPA, including increasing awareness among referring clinicians, improving training of speech and language therapists and developing evidence-based guidelines for therapeutic interventions. This review highlights this inequity and the reasons why neurologists should refer people with PPA to speech and language ...
PDF. Thompson, C.K., Cho, S., Hsu, C.J., Wieneke, C., Weitner, B.B., Mesulam, M.M., & Weintraub, S. (2012). Dissociation between fluency and agrammatism in Primary Progressive Aphasia. Aphasiology, 26(1), 20-43. PMC3244141.. Mesulam, M.M., Wieneke, C., Thompson, C.K., Rogalski, E., & Weintraub, S. (2012). Quantitative classification of Primary Progressive Aphasia at early and mild impairment stages. Brain, 135(5), 1537-1553. PMC3577099.. Thompson, C.K., Cho, S., Price, C., Wieneke, C., Bonakdarpour, B., Weintraub, S., & Mesulam, M.M. (2012). Semantic interference during object naming in agrammatic and logopenic Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). Brain and Language, 120, 237-250. PMC3299898.. Rogalski, E., Cobia, D., Harrison, T.M., Wieneke, C., Thompson, C.K., Weintraub, S., & Mesulam, M.-M. (2011). Anatomy of language impairments in Primary Progressive Aphasia. Journal of Neruoscience, 31(9), 3344-3350. PMC3112000.. Hurley, R.S., Paller, K.A., Wieneke, C.A., Weintraub, S., Thompson, C.K., ...
Abstract: This thesis examines the feasibility of the ASL for Active Living Program as an intervention for clinical practice among individuals with memory loss and/or aphasia with associated depression. It strives to answer the following questions: First will an eight session RT intervention impact on symptoms of depression in individuals with mild memory loss and aphasia? Second, will participation in this intervention change levels of self-esteem? Third, to what extent will the older adult participants be able to learn and retain finger-spelling and vocabulary taught? Lastly, will participants be satisfied with this type of intervention? The first chapter reports the current trends of an aging society, as well as the increase in co-morbid disorders such as depression. The second chapter provides a thorough literature review which clearly identifies Mild Cognitive Impairment and Primary Progressive Aphasia as well as describes efficacy studies that provide the foundation for this study. The ...
The Language in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) aims to understand the behavioral, anatomical and physiological changes in people with PPA throughout the course of the illness. The researchers in this study want to increase awareness of PPA, educate others about this unique disorder, and to encourage more research to eventually develop therapies.. During the three-day research program, participants will be asked to undergo neuropsychological testing (paper and pencil tests that evaluate cognition), an MRI (a non-invasive brain-imaging procedure), an EEG (another non-invasive procedure that looks at brain waves when you think) and other computer and language testing batteries. Participants may be asked to return every two years to complete the same measures.. The study will recruit approximately 15 participants with PPA per year. For participants not living near Chicago, IL, flights and accommodations (for both the person with PPA and their companion) will be covered by the study. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Identification of an atypical variant of logopenic progressive aphasia. AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret. AU - Whitwell, Jennifer Lynn. AU - Duffy, Joseph R.. AU - Strand, Edythe A.. AU - Dean, Pamela M.. AU - Senjem, Matthew L.. AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.. AU - Josephs, Keith Anthony. PY - 2013/11. Y1 - 2013/11. N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine the association between aphasia severity and neurocognitive function, disease duration and temporoparietal atrophy in 21 individuals with the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA). We found significant correlations between aphasia severity and degree of neurocognitive impairment as well as temporoparietal atrophy; but not disease duration. Cluster analysis identified three variants of lvPPA: (1) subjects with mild aphasia and short disease duration (mild typical lvPPA); (2) subjects with mild aphasia and long disease duration (mild atypical lvPPA); and, (3) subjects with severe aphasia and relatively long ...
Accumulation of paired helical filament tau contributes to neurodegeneration in Alzheimers disease (AD). 18 F-flortaucipir is a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand sensitive to tau in AD, but its clinical utility will depend in part on its ability to predict cognitive symptoms in diverse dementia phenotypes associated with selective, regional uptake. We examined associations between 18 F-flortaucipir and cognition in 14 mildly-impaired patients (12 with cerebrospinal fluid analytes consistent with AD pathology) who had amnestic (n = 5) and non-amnestic AD syndromes, including posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, n = 5) and logopenic-variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, n = 4 ...
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia syndrome caused by neurodegenerative brain disease, with language impairment as the primary feature. Al...
Primary progressive aphasia is one of several forms of brain disease lost in the medical shadow of a much better known relative, Alzheimers disease.
We defined the neuropsychological and imaging features of the logopenic variant of PPA that in our experience represents 30% of all PPA cases. Our results suggested that the core cognitive deficit in LPA was a phonological loop disorder. Consistently, the imaging investigation showed involvement of GM and WM in the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal regions.. LPA is characterized by a decreased rate of spontaneous language production with frequent halts due to word-finding pauses. Phonemic paraphasias are common, but motor speech and grammar are spared. This pattern of language production is different from the fast output typical of early SemD patients, who usually fill word-finding pauses with circumlocutions and filler words. It is also distinct from the production deficit typical of PNFA, in which articulation deficits and agrammatism predominate.22 LPA patients, therefore, show a pattern of intermediate fluency distinct from the fluent SemDs and the nonfluent PNFAs, raising the ...
The signs and symptoms for frontotemporal dementia varies from one individual to another. It can easily be mistaken for a psychiatric disorder. Identifying the disease in an individual can be a challenge for the scientists and doctors. Frontotemporal dementia is generally broken down into three subgroups - a behavioral variant and two forms of primary progressive aphasia, the nonfluent variant and the semantic variant.. The behavioral variant is characterized by personality changes, a lack of restraint toward social conventions or behaviors (disinhibition), and a general lack of interest, enthusiasm or concern (apathy). This is the most common subtype of frontotemporal dementia.. Primary progressive aphasia is characterized by the slow onset and gradual progression of language difficulties. Individuals may have difficulty finding the right word or understanding certain words in written or spoken speech. The nonfluent variant is characterized by slow, deliberate, sometimes halting speech ...
Frontotemporal dementias are a group of disorders featuring progressive decline in behavior or language, with neurodegeneration of the frontal or temporal lobes. In this session, faculty will highlight current diagnostic and management approaches for the most common subtypes of frontotemporal dementia: behavioural variant FTD, nonfluent primary progressive aphasia, and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia. Recent developments in neuroimaging, genetics, and biomarkers related to FTD will be highlighted. Through case presentations, practical approaches to the assessment and management of patients with FTD symptoms will be discussed, including discussion of related disorders that can mimic FTD ...
Although commonly interpreted as a marker of episodic memory during neuropsychological exams, relatively little is known regarding the neurobehavior of total learning immediate recall scores. Medial temporal lobes are clearly associated with delayed recall performances, yet immediate recall may necessitate networks beyond traditional episodic memory. We aimed to operationalize cognitive and neuroanatomic correlates of total immediate recall in several aging syndromes. Demographically-matched neurologically normal adults (n=91), individuals with Alzheimers disease (n=566), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (PPA) (n=34), behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (n=97), semantic variant PPA (n=71), or nonfluent/agrammatic variant PPA (n=39) completed a neurocognitive battery, including the CVLT-Short Form trials 1-4 Total Immediate Recall; a majority subset also completed a brain MRI ...
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A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions.
Researchers from the University of Louisville say their latest study confirms gut bacteria play a role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinsons disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimers disease are characterized by misfolded proteins and inflammation of the brain. Scientists say they are unsure about the causes of 90 percent of cases recorded. In the ...
Speech Pathology Week (25 - 31 August) seeks to promote the work done by speech pathologists with the more than 1.2 million Australians who have a communication disability which impacts on daily life.
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Family members eventually may need to consider long-term care options for the person with primary progressive aphasia. Family members may also need to plan the persons finances and help make legal decisions to prepare for more-serious stages of the condition.. Support groups may be available for you and the person with primary progressive aphasia or related conditions. Ask your social worker or other members of your treatment team about community resources or support groups.. ...
Marta Balagué, neuropsicologa clínica con más de 15 años de experiencia en el diagnóstico neuropsicológico en el campo de procesos neurodegenerativos,
Three cases of slowly progressive speech and language disturbance were studied at various points post onset (three, five and 15 years respectively). Language, neuropsychological and brain imaging (computer tomography and positron emission tomography) evaluations were completed on all three patients. The data suggest that the syndrome of progressive aphasia: 1) does not involve a uniform symptom complex; 2) does not necessarily develop into a full blown dementia syndrome; 3) varies greatly in rate of progression from case to case; 4) is associated with normal brain structure (on computer tomography); and 5) is associated with abnormal left temporal lobe metabolism as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). One patient had histological findings consistent with Alzheimers disease at necropsy.. ...
Alzheimers disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and usually occurs in old age. It is invariably fatal, generally within ten years of the first signs. Early signs of AD include unusual memory loss, particularly in remembering recent events and the names of people and things, logopenic primary progressive aphasia. As the disease progresses the patient exhibits more serious problems, becoming subject to mood swings and unable to perform complex activities such as driving. In the latter stages they forget how to do simple things such as brushing their hair and then require full-time care.. Histologically, familial AD is practically indistinguishable from other forms of the disease. Deposits of amyloid can be seen in sections of brain tissue. This amyloid protein forms plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that progress through the brain. Very rarely the plaque may be unique, or uncharacteristic of AD; this can happen when there is a mutation in one of the genes that creates a functional, ...
The meeting of the Memory Disorders Research Society in Chicago, held 9-11 October, opened with a session on two neurodegenerative syndromes: primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and semantic dementia (SD). Each of these syndromes bears some resemblance to the progression of Alzheimers disease, but with the key difference that memory is not initially impaired in these patients. Marsel Mesulam of Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, began with a characterization of the progression of PPA. In this disease, patients initially have difficulties in basic language functions such as finding names for objects or comprehending speech. These deficits are associated with brain damage occurring in the left hemisphere in perisylvian regions that looks at the cellular level somewhat similar to the damage associated with Alzheimers disease (Mesulam, 2001; Sobrido et al., 2003). John Hodges of the University of Cambridge presented a discussion of SD. Patients with this syndrome initially have difficulty ...
