Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Aphasia, Primary Progressive: A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)Anomia: A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)Aphasia, Conduction: A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)Primary Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia: A form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a progressive form of dementia characterized by motor speech impairment and AGRAMMATISM, with relative sparing of single word comprehension and semantic memory.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Language Therapy: Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.Agraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Dyslexia, Acquired: A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.Speech Production Measurement: Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Apraxia, Ideomotor: A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)Names: Personal names, given or surname, as cultural characteristics, as ethnological or religious patterns, as indications of the geographic distribution of families and inbreeding, etc. Analysis of isonymy, the quality of having the same or similar names, is useful in the study of population genetics. NAMES is used also for the history of names or name changes of corporate bodies, such as medical societies, universities, hospitals, government agencies, etc.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Speech-Language Pathology: The study of speech or language disorders and their diagnosis and correction.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Multiple subtypes or forms are recognized based on presence or absence of TAU PROTEIN inclusions. FTLD includes three clinical syndromes: FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, semantic dementia, and PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE NONFLUENT APHASIA.Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Frontotemporal Dementia: The most common clinical form of FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION, this dementia presents with personality and behavioral changes often associated with disinhibition, apathy, and lack of insight.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Dysarthria: Disorders of speech articulation caused by imperfect coordination of pharynx, larynx, tongue, or face muscles. This may result from CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; CEREBELLAR DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; BRAIN STEM diseases; or diseases of the corticobulbar tracts (see PYRAMIDAL TRACTS). The cortical language centers are intact in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p489)Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Communication Aids for Disabled: Equipment that provides mentally or physically disabled persons with a means of communication. The aids include display boards, typewriters, cathode ray tubes, computers, and speech synthesizers. The output of such aids includes written words, artificial speech, language signs, Morse code, and pictures.Thalamic Diseases: Disorders of the centrally located thalamus, which integrates a wide range of cortical and subcortical information. Manifestations include sensory loss, MOVEMENT DISORDERS; ATAXIA, pain syndromes, visual disorders, a variety of neuropsychological conditions, and COMA. Relatively common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; BRAIN HYPOXIA; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; and infectious processes.Agnosia: Loss of the ability to comprehend the meaning or recognize the importance of various forms of stimulation that cannot be attributed to impairment of a primary sensory modality. Tactile agnosia is characterized by an inability to perceive the shape and nature of an object by touch alone, despite unimpaired sensation to light touch, position, and other primary sensory modalities.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)BostonAphasia, Wernicke: Impairment in the comprehension of speech and meaning of words, both spoken and written, and of the meanings conveyed by their grammatical relationships in sentences. It is caused by lesions that primarily affect Wernicke's area, which lies in the posterior perisylvian region of the temporal lobe of the dominant hemisphere. (From Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p141; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p846)Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Schools: Educational institutions.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Communication Disorders: Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS.Gait Apraxia: Impaired ambulation not attributed to sensory impairment or motor weakness. FRONTAL LOBE disorders; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES (e.g., PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS); DEMENTIA, MULTI-INFARCT; ALZHEIMER DISEASE; and other conditions may be associated with gait apraxia.National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports biomedical research and research training on normal mechanisms as well as diseases and disorders of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language. It was established in 1988.

Mechanisms of recovery from aphasia: evidence from positron emission tomography studies. (1/519)

OBJECTIVES: Language functions comprise a distributed neural system, largely lateralised to the left cerebral hemisphere. Late recovery from aphasia after a focal lesion, other than by behavioural strategies, has been attributed to one of two changes at a systems level: a laterality shift, with mirror region cortex in the contralateral cortex assuming the function(s) of the damaged region; or a partial lesion effect, with recovery of perilesional tissue to support impaired language functions. Functional neuroimaging with PET allows direct observations of brain functions at systems level. This study used PET to compare regional brain activations in response to a word retrieval task in normal subjects and in aphasic patients who had shown at least some recovery and were able to attempt the task. Emphasis has been placed on single subject analysis of the results as there is no reason to assume that the mechanisms of recovery are necessarily uniform among aphasic patients. METHODS: Six right handed aphasic patients, each with a left cerebral hemispheric lesion (five strokes and one glioma), were studied. Criteria for inclusion were symptomatic or formal test evidence of at least some recovery and an ability to attempt word retrieval in response to heard word cues. Each patient underwent 12 PET scans using oxygen-15 labelled water (H2(15)O) as tracer to index regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The task, repeated six times, required the patient to think of verbs appropriate to different lists of heard noun cues. The six scans obtained during word retrieval were contrasted with six made while the subject was "at rest". The patients' individual results were compared with those of nine right handed normal volunteers undergoing the same activation study. The data were analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM96, Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK). RESULTS: Perception of the noun cues would be expected to result in bilateral dorsolateral temporal cortical activations, but as the rate of presentation was only four per minute the auditory perceptual activations were not evident in all people. Anterior cingulate, medial premotor (supplementary speech area) and dorsolateral frontal activations were evident in all normal subjects and patients. There were limited right dorsolateral frontal activations in three of the six patients, but a similar pattern was also found in four of the nine normal subjects. In the left inferolateral temporal cortex, activation was found for the normal subjects and five of the six patients, including two of the three subjects with lesions involving the left temporal lobe. The only patient who showed subthreshold activation in the left inferolateral temporal activation had a very high error rate when performing the verb retrieval task. CONCLUSIONS: The normal subjects showed a left lateralised inferolateral temporal activation, reflecting retrieval of words appropriate in meaning to the cue from the semantic system. Lateralisation of frontal activations to the left was only relative, with right prefrontal involvement in half of the normal subjects. Frontal activations are associated with parallel psychological processes involved in word retrieval, including task initiation, short term (working) memory for the cue and responses, and prearticulatory processes (even though no overt articulation was required). There was little evidence of a laterality shift of word retrieval functions to the right temporal lobe after a left hemispheric lesion. In particular, left inferolateral temporal activation was seen in all patients except one, and he proved to be very inefficient at the task. The results provide indirect evidence that even limited salvage of peri-infarct tissue with acute stroke treatments will have an important impact on the rehabilitation of cognitive functions.  (+info)

Global aphasia without hemiparesis: language profiles and lesion distribution. (2/519)

OBJECTIVES: Global aphasia without hemiparesis (GAWH) is an uncommon stroke syndrome involving receptive and expressive language impairment, without the hemiparesis typically manifested by patients with global aphasia after large left perisylvian lesions. A few cases of GAWH have been reported with conflicting conclusions regarding pathogenesis, lesion localisation, and recovery. The current study was conducted to attempt to clarify these issues. METHODS: Ten cases of GAWH were prospectively studied with language profiles and lesion analysis; five patients had multiple lesions, four patients had a single lesion, and one had a subarachnoid haemorrhage. Eight patients met criteria for cardioembolic ischaemic stroke. RESULTS: Cluster analysis based on acute language profiles disclosed three subtypes of patients with GAWH; these clusters persisted on follow up language assessment. Each cluster evolved into a different aphasia subtype: persistent GAWH, Wernicke's aphasia, or transcortical motor aphasia (TCM). Composite lesion analysis showed that persistent GAWH was related to lesioning of the left superior temporal gyrus. Patients with acute GAWH who evolved into TCM type aphasia had common lesioning of the left inferior frontal gyrus and adjacent subcortical white matter. Patients with acute GAWH who evolved into Wernicke's type aphasia were characterised by lesioning of the left precentral and postcentral gyri. Recovery of language was poor in all but one patient. CONCLUSIONS: Although patients with acute GAWH are similar on neurological examination, they are heterogeneous with respect to early aphasia profile, language recovery, and lesion profile.  (+info)

Conduction aphasia elicited by stimulation of the left posterior superior temporal gyrus. (3/519)

OBJECTIVE: Disruption of fascicular tracts that connect Wernicke's to Broca's areas is the classic mechanism of conduction aphasia. Later work has emphasised cortical mechanisms. METHODS: To determine the distribution of language on dominant cortex, electrical cortical stimulation was performed using implanted subdural electrodes during brain mapping before epilepsy surgery. RESULTS: A transient, isolated deficit in repetition was elicited with stimulation of the posterior portion of the dominant superior temporal gyrus. CONCLUSION: This finding suggests that cortical dysfunction, not just white matter disruption, can induce conduction aphasia.  (+info)

Aphasic disorder in patients with closed head injury. (4/519)

Quantitative assessment of 50 patients with closed head injury disclosed that anomic errors and word finding difficulty were prominent sequelae as nearly half of the series had defective scores on tests of naming and/or word association. Aphasic disturbance was associated with severity of brain injury as reflected by prolonged coma and injury of the brain stem.  (+info)

Impaired dexterity of the ipsilateral hand after stroke and the relationship to cognitive deficit. (5/519)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous research has reported impaired hand function on the "unaffected" side after stroke, but its incidence, origins, and impact on rehabilitation remain unclear. This study investigated whether impairment of ipsilateral dexterity is common early after middle cerebral artery stroke and explored the relationship to cognitive deficit. METHODS: Thirty patients within 1 month of an infarct involving the parietal or posterior frontal lobe (15 left and 15 right hemisphere) used the ipsilateral hand in tests that simulated everyday hand functions. Performance was compared with that of healthy age-matched controls using the same hand. Standardized tests were used to assess apraxia, visuospatial ability, and aphasia. RESULTS: All patients were able to complete the dexterity tests, but video analysis showed that performance was slow and clumsy compared with that of controls (P<0.001). Impairment was most severe after left hemisphere damage, and apraxia was a strong correlate of increased dexterity errors (P<0.01), whereas reduced ipsilateral grip strength correlated with slowing (P<0.05). The pattern of performance was different for patients with right hemisphere damage. Here there was no correlation between grip strength and slowing, while dexterity errors appeared to be due to visuospatial problems. CONCLUSIONS: Subtle impairments in dexterity of the ipsilateral hand are common within 1 month of stroke. Ipsilateral sensorimotor losses may contribute to these impairments, but the major factor appears to be the presence of cognitive deficits affecting perception and control of action. The nature of these deficits varies with side of brain damage. The effect of impaired dexterity on functional outcome is not yet known.  (+info)