A probe conducted on the brain by researchers at the Northwestern University suggests that the long-held belief that Wernickes area is the prime area of language comprehension might not be accurate. Marek-Marsel Mesulam, lead probe author and director of Northwesterns Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimers Disease Center, performed language tests and brain MRIs on 72 patients with a uncommon form of language-affecting dementia called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in which Wernickes area is bruised. He observed that these patients did not exhibit the same trouble with word meaning as stroke victims with similar brain harm. PPA and stroke harm the brain differently; in PPA, cortical areas degenerate, but their underlying fiber pathways that are necessary for communication inbetween different language centers in the brain, remain intact. However, stroke damages large regions of brain. According to Mesulam, this strongly indicates that language comprehension is a sophisticated process that ...
Former Monty Python member Terry Jones, who also co-directed Monty Python and the Holy Grail and directed Monty Pythons Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life, has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia. Because the disease impacts his ability to communicate, Jones is no longer giving interviews and may eventually lead to complete inability to speak. In addition to his work with Monty Python, Jones has written several documentaries and books on history as well as the novelization of Douglas Adamss video game Starship Titanic ...
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Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved OCREVUS
Terrible news for those of us suffering from primary progressive. Im beyond words... http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/080414/20080414006526.html?.v=1
Does anyone know if Novartis has published the protocol for the arm of the FTY 720 study involving primary progressive patients? Where I can look it up? The trial should start recruiting in January so surely the information is somewhere! ...
Mahoney CJ, Downey LE, Beck J, Liang Y, Mead S, Perry RJ, Warren JD. The Presenilin 1 P264L Mutation Presenting as non-Fluent/Agrammatic Primary Progressive Aphasia ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Apraxia of speech. T2 - An overview. AU - Ogar, Jennifer. AU - Slama, Hilary. AU - Dronkers, Nina. AU - Amici, Serena. AU - Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa. PY - 2005/12. Y1 - 2005/12. N2 - Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder that can occur in the absence of aphasia or dysarthria. AOS has been the subject of some controversy since the disorder was first named and described by Darley and his Mayo Clinic colleagues in the 1960s. A recent revival of interest in AOS is due in part to the fact that it is often the first symptom of neurodegenerative diseases, such as primary progressive aphasia and corticobasal degeneration. This article will provide a brief review of terminology associated with AOS, its clinical hallmarks and neuroanatomical correlates. Current models of motor programming will also be addressed as they relate to AOS and finally, typical treatment strategies used in rehabilitating the articulation and prosody deficits associated with AOS will be ...
I think the most difficult news to share, is the news for those who find themselves with the most disabling form of MS, the primary progressive sufferers. Unfortunately, this group may be the most under-served of the MS Community simply because...
Aphasia Registry - Opportunities to take part in Aphasia research.. Aphasia & Stroke Caregivers Guide - A range of US articles on Aphasia related topics.. Atrial Fibrillation Association (Australia) - Provides information, support and access to established, new or innovative treatments for Atrial Fibrillation. Australian Aphasia Association - Their official website.. Australian Aphasia Guide - 2011 Version available through the National Library of Australia. Books on Aphasia - Books available on line for purchase at The Book Depository (Free Shipping).. Build Your Own Aphasia Talk: Increasing Community Awareness of Aphasia - This resource was developed by Latrobe University in conjunction with the Australian Aphasia Association, it aims to address the poor community awareness of the condition aphasia.. Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE) in Aphasia Rehabilitation - A new Australia-wide research program on Aphasia.. Communication Problems Following a Stroke - Fact Sheet from Speech ...
Progressive naming impairment (i.e., anomia) is a core diagnostic symptom of numerous pathologies that impact anterior and inferior portions of the temporal lobe. For patients who experience such regional temporal lobe degeneration, patterns of language loss often parallel the degradation of semantic memory, an etiology of naming impairment known as semantic anomia. Previous studies of semantic anomia have focused extensively on the output of naming attempts by contrasting errors, omissions, and distortions as a function of item-level characteristics (e.g., prototypicality, semantic category). An alternative approach involves evaluating visual confrontation naming as the naming process unfolds. Techniques with high temporal resolution (e.g., eyetracking) offer a potentially sensitive mode of delineating the locus of impairment during naming. For example, a lexical retrieval disorder would hypothetically elicit normal gaze patterns associated with successful visual object recognition regardless ...
Unscramble aphasia, Unscramble letters aphasia, Point value for aphasia, Word Decoder for aphasia, Word generator using the letters aphasia, Word Solver aphasia, Possible Scrabble words with aphasia, Anagram of aphasia
Results NfL was higher in all diagnoses, except lvPPA (n = 4), than in controls, equally elevated in behavioral variant FTD, semantic variant PPA, nonfluent variant PPA, and corticobasal syndrome, and highest in FTD-MND. The p/t-tau was lower in all clinical groups, except lvPPA, than in controls and lowest in FTD-MND. NfL did not discriminate between TDP and tau pathology, while the p/t-tau ratio had a good specificity (76%) and moderate sensitivity (67%). Both high NfL and low p/t-tau were associated with poor survival (hazard ratio on tertiles 1.7 for NfL, 0.7 for p/t-tau). ...
Aphasia usually results from lesions to the language-relevant areas of the temporal and parietal cortex of the brain, such as Brocas area, Wernickes area, and the neural pathways between them. These areas are almost always located in the left hemisphere, and in most people this is where the ability to produce and comprehendlanguage is found. However, in a very small number of people, language ability is found in the right hemisphere. In either case, damage to these language areas can be caused by a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other brain injury. Aphasia may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor or progressive neurological disease, e.g., Alzheimers or Parkinsons disease. It may also be caused by a sudden hemorrhagic event within the brain. Certain chronic neurological disorders, such as epilepsy or migraine, can also include transient aphasia as a prodromal or episodic symptom. Aphasia is also listed as a rare side effect of the fentanyl patch, an opioid used to control ...
Free, official info about 2015 ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 010.83. Includes coding notes, detailed descriptions, index cross-references and ICD-10-CM conversion info.
When its time to talk with your doctor about PPMS, you may feel overwhelmed. Find out what you should ask - and how to move forward after your appointment.
Aphasia is a serious acquired communication disability, that affects approximately 30% of stroke survivors.1 It is chronic in nature: 50% of people diagnosed with aphasia have persistent communication problems 1 year after stroke.2 Aphasia compromises an individuals ability to undertake many activities of daily living, resulting in reduced mood and quality of life.3,4 In addition to the personal cost of aphasia, health-care costs for people with aphasia are the highest in stroke care.5 Therefore, the recent identification of recovery from aphasia as one of the top ten research priorities related to life after stroke is unsurprising.. ...
Aphasia Access Conversations brings you the latest aphasia resources, tips and a-ha moments from Life Participation professionals who deliver way more than stroke and aphasia facts. Topics include: aphasia group treatment ideas, communication access strategies, plus ways for growing awareness and funds for your group aphasia therapy program. ​This podcast is produced by Aphasia Access.
Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage to the area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension often the result of a stroke. If you have been diagnosed with aphasia, we invite you to join our weekly Aphasia Conversation Group. Here people with Aphasia and their caregivers can find a place to share thoughts, frustrations and successes with others facing similar challenges. These interactions also offer you the chance to gain the confidence and support necessary to move forward with recovery.. Aphasia Support Group Flyer. ...
The Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp Committee is made up of members from UBC, Douglas College, March of Dimes and the community. The Committee is represented by both healthcare professionals and people with aphasia to ensure that the Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp meets the needs of those living with aphasia in the community.
Communication Strategies: Some Dos and Donts. The impact of aphasia on relationships may be profound, or only slight. No two people with aphasia are alike with respect to severity, former speech and language skills, or personality.
List of words make out of Aphasias. Anagrams of word Aphasias. Words made after scrabbling Aphasias. Word Creation helps in Anagrams and Puzzles.
From our series Working Together To Help You Where You Live, this pictographic resource is designed to facilitate a conversational partnership between health care practitioners and people with aphasia. It is also ideal for people with limited English language skills. It is based on the techniques of Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia™ (SCA™), developed by the Aphasia Institute ...
From our series Working Together To Help You Where You Live, this pictographic resource is designed to facilitate a conversational partnership between health care practitioners and people with aphasia. It is also ideal for people with limited English language skills. It is based on the techniques of Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia™ (SCA™), developed by the Aphasia Institute.. The Arthritis resource contains the following topics:. ...
Aphasia Toolbox revolutionized the treatment & recovery of aphasia, Dysphasia Speech, and Stroke Aphasia recovery; helping hundreds of people recover since 1976.
Aphasia Toolbox revolutionized the treatment & recovery of aphasia, Dysphasia Speech, and Stroke Aphasia recovery; helping hundreds of people recover since 1976.
A blog written by someone who is inspired daily by people with aphasia, who provides treatment for people with aphasia, who conducts research with people with aphasia and their close friends and family members, and who is constantly learning ...
A blog written by someone who is inspired daily by people with aphasia, who provides treatment for people with aphasia, who conducts research with people with aphasia and their close friends and family members, and who is constantly learning ...
Participants are all family members providing substantial care for a relative with a primary progressive dementia such as Alzheimers disease or related conditions. The carers involved are all experiencing considerable difficulties with their own low mood or concern for the future to the extent that they could be classified as having a depressive disorder meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. ...
Aphasia: Aphasia refers to the loss or impairment of previously acquired abilities in language comprehension or production that cannot be explained by sensory or motor defects or by diffuse brain dysfunction
associative aphasia definition: aphasia where the lesion is presumed to be in the organization tracts linking the different language facilities when you look at the brain; persons have difficulty repeating…
Acquired epileptic aphasia (AEA) typically develops in healthy children who acutely or progressively lose receptive and expressive language ability coincident with the appearance of paroxysmal electroencephalographic (EEG) changes. In 1957, Landau and Kleffner initially described acquired epileptic aphasia and subsequently reluctantly agreed ...
Nominal aphasia is a form of aphasia in which the subject has difficulty remembering or recognizing names which the subject should know well.
Eventbrite - Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation presents Aphasia CRE Seminar Series 2020 Registration - Wednesday, 29 January 2020 - Find event and ticket information.
Aphasia centers are designed to enhance quality of life by creating a community of people who are all living with aphasia. Typically, they offer conversation
In light of COVID-19 we ask that you please support our 17th Annual Fundraiser in lieu of our Annual Gala this year! Despite the separation we have experienced in 2020, the Adler Aphasia Center continues to be a lifeline for people with aphasia. Within days of suspending in-person programming across. Read More. ...
Factors related to prognosis of acquired aphasia in children.: In a follow up study of 15 children with acquired aphasia, it was found that the persistent prese
The next stage is to ensure that those who have the power to influence the provision of services from health and social systems are fully aware of the impact that aphasia has and the impact that services for aphasic people and their relatives can have when readily provided ...
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia ...
Its been compared to being in a foreign country and not knowing the language or spending 24 hours a day with a word on the tip of your tongue. Imagine hearing and understanding everyone around you, trying to speak, but being unable to form the words. Thats what aphasia sufferers deal with every single day.Frustrating, right? Whats also frustrating is the minimal level of awareness of the condition. Even with 2 million people affected - more people than
Aphasia is an inability to comprehend and formulate language because of dysfunction in specificbrain regions. We offer ELISA kits for this research.
Watch full episodes of Aphasia - Bills Story and get the latest breaking news, exclusive videos and pictures, episode recaps and much more at TVGuide.com
WAYNE, NJ - Arden Courts of Wayne presents a free Lunch-n-Learn on Understanding Aphasia on Tuesday, September 17 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at located at their 800 Hamburg Turnpike in Wayne. ...
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a syndrome characterized by a progressive language deficit without other features of ... Weintraub, S., Rubin, N. P., & Mesulam, M. M. (1990). Primary progressive aphasia. Longitudinal course, neuropsychological ... Patterns of limb apraxia in primary progressive aphasia. Brain and Cognition, 53(2), 403-407. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ ... It has been debated whether the existence of BPO errors can be used as a measure for aphasia or brain damage. In the studies ...
... (SD), also known as semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), is a progressive neurodegenerative ... Henry, M.L.; Gorno-Tempini, M.L. (December 2010). "The logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia". Current Opinion in ... "Semantic variant Primary Progressive Aphasia". Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration. Retrieved 2017-12-18. Warrington, E ... Bonner, M.F.; Ash, S.; Grossman, M. (November 2010). "The new classification of primary progressive aphasia into semantic, ...
Rogalski E, Weintraub S, Mesulam MM (2013). "Are there susceptibility factors for primary progressive aphasia?". Brain Lang. ... An association between vasectomy and primary progressive aphasia, a rare variety of frontotemporal dementia, was reported. ... The primary long-term complications are chronic pain conditions or syndromes that can affect any of the scrotal, pelvic or ...
Rohrer JD, Rossor MN, Warren JD (15 February 2009). "Neologistic jargon aphasia and agraphia in primary progressive aphasia". ... Aphasia Auditory processing disorder Emil Kraepelin's dream speech Speech and language pathology Hart, M; Lewine, RR (May 2017 ... John Noble; Harry L. Greene (15 January 1996). Textbook of primary care medicine. Mosby. p. 1325. ISBN 978-0-8016-7841-7. ... although it is often observed in patients with primary psychoses, namely schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Derailment ...
March 2004). "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Annals of Neurology. 55 (3): 335-46. doi ... Progressive expressive aphasia is the deterioration of normal language function that causes individuals to lose the ability to ... Nestor PJ, Graham NL, Fryer TD, Williams GB, Patterson K, Hodges JR (November 2003). "Progressive non-fluent aphasia is ... The anterior insula is part of the primary gustatory cortex. There is evidence that, in addition to its base functions, the ...
Brambati SM, Ogar J, Neuhaus J, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML (July 2009). "Reading disorders in primary progressive aphasia: a ... "The Wernicke conundrum and the anatomy of language comprehension in primary progressive aphasia". Brain. 138 (Pt 8): 2423-37. ... Through research in aphasias, RHD signers were found to have a problem maintaining the spatial portion of their signs, ... See also the reviews by discussing this topic). The primary evidence for this role of the MTG-TP is that patients with damage ...
He had contracted primary progressive aphasia, a rare form of dementia, over decade before his death. LLC, New York Media (1989 ...
Conduction aphasia Anomic aphasia Global aphasia Primary progressive aphasias Progressive nonfluent aphasia Semantic dementia ... and primary progressive aphasias caused by progressive illnesses such as dementia. Acute aphasias Expressive aphasia also known ... Receptive aphasia also known as Wernicke's aphasia, receptive aphasia is a fluent aphasia that is categorized by damage to the ... Harciarek M, Kertesz A (September 2011). "Primary progressive aphasias and their contribution to the contemporary knowledge ...
... was not distinguished from other motor speech disorders such as dysarthria and in particular primary progressive aphasia. Many ... Recent research has established the existence of primary progressive apraxia of speech caused by neuroanatomic motor atrophy. ... AOS and expressive aphasia (also known as Broca's aphasia) are commonly mistaken as the same disorder mainly because they often ... May 2012). "Characterizing a neurodegenerative syndrome: primary progressive apraxia of speech". Brain. 135 (Pt 5): 1522-36. ...
Jones was diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, a form of frontotemporal dementia that impairs the ability to speak and ... After living for several years with a degenerative aphasia, he gradually lost the ability to speak and died in 2020 from ... Jones attended Esher COE primary school, then the Royal Grammar School in Guildford, where he was school captain in the 1960-61 ... This was Jones' last performance with the group prior to his aphasia diagnosis. In October 2016, Jones received a standing ...
... logopenic primary progressive aphasia. As the disease progresses, the patient exhibits more serious problems, becoming subject ... Levy-Lahad (1996) determined that PSEN2 contained 12 exons, 10 of which were coding exons, and that the primary transcript ...
... nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (naPPA), and progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSPS). ... system atrophy Alzheimer's disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis semantic or logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia ... Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a rare, progressive atypical Parkinsonism syndrome and is a tauopathy related to frontotemporal ... Fredericks CA, Lee SE (2016). "The cognitive neurology of corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy". In ...
In 2012, McFadden was diagnosed with logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia, a type of Alzheimer's disease that affects ...
... aphasia, conduction MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100.155 - primary progressive aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100 ... aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100.100 - expressive aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.800.100.111 - ... chronic progressive external MeSH C23.888.592.636.447.690 - supranuclear palsy, progressive MeSH C23.888.592.636.637 - ... anomic aphasia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.300 - dyslexia MeSH C23.888.592.604.150.500.300.200 - Alexia (acquired dyslexia) ...
... primary progressive aphasia, supranuclear palsy, and traumatic brain injuries. AAC can be divided into different categories, ... Sign language is the primary example of unaided AAC. Aided forms of augmented communication require some external tools or aid ...
... of Lewy body disease multiple system atrophy Alzheimer's disease ALS semantic or logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia ... This may be related to speech impairment such as dysarthria, and thus is not a true aphasia, as aphasia is related to a change ... Aphasia in CBD is revealed through the inability to speak or a difficulty in initiating spoken dialogue and falls under the non ... Because CBD is progressive, a standard set of diagnostic criteria can be used, which is centered on the disease's evolution. ...
... and two variants of primary progressive aphasia - semantic variant (svPPA), and nonfluent variant (nfvPPA). Two rare distinct ... Progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) is characterized by progressive difficulties in speech production. Neuronal intermediate ... The main subtypes of frontotemporal dementia are behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive nonfluent aphasia, and ... The language subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia) can be ...
... aphasia, conduction MeSH C10.597.606.150.500.800.100.155 - primary progressive aphasia MeSH C10.597.606.150.500.800.100.166 - ... primary progressive aphasia MeSH C10.228.140.380.165 - creutzfeldt-jakob syndrome MeSH C10.228.140.380.230 - dementia, vascular ... chronic progressive external MeSH C10.597.622.447.690 - supranuclear palsy, progressive MeSH C10.597.622.669 - paraplegia MeSH ... progressive MeSH C10.292.562.775 - ophthalmoplegia, chronic progressive external MeSH C10.292.562.775.500 - kearns-sayer ...
Primary Progressive Aphasia, Memory Loss, and Other Focal Cerebral Disorders Chapter V3: Video Library of Neuro-Ophthalmology ... Primary and Metastatic Tumors of the Nervous System Chapter 87: Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcomas and Bone Metastases Chapter 88: ... Primary Care and Global Health Part 18: Aging Chapter 463: The Biology of Aging Chapter 464: Clinical Problems Associated with ... Primary Immunodeficiencies Associated with (or Secondary to) Other Diseases Chapter S8: Cardiac Trauma Chapter S9: Technique of ...
... examination Parahippocampal place area located within the parahippocampal gyrus Phenylpropanolamine Primary progressive aphasia ... Alliance Professional Photographers of America Professional Publishers Association Professional Putters Association Progressive ...
... sclerosis Primary malignant lymphoma Primary muscular atrophy Primary orthostatic tremor Primary progressive aphasia Primary ... 2 Primary ciliary dyskinesia Primary craniosynostosis Primary cutaneous amyloidosis Primary granulocytic sarcoma Primary ... Griscelli syndrome Primary agammaglobulinemia Primary aldosteronism Primary alveolar hypoventilation Primary amenorrhea Primary ... Progressive spinal muscular atrophy Progressive supranuclear palsy atypical Progressive supranuclear palsy Progressive systemic ...
L Cleret de Langavant and collaborators reported the unusual case of a female patient with primary progressive aphasia of the ...
Primary progressive aphasia is a rare disorder where people slowly lose their ability to talk, read, write, and comprehend what ... expressive aphasia (Broca's aphasia) and receptive aphasia (Wernicke's or sensory aphasia). Acute aphasias are often the result ... There are three variants: progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), and logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA ... Nov 2006). "Semantic dementia and fluent primary progressive aphasia: two sides of the same coin?". Brain. 129 (Pt 11): 3066-80 ...
"Neologistic jargon aphasia and agraphia in primary progressive aphasia". Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 277 (1-2): 155- ... Jargon aphasia is a type of fluent aphasia in which an individual's speech is incomprehensible, but appears to make sense to ... 2010-01-05). "Prediction of pathology in primary progressive language and speech disorders". Neurology. 74 (1): 42-49. doi: ... All of these types of jargon are seen in fluent aphasia, which can more commonly be addressed as Wernicke's aphasia. Weinstein ...
"Primary Progressive Aphasia - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia Association. Retrieved 2018-11-26. "Common ... Expressive aphasia is classified as non-fluent aphasia, as opposed to fluent aphasia. Diagnosis is done on a case-by-case basis ... Expressive aphasia, also known as Broca's aphasia, is a type of aphasia characterized by partial loss of the ability to produce ... Expressive aphasia occurs in approximately 12% of new cases of aphasia caused by stroke. In most cases, expressive aphasia is ...
... which he called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) included patients with progressive nonfluent (aphasia, semantic dementia, and ... Bonner MF, Ash S, Grossman M (November 2010). "The new classification of primary progressive aphasia into semantic, logopenic, ... Mesulam MM (October 2003). "Primary progressive aphasia-a language-based dementia". N. Engl. J. Med. 349 (16): 1535-42. doi: ... March 2004). "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Ann. Neurol. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002 ...