Language related brain potentials in patients with cortical and subcortical left hemisphere lesions. (6/519)

The role of the basal ganglia in language processing is currently a matter of discussion. Therefore, patients with left frontal cortical and subcortical lesions involving the basal ganglia as well as normal controls were tested in a language comprehension paradigm. Semantically incorrect, syntactically incorrect and correct sentences were presented auditorily. Subjects were required to listen to the sentences and to judge whether the sentence heard was correct or not. Event-related potentials and reaction times were recorded while subjects heard the sentences. Three different components correlated with different language processes were considered: the so-called N400 assumed to reflect processes of semantic integration; the early left anterior negativity hypothesized to reflect processes of initial syntactic structure building; and a late positivity (P600) taken to reflect second-pass processes including re-analysis and repair. Normal participants showed the expected N400 component for semantically incorrect sentences and an early anterior negativity followed by a P600 for syntactically incorrect sentences. Patients with left frontal cortical lesions displayed an attenuated N400 component in the semantic condition. In the syntactic condition only a late positivity was observed. Patients with lesions of the basal ganglia, in contrast, showed an N400 to semantic violations and an early anterior negativity as well as a P600 to syntactic violations, comparable to normal controls. Under the assumption that the early anterior negativity reflects automatic first-pass parsing processes and the P600 component more controlled second-pass parsing processes, the present results suggest that the left frontal cortex might support early parsing processes, and that specific regions of the basal ganglia, in contrast, may not be crucial for early parsing processes during sentence comprehension.  (+info)

Improving outcomes for persons with aphasia in advanced community-based treatment programs. (7/519)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Studies have yet to document that community-based aphasia treatment programs routinely produce results comparable or superior to published research protocols. We explore this issue here in an outcome study of individuals with aphasia enrolled in 2 community-based, comparably managed and equipped therapy programs, which use a specially designed computer-based tool that is employed therapeutically in adherence to an extensive, detailed, and formally trained patient care algorithm. METHODS: Patients (n=60) were assessed before and after treatment with standardized instruments at both the impairment and the disability levels. Pretreatment and posttreatment means were calculated and compared, with statistical significance of differences established with the use of 1-tailed matched t tests. One-way ANOVAs were used to analyze the comparability of patient performance changes among various subgroups, eg, patients in acute versus chronic stages of aphasia, patients by aphasia diagnostic type at start of care, patients by severity level at start of care, and patients by treatment location. RESULTS: Analysis shows that patients spanned a wide range of aphasia diagnostic types, impairment severity levels at start of care, and times after onset. Patients' mean performance scores improved significantly in response to treatment in all measures assessed at both the impairment level and the functional communication level. Mean overall improvements ranged from 6.6% to 19.8%, with statistical significance ranging from P=0.0006 to P<0.0001. ANOVAs revealed no significant differences between improvements in patients in the acute versus chronic stages of aphasia, between those at different impairment severity levels at start of care, between those treated at different locations, or, at the functional level, between those with different diagnostic types of aphasia at start of care. CONCLUSIONS: Measures of both language impairment and functional communication can be broadly, positively, and significantly influenced by therapy services that are delivered to persons with aphasia in these community-based programs. The significant improvements are shown to be available to individuals with chronic as well as acute aphasia and independent of diagnostic type of aphasia, impairment severity at start of care, or geographic program location.  (+info)

Poststroke depression correlates with cognitive impairment and neurological deficits. (8/519)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The prevalence of poststroke depression is known to be high, but the knowledge of its neuropsychological correlates is limited. This 12-month prospective study was designed to evaluate the natural history of poststroke depression and to study its neuropsychological, clinical, and functional associates. METHODS: We studied a series of 106 consecutive patients (46 women and 60 men, mean age 65.8 years) with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. The patients underwent a neurological, psychiatric, and neuropsychological examination at 3 and 12 months after the stroke. The psychiatric diagnosis of depression was based on DSM-III-R-criteria. RESULTS: Depression was diagnosed in 53% of the patients at 3 months and in 42% of the patients at 12 months after the stroke. The prevalence of major depression was 9% at 3 months and 16% at 12 months. There was an association between poststroke depression and cognitive impairment; the domains most likely to be defective in stroke-related depression were memory (P=0.022), nonverbal problem solving (P=0.039), and attention and psychomotor speed (P=0.020). The presence of dysphasia increased the risk of major depression. The depressive patients were more dependent in ADL and had more severe impairment and handicap than the nondepressive patients. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the patients suffer from depression after stroke, and the frequency of major depression seems to increase during the first year. In addition to dysphasia, poststroke depression is correlated with other cognitive deficits. We emphasize the importance of psychiatric evaluation of stroke patients.  (+info)

The Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE) provides a comprehensive exploration of a range of communicative abilities. The results of the BDAE are used to classify patients language profiles into one of the localization based classifications of aphasia: Brocas, Wernickes, anomic, conduction, transcortical, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, and global aphasia syndromes, although the test does not always provide a diagnosis or a therapeutic approach. The assessment does provide you with a severity rating.[3] The Examination is designed to go beyond simple functional definitions of aphasia into the components of language dysfunctions (symptoms) that have been shown to underlie the various aphasic syndromes. Thus, this test evaluates various perceptual modalities (e.g., auditory, visual, and gestural), processing functions (e.g., comprehension, analysis, problem-solving), and response modalities (e.g., writing, articulation, and manipulation). This approach allows for the ...
Enabling fluent speech in non-fluent aphasia is a TedX talk about a treatment for non-fluent aphasia. This is one of the treatments that we use at SpeechWorks Inc.. An Aphasiologist Has a Stroke is another extremely interesting TedX talk.. Association International Aphasie: learn about Aphasia in many languages, including French.. National Aphasia Association (U.S.A.): information about Aphasia for people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals. The NAA has an Aphasia Quiz, a good tool for educating people about aphasia.. Aphasia Institute (Canada): information about aphasia from a community-based centre. Aphasia Corner: aphasia simulations - helping family and friends, and people working with people with aphasia, to understand how aphasia feels; Aphasia Corner also has a community-written blog. Aphasia Recovery Connection: online support group connecting people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals - their FaceBook page quickly addresses questions about aphasia from lots of ...
Aphasia Registry - Opportunities to take part in Aphasia research.. Aphasia & Stroke Caregivers Guide - A range of US articles on Aphasia related topics.. Atrial Fibrillation Association (Australia) - Provides information, support and access to established, new or innovative treatments for Atrial Fibrillation. Australian Aphasia Association - Their official website.. Australian Aphasia Guide - 2011 Version available through the National Library of Australia. Books on Aphasia - Books available on line for purchase at The Book Depository (Free Shipping).. Build Your Own Aphasia Talk: Increasing Community Awareness of Aphasia - This resource was developed by Latrobe University in conjunction with the Australian Aphasia Association, it aims to address the poor community awareness of the condition aphasia.. Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE) in Aphasia Rehabilitation - A new Australia-wide research program on Aphasia.. Communication Problems Following a Stroke - Fact Sheet from Speech ...
Background: Individuals with aphasia are often excluded from studies exploring post-stroke cognition because so many of the standard cognitive assessments rely on language ability. Our primary objective was to examine the association between performance on cognitive tests and performance on comprehension and naming tests in post-stroke aphasia. Second, we aimed to determine the association between language performance and a real-life measure of cognition (Kettle Test). Third, we explored the feasibility of administering cognitive tests in aphasia.Methods: Thirty-six participants with post-stroke aphasia and 32 controls were assessed on a battery of pen-and-paper cognitive tests recommended in stroke. Auditory comprehension was measured using the Comprehensive Aphasia Test and naming was measured using the Boston Naming Test. Twenty-two community dwelling participants with aphasia and controls were also asked to complete the Kettle Test. Multiple linear regressions were used to explore the relationship
Aphasia after stroke is associated with high mortality, significant motor impairment, and severe limitations in social participation. During the past decade, therapies administered by stroke teams have made great strides to limit the motor impairments caused by stroke. Unfortunately, progress in aphasia rehabilitation has not experienced the same rapid advancement. This proposal is based on preliminary evidence from our recently completed pilot study which showed that navigated excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nerTMS) targeted to residual activity in the affected hemisphere has a significant beneficial effect on post-stroke aphasia recovery.1 The main aim of this study is to conduct a double-blind, sham-controlled, dose-response nerTMS treatment trial in subjects with chronic aphasia. By conducting this comparative trial, we will provide clinical (qualitative and quantitative) and imaging evidence that nerTMS improves language function after stroke when compared to ...
This chapter reviews the broad literature on approaches to treatment of aphasia. Behavioral interventions for aphasia are influenced by perspectives from neuroscience that emphasize that neuroplasticity in rehabilitation is experience-dependent and potent. Several principles of neuroplasticity are reviewed, and examples are described from the aphasia treatment literature. Additional principles are considered regarding influences of error production and feedback in aphasia rehabilitation outcomes. Adjuvant treatments then are described that are meant to enhance behavioral treatment outcomes through pharmacologic and neuromodulatory interventions. Finally, life participation approaches are highlighted that encourage use of multi-modality communication for daily life activities along with training of communication partners. An interdisciplinary process is emphasized in which many professionals work together to provide individuals with aphasia the maximum benefits in language recovery, communication skills,
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Background: We previously developed the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39) and tested it with people with chronic aphasia. A scale allowing comparisons of quality of life between people with versus without aphasia post-stroke would be of value to clinicians.. Objectives: To evaluate the psychometrics of the SAQOL-39 in a generic stroke sample. Should this process result in a generic-stroke version of the scale (SAQOL-39g), a further aim is to compare the latter and the SAQOL-39 as tested in chronic aphasia.. Design and subjects: Repeated measures psychometric study, evaluating internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness to change. People admitted to hospital with a first stroke were assessed two weeks, three months and six months post stroke.. Measures: SAQOL-39, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel, Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, General Health Questionnaire-12 and Frenchay Activities Index.. Results: Of 126 eligible ...
A recent newsletter from The Aphasia Center contemplated the "4 reasons that your doctor may tell you there is no hope" for your aphasia recovery. Dr Lori Bartels-Tobin, the CEO at The Aphasia Center , an intensive aphasia program located in St Petersburg, discussed why doctors may say that: 1/ Your doctor forms an opinion about you and your recovery potential during a very short visit.. 2/ Your doctors and other medical professionals may have a different view of progress and quality of life.. 3/ Medical professionals are not necessarily up on the latest aphasia research.. 4/ Some medical professionals still believe that aphasia recovery is limited.. I have first-hand experience for comment # 4. When I had my stroke in October 2010, my neurologist and speech language pathologist told me and my family that I should not expect to get any better. They both restated the comment that aphasia recovery is limited, that if youre not better with the first 6 to 9 months, then there is no hope for ...
Speech Therapy Aphasia Rehabilitation Workbook (STAR), Amanda Anderson. A perfect workbook full of exercises created for clients with aphasia to make stronger expressive language. These can be utilized in therapy or in carryover activities by a caregiver at home. It includes straightforward and detailed instructions for somebody so that you can use the exercises with the client. The reproducible pages can be utilized to succeed in more than one goals for fumctional naming and descriptive language. Appropriate for clients with severe expressive aphasia in addition to more advanced exercises Includes 70 full color photographs of functional objects to extend naming ability and full color photographs of scenes to extend descriptive language skills. Sections also include: carrier phrases, rote naming, divergent naming, convergent naming, functional writing exercises, reading exercises, "wh" questions, melodic intonation exercises and conversation exercises. 150 pages, softcover ...
Aphasia is a serious acquired communication disability, that affects approximately 30% of stroke survivors.1 It is chronic in nature: 50% of people diagnosed with aphasia have persistent communication problems 1 year after stroke.2 Aphasia compromises an individuals ability to undertake many activities of daily living, resulting in reduced mood and quality of life.3,4 In addition to the personal cost of aphasia, health-care costs for people with aphasia are the highest in stroke care.5 Therefore, the recent identification of recovery from aphasia as one of the top ten research priorities related to life after stroke is unsurprising.. ...
The present study demonstrates that improvement of language performance in chronic aphasia after stroke can be achieved by intensive CI aphasia therapy in only a few days. After ∼32 hours of treatment given over 10 days, substantial improvement occurred in language performance on a standard test for aphasia and an increase of the patients verbal communication in everyday life. That significant language improvements were obtained over such a short period of time in patients with chronic aphasia (average, 8.3 years after onset) is noteworthy.. Most earlier studies found either no effect of aphasia therapy18 or significant effects if treatment began within 6 months after onset of the disease and was administered several hours a week for several months.19 20 21 22 23 24 It is generally agreed that a plateau in language function is reached within the first year after stroke.1 Scattered reports indicate that therapy can produce improvements in linguistic ability after the first year after stroke, ...
Background: Communication outcomes following stroke are improved when treatments for aphasia are administered early, within the first 3 months after stroke, and provided for more than 2 hours per week. However, uncertainty remains about the optimal type of aphasia therapy. Aims: We compared constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) with individual, impairment-based intervention, both administered early and daily after acute stroke. Methods & Procedures: This prospective, single-blinded, randomised, controlled trial recruited participants with mild to severe aphasia within 10 days of an acute stroke from acute/subacute Perth metropolitan hospitals (n = 20). Participants were allocated by computer-generated block randomisation method to either the CIAT (n = 12) or individual, impairment-based intervention group (n = 8) delivered at the same intensity (45-60 min, 5 days a week) for 20 sessions over 5 weeks (15-20 hours total). The primary outcome, measured after completing the intervention, was the Aphasia
The role of the right hemisphere in recovery of language function after left hemisphere stroke remains unclear. This prospective study aimed to determine the relationship between bilateral hemispheric changes and severity of aphasia in patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. Twenty-three patients with left hemisphere stroke with aphasia and 10 healthy control patients underwent high-resolution T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with aphasia were assessed using the Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery, and severity of aphasia was quantified in terms of aphasia quotient; patients were classified into two groups - the mild-to-moderate and severe groups - on the basis of severity of aphasia ...
Background: Performance stability is an implicit assumption within theoretical explanations of aphasia. The assumption being that when completing language processing tasks, performance will be stable from moment to moment and day to day. Theoretically, aphasia is most commonly viewed within a modular framework. that is, language processing is carried out by specific, specialised language processing modules. Aphasia is thought to result when one of these modules is dammed leading to a unique pattern of performance results. Implicit to this view of aphasia is stability, once damaged, the module will no longer be accessed and any process using the module will be impaired. This theory of aphasia is widely held within both research and clinical communities and underlies many of our approaches to the assessment and treatment of aphasia. However more recently researchers have been expressing doubts about the validity of assuming stability in aphasia performance. Instead variability in performance is ...
2011 (English)In: 3rd Nordic Aphasia Conference, 2011, Helsinki, Finland: Aphasia rehabilitation today and in the future, Helsinki, Finland, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) ...
Aphasia, commonly defined as impairment or loss of language functions, is a frequent and often chronic consequence of stroke, with detrimental effects on patient autonomy and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Although beneficial in some cases, the effectiveness of behavioral therapy is often limited, and therefore new complementary treatments must be developed in order to improve rehabilitation of post-stroke aphasia.. In most individuals, language areas in the brain are localized in the left hemisphere. After stroke, there is evidence that the brain reorganizes such that either areas close to damaged language areas in the Left Hemisphere, or anatomically similar areas in the Right Hemisphere, are recruited to perform language tasks.. Recently, studies have begun to examine the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on aphasia rehabilitation. One such technique is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which involves administering weak electrical currents through surface ...
Synonyms for amnesic aphasia in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for amnesic aphasia. 4 synonyms for amnesic aphasia: amnestic aphasia, anomia, anomic aphasia, nominal aphasia. What are synonyms for amnesic aphasia?
Comparative research on aphasia and aphasia rehabilitation is challenged by the lack of comparable assessment tools across different languages. In English, a large array of tools is available, while in most other languages, the selection is more limited. Importantly, assessment tools are often simple translations and do not take into consideration specific linguistic and psycholinguistic parameters of the target languages. As a first step in meeting the needs for comparable assessment tools, the Comprehensive Aphasia Test is currently being adapted into a number of languages spoken in Europe. In this article, some key challenges encountered in the adaptation process and the solutions to ensure that the resulting assessment tools are linguistically and culturally equivalent, are proposed. Specifically, we focus on challenges and solutions related to the use of imageability, frequency, word length, spelling-to-sound regularity and sentence length and complexity as underlying properties in the ...
Purpose: Treatment for aphasia, a communication disorder resulting from damage to speech and language areas of the brain, has often been guided by clinical intuition and pragmatism. This manuscript aimed to identify predictors of effective aphasia treatment that could better indicate a patients prognosis. Method: This retrospective study analyzed behavioral and neurophysiological data collected from 26 individuals with chronic aphasia who had undergone intensive semantic and phonological treatment for anomia, a naming impairment common among all aphasic patients. Using trained and untrained items as measures of correct naming improvement, the following analyses were performed: 1) a partial correlation examined whether participants who began the semantic treatment first improved to a greater degree than participants who began the phonological treatment first; 2) a simple linear regression tested whether the average number of paradigm completions (APC) predicted an individuals change in correct naming;
Aphasia usually results from lesions to the language-relevant areas of the temporal and parietal cortex of the brain, such as Brocas area, Wernickes area, and the neural pathways between them. These areas are almost always located in the left hemisphere, and in most people this is where the ability to produce and comprehendlanguage is found. However, in a very small number of people, language ability is found in the right hemisphere. In either case, damage to these language areas can be caused by a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other brain injury. Aphasia may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor or progressive neurological disease, e.g., Alzheimers or Parkinsons disease. It may also be caused by a sudden hemorrhagic event within the brain. Certain chronic neurological disorders, such as epilepsy or migraine, can also include transient aphasia as a prodromal or episodic symptom. Aphasia is also listed as a rare side effect of the fentanyl patch, an opioid used to control ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - An acoustic measure of lexical stress differentiates aphasia and aphasia plus apraxia of speech after stroke. AU - Vergis, Marianne K.. AU - Ballard, Kirrie J.. AU - Duffy, Joseph R.. AU - McNeil, Malcolm R.. AU - Scholl, Dominique. AU - Layfield, Claire. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Background: Apraxia of Speech (AOS) is partly characterised by impaired production of prosody in words and sentences. Identification of dysprosody is based on perceptual judgements of clinicians, with limited literature on potential quantitative objective measures.Aims: This study investigated whether an acoustic measure quantifying degree of lexical stress contrastiveness in three syllable words, produced in isolation and in a carrier sentence, differentiated individuals with AOS with/without aphasia (AOS), aphasia only (APH), and healthy controls (CTL).Methods & Procedures: Eight individuals with aphasia, nine with AOS plus aphasia and 8 age-matched control participants named pictures of strong-weak ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Tapping into neural resources of communication. T2 - Formulaic language in aphasia therapy. AU - Stahl, Benjamin. AU - Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana. PY - 2015. Y1 - 2015. KW - Aphasia. KW - Apraxia of speech. KW - Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy. KW - Formulaic language. KW - Intensive Language-Action Therapy. KW - Left-hemisphere stroke. KW - Melodic Intonation Therapy. KW - Post-stroke depression and anxiety. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947207116&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947207116&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01526. DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01526. M3 - Comment/debate. AN - SCOPUS:84947207116. VL - 6. JO - Frontiers in Psychology. JF - Frontiers in Psychology. SN - 1664-1078. IS - OCT. M1 - 1526. ER - ...