Anomic aphasia Conduction aphasia Global aphasia Primary progressive aphasias Transcortical motor aphasia Broca's area ... TSA is a fluent aphasia similar to Wernicke's aphasia (receptive aphasia), with the exception of a strong ability to repeat ... receptive aphasia. However, transcortical sensory aphasia differs from receptive aphasia in that patients still have intact ... Transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA) is a kind of aphasia that involves damage to specific areas of the temporal lobe of the ...
... (LPA) is a variant of primary progressive aphasia. It is defined clinically by impairments in ... Aphasia Dementia Early-onset Alzheimer's disease Harciarek M, Kertesz A (September 2011). "Primary progressive aphasias and ... Compared to other subtypes of primary progressive aphasia, the logopenic variant has been found to be associated with cognitive ... Henry ML, Gorno-Tempini ML (December 2010). "The logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia". Curr. Opin. Neurol. 23 (6 ...
In 2018, 193,971 children in English primary schools were on the special educational needs register needing speech-therapy ... Mental health issues Stroke Progressive neurological conditions such as cancer of the head, neck and throat (including ... "Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2016 (6): CD000425. doi ... Primary pediatric speech and language disorders include: (i) receptive and (ii) expressive language disorders, (iii) speech ...
Progressive Aphasias *Progressive nonfluent aphasia. *Semantic dementia. *Logopenic progressive aphasia. *Speech disturbances * ... al.], edited by Roger Jones ... [et (2004). Oxford textbook of primary medical care (repr. ed.). Oxford: Oxford University ...
Tumors can be benign or malignant, can occur in different parts of the brain, and may be primary or secondary. A primary tumor ... Oligodendrogliomas are incurable but slowly progressive malignant brain tumors. They can be treated with surgical resection, ... aphasia, ataxia, visual field impairment, impaired sense of smell, impaired hearing, facial paralysis, double vision, or more ... Primary brain tumors rarely metastasize to other organs; some forms of primary brain tumors can metastasize but will not spread ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... Infantile Progressive Bulbar palsy is a rare type of progressive bulbar palsy that occurs in children. The disease exists in ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Infantile_progressive_bulbar_palsy&oldid=943481368" ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *زوال عقل با اجسام لویی ...
... primary HIV infection - primary isolate - primaquine - proctitis - prodrome - prodrug - progressive multifocal ... aphasia - aphthous ulcer - apoptosis - approved drugs - ARC - Armenicum - ART - arthralgia - ASO - aspergillosis - assembly and ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... progressive bulbar palsy, progressive muscular atrophy, and primary lateral sclerosis.[130] In Europe, the term "ALS" also ... primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), progressive bulbar palsy, pseudobulbar palsy, and ... Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) involves only upper motor neurons, and progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) involves only lower ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... "Meta-analysis: melatonin for the treatment of primary sleep disorders". www.crd.york.ac.uk. Retrieved 2016-03-08.. ... Primary hypersomnia. Hypersomnia of central or brain origin. *Narcolepsy: A chronic neurological disorder (or dyssomnia), which ... Insomnia disorder (primary insomnia), chronic difficulty in falling asleep and/or maintaining sleep when no other cause is ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... "Orphanet: Progressive supranuclear palsy". Orpha.net. Retrieved 2017-01-08.. *^ "What's New in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?" ... "What is progressive supranuclear palsy?". Movementdisorders.org. Retrieved 2017-01-08.. *^ " ... Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), also known as Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, is a degenerative disease involving ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... Some patients have long periods without disease progression while others develop progressive decline.[6] ... A mitochondrial metabolism disease characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities. ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... Progressive inflammatory neuropathy. Treatment[edit]. See also: Multiple sclerosis § Medications, and Management of multiple ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... GABAA agonists,[2] usually diazepam but sometimes other benzodiazepines,[31] are the primary treatment for SPS. Drugs that ... Patients with stiff-person syndrome (SPS) suffer progressive stiffness in their truncal muscles,[2] which become rigid and ... Sphincter and brainstem issues often occur with stiff-limb syndrome.[16] Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity, another ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... Other causes that can secondarily produce parkinsonism are stroke and drugs.[59] Parkinson plus syndromes such as progressive ... closed).[94] Strengthening exercises have shown improvements in strength and motor function for people with primary muscular ... Dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy, essential tremor, antipsychotic use[5]. ...
Progressive Aphasias *Progressive nonfluent aphasia. *Semantic dementia. *Logopenic progressive aphasia. *Speech disturbances * ... and may be either a primary or secondary symptom. Fatigue is also a normal, healthy condition when experienced after exertion ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... Essential tremor (ET, also referred to as benign tremor, familial tremor, or idiopathic tremor) is a progressive[7][8][9] ... HAPT1 mutations have also been linked to ET, as well as to Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive ... ET is generally progressive in most cases (sometimes rapidly, sometimes very slowly), and can be disabling in severe cases.[57] ...
Primary lateral sclerosis. *Prion diseases. *Progressive hemifacial atrophy. *Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. * ... aphasia) and syndromes (e.g., Aicardi syndrome). There is disagreement over the definitions and criteria used to delineate ...
原发性渐行失语症(英语:Primary progressive aphasia) ... 进行性延髓麻痹(英语:Progressive bulbar palsy) *洛二氏病(英语:Fazio-Londe disease) ... 婴儿进行性延髓麻痹(英语:Infantile progressive
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... The primary goal in treatment of IIH is the prevention of visual loss and blindness, as well as symptom control.[9] IIH is ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... This is caused by progressive degeneration of neurons in several parts of the brain including the substantia nigra, striatum, ... characterized by progressive ataxia (an inability to coordinate voluntary muscular movements) of the gait and arms and ... August 2010). "Cognitive impairment in patients with multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy". Brain. 133 ( ...
"Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Annals of Neurology. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002/ana. ... Progressive expressive aphasiaEdit. Progressive expressive aphasia is the deterioration of normal language function that causes ... "Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula". Brain. 126 (Pt 11): 2406 ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ...
An association between vasectomy and primary progressive aphasia, a rare variety of frontotemporal dementia, was reported.[25] ... "Are there susceptibility factors for primary progressive aphasia?". Brain Lang. 127 (2): 135-8. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2013.02.004 ... The primary long-term complications are chronic pain conditions or syndromes that can affect any of the scrotal, pelvic or ... researchers extracted primary themes from their interviews of "taking responsibility" and "vasectomy as an act of minor heroism ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... Depressive symptoms, if seen in CFS, may be differentially diagnosed from primary depression by the absence of anhedonia, ... It is unclear whether or not the HPA axis plays a primary role as a cause of CFS,[70][71][72] or has a secondary role in ... in 2015 the MEA concluded that CBT in its current form should not be recommended as a primary intervention for people with CFS[ ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... The primary symptom of post-traumatic syringomyelia (often referred to using the abbreviation of PTS)[8] is pain, which may ... This often results in flattening or disappearance of the primary syrinx or cavity, over time, as the normal flow of ...
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... reported in 1761 that it was a progressive condition.[21] ... Progressive muscular atrophy. *Progressive bulbar palsy *Fazio- ...
... "progressive conservative"[129] who used terms like "progressive moderate" and "dynamic conservatism" to describe his approach,[ ... His primary duty was planning for the next war, which proved most difficult in the midst of the Great Depression.[63] He then ... The stroke had caused an aphasia. The president also suffered from Crohn's disease,[225] chronic inflammatory condition of the ... Primary sourcesEdit. *Boyle, Peter G., ed. (1990). The Churchill-Eisenhower Correspondence, 1953-1955. University of North ...
原發性漸行失語症(英語:Primary progressive aphasia) ... primary prevention,病因預防) 針對致TIA因素的預防措施,分針對環境的措施和針對機體的措施。這一階段疾病並未發生,但某些危險因素已經存在,如飲食不健康、
Primary progressive aphasia. *Frontotemporal dementia/Frontotemporal lobar degeneration *Pick's. *Dementia with Lewy bodies ... "Meta-analysis: melatonin for the treatment of primary sleep disorders". www.crd.york.ac.uk. Retrieved 2016-03-08.. ... Insomnia disorder (primary insomnia), chronic difficulty in falling asleep and/or maintaining sleep when no other cause is ... Insomnia: Insomnia may be primary or it may be comorbid with or secondary to another disorder such as a mood disorder (i.e., ...
132 Studies found for: Primary progressive aphasia. Also searched for Aphasia, primary progressive, Frontotemporal dementia, ... rTMS for the Treatment of Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Randomized Controlled Trial. *Aphasia, Primary Progressive ... Assessment of Hyperphosphorylated Tau PET Binding in Primary Progressive Aphasia. *Primary Progressive Aphasia ... Rehabilitation and Prophylaxis of Anomia in Primary Progressive Aphasia. *Aphasia, Primary Progressive ...
Primary progressive aphasia is one of several forms of brain disease lost in the medical shadow of a much better known relative ... Riedner might have a condition called primary progressive aphasia, or P.P.A., a form of dementia affecting the brains language ... The Personal Health column on Tuesday, about primary progressive aphasia, a type of dementia that affects the brains language ... The progression occurs in the course of years rather than months, and the primary nature of the aphasia is demonstrated by ...
primary progressive aphasia. frontotemporal dementia. semantic dementia. progressive nonfluent aphasia. progressive aphasia. ... Primary Progressive Aphasia Semantic Dementia Progressive Non-fluent Aphasia ... Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) Research Program at Northwestern University Publications: Mesulam MM. Slowly progressive ... Aphasia. Aphasia, Primary Progressive. Pick Disease of the Brain. Frontotemporal Dementia. Speech Disorders. Communication ...
Abstract: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease of insidious onset presenting with progressive ...
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a condition that slowly damages the parts of the brain that control speech and language. ... Primary Progressive Aphasia*Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia. *Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia ... A Healthcare Providers Guide to the Logopenic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PDF) ... A Healthcare Providers Guide to the Nonfluent Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PDF) ...
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DiseaseMagnetic resonance imagingNeurodegenerationParkinsons diseasePositron emission tomographyPrimary progressive aphasia ...
Purpose Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose ( ... Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 positron emission tomography in progressive apraxia of speech and primary progressive aphasia. Arch ... Primary progressive aphasia: a tale of two syndromes and the rest. Neurology 2012;78:1670-7.CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle ... Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology 2011;76:1006-14.CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle ...
Primary progressive aphasia. Ann Neurol 2001;49:425-432 [PubMed]. 33. Mesulam MM. Primary progressive aphasia: a language-based ... "slowly progressive aphasia," subsequently renamed primary progressive aphasia (PPA).4 Warrington5 described a progressive ... Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. M.L. Gorno-Tempini, MD, PhD,. A.E. Hillis, MD, S. Weintraub, ... Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia. Ann Neurol 2004;55:335-346 [PMC free article] [PubMed] ...