In a study designed to differentiate why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not, investigators have found that a compensatory reorganization of language function to right hemispheric brain regions bodes ...
... brings you the latest aphasia resources, tips and a-ha moments from Life Participation professionals who deliver way more than stroke and aphasia facts. Topics include: aphasia group treatment ideas, communication access strategies, plus ways for growing awareness and funds for your group aphasia therapy program. ​This podcast is produced by Aphasia Access.
TY - GEN. T1 - Diagnosis of aphasia using neural and fuzzy techniques. AU - Jantzen, Jan. AU - Axer, H.. AU - Keyserlingk, D. Graf von. PY - 2000. Y1 - 2000. N2 - The language disability Aphasia has several sub-diagnoses such as Amnestic, Broca, Global, and Wernicke. Data concerning 265 patients is available in the form of test scores and diagnoses, made by physicians according to the Aachen Aphasia Test. A neural network model has been built, which is available for consultation on the World Wide Web. The neural network model is in this paper compared with a fuzzy model. Rather than concluding which method provides the best approximation, the paper acts as an example solution useful for other benchmark studies.. AB - The language disability Aphasia has several sub-diagnoses such as Amnestic, Broca, Global, and Wernicke. Data concerning 265 patients is available in the form of test scores and diagnoses, made by physicians according to the Aachen Aphasia Test. A neural network model has been ...
There are many types of aphasia, which are usually diagnosed by which area of the language-dominant side of the brain is affected and the extent of the damage.. People with Brocas aphasia, for example, have damage to the front portion of the language-dominant side of the brain. They may eliminate the articles "and" and "the" from their language, and speak in short, but meaningful, sentences. They usually can understand some speech of others.. Those with Wernickes aphasia have damage to the side portion of the language-dominant part of the brain. They may speak in long confusing sentences, add unnecessary words, or create new words. They usually have difficulty understanding the speech of others.. Global aphasia is the result of damage to a large portion of the language-dominant side of the brain. People with global aphasia have difficulties with speaking or comprehending language.. ...
Speech therapy software for stroke, aphasia, apraxia, articulation, speech production and word retrieval - traumatic brain injury, reading comprehension.
Most people undergo speech and language therapy to rehabilitate their language skills and supplement their communication experiences.. At senior living rehabilitation communities such as ours, speech-language pathologists work with individuals to determine the particular variety of aphasia and the amount of function available. There is no medical cure for aphasia, but people can improve over time, particularly if speech therapy is provided. Aphasia can be helped even 10 years after the initial onset if the individuals are provided access to intensive treatment. New imaging studies reveal that with time, the brain can make new networks and heal.. Our communitys speech and language therapy for aphasia helps improve the persons ability to communicate by restoring as much language as possible, teaching how to make up for lost language skills and working with a variety of methods to communicate. We have access to vital resources, and our professionals work one-on-one with seniors with aphasia to ...
The severity and scope of the problems depend on the extent of damage and the area of the brain affected. Some people may comprehend what others speak relatively well but struggle to find words to speak. Other people may speak more clearly than they can write. Your doctor may refer to one of three broad categories of aphasia nonfluent, fluent and global that describes what region of the brain was damaged and how communication is usually affected. The two primary language networks for most people are located in the brains left hemisphere.. Nonfluent aphasia. Damage to the language network near the left frontal area of the brain usually results in Broca aphasia. Its also called nonfluent aphasia. People with this disorder struggle to get words out, speak in very short sentences and leave out words. A person might say, Want food or Walk park today. Although the sentences arent complete, a listener can usually decipher the meaning. A person with Broca aphasia may comprehend what other people ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Interaction-focussed therapy for aphasia. T2 - effects on communication and quality of life. AU - Barnes, Scott. AU - Nickels, Lyndsey. PY - 2018. Y1 - 2018. N2 - Purpose: This study examined the effects of an interaction-focussed therapy for aphasia, which involved both people with aphasia and their familiar conversation partners. It was hypothesised the interaction-focussed therapy would lead to positive changes in targeted conversation behaviours, and improved quality of life for participants with aphasia. Method: Three people with chronic aphasia and three of their familiar conversation partners completed an 8-week interaction-focussed therapy programme. A series of single case multiple-baseline ABA experiments were conducted. Outcome measures focussed on changes in targeted behaviours between pre- and post-therapy conversation samples, and changes in quality of life. Result: All participant dyads improved their conversations. Familiar conversation partners demonstrated ...
... : The disorder that makes you lose your words - Susan Wortman-Jutt, Fluent Aphasia (Wernickes Aphasia), Pinegrove- Aphasia (Acoustic), Expressive Aphasia - Sarah Scott - Teenage Stroke Survivor, Pinegrove - Aphasia (Official Audio)
Recovery of language function after aphasic stroke is the product of activity in domain-general and domain-specific distributed brain networks. These may include left and right fronto-temporo-parietal, cingulo-opercular, and default mode networks.. This functional MRI study investigated the effects of a previous left hemisphere stroke on brain activity during speech production in fifty-three patients. The results were related to twenty-four healthy participants. The analyses investigated not only local activity, but also functional connectivity both within and between distributed networks.. Although activity within individual networks was not predictive of speech production, the relative activity between networks was a predictor of both within-scanner and out-of-scanner performance, over and above that predicted from lesion volume and various demographic factors. The specific imaging predictors were the differential activity between the default mode network and both the left and right ...
Aphasia primarily affects the individuals ability to speak. Also, this condition can affect the patients understanding of language. Aphasia affects over 1 million people across the world. The level of severity and impairment varies. However, one must understand that this condition does not make an affected individual less intelligent. No cure has yet been discovered, although speech therapy can help. Speech-language therapists help the patient to relearn language skills. Also, they offer advice for improving communication. Read on to know how to identify aphasia.. Aphasia - Points to Identify. ...
Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage to the area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension often the result of a stroke. If you have been diagnosed with aphasia, we invite you to join our weekly Aphasia Conversation Group. Here people with Aphasia and their caregivers can find a place to share thoughts, frustrations and successes with others facing similar challenges. These interactions also offer you the chance to gain the confidence and support necessary to move forward with recovery.. Aphasia Support Group Flyer. ...
Village residents Bill and Barbara Grundy will be the hosts of a "Bach and Brunch" fundraiser Sunday for the Adler Aphasia Center.. Bill Grundy, a former Ridgewood High School football coach and gym teacher in Demarest, suffered a stroke at age 50 that caused him to develop aphasia. The communication disorder can impair the expression and understanding of spoken language, reading and writing.. The stroke and aphasia forced Grundy to end his career working with young people. Previously, he had also been Bergen Countys director of summer recreation.. The condition, which does not affect intellect, is nevertheless frustrating and isolating for sufferers and their friends and families.. At the Adler Aphasia Center in Maywood, Grundy received therapy and learned to use an iPad with personalized software to help him communicate. The center has a variety of programs that address the long-term needs of stroke and brain injury survivors and their families.. ...
Description of disease Aphasia, amnesic. Treatment Aphasia, amnesic. Symptoms and causes Aphasia, amnesic Prophylaxis Aphasia, amnesic
The Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp Committee is made up of members from UBC, Douglas College, March of Dimes and the community. The Committee is represented by both healthcare professionals and people with aphasia to ensure that the Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp meets the needs of those living with aphasia in the community.
Aphasia Toolbox revolutionized the treatment & recovery of aphasia, Dysphasia Speech, and Stroke Aphasia recovery; helping hundreds of people recover since 1976.
Aphasia & Dysphasia & Loss of Vision Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Transient Ischemic Attack. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
Todays theme at the Nordic Aphasia Conference is multilingualism (i.e. people speaking two or more languages). Treating people with aphasia who are multilingual is a real challenge!. The presenters, Mira Goral and Monica Norvik, raised some truly intriguing questions. How does the multilingual brain actually work? How do you know what to assess? If you need an interpreter during therapy, does the interpreter know enough about aphasia (and aphasia therapy) not to correct what the person is saying?. Since I am focused on issues of social media use, I found it particularly interesting that Monica said that social media may be used to get a picture of the persons pre-onset use of the different language. The videos we make and post online thus become a tool for therapy, long after they were created.. ...
This blog stands for faith in God and better stroke awareness. Everyone should be aware of stroke signs and know what to do. The life you save may be your own. Toward that end, stroke survivors and families are invited to share comments or stories. This is not designed to give anyone medical advice - we might talk about stroke care in general but always, always seek appropriate medical advice ...
Aphasia is an acquired disorder of language due to brain damage. Aphasia does not include (1) developmental disorders of language, often called dysphasia in the United States; (2) purely motor speech disorders, limited to articulation of speech via the oral-motor apparatus, referred to as stuttering, dysarthria, and apraxia of speech; or (3) ...
Background and Purpose-In a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, it was investigated whether piracetam improves language recovery in poststroke aphasia assessed by neuropsychological tests and activation PET measurement of cerebral blood flow.. Methods-Twenty-four stroke patients with aphasia were randomly allocated to 2 groups: 12 patients received 2400 mg piracetam twice daily, 12 placebo. Before and at the end of the 6-week treatment period in which both groups received intensive speech therapy, the patients were examined neuropsychologically and studied with H215O PET at rest and during activation with a word-repetition task. Blood flow was analyzed in 14 language-activated brain regions defined on reconstructed surface views from MRI coregistered to the PET images.. Results-Before treatment, both groups were comparable with respect to performance in language tasks and to type and severity of aphasia. In the piracetam group, increase of activation effect was significantly ...
Aphasia is an acquired language disorder subsequent to brain damage in the left hemisphere. It is characterized by diminished abilities to produce and understand both spoken and written language compared with the speakers presumed ability pre-cerebral damage. The type and severity of the aphasia depends not only on the location and extent of the cerebral damage but also the effect the lesion has on connecting areas of the brain. Type and severity of aphasia is diagnosed in comparison with assumed normal adult language. Language changes associated with normal aging are not classed as aphasia. The diagnosis and assessment of aphasia in children, which is unusual, takes account of age norms.. The most common cause of aphasia is a cerebral vascular accident (CVA) commonly referred to as a stroke, but brain damage following traumatic head injury such as road accidents or gunshot wounds can also cause aphasia. Aphasia following such traumatic events is non-progressive in contrast to aphasia arising ...
Aphasia is a common and often devastating consequence of stroke, affecting approximately 1 million patients in the US, including 80,000 new patients annually. The course of recovery from aphasia is highly variable, and it is now understood that functional recovery after brain injury depends largely on the adaptive plasticity of neural systems. Although it has been recognized that individual variability may account for differences in functional resilience after neurologic insult, no validated neurophysiologic indicators of neuroplasticity are currently being used clinically to predict cognitive recovery from aphasia or other cognitive deficits after brain injury. Evidence indicates that variability in response to the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may index differences in cortical plasticity, both within the motor system and in other domains. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is an effective TMS method for inducing persistent changes in motor physiology, and converging ...
I found this article very interesting. It discussed how certain people suffering from aphasia are able to sing songs that are familiar to them, and how music can help in aphasia recovery. There were three experiments performed. In experiment one, each subject was asked to complete the words to familiar songs which they identified as having heard before prior to the experiment, both with and without the melodies. In experiment two, each subject listened to twenty unfamiliar songs with randomly assigned syntactic phrases and the subjects were asked to repeat the phrases with and without the melodies. In the third experiment, each subject listened to a simple melody. The melody was the combined with 32 excerpts from the unfamiliar songs in experiment two, then the excerpts were asked to be sung and spoken. ...
Samsung Android smartphone app for language problems : Newly developed Samsung smartphone application tool helps people with Aphasia and other language disorders to chat online and express their emotions via emoji-based chat application. Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language. Samsung Italia earlier this month launched Samsung Wemogee, the first emoji-based chat application designed to enable people with aphasia and other language disorders to more effectively express their ideas and emotions with the people they love. Currently, there are more than three million people worldwide living with aphasia, a disorder that causes the loss of language capabilities ...
CREATED BY THE WITS APHASIA GROUP: DAWN, JOHN, GYS, MARGIT, MAURICE, MELANIE AND TUME WHAT IS APHASIA? Aphasia is caused by a stroke in the left hemisphere and can vary in its severity according to the severity of the stroke. There are many different types of aphasia. The following areas can be affected: understanding of…
Suffering from a stroke or caring for a loved one who has can be difficult in of itself. However, the recovery process can often be further complicated with the emergence of side effects as a result of brain injury caused by the stroke. Since the month of May is Stroke Awareness Month, I am setting a spotlight on one of the most frustrating of these possible side effects, aphasia. Aphasia is defined as the loss of ability to understand or express speech and often leads to difficulty speaking, understanding when others are speaking to you, writing, and sometimes reading, as well. Although aphasia is related to other sorts of brain injury or damage, stroke is still the leading cause.. Having a family member with aphasia has taught me a great deal about patience and effective communication and I honestly believe that it has given me the greatest lesson in how to actually listen to someone when they talk. Given that we often take our speech and the speech of others for granted, we are often at a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Broca aphasia with neologisms. AU - Iizuka, Osamu. AU - Suzuki, Kyoko. AU - Fujii, Toshikatsu. AU - Endo, Yoshiko. AU - Mori, Etsuro. AU - Yamadori, Atsushi. PY - 2004/7/1. Y1 - 2004/7/1. N2 - Patients with jargon aphasia generally have fluent speech with poor comprehension. However, outstanding jargons may appear in non-fluent aphasics. We report a 69-year-old left-handed woman with non-fluent jargon aphasia due to lesions in the right frontoparietal area. Features of her speech included non-fluent meaningless sequences of syllables, i. e., phonetic jargon, which was obvious in all the tasks including spontaneous speech, repetition, naming and reading. Her utterance was sparse, but not effortful or anarthric. She understood most of spoken single words, but was confused by complex sentences. Brain CTs revealed acute lesions affecting the inferior and middle frontal gyri, insular cortex, precentral and postcentral gyri, and a part of the angular gyrus in the right hemisphere. Old ...
Looking for graphic aphasia? Find out information about graphic aphasia. Loss of the ability to write. a speech disorder marked by the loss of the ability to write.Agraphia is observed, as a rule, in cases in which the occipital... Explanation of graphic aphasia
A blog written by someone who is inspired daily by people with aphasia, who provides treatment for people with aphasia, who conducts research with people with aphasia and their close friends and family members, and who is constantly learning ...
Communication Strategies: Some Dos and Donts. The impact of aphasia on relationships may be profound, or only slight. No two people with aphasia are alike with respect to severity, former speech and language skills, or personality.
These monthly sessions offer effective rehabilitation for stroke survivors with aphasia. In this innovative program, customers participate in treatment sessions for three and a half hours a day, five days a week. After four weeks of therapy, participants achieve an average of 13% gain (as measured by the Western Aphasia Battery) and are able to achieve similar results with repeated participation.. Session times:. ...
Eventbrite - Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation presents Aphasia CRE Seminar Series 2020 Registration - Wednesday, 29 January 2020 - Find event and ticket information.
We are conducting a study involving people with aphasia caused by TBI (traumatic brain injury) or CVA (cerebral vascular accident). We are interested in understanding, in particular, how different types of sentences are processed by people with different lesions and aphasia types. This study will help us gain insights into the building blocks of sentence structure and meaning, as well as the patterns of language disfunction in aphasia. This study is being conducted in our lab located at the Constance Lethbridge Rehabilitation Centre (CLRC), near Concordias Loyola campus ...
Research literature on participatory design in relation to people with communicative and cognitive disabilities often focuses on the challenges of communication among the participants. This paper presents a case study involving people suffering from communication disabilities after a brain injury (aphasia) early in a design process of an avatar-mediated virtual learning environment for rehabilitation. The example demonstrates how providing time and space and supporting the communication with well-suited tools and artefact opens for firth-hand domain knowledge of living with aphasia. The results demonstrate that participatory design methods might result in much more than just being a step in the design process. In this specific case, it turns out to be a tool to engage, involve, and empower people with communication disabilities to interact and communicate. The paper argues, that participatory design is a way for designers to gain insights into what people with aphasia really want and, ...
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the structure and measurement properties of the Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM), a patient-reported outcome measure of communicative functioning for persons with aphasia. Method: Three hundred twenty-nine participants with aphasia responded to 177 items asking about communicative functioning. The data were analyzed using a categorical item factor analysis approach. Validity of ACOM scores on the basis of their convergence with performance-based, clinician-reported, and surrogate-reported assessments of communication was also assessed. Results: Fifty-nine items that obtained adequate fit to a modified bifactor measurement model and functioned similarly across several demographic and clinical subgroupings were identified. The factor model estimates were transformed to item response theory graded response model parameters, and the resulting score estimates showed good precision and moderately strong convergence with other
There are many types of aphasia. Some individuals have difficulty speaking; whereas, others may struggle to follow a conversation. Cases may be mild, severe, or anywhere in between. Symptoms may differ greatly, but the bottom line is that all people with aphasia will have some difficulty communicating. The symptoms of aphasia may be temporary or permanent, depending upon the amount of brain damage a child experiences ...
List of words make out of Aphasias. Anagrams of word Aphasias. Words made after scrabbling Aphasias. Word Creation helps in Anagrams and Puzzles.
From our series Working Together To Help You Where You Live, this pictographic resource is designed to facilitate a conversational partnership between health care practitioners and people with aphasia. It is also ideal for people with limited English language skills. It is based on the techniques of Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia™ (SCA™), developed by the Aphasia Institute.. The Arthritis resource contains the following topics:. ...
Neuroscience of Rehabilitation lab director Dr. Jessica Richardson (University of South Carolina) (aka JDRichSLP) and colleage/collaborator Dr. Adam Jacks from University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill have been named co-chairs for the research committee for Triangle Aphasia Project - Unlimited. They will be, along with their graduate students, completing testing (initial and annual) for all TAP clients and offering clients opportunities to participate in further studies that will advance aphasia programming ...
Jon Urch, Chair of the selection panel: "The selection panel were extremely impressed by the impact that Rolfs work is having in the aphasia community in Scotland and the UK. The positive impact Rolf and his work has on the lives of aphasia sufferers, especially their increase in self-confidence shone through in his presentation.. "The panel also noted Rolfs passionate and creative leadership in his field, built on the strong relationships with members of the Aphasia iPad group. They were impressed with the reflection and growth demonstrated in the application and the future plans outlined within.". ...
The National Aphasia Association As you know, technology surrounds us and changes by the second. There are many people with aphasia, caregivers and professionals who now rely on communicating via the internet. Below is a listing of aphasia blogs, online support groups and therapy programs ...
Aphasia is challenging, isolating, and frustrating. Here you can find information to help you better understand aphasia, typical treatments, and assistive technology options. You are not alone: over one million people in the U.S. have aphasia.