Conclusions: Logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) is a distinctive variant of primary progressive aphasia. Cognitive and ... progressive nonfluent aphasia; PPA = primary progressive aphasia; Rey-O = Rey-Osterrieth; SemD = semantic dementia; VBM = voxel ... Since Mesulams original description of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in 1982,1 it has become clear that progressive ... The logopenic/phonological variant of primary progressive aphasia. M. L. Gorno-Tempini, S. M. Brambati, V. Ginex, J. Ogar, N. F ...
Aphasia. Aphasia, Primary Progressive. Pick Disease of the Brain. Frontotemporal Dementia. Speech Disorders. Language Disorders ... Communication Bridge: A Person-centered Internet-based Intervention for Individuals With Primary Progressive Aphasia. The ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Familial Alzheimer Disease Primary Progressive Aphasia Frontotemporal ... A dementia diagnosis other than Primary Progressive Aphasia. *Participation in outside speech language therapy during the ...
Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities. People with primary progressive ... Primary progressive aphasia. August 5, 2008. Mental disordersfrontotemporal dementia, neurological syndrome, Primary ... Some people with primary progressive aphasia may have less trouble with written language than with spoken language.. Risk ... Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, usually before the age of 65, and tend to worsen over time. Symptoms ...
Primary Progressive Aphasia and Post-Stroke Aphasia: Some Complementary Insights into Brain-Behavior Relationships/Hemispatial ... Primary Progressive Aphasia and Post-Stroke Aphasia: Some Complementary Insights into Brain-Behavior Relationships/Hemispatial ... Primary Progressive Aphasia and Post-Stroke Aphasia: Some Complementary Insights into Brain-Behavior Relationships/Hemispatial ... Spelling Intervention in Post-Stroke Aphasia and Primary Progressive Aphasia. Kyrana Tsapkini , Argye E. Hillis ...
Meets once a month on the third Monday of the month from 6-7:30 pm. 2009 Schedule*. Contact: Darby Morhardt, MSW, LCSW. (312) 908-9432. Mailing Address: Darby Morhardt, MSW, LCSW, Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimers Disease Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 320 E Superior, #11-453B, Chicago, IL 60611. Email: [email protected] ...
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) represents a group of clinical syndromes that involve progressive decline in language ... Patients with logopenic progressive aphasia (A) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (B) demonstrated frontotemporal atrophy (red ... AD is thought to cause logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA), and FTLD may cause progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA). We sought ... Table 2 Demographic and neuropsychological features of logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) and progressive nonfluent aphasia ( ...
Background: With upcoming therapeutic interventions for patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), instruments for the ... A language-based sum score for the course and therapeutic intervention in primary progressive aphasia. In: Alzheimers Research ...
Overall, individuals with primary progressive aphasia lived an average of 7 years after symptoms first developed.[3] ... Symptoms of the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia typically begin between the ages of 55 and 70. Half of affected ... Ratnavalli E. Progress in the last decade in our understanding of primary progressive aphasia. Ann Indian Acad Neurol. December ... Additionally, one article studied the progression of primary progressive aphasia in general (that is, they did not distinguish ...
... agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia Modality: Nuclear medicine ... agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia. From the case: Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary ... View full size version of Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia ... See the case: Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration - agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia ...
Primary Progressive Aphasia, Recreation Therapy, Sign Language. Subjects. Older people.. Aphasia $x Psychological aspects.. ... A recreation therapy twist to sign language: an intervention for primary progressive aphasia.. UNCG Author/Contributor (non- ... A recreation therapy twist to sign language: an intervention for primary progressive aphasia.. PDF (Portable Document Format). ... provides a thorough literature review which clearly identifies Mild Cognitive Impairment and Primary Progressive Aphasia as ...
Murray, Laura L. (1998) Longitudinal treatment of primary progressive aphasia: a case study. [Journal (Paginated)] ... to describe the evolving treatment regimen provided to a woman with a 4 year history of non-fluent primary progressive aphasia ...
Disease(s): Aphasia, Primary Progressive, Anomia, Alzheimer Disease Intervention(s): Phonological, Orthographic, Semantic, ... Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Nonfluent/Agrammatic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia Status: Not yet recruiting ...
This report contains Primary Progressive Aphasia incidence/prevalence and country specific Primary Progressive Aphasia ... Dowload Sample Page for Primary Progressive Aphasia epidemiology analysis. ...
Sentence Comprehension and Production in Stroke-induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA): The Northwestern Assessment of ... and 32 with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) [15 agrammatic (PPA-G); 17 logopenic (PPA-L)], using the Northwestern Assessment ... Sentence Comprehension and Production in Stroke-induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA): The Northwestern Assessment of ...
The study population consisted of 56 participants with primary progressive aphasia, including 27 with progressive nonfluent ... The study population consisted of 56 participants with primary progressive aphasia, including 27 with progressive nonfluent ... The study population consisted of 56 participants with primary progressive aphasia, including 27 with progressive nonfluent ... The study population consisted of 56 participants with primary progressive aphasia, including 27 with progressive nonfluent ...
... nonfluent aphasia, and the more recently defined logopenic variant; (2) to draw relations between functional disability, ... In primary progressive aphasia (PPA), assessment of language predominates over assessment of functional impairment in ... Background: In primary progressive aphasia (PPA), assessment of language predominates over assessment of functional impairment ... nonfluent aphasia, and the more recently defined logopenic variant; (2) to draw relations between functional disability, ...
BACKGROUND: Although primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by progressive loss of language and communication ... Primary progressive aphasia is a language-based dementia that initially spares other cognitive domains; however, aphasia ... Rates of Amyloid Imaging Positivity in Patients With Primary Progressive Aphasia.. Miguel A Santos-Santos, Gil D Rabinovici, ... Impaired Interoceptive Accuracy in Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia.. Charles R Marshall, Chris J D Hardy, Lucy L ...
... which he called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) included patients with progressive nonfluent (aphasia, semantic dementia, and ... Bonner MF, Ash S, Grossman M (November 2010). "The new classification of primary progressive aphasia into semantic, logopenic, ... Mesulam MM (October 2003). "Primary progressive aphasia-a language-based dementia". N. Engl. J. Med. 349 (16): 1535-42. doi: ... March 2004). "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Ann. Neurol. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002 ...
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a syndrome characterized by a progressive language deficit without other features of ... Weintraub, S., Rubin, N. P., & Mesulam, M. M. (1990). Primary progressive aphasia. Longitudinal course, neuropsychological ... Patterns of limb apraxia in primary progressive aphasia. Brain and Cognition, 53(2), 403-407. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ ... It has been debated whether the existence of BPO errors can be used as a measure for aphasia or brain damage. In the studies ...
title = "Primary progressive aphasia: A 25-year retrospective",. abstract = "The diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia (PPA ... Primary progressive aphasia: A 25-year retrospective. Together they form a unique fingerprint. * Primary Progressive Aphasia ... The diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is made in any patient in whom a language impairment (aphasia), caused by a ... N2 - The diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is made in any patient in whom a language impairment (aphasia), caused ...
  • In the classical Mesulam criteria for primary progressive aphasia, there are two variants: a non-fluent type progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) and a fluent type semantic dementia (SD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluent versus nonfluent primary progressive aphasia: a comparison of clinical and functional neuroimaging features. (springer.com)
  • Semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia are accepted PPA variants. (neurology.org)
  • Thus, the present-day distinction between progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) and semantic dementia (SemD) may reflect an oversimplification of the clinical presentations of progressive aphasia. (neurology.org)
  • AD is thought to cause logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA), and FTLD may cause progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA). (neurology.org)
  • Aims: To test the hypotheses (1) that individuals with progressive nonfluent aphasia (associated with left posterior, inferior frontal, and insular atrophy) show progressive motor speech impairment and disproportionate deterioration in naming actions relative to objects, and (2) that individuals with semantic dementia (associated with anterior and inferior temporal atrophy) show disproportionate deterioration in semantic representations of objects relative to actions. (elsevier.com)
  • Methods & procedures: The study population consisted of 56 participants with primary progressive aphasia, including 27 with progressive nonfluent aphasia, 16 with semantic dementia, and 13 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). (elsevier.com)
  • Outcomes & results: Participants with progressive nonfluent aphasia and ALS-FTD showed significantly more impairment in naming actions than objects. (elsevier.com)
  • Progressive nonfluent aphasia and some types of semantic dementia can be considered subtypes of PPA. (northwestern.edu)
  • Progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) is one of three clinical syndromes associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on these imaging methods, progressive nonfluent aphasia can be regionally dissociated from the other subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mesulam's original description in 1982 of progressive language problems caused by neurodegenerative disease (which he called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) included patients with progressive nonfluent (aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic progressive aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The progressive aphasias have been divided into 3 groups: progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic progressive aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • Grossman, "Syntactic and thematic components of sentence processing in progressive nonfluent aphasia and nonaphasic frontotemporal dementia," Journal of Neurolinguistics, vol. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The use of melody in aphasia treatment is based on the observation that singing and the production of melodic speech are often intact, even when standard speech is impaired in patients with nonfluent aphasia [22-24]. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Improvement of nonfluent aphasia patients' speech production by voice cues is related to the direct extraction of phonological encoding. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • On neurological examination, he was found to have poor memory, fair concentration, mild dysarthria and nonfluent aphasia , poor knowledge, and limited judgement. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This is also known as Broca's aphasia (attributed to the person who discovered the condition and the area of the brain that is thought to be affected) or nonfluent aphasia (as individuals with this type of aphasia exhibit great effort when attempting to speak). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Stimulating conversation: enhancement of elicited propositional speech in a patient with chronic nonfluent aphasia following transcranial magnetic stimulation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Treatment of naming in nonfluent aphasia through manipulation of intention and attention: A phase 1 comparison of two novel treatments. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The term frontotemporal dementia incorporates 3 distinct clinical syndromes: behavioral variant of FTD, progressive nonfluent aphasia , and semantic dementia. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Nonfluent aphasia after closed head trauma:report of a case. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Objective:To identify early cognitive and neuroimaging features of sporadic nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) caused by frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) subtypes.Methods:We prospectively collected clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathologic data in 11 patients with sporadic nfvPPA with FTLD-tau (nfvPPA-tau, n = 9) or FTLD-transactive response DNA binding protein pathology of 43 kD type A (nfvPPA-TDP, n = 2). (unitn.it)
  • Damage to the language network near the left frontal area of the brain usually results in Broca aphasia, which is also called nonfluent aphasia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Here, we described a case of a crossed nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), who developed a corticobasal syndrome (CBS). (elsevier.com)