The Australian Aphasia Association is a member of the Association Internationale Aphasie. This allows for us to be part of an international collaboration on Aphasia!. National aphasia association representatives from around the world convene at a General Assembly to make this collaboration happen.. The next General Assembly will be held in September 2019 in Geneva, Switzerland.. Visit the Association Internationale Aphasie site here.. ...
Aphasia is an acquired disorder of language due to brain damage. Aphasia does not include (1) developmental disorders of language, often called dysphasia in the United States; (2) purely motor speech disorders, limited to articulation of speech via the oral-motor apparatus, referred to as stuttering, dysarthria, and apraxia of speech; or (3) ...
List of 43 causes for Dysphasia and Impaired thinking, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Three studies of deficits in pantomimic expression and pantomimic recognition in aphasia. AU - Duffy, R. J.. AU - Duffy, J. R.. PY - 1981. Y1 - 1981. N2 - Studies were conducted to investigate aphasic deficits in pantomimic behaviors. Three groups of subjects were used: 47 aphasics; 27 right-hemisphere-damaged; and 11 controls. Study I replicates a previous study of pantomimic recognition deficits (Duffy, Duffy, & Pearson, 1975) and essentially duplicates the previous findings of significant deficits of pantomimic recognition in aphasic subjects that are highly correlated with their verbal deficits. Study II examines the relationship between deficits in pantomimic recognition and expression; and the relationships between these two nonverbal behaviors and aphasic verbal deficits. Zero order correlations, partial correlations, and multiple regression analyses are presented. The results show that aphasics exhibit significant deficits in both pantomimic expression and recognition; ...
Approximately half a million individuals suffer strokes in the US each year, and about one in five develops some form of post-stroke aphasia, the partial or total loss of the ability to communicate. By comparing different types of aphasia, investigators have been able to gain new insights into the normal cognitive processes underlying language, as well as the potential response to interventions. Their findings are published alongside papers on hemispatial neglect and related disorders in the January, 2013 issue of Behavioural Neurology.. The January issue of Behavioural Neurology, edited by the journals co-Editor in Chief, Argye E. Hillis, MD, of the Departments of Neurology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, features papers on two topics that have traditionally captured the interest of behavioral neurologists - aphasia and hemispatial neglect.. The first section on aphasia includes a number of papers that ...
Multiple Baseline Language Evaluations (x3) are performed at Entry (Boston Naming Test, BNT; and Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Exam, BDAE). Naming ability for Snodgrass & Vanderwart (S&V, 1980) pictures is also tested at Baseline. Patients are randomly assigned to receive a series of either Sham rTMS followed by a series of Real rTMS; OR they receive only the series of Real rTMS. There are two rTMS Phases: During Phase 1, the single, best RH cortical ROI to suppress with rTMS to improve picture naming, is determined for each patient. Real rTMS (1 Hz, 90% motor threshold) is applied for 10 minutes, in separate rTMS sessions, to each of 4 different RH cortical ROIs (R ant. BA 45; R post. BA 45; R BA 44 and R M1, mouth). S&V Picture Naming is tested immediately before and after each ROI has been suppressed with rTMS. The single RH ROI which is associated with at least a 2 SD improvement (above Baseline S&V Naming), immediately following 10 minutes of rTMS to suppress that cortical area, is considered ...
If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patients written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms] ...
Language processing is dynamic and requires the participation of both cerebral hemispheres. The left hemisphere (LH) is considered to be the language dominant hemisphere, however, the right hemisphere (RH) is also accepted to play an important role in language processing. The RH has been linked with processing of discourse, comprehension of inferences, ambiguity and metaphoric language, and underlying much of this, is its role in lexical-semantic processing [see for a review of RH language processing [1]]. According to dynamic models of cognitive functioning bilateral lexical-semantic processing will involve both interhemispheric activation and inhibition [2]. The language dominant LH is suggested to inhibit aspects of RH participation in order to maximize the efficiency of word level processing and meaning selection [2-4]. Interhemispheric inhibition has been suggested to limit the RHs ability to perform to its maximum semantic processing capacity under normal processing conditions, and to ...
This book has something to help every client with aphasia. Forty-one activities are presented, each with a goal, instructions, and compensatory strategies to help you individualize your treatment.
Just like a wheelchair ramp helps people with physical challenges access their home life, healthcare, businesses, and community in general, "communication ramps" are necessary for people trying to navigate daily life with aphasia. Every environment can become communication accessible. Communication barriers can be torn down in every setting. By learning about aphasia and communication strategies, common sense adaptations increase communication access.. Located in Midland, TX, members and families at the Aphasia Center of West Texas experience the positive impact of a communication-accessible environment. Individuals, family and friends are empowered when they discover aphasia-friendly strategies and the life-changing impact of a Life Participation Approach to aphasia treatment. All of these factors combined help people re-engage in lifes interactions and activities. Thats what the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia is all about ...
Four aspects of auditory comprehension were compared in 44 normal children ages 4 to 9, in 12 normal adults, and in 52 aphasics of 5 diagnostic classes: Brocas, Wernickes, conduction, anomic, and global aphasics. The 4 aspects studied were breadth of vocabulary, auditory sequential pointing-span, comprehension of directional prepositions, and recognition of correct grammatical usage of prepositions. The aphasics patterns of success were all different from those of the children, and the diagnostic subgroups could be distinguished from each other by a discriminant analysis. The mean pointing-span of the best aphasic group (anomics) was below the level of 6-year-olds. Brocas aphasics had by far the poorest score. It is concluded that auditory comprehension is multidimensional, and that its pattern of disturbance is characteristic for different aphasic subgroups.. ...
BACKGROUND:Recovery from post-stroke aphasia is a long and complex process with an uncertain outcome. Various interventions have been proposed to augment the recovery, including constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT). CIAT has been applied to pati...
Recovery of language in stroke-induced aphasia is little understood, with extant theories suggesting that ipsilesional and/or contralesional tissue may be recruited into the language network. However, several cognitive and neural factors contribute to recovery patterns, including language deficit, lesion volume/location, and neurophysiological variables. In this talk I will present first-phase findings derived from the Center for the Neurobiology of Language Recovery, a multisite NIH funded project focused on recovery of anomia (Boston University, Harvard MGH), dysgraphia (Johns Hopkins University) and sentence processing (Northwestern University), respectively. Results of cross-site projects will be presented, including BOLD signal patterns and activation reliability, perfusion patterns, and right-hemisphere density found in over 50 chronic stroke aphasic participants. The neurobiology of recovered sentence processing also will be discussed, emphasizing the effects of treatment versus natural ...
Aphasia is a language disorder that affects the ability to communicate. Its most often caused by strokes that occur in areas of the brain that control speech and language. Brain injuries resulting in aphasia may also arise from head trauma, brain tumors, or infections. Aphasia does not affect intelligence. Stroke survivors remain mentally alert, even though their speech…
... : Aphasia refers to the loss or impairment of previously acquired abilities in language comprehension or production that cannot be explained by sensory or motor defects or by diffuse brain dysfunction
Emily Myers, assistant professor of speech, language and hearing sciences at UConn, was recently featured in an article in UConn Today regarding her recent aphasia research in collaboration with Carl Coelho and Jennifer Mozeiko. By using UConns powerful new fMRI scanning software, Myers has been able to identify the specific neural regions in the brain that are impacted by aphasia. This new information can help shape therapies for people with language disorders.. Click here to read more.. ...
The overall goal of this project is to identify the neural correlates of recovery from aphasia during the first three months after acute stroke. Aphasia is one...
Oculomotor aphasia symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Oculomotor aphasia (Apraxia) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
This reader traces the history of aphasia, the partial or total loss of speech through brain damage. It includes studies of aphasia by figures such as Franz Gall, Carl Wernicke, Sigmund Freud, Arnold Pick, Kurt Goldstein and Norman Geschwind.
One of the biggest challenges for people affected by aphasia is that many people dont know enough about it or how they can help. Better aphasia awareness and knowing the right communication tools can make all the difference. Find out more.
Aphasia centers are designed to enhance quality of life by creating a community of people who are all living with aphasia. Typically, they offer conversation
As we reflect on the past ten years, we are energized by the possibilities of the next ten! To honor Mike and Kathys vision of serving people with aphasia, Voices of Hope for Aphasia ran a campaign to raise money to offer our programs to more people. The campaign culminated with a private, benefit event and performance of "Dixie Swim Club" at Early Bird Dinner Theatre. Thank you for helping us reach our goal of $50,000 which will cover the costs of opening another location in South Tampa! ...
associative aphasia definition: aphasia where the lesion is presumed to be in the organization tracts linking the different language facilities when you look at the brain; persons have difficulty repeating…
Factors related to prognosis of acquired aphasia in children.: In a follow up study of 15 children with acquired aphasia, it was found that the persistent prese
... is a form of aphasia in which the subject has difficulty remembering or recognizing names which the subject should know well.
In light of COVID-19 we ask that you please support our 17th Annual Fundraiser in lieu of our Annual Gala this year! Despite the separation we have experienced in 2020, the Adler Aphasia Center continues to be a lifeline for people with aphasia. Within days of suspending in-person programming across. Read More. ...
But while Trump didnt offer specific diagnoses, his campaign did. At one point national spokeswoman Katrina Pierson said Clinton was suffering from a condition called dysphasia.. "Whats new are the other reports of the observations of Hillary Clintons behavior and mannerisms, specifically with what you just showed in those previous clips, as well as her dysphasia, the fact that shes fallen, she has had a concussion," Pierson told MSNBC.. Dysphasia is a language disorder defined as the "loss of or deficiency in the power to use or understand language as a result of injury to or disease of the brain." So the parallels to Trumps situation couldnt be more direct. The White House says that merely raising questions about Trumps health isnt okay even though Trumps campaign offered specific diagnoses and insinuations about similar episodes for Clinton.. Thats not to say anybody should be speculating too much about Trumps health. Building theories based upon a small fraction of Trumps public ...
Understanding language is significant to social reciprocity within family, peer groups, professional settings, and everyday society. When an individual is diagnosed with aphasia, specifically Wer
Your gift of Ability impacts everything that we do every day at Shirley Ryan AbilityLab. From high-quality clinical care and groundbreaking research to community programs that improve quality of life, philanthropic support drives our mission.. ...
Aphasia Online is a blog about my PhD project at Halmstad University. The project is about online identity and post-stroke aphasia. I will be posting in Swedish and English. Please contact me with your input or questions! /Helena ...
Understanding the emotional content in the words of others and reacting inan adequate way are basic human competences. This article deals with someof the multiple facets of language comprehension and inferences on protagonists’emotions depending on mood and neuropsychological factors. The firstsection asks how moods color our understanding of other people’s emotionexpressions, thereby influencing communicative behavior. The second sectiondiscusses neuropsychological foundations of emotion perception. Lesions ineach hemisphere influence this competence in different aspects. Results fromreading tasks will present the specific problems of mild aphasia vs. right hemisphericlesions showing different error patterns to infer the emotional contentfrom small texts. Consequences for patients’ communication strategies andemotive alignment are discussed.
Aphasia, which is the loss of the ability to understand, process, or express language. Non-fluent or expressive aphasia is the loss of the ability to express thoughts in speech or writing. Fluent or receptive aphasia is the loss of the ability to understand spoken or written speech. The most common causes of aphasia are stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) ...
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia ...
A 48 year old right handed man developed sudden difficulty speaking while at work. His past medical history was significant for hypertension, but he took no medication. On initial exam, he was afebrile, BP 168/106 with regular heart rate of 100. He was alert, attentive and fully oriented. Examination of language was significant for sparse, telegraphic spontaneous speech with intact repetition. He had intact comprehension for simple commands, but some difficulty with complex grammatical phrases. He had a right facial paresis consistent with an upper motor neuron pattern. He had no pronation drift and full power. Sensory examination was intact to primary and cortical modalities. He had no dysmetria and a normal gait. Muscle stretch reflexes were 2+ and symmetric. His right plantar reflex was extensor. Admission labs and chest x-ray were normal. Cardiogram showed a sinus rhythm, rate 100, with diffuse non-specific T wave abnormalities. The patient was thought to have a transcortical motor aphasia ...
Broca's aphasia[edit]. Broca's aphasia is a specific type of expressive aphasia and is so named due to the aphasia that results ... Wernicke's aphasia[edit]. Wernicke's aphasia is the result of damage to the area of the brain that is commonly in the left ... Thus, the aphasia that develops from the lack of functioning of the Broca's area is an expressive and non-fluent aphasia. It is ... His research involved the male patient nicknamed "Tan", who suffered a speech deficit (aphasia); "tan" was one of the few words ...
Anomic aphasia[edit]. Anomic aphasia is the inability to recall words and names and is a common symptom of patients with ... and conduction aphasia) were instructed to name famous people. Those with anomic aphasia showed to be superior to the other ... This disorder is called anomic aphasia when acquired by brain damage, usually from a head injury, stroke, or dementia.[11] ... An examination of tip-of-the-tongue phenomena in aphasia and Alzheimer's disease'" (PDF). Aphasiology. 11 (4): 323-336. doi: ...
Kussmaul's aphasia - selective mutism. First to describe dyslexia in 1877. (He called it 'word blindness'.) First to describe ...
Aphasia Centre, official website; "Stouffville's Aphasia Centre has Plenty to Celebrate", Stouffville Sun-Tribune, Oct. 17, ... The York-Durham Aphasia Centre is located in Stouffville's Parkview Village, and is a program of March of Dimes Canada.[94] ...
Aphasias. *Acute Aphasias *Expressive aphasia. *Receptive aphasia. *Conduction aphasia. *Anomic aphasia. *Global aphasia ...
a b Hillis, A.E., & Caramazza, A. (2005). "Aphasia". In L. Nadel, Encyclopedia of cognitive science. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. ... Diseases and disorders of the brain, including alogia, aphasias, dysarthria, dystonia and speech processing disorders, where ... In expressive aphasia, speech comprehension is generally less affected except in the comprehension of grammatically complex ... This deficit, known as Broca's or expressive aphasia, is characterized by difficulty in speech production where speech is slow ...
Aphasias. *Acute aphasias *Expressive aphasia. *Receptive aphasia. *Conduction aphasia. *Anomic aphasia. *Global aphasia ...
Cherney LR (2004). "Aphasia, alexia, and oral reading". Top Stroke Rehabil. 11 (1): 22-36. doi:10.1310/VUPX-WDX7-J1EU-00TB. ...
Tzeng, Ovid J. L.; Chen, Sylvia; Hung, Daisy L. (1991). "The classifier problem in Chinese aphasia". Brain and Language. 41 (2 ...
While cases of zolpidem improving aphasia in people with stroke have been described, use for this purpose has unclear benefit.[ ... de Boissezon X, Peran P, de Boysson C, Démonet JF (July 2007). "Pharmacotherapy of aphasia: myth or reality?". Brain and ...
Damage to the dominant hemisphere (usually the left hemisphere) results in aphasia i.e. Broca's area or Wernicke's ...
"In La Pointe, Leonard L. (ed.). Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Language Disorders. New York. pp. 199-212. ISBN 9781588902269. . ...
Progressive expressive aphasiaEdit. Progressive expressive aphasia is the deterioration of normal language function that causes ... "Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia". Annals of Neurology. 55 (3): 335-46. doi:10.1002/ana. ... "Progressive non-fluent aphasia is associated with hypometabolism centred on the left anterior insula". Brain. 126 (Pt 11): ...
... www.aphasia.org/aphasia-resources/aphasia-statistics/ *^ "Aphasia Fact sheet - National Aphasia Association". National Aphasia ... Transcortical aphasias include transcortical motor aphasia, transcortical sensory aphasia, and mixed transcortical aphasia. ... Aphasia is from Greek a- ("without") + phásis (φάσις, "speech"). The word aphasia comes from the word ἀφασία aphasia, in ... the nonfluent aphasias (which encompasses Broca's aphasia and transcortical motor aphasia) and the fluent aphasias (which ...
F80.3) Acquired aphasia with epilepsy (Landau-Kleffner). *(F80.8) Other developmental disorders of speech and language *Lisping ...
An association between vasectomy and primary progressive aphasia, a rare variety of frontotemporal dementia, was reported.[24] ... "Are there susceptibility factors for primary progressive aphasia?". Brain Lang. 127 (2): 135-8. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2013.02. ...
"Wernicke-Lichtheim Model of Aphasia", SpringerReference, Springer-Verlag. *^ Kean ML (October 2003). "Syntactic deficits in ... The symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia are caused by damage to the posterior section of the superior temporal gyrus.[12][13] ... Broca's aphasia is indicative of damage to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus of the brain.[14] ... Wernicke's aphasia is associated with anomia, unknowingly making up words (neologisms), and problems with comprehension. ...
One of Freud's earliest papers, On Aphasia (1891), was concerned with the speech disorder the neurological mechanisms of which ... Lanteri-Laura, G. (2005a). Aphasia. In A. de Mijolla (Ed.), International dictionary of psychoanalysis, vol. 1 (pp. 106-107). ... Freud, S. (1891). On aphasia. E. Stengel (Trans.). International Universities Press, 1953. Freud, S. (1894). The defense neuro- ...
Hinterbuchnes, L. [1974]. Aphasia. N Y Acad Med., 50[5]: 589-601. Karnath, H. [1997]. Spatial orientation and the ...
... errors associated with certain kinds of aphasia have been used to map certain components of speech onto the brain and ... In expressive aphasia, speech comprehension is generally less affected except in the comprehension of grammatically complex ... Reader in the History of Aphasia: From sasi(Franz Gall to). 4. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Pub Co. pp. 69-89. ISBN 90-272-1893-5 ... This deficit, known as Broca's or expressive aphasia, is characterized by difficulty in speech production where speech is slow ...
rehabilitation of aphasia and motor disability after stroke,[4][7][11][12][55] ... "Research with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Aphasia". Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports. 9 (6 ...
There is evidence from brain disorders such as aphasia that proper names and common names are processed differently by the ... Robsona, Jo; Marshalla, Jane; Pringa, Tim; Montagua, Ann; Chiatb, Shula (2004). "Processing proper nouns in aphasia: Evidence ...
Aphasia (language). *Dysgraphia (writing). *Dysarthria (speech). *Apraxia (patterns or sequences of movements) ...
Examples of these fluent aphasias include receptive or Wernicke's aphasia, anomic aphasia, conduction aphasia, and ... Neologistic paraphasia is often associated with receptive aphasia and jargon aphasia. Types of Neologistic paraphasias There ... Subjects of this aphasia are aware of their errors in speech. Damage to the Broca's area does not affect comprehension of ... Wernicke's aphasia is characterized by fluent language with made up or unnecessary words with little or no meaning to speech. ...
... receptive aphasia), for his discovery. Wernicke's aphasia: The eponymous term for receptive or sensory aphasia. It is the ... "Types of Aphasia". atlantaaphasia.org. Atlanta Aphasia Association. Heinrichs, R. Walter. In Search of Madness: Schizophrenia ... "Wernicke's aphasia". Who Named It. Truedsson, Mikael; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas (1 May 2002). "Wernicke's Encephalopathy ... This region is now referred to as Wernicke's area, and the associated syndrome is known as Wernicke's aphasia ( ...