  • There are three distinct subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) the nonfluent/agrammatic variant (nfvPPA), the semantic variant (svPPA), and the logopenic variant (lvPPA). (bvsalud.org)
  • Broca aphasia is characterized by nonfluent, poorly articulated, and agrammatic speech output (in both spontaneous speech and repetition) with relatively spared word comprehension. (bmj.com)
  • Hereditary primary lateral sclerosis and progressive nonfluent aphasia. (nih.gov)
  • Also searched for Aphasia, primary progressive , Frontotemporal dementia , and Pick's disease . (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A second neurologist concluded after further testing that Mr. Riedner might have a condition called primary progressive aphasia , or P.P.A., a form of dementia affecting the brain's language center. (nytimes.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal dementia, a cluster of related disorders that all originate in the frontal or temporal lobes of the brain. (bhealthblog.com)
  • Aphasia may also be caused by a brain tumor , brain infection, or dementia such as Alzheimer's disease . (webmd.com)
  • In 1982, Mesulam reported 6 patients with progressive aphasia, gradually worsening over a number of years, who did not develop a more generalized dementia. (medscape.com)
  • Subsequently, the PPA syndrome was defined as a disorder limited to progressive aphasia, without general cognitive impairment or dementia, over a 2-year period. (medscape.com)
  • In England and Europe, cases of frontal lobe dementia were described with progressive dysfunction of the frontal lobes. (medscape.com)
  • The condition described in the North American literature as primary progressive aphasia and that described in the European literature as frontal dementia have been combined under the term frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTD), or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). (medscape.com)
  • In recent years, the term frontotemporal dementia has become an umbrella term referring to clinical syndromes of frontal dementia or progressive aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • Frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia, a review. (medscape.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia syndrome caused by neurodegenerative brain disease, with language impairment as the primary feature. (grantome.com)
  • Although geared for research, diagnostic criteria have been refined over the past several years and can nevertheless aid the clinician with the diagnosis of disorders such as mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, the primary progressive aphasias, corticobasal syndrome, vascular cognitive impairment, and posterior cortical atrophy. (lww.com)
  • Semantic dementia and primary progressive aphasia: two sides of the same coin? (uea.ac.uk)
  • Prion Problem: A Rapidly Progressive Dementia. (alzforum.org)
  • Sometimes this type of aphasia will progress to a more generalized dementia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Dr. Dickerson is also on staff as a behavioral neurologist in the MGH Memory Disorders Unit.Dr. Dickerson is an active clinical consultant in many aspects of cognitive and behavioral neurology of neurodegenerative and related disorders, including frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Alzheimer's, mild cognitive impairment, posterior cortical atrophy, and related conditions, and the use of neuroimaging and other diagnostic markers in neurodegenerative diseases. (massgeneral.org)
  • Dementia assessment and management in primary care settings: a survey of current provider practices in the United States. (ucsf.edu)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a language led dementia, often associated with Fronto-Temporal dementia or Alzheimer's disease, presenting as insidious deterioration of language, initially with relative sparing of cognition. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • This type of dementia resembles Alzheimer's disease in that it also involves a progressive degeneration of brain cells that is irreversible. (alzheimer.ca)
  • Progressive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia or frontotemporal dementia are commonly seen, but other less common disorders are also assessed including limbic encephalitis, hereditary leukodystrophies and acquired cognitive problems such as amnesia, aphasia, visuo-spatial problems, apraxia, facial recognition and executive dysfunction due to varying aetiologies. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • Ongoing communication is provided by the award-winning national CANDID (counselling and diagnosis in dementia) phone line and patient support groups in unusual forms of dementia e.g. posterior cortical atrophy, primary progressive aphasia and familial AD and FTD. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • Primary progressive aphasias have a clinical and pathological overlap with the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum of disorders and Alzheimer's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Pick's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, progressive deterioration of comprehension and production of language is just one of the many possible types of mental deterioration, such as the progressive decline of memory, motor skills, reasoning, awareness, and visuospatial skills. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some doctors have tried Alzheimer's drugs to treat primary progressive aphasia, but no studies have proved these drugs are effective. (bhealthblog.com)
  • This entry was tagged alzheimer's disease and other dementias , PPA , Primary Progressive Aphasia . (doctordementia.com)
  • Patients included a cohort of patients with anomia associated with either primary progressive aphasia ( N = 9) or Alzheimer's disease ( N = 1) who attempted to name 200 pictures over the course of 18-24 months. (frontiersin.org)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is sometimes mistaken for Alzheimer's disease because early symptoms of the two disorders can be similar. (knowyourdisease.com)
  • But primary progressive aphasia is not usually a part of Alzheimer's disease. (knowyourdisease.com)
  • The condition is called primary progressive aphasia and about 40% of people who have it have underlying Alzheimer's. (medworm.com)
  • Our main mission is to improve the understanding of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related forms of dementias -- with primary goals of finding effective treatments and eventual cures for these neurodegenerative diseases, and providing comprehensive care to patients and loved ones affected by such devastating disorders. (massgeneral.org)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the comprehension of concrete, abstract and abstract emotional words in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and healthy elderly adults (HE) Three groups of participants (9 svPPA, 12 AD, 11 HE) underwent a general neuropsy- chological assessment, a similarity judgment task, and structural brain MRI. (gtvallet.com)
  • His research focuses on primary progressive aphasia, a fast-growing field that concerns with progressive language disturbances caused by neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. (edu.au)
  • Jet Vonk is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care at Utrecht University (Netherlands) and at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain at Columbia University (New York, United States). (umcutrecht.nl)
  • Alzheimer's disease and primary progressive aphasia) with behavioral methods and neuroimaging, with a focus on semantics in preclinical Alzheimer's disease. (umcutrecht.nl)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slow, progressive disease that profoundly affects memory and everyday function. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This type of aphasia begins gradually, with speech or language symptoms that vary depending on the brain areas affected by the disease. (ucsf.edu)
  • This is the most severe type of aphasia. (webmd.com)
  • Most experimental research has been in this type of aphasia. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • Also known as Wernicke aphasia, this type of aphasia is the result of damage to the language network in the middle left side of the brain. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Learn as much as you can for your type of aphasia and prepare for the future. (aphasia.org)
  • All people with aphasia don't have the same symptoms for the type of aphasia they have and need specialized treatment. (aphasia.org)
  • Background: With upcoming therapeutic interventions for patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), instruments for the follow-up of patients are needed to describe disease progression and to evaluate potential therapeutic effects. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • Four patients with primary progressive aphasia displayed a greater deficit in understanding words they heard than words they read, and a further deficiency in naming objects orally rather than in writing. (northwestern.edu)
  • From a practical point of view, the identification of these features in patients with primary progressive aphasia should help in the design of therapeutic interventions where written communication modalities are promoted to circumvent some of the oral communication deficits. (northwestern.edu)
  • Patients with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) may react to linguistic stimuli differently than healthy controls, reflecting degeneration of language networks and engagement of compensatory mechanisms. (elsevier.com)
  • Development, cross-cultural adaptation, and psychometric characteristics of the Persian progressive aphasia language scale in patients with primary progressive aphasia: A pilot study. (edu.au)
  • According to the National Aphasia Association, about 25% to 40% of people who survive a stroke get aphasia. (webmd.com)
  • Aphasia Threads is an on-going project created by the National Aphasia Association. (aphasia.org)
  • Preferential Disruption of Auditory Word Representations in Primary Progressive Aphasia with the Neuropathology of FTLD-TDP Type A . Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology , 32 (1), 46-53. (northwestern.edu)
  • Hillis 2015 provides an edited collection of papers from researchers working in different disciplines and approaching aphasia from different perspectives (cognitive neuropsychology, linguistics, neurology, neuroimaging, and speech and language therapy). (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 -- Individuals with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) have longitudinally preserved episodic memory, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Neurology. (medworm.com)
  • Dr. Dickerson is the Tom Rickles Chair in Progressive Aphasia Research at MGH & Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. (massgeneral.org)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease of insidious onset presenting with progressive isolated loss of language function, without significant impairment in other cognitive domains. (dovepress.com)
  • The second chapter provides a thorough literature review which clearly identifies Mild Cognitive Impairment and Primary Progressive Aphasia as well as describes efficacy studies that provide the foundation for this study. (uncg.edu)
  • The diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is made in any patient in whom a language impairment (aphasia), caused by a neurodegenerative disease (progressive), constitutes the most salient aspect of the clinical picture (primary). (northwestern.edu)
  • For people suffering from PPA, language impairment is the primary symptom. (wa.gov.au)
  • These features of language impairment are not characteristic of any currently recognized primary progressive aphasia variant. (northwestern.edu)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive language impairment. (cdc.gov)
  • Progressive naming impairment (i.e., anomia) is a core diagnostic symptom of numerous pathologies that impact anterior and inferior portions of the temporal lobe. (frontiersin.org)
  • Aphasia describes language impairment associated with a brain lesion.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of drugs on language abilities when given to people with aphasia following stroke.We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Register (last searched: May 2001), and reference lists of relevant articles to December 1998. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Aphasia describes language impairment associated with a brain lesion.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of formal speech and language therapy and non-professional types of support from untrained providers for people with aphasia after stroke.We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched: March 1999), and reference lists of relevant articles to December 1998. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia variant distinguished by slowing of speech with impairment of naming and difficulty comprehending syntax. (behavenet.com)
  • Aphasia is an acquired impairment of language that affects comprehension and production of words, sentences, and/or discourse. (bmj.com)
  • Aphasia is a selective impairment of language or the cognitive processes that underlie language. (bmj.com)
  • The following diagnosis criteria were defined by Mesulam: As opposed to having followed trauma to the brain, a patient must show an insidious onset and a gradual progression of aphasia, defined as a disorder of sentence and/or word usage, affecting the production and comprehension of speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • Logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) was characterized by slow speech, sentence repetition, and comprehension deficits, and relative sparing of motor speech, grammar, and single-word comprehension. (neurology.org)
  • Bak, Thomas H. / Naming and comprehension in primary progressive aphasia : The influence of grammatical word class . (elsevier.com)