Thus, unambiguous cases of Brocas aphasia, Wernickes aphasia, conduction aphasia, and anomic aphasia were selected. Ten ... evaluate adults suspected of having aphasia,. The Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination or BDAE is a neuropsychological battery ... "BDAE 3 Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination Third Edition". linguisystems. linguisystems. 2001.. *^ Chapey, Roberta (2008). ... "BDAE 3 Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination Third Edition". linguisystems. linguisystems. 2001.. Further reading[edit]. *. ...
Primary progressive aphasia. August 5, 2008. Mental disordersfrontotemporal dementia, neurological syndrome, Primary ... Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal dementia, a cluster of related disorders that all originate in the ... Primary progressive aphasia specifically targets the language center of the brain - located in the brains left hemisphere. ... Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurological syndrome that impairs language capabilities. People with primary progressive ...
It is proposed that language deviations (in oral as in written language) in conduction aphasia can be understood as a ... Characteristics of literal paraphasias in parietal-insular conduction aphasia are discussed, emphasizing that paraphasias in ... Similarities between errors in ideomotor apraxia and conduction aphasia language deficits are presented. ... conduction aphasia are articulatory-based (articulatory literal paraphasias) and due mainly to phoneme substitutions and ...
From a practical point of view, the identification of these features in patients with primary progressive aphasia should help ... From a practical point of view, the identification of these features in patients with primary progressive aphasia should help ... From a practical point of view, the identification of these features in patients with primary progressive aphasia should help ... From a practical point of view, the identification of these features in patients with primary progressive aphasia should help ...
Aphasia is a disorder caused by damage to the parts of the brain that control language. It can make it hard for you to read, ... Aphasia vs. Apraxia (American Stroke Association) * Lets Talk about Stroke and Aphasia (American Stroke Association) - PDF ... Aphasia (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Also in Spanish * Communication Breakdown: How Aphasia ... Global aphasia - you cant speak, understand speech, read, or write Some people recover from aphasia without treatment. Most, ...
Tags: aphasia, aphasia rehabilitation, therapy. Teens teaching technology program at BU_BU Today close up in Accomplishments, ... Tags: aphasia, aphasia rehabilitation, intervention, language, neuroplasticity, treatment. Sarah Villard published her recent ... Tags: aphasia, technology, teens. Our new paper in Bilingualism Language and Cognition- Language and Cognitive Control in ... Our new paper on #connectivity changes in language networks in aphasia in Accomplishments, Recent and relevant interesting work ...
... may help patients with fluent aphasias (such as Wernickes) (Love and Webb 2001). Pharmacotherapy and traditional aphasia ... Operant conditioning, a form of behavior modification was the first type of therapy used to remediate aphasia. This approach ... One of the best-known pragmatic therapies for aphasia is PACE, or therapy for promoting aphasics communicative effectiveness ... Schuell was the first to take a cognitive approach to aphasia therapy. She proposed that an extended period of intensive ...
aphasia aphasia rehabilitation bilingual aphasia bilingualism category learning computational modeling effective connectivity ... The Neurobiology of the Recovery of Aphasia. Categories. Categories. Select Category. Accomplishments. Announcements. Lab work ...
aphasia aphasia rehabilitation bilingual aphasia bilingualism category learning computational modeling effective connectivity ...
... a speech disorder known as Broca aphasia, which is characterized by deliberate, telegraphic speech with very simple grammatical ... Other articles where Broca aphasia is discussed: Broca area: … ... classification of aphasias. * In aphasia. …frontal lobe may ... People with Broca aphasia speak in short phrases that include only nouns and verbs (telegraphic speech). Individuals with ... damage to it results in Broca aphasia, a language disorder characterized by deliberate, telegraphic speech with very simple ...
Living with Aphasia (PDF opens in new window). *Communication Advice from Experts - Survivors with Aphasia (PDF opens in new ... Read more Aphasia articles:. *Talking Tech: How technology helps survivors with aphasia ... Therapy approaches for aphasia:. Restoring language ability. Understanding spoken language. Example: Word/picture matching. ... Excerpted from Aphasia v. Apraxia, Stroke Connection Magazine September/October 2003 (Last science update March 2013) ...
Aphasia does not include (1) developmental disorders of language, often called dysphasia in the United States; (2) purely motor ... Aphasia is an acquired disorder of language due to brain damage. ... encoded search term (Aphasia) and Aphasia What to Read Next on ... Memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy in chronic poststroke aphasia. Ann Neurol. 2009 May. 65 (5):577-85. [Medline] ... Alexander MP, Naeser MA, Palumbo C. Brocas area aphasias: aphasia after lesions including the frontal operculum. Neurology. ...
Milestones in the History of Aphasia surveys the history of aphasia from its earliest mentions in ancient times, to the turn of ... Psychotherapy and Aphasia. Interventions for Emotional Wellbeing and Relationships, 1st Edition. Edited by Kate H. Meredith, ... Agrammatic aphasia (agrammatism), resulting from brain damage to regions of the brain involved in language processing, affects ... Milestones in the History of Aphasia. Theories and Protagonists, 1st Edition. By Juergen Tesak, Chris Code ...
... of visual aphasia (or as they called it, verbal blindness) reported in 1892. The patient, after a stroke, lost his ability to ... Re: visual aphasia Interesting! Im one of the people who has mild face-blindness (the subject of the mistook his wife for a ... of visual aphasia (or as they called it, verbal blindness) reported in 1892. The patient, after a stroke, lost his ability to ... about Sackss patient who has visual aphasia: The Writer Who Couldnt Read : Krulwich Wonders? : NPR. Fascinating stuff. ...
Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Aphasia in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw includes 1000s of professional ... Wernickes Aphasia (Receptive aphasia). have damage to the temporal lobe of the brain. Individuals with Wernickes aphasia may ... Aphasia. Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language. ... Brocas Aphasia (Expressive Aphasia). have damage to the frontal lobe of the brain. These individuals frequently speak in short ...
Types of aphasia. Your doctor may refer to aphasia as nonfluent, fluent or global:. * Nonfluent aphasia. Damage to the language ... Global aphasia. Global aphasia results from extensive damage to the brains language networks. People with global aphasia have ... People with aphasia. If you have aphasia, the following tips may help you communicate with others:. *Carry a card explaining ... Fluent aphasia. People with this form of aphasia may speak easily and fluently in long, complex sentences that dont make sense ...
Descriptions of the sessions available at ASHA Professional Developments Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia online ... Psychosocial Impacts of Aphasia Tami Howe, PhD, CCC-SLP Aphasia can have negative impacts on an individuals post-stroke ... Neuroplasticity and Medical Management in Aphasia Peter Turkeltaub, MD, PhD Neuroplasticity is the basis of aphasia recovery, ... Medicare and Aphasia Treatment Models Tim Nanof, MSW This session will discuss key considerations for SLPs when providing ...
WebMD explains how aphasia affects speech, writing, and language comprehension. ... Global aphasia. This is the most severe type of aphasia. It is often seen right after someone has a stroke. With global aphasia ... Common types of aphasia include the following:. * Expressive aphasia (non-fluent): With expressive aphasia, the person knows ... They also help determine the severity of the aphasia.. How Is Aphasia Treated?. Treatment for someone with aphasia depends on ...
... the Aphasia Community Group became part of the Aphasia Resource Center at Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation ... Aphasia Research Laboratory at Boston University Sargent College.. *Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation ... The Center evolved from the Aphasia Community Group, founded in 1990 by speech-language pathologist Jerome Kaplan, together ...
Intense speech therapy shows potential in post-ischemic aphasia Patients who have post-stroke aphasia might achieve slightly ... Study shows why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not In a study designed to differentiate why some ... Patients with rare epilepsy aphasia share mutations on same gene Some patients with a rare type of epilepsy called epilepsy ... Stroke victims affected with loss of speech caused by Brocas aphasia have been shown to speak fluidly through the use of a ...
Aphasia does not include (1) developmental disorders of language, often called dysphasia in the United States; (2) purely motor ... Aphasia is an acquired disorder of language due to brain damage. ... encoded search term (Aphasia) and Aphasia What to Read Next on ... Classical aphasia syndromes (see Aphasia syndromes in History) include global, Broca, Wernicke, and conduction aphasia, as well ... Because aphasia is most often caused by stroke, neuroimaging is required to localize and diagnose the cause of aphasia. CT ...
... to promote research into the cure and prevention of aphasia; and (2) to provide survivors of aphasia and their caregivers ... AHF maintains an electronic bulletin board and a Web-based forum for posting questions to aphasia professionals and caregivers. ... The Aphasia Hope Foundation (AHF) is a nonprofit organization with a twofold mission: (1) ... Aphasia Hope Foundation (AHF). Founder/Executive Director: Judi Stradinger. Public Information Contact: Sandy Caudell, Program ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Aphasia , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Aphasia via the Trip Database. ... aphasia aphasia aphasia - General Practice Notebook This site ... aphasia (sensory transcortical) aphasia (sensory transcortical) aphasia (sensory transcortical) - General Practice Notebook ... Intensity of aphasia therapy, impact on recovery Intensity of aphasia therapy, impact on recovery Untitled Document The CRD ...
Our latest article on #connectivity #rehabilitation #aphasia is on Brain and Language. Posted 4 years ago on Monday, September ... Our latest article on #connectivity #rehabilitation #aphasia is on Brain and Language. Check out our latest paper #connectivity ... Read our recent paper, "Benchmarks of significant change after aphasia rehabilitation" September 25, 2018 ... rehabilitation #aphasia #graph theory in Brain and Language http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0093934X1500187X ...
Impressive aphasia definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it ... impressive aphasia im·pres·sive aphasia (ĭm-prěsĭv