  • Relationship between lesion extent in 'Wernicke's area' on computed tomographic scan and predicting recovery of comprehension in Wernicke's aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • Profiles of deficits vary in the extent that levels of language, phonology (see Phonemic and Phonetic Characteristics ), lexis (see Nouns , Verbs , Closed-Class Words ), and syntax (see Sentence Comprehension and Sentence Production ) are involved, in varying degrees and patterns, although lexical access problems are found in most types of aphasia. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • Medical search aphasia Dysphasia is an acquired deficit in the comprehension or production of language whether spoken or written. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Aphasia is a complete loss of language comprehension or production. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Receptive aphasia (fluent): comprehension is poor, often producing jargon and nonsensical words and phrases. (ausmed.com.au)
  • People with global aphasia have severe disabilities with expression and comprehension. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Wernicke aphasia is characterized by fluent but meaningless speech output and repetition, with poor word and sentence comprehension. (bmj.com)
  • Aphasia -language comprehension and/or production deficits. (asha.org)
  • Since Mesulam's original description of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in 1982, 1 it has become clear that progressive isolated language disorders due to neurodegeneration are clinically heterogeneous. (neurology.org)
  • The Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) syndrome was firstly introduced in 1982. (atlasofscience.org)
  • 1982. and Boston diagnostic aphasia examination [4] Goodglass H, Kaplan E. The Boston diagnostic aphasia examination. (bmj.com)
  • abstract = "Many patients who meet core/root criteria for Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) are not classifiable as a recognized variant and are often excluded from neuroimaging studies. (elsevier.com)
  • In 2011, the classification of primary progressive aphasia was updated to include three clinical variants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may be a useful diagnostic technique. (springer.com)
  • Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. (springer.com)
  • Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia. (springer.com)
  • This article provides a classification of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and its 3 main variants to improve the uniformity of case reporting and the reliability of research results. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Additionally, one article studied the progression of primary progressive aphasia in general (that is, they did not distinguish between the variants). (nih.gov)
  • An overview on Primary Progressive Aphasia and its variants. (nih.gov)
  • To determine the rates of positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid positivity in the main clinical variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The present study investigated the pattern of longitudinal changes in cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). (umontreal.ca)
  • Differential diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia variants using the international criteria. (edu.au)
  • Correlates of anomia in non-semantic variants of primary progressive aphasia converge over time. (edu.au)
  • Logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) is a distinctive variant of primary progressive aphasia. (neurology.org)
  • Symptoms of the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia typically begin between the ages of 55 and 70. (nih.gov)
  • The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by neurodegeneration and progressive loss of semantic knowledge. (cdc.gov)
  • Patterns of longitudinal brain atrophy in the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterised by impaired sentence repetition and word retrieval difficulties. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) represents a group of clinical syndromes that involve progressive decline in language functions. (neurology.org)
  • His case study "On the relationship between aphasia and senile atrophy of the brain "still serves as a frame of reference for apparently focal brain syndromes in diffuse or generalized degenerative diseases of the brain. (medscape.com)
  • Naeser MA, Alexander MP, Helm-Estabrooks N, Levine HL, Laughlin SA, Geschwind N. Aphasia with predominantly subcortical lesion sites: description of three capsular/putaminal aphasia syndromes. (medscape.com)
  • Variations in the types of language deficit found in aphasia led to the notion of syndromes and the search for associations between types of language deficits and sites of lesion (see Historical Overviews ). (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • Two well-described syndromes are Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • The most common classification of aphasia divides the disorder into clinical syndromes of frequently co-occurring deficits that reflect the vascular territory affected in stroke. (bmj.com)
  • Unlike many people who develop aphasia from head injury or stroke, people with PPA do not typically improve with time, but a therapist may be helpful in maximizing abilities and exploring other ways to communicate. (ucsf.edu)
  • Recent evidence has fuelled the debate on the role of massed practice in the rehabilitation of chronic post-stroke aphasia. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Individuals with chronic aphasia more than 1 year post-stroke received Intensive Language-Action Therapy in a randomised, parallel-group, blinded-assessment, controlled trial. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • PNFA has an insidious onset of language deficits over time as opposed to other stroke-based aphasias, which occur acutely following trauma to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia is usually caused by a stroke or brain injury with damage to one or more parts of the brain that deal with language. (webmd.com)
  • With a stroke, aphasia may improve with proper therapy. (webmd.com)
  • Usually, a doctor first diagnoses aphasia when treating a patient for a stroke, brain injury, or tumor. (webmd.com)
  • Fridriksson J, Rorden C, Elm J, Sen S, George MS, Bonilha L. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation vs Sham Stimulation to Treat Aphasia After Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (medscape.com)
  • An update on medications and noninvasive brain stimulation to augment language rehabilitation in post-stroke aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • [1] The major causes are a cerebral vascular accident ( stroke ), or head trauma, but aphasia can also be the result of brain tumors, brain infections, or neurodegenerative diseases . (wikipedia.org)
  • [7] Older individuals have the highest risk of developing aphasia because the danger of stroke increases with age: approximately 75% of all strokes occur in individuals over the age of 65. (wikipedia.org)
  • [9] 25% - 40% of people who survive a stroke develop aphasia as a result of damage to the language-processing regions of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is associated with a disease process that causes atrophy in the frontal and temporal areas of the brain, and is distinct from aphasia resulting from a stroke. (doctordementia.com)
  • Evidence-based systematic review: effects of intensity of treatment and constraint-induced language therapy for individuals with stroke-induced aphasia Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Pharmacological treatment for aphasia following stroke. (tripdatabase.com)
  • We could not determine whether one drug is more effective than another.The main conclusion of this review is that drug treatment with piracetam may be effective in the treatment of aphasia after stroke. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Aphasia is the most common language disorder post-stroke , with one third of all patients diagnosed with stroke experiencing it. (ausmed.com.au)
  • When a person who has had a stroke experiences speech difficulty, word-finding difficulty, or speaks with made-up or inappropriate language, they are highly likely to be experiencing aphasia . (ausmed.com.au)
  • However, in addition to aphasia, a person's communication abilities after a stroke can be affected in other ways . (ausmed.com.au)
  • Aphasia typically occurs suddenly after a stroke or a head injury. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Aphasia is a sign of some other condition, such as a stroke or a brain tumor. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The most common cause of aphasia is brain damage resulting from a stroke - the blockage or rupture of a blood vessel in the brain. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If your aphasia is due to a stroke or head injury, you'll probably first see an emergency room physician. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Crossed aphasia has been reported mainly as post-stroke aphasia resulting from brain damage ipsilateral to the dominant right hand. (elsevier.com)
  • Ischemia in Broca area is associated with Broca aphasia more reliably in acute than in chronic stroke. (bmj.com)
  • AOS can improve, remain stable, or worsen depending on specific diagnosis and time elapsed since onset (e.g., primary progressive AOS vs. acute stroke recovery). (asha.org)
  • My research examines the interactions between language and cognitive systems in post-stroke and primary progressive aphasia (PPA). (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • At my Ph.D. research and the first years of my academic career in neuropsychology, I was interested in how culture and language influence grammatical processing-and in particular the distinction between nouns and verbs-in healthy controls and after language breakdown due to post-stroke aphasia. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • One prevalent deficit in the aphasias is anomia , which is a difficulty in finding the correct word. (wikipedia.org)
  • A progressive disorder of language associated with atrophy of the frontal and temporal regions of the left hemisphere was first described in the 1890s by Pick 1 and Serieux. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • 4 Warrington 5 described a progressive disorder of semantic memory in 1975. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • This disorder commonly has a primary effect on the left hemisphere, causing the symptomatic display of expressive language deficits (production difficulties) and sometimes may disrupt receptive abilities in comprehending grammatically complex language. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia is a communication disorder that results from damage or injury to language parts of the brain . (webmd.com)
  • In some cases, aphasia is a symptom of epilepsy or other neurological disorder. (webmd.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is a rare disorder where people slowly lose their ability to talk, read, write, and comprehend what they hear in conversation over a period of time. (webmd.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is a form of degenerative neurological disorder, in which the first signs are changes in ability to communicate. (aphasianyc.org)
  • Some people with primary progressive aphasia have a family history of this disorder. (aphasianyc.org)
  • Since primary progressive aphasia is diagnosed on the basis of symptoms, it is possible that there is more than one cause of the disorder. (aphasianyc.org)
  • Few studies have reported neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects the left hemisphere. (elsevier.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by deterioration in language function while other higher centre functions are relatively preserved initially. (austin.org.au)
  • Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive language disorder associated with atrophy of the dominant language hemisphere, typically left. (edu.pl)
  • Reasons for doing so include dysphasia being easily confused with the swallowing disorder dysphagia , consumers and speech pathologists preferring the term aphasia, and many languages other than English using a word similar to aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a language disorder that involves changes in the ability to speak, read, write and understand what others are saying. (doctordementia.com)
  • Most people with progressive aphasia maintain the ability to care for themselves, keep up outside interests and, in some instances, remain employed for a few years after onset of the disorder. (doctordementia.com)
  • Aphasia is a language disorder acquired subsequent to brain damage that affects production and understanding of spoken and written language in varying degrees and patterns associated with the size and site of the lesion (see Symptoms and Neurological Correlates ). (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is thought to be a disorder of focal cortical degeneration which occurs as a result of lobar atrophy of dominant frontal and temporal lobe. (who.int)
  • Others are more obscure, such as Alpers disease, a progressive neurologic disorder that begins during childhood, type 2 Gaucher disease, an inherited disorder in which the body accumulates harmful quantities of certain fats, and Menkes disease, a genetic disorder that affects the development of hair, brain, bones, liver and arteries. (heraldnet.com)
  • Duffy (2013) observed that AOS was documented as the primary, but not necessarily the only, communication disorder for 6.9% of all motor speech disorders in the Mayo Clinic Speech Pathology practice. (asha.org)
  • Assessment is important to rule out other problems, for example, primary psychiatric disorder, for which it may be mistaken. (alzheimer.ca)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a type of neurological syndrome in which language capabilities slowly and progressively become impaired. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of this study is to further define the neurological and linguistic deterioration in primary progressive aphasia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities. (bhealthblog.com)
  • Genetic tests can determine if you have genetic mutations associated with primary progressive aphasia or other neurological conditions. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The study of aphasia is made interesting through coverage of some fundamentals running through the topics , such as neurological foundations. (pearson.ch)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities, primarily in people over the age of 50. (knowyourdisease.com)
  • NPC is a rare, relentlessly progressive, neurological disease and associated with serious morbidity and shortened life expectancy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Some people with aphasia have problems understanding what others are saying. (webmd.com)
  • People with aphasia may experience any of the following behaviors due to an acquired brain injury, although some of these symptoms may be due to related or concomitant problems, such as dysarthria or apraxia , and not primarily due to aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Welcome to the Aphasia Threads Project , which weaves together three points-of-view: people with aphasia, caregivers, and the professionals who help each family navigate aphasia. (aphasia.org)
  • T1-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies report early atrophy in the left anterior temporal lobe, especially the perirhinal cortex, in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA). (lu.se)
  • Primary Progressive Aphasia Sample Report covering Primary Progressive Aphasia epidemiology from 2017 to 2030. (delveinsight.com)
  • I called the Brain and Memory Center at the University of Washington and after many tests, they diagnosed me with Primary Progressive Non-Fluent Aphasia in December of 2017. (aphasia.org)
  • Alexander MP, Naeser MA, Palumbo C. Broca's area aphasias: aphasia after lesions including the frontal operculum. (medscape.com)
  • Broca's aphasia is characterized by syntactic deficits in output but with relatively retained understanding of language. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • But while a definitive diagnosis can be made only at autopsy, the results of neuropsychological testing and the patient's progressive difficulty with communication despite a normal memory can pinpoint P.P.A. as the problem. (nytimes.com)
  • There is no specific test that can confirm a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia. (knowyourdisease.com)
  • Where the Light Gets In tells the full story of Linda's illness--called primary progressive aphasia--from her early-onset diagnosis at the age of 62 through the present day. (goodreads.com)
  • most information, especially that regarding assessment and diagnosis, also applies to progressive AOS. (asha.org)
  • Marta Balagué, clinical neuropsychologist with more than 15 years of experience in neuropsychological diagnosis in the field of neurodegenerative processes, answers the questions about her presentation on the update on the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasias last March in #YoMeQuedoEnCasa learning with #NeuronUPAcademy. (neuronup.com)
  • If you liked this blog entry about the doubts about his paper on the update on the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasias, you are probably interested in more papers from #YoMeQuedoEnCasa learning with #NeuronUPAcademy. (neuronup.com)
  • Global aphasia. (webmd.com)
  • With global aphasia, the person has difficulty speaking and understanding words. (webmd.com)
  • Global aphasia results from extensive damage to the brain's language networks. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In Wernicke's aphasia, understanding is impaired and lexical semantics are compromised, whereas syntax is relatively intact. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • Receptive aphasia (also known as Wernicke's aphasia , fluent aphasia and sensory aphasia ), is caused by damage to the posterior left portion of brain in the medial temporal/parietal lobes. (ausmed.com.au)
  • They provide treatment, research and support groups for caregivers of people with primary progressive aphasia and other dementias. (aphasianyc.org)
  • There is no specific test to diagnose primary progressive aphasia. (bhealthblog.com)
  • To diagnose primary progressive aphasia, your doctor will review your symptoms and order tests. (mayoclinic.org)
  • MRI scans can help diagnose primary progressive aphasia, detect shrinking of certain areas of the brain and show which area of the brain might be affected. (mayoclinic.org)
  • However, unlike most other aphasias, PPA results from continuous deterioration in brain tissue, which leads to early symptoms being far less detrimental than later symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a condition that slowly damages the parts of the brain that control speech and language. (ucsf.edu)
  • Primary progressive aphasia specifically targets the language center of the brain - located in the brain's left hemisphere. (bhealthblog.com)
  • Brain scans typically show a marked shrinkage of the brain's language center in people who have primary progressive aphasia. (bhealthblog.com)
  • [ 1 ] As Pick stated, "simple progressive brain atrophy can lead to symptoms of local disturbance through local accentuation of the diffuse process. (medscape.com)
  • Aphasia is an inability to comprehend or formulate language because of damage to specific brain regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • [2] To be diagnosed with aphasia, a person's speech or language must be significantly impaired in one (or more) of the four aspects of communication following acquired brain injury, or have significant decline over a short time period (progressive aphasia). (wikipedia.org)
  • With aphasia, one or more modes of communication in the brain have been damaged and are therefore functioning incorrectly. (wikipedia.org)
  • that is, aphasia is not related to the mechanics of speech but rather the individual's language cognition (although a person can have both problems, particularly if they suffered a hemorrhage that damaged a large area of the brain). (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia symptoms can vary based on the location of damage in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia is found in all languages (see Across Languages ) and in children who have passed the early stages of language development and subsequently have impaired language following brain damage. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • Paquier and van Dongen 1993 describes acquired aphasia in children who, previous to brain damage, were exhibiting normal language development. (oxfordbibliographiesonline.com)
  • We report a case of a 78 year old male patient presenting with progressive language affection predominantly and clinically diagnosed as PPA but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain showed an unusual finding of reverse 'hot cross bun' sign in pons in T2 weighted (T2W) / diffusion weighted image (DWI)/ T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) axial views. (who.int)
  • But it can also come on gradually from a slow-growing brain tumor or a disease that causes progressive, permanent damage (degenerative). (mayoclinic.org)
  • Brain damage caused by a severe head injury, a tumor, an infection or a degenerative process also can cause aphasia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Clinical Perspectives on Primary Progressive Aphasia (Brain, Behaviour and Cognition) , (pp. 25-37). (edu.au)
  • Matías-Guiu JA, García-Ramos R. Primary progressive aphasia: from syndrome to disease. (springer.com)
  • He was struck down by aphasia, loss of movement control, defective oculomotor movements and an episode of motor difficulty as confirmation of extrapyramidal syndrome. (atlasofscience.org)
  • Background: Various clinical types of primary progressive aphasia have been associated with distinct areas of atrophy and pathological changes. (elsevier.com)
  • Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, usually before the age of 65, and tend to worsen over time. (bhealthblog.com)
  • But because these tests depend primarily on language skills, their usefulness declines as the symptoms of primary progressive aphasia worsen. (bhealthblog.com)
  • Early symptoms of primary progressive aphasia involve difficulty finding the right words during conversations or in writing. (knowyourdisease.com)
  • Losing the ability to communicate is distressing and incredibly frustrating, both for the person with primary progressive aphasia and for friends and family. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Family members eventually may need to consider long-term care options for the person with primary progressive aphasia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Support groups may be available for you and the person with primary progressive aphasia or related conditions. (mayoclinic.org)
  • This week, we'll hear from Sheila, a person with primary progressive aphasia. (aphasia.org)
  • With receptive aphasia, the person can hear a voice or read the print, but may not understand the meaning of the message. (webmd.com)
  • Oftentimes, someone with receptive aphasia takes language literally. (webmd.com)
  • The drugs caused me to suffer receptive aphasia, hypomania and other derangements. (medworm.com)
  • Overall, individuals with primary progressive aphasia lived an average of 7 years after symptoms first developed. (nih.gov)
  • This thesis examines the feasibility of the ASL for Active Living Program as an intervention for clinical practice among individuals with memory loss and/or aphasia with associated depression. (uncg.edu)
  • It strives to answer the following questions: First will an eight session RT intervention impact on symptoms of depression in individuals with mild memory loss and aphasia? (uncg.edu)
  • Signs and symptoms may or may not be present in individuals with aphasia and may vary in severity and level of disruption to communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effects of primary progressive aphasia differ greatly among individuals. (knowyourdisease.com)
  • Two individuals with aphasia performed the eyetracking task on the same schedule without intervening language treatment. (frontiersin.org)
  • Individuals with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) suffer a gradual decline in communication ability as a result of neurodegenerative disease. (elsevier.com)
  • Individuals with Broca aphasia often have difficulty understanding syntactically complex or semantically reversible sentences (e.g., 'touch your nose after you touch your foot') but have little trouble understanding simple, semantically nonreversible sentences. (bmj.com)
  • Alzheimer disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are hypothesized to cause clinically distinct forms of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) that predominantly affect expressive speech. (neurology.org)
  • This case illustrates a patient with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, as spotted on the MRI and SPECT images, with a clear progressive loss of s. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Aphasia gets in the way of a person's ability to use or understand words. (webmd.com)
  • Aphasia does not impair the person's intelligence. (webmd.com)
  • Severe aphasia limits the person's ability to communicate. (webmd.com)
  • When working with medical personnel, including medical residents, med students, nursing students, I see that even most of them don't understand the long term impact aphasia can have on a person's life. (aphasia.org)
  • Transcortical sensory aphasia usually results from ischemia involving the watershed area between the left MCA and left posterior cerebral artery territory. (bmj.com)
  • We run focus groups and support groups such as the PCA support group for patients and carers with posterior variant of disease and the PPA support group for those with primary progressive aphasia. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • To quantitatively examine the regional densities and hemispheric distribution of the 43-kDa transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) inclusions, neurons, and activated microglia in a left-handed patient with right hemisphere language dominance and logopenic-variant primary progressive aphasia (PPA). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 positron emission tomography in progressive apraxia of speech and primary progressive aphasia. (springer.com)
  • It is important to distinguish aphasia from dysarthria or apraxia. (bmj.com)
  • The scope of this page is limited to acquired and progressive apraxia of speech. (asha.org)
  • Hematoxylin and eosin stain of the left frontal cortex from a patient with primary progressive aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • The main treatment for aphasia is speech therapy. (ausmed.com.au)
  • Once the cause has been addressed, the main treatment for aphasia is speech and language therapy. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Correlations of subcortical CT lesion sites and aphasia profiles. (medscape.com)
  • Data from this project will determine whether the temporal progression of atrophy is related to cognitive decline, anatomical site of primary atrophy, or putative underlying pathology based on amyloid burden. (grantome.com)
  • Broca aphasia: pathologic and clinical. (medscape.com)
  • People with Broca aphasia may understand what other people say better than they can speak. (mayoclinic.org)
  • People with Broca aphasia may also have right-sided paralysis or weakness. (mayoclinic.org)
  • People who have aphasia may have difficulty speaking and finding the "right" words to complete their thoughts. (webmd.com)
  • With expressive aphasia, the person knows what he or she wants to say, yet has difficulty communicating it to others. (webmd.com)
  • Worsening communication difficulty without significant changes in thinking and behavior for a year or two is a hallmark of primary progressive aphasia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Primary progressive aphasia is the term used for language difficulty that develops gradually. (mayoclinic.org)
  • 2014). Collection of data is also challenging due to difficulty distinguishing among those disorders-particularly in distinguishing between AOS characteristics and phonological errors that can occur in aphasia (McNeil et al. (asha.org)
  • AOS in the absence of dysarthria or aphasia) is very uncommon. (asha.org)
  • The following speech characteristics may not be unique to AOS and can occur in the presence or absence of coexisting dysarthria or aphasia. (asha.org)
  • [6] Any person of any age can develop aphasia, given that it is often caused by a traumatic injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expressive aphasia (non-fluent): speech production is halting and effortful. (ausmed.com.au)
  • administered by trained speech and language therapists versus any type of informal support for aphasia , given by speech and language therapists or volunteers, whether these were trained or untrained. (tripdatabase.com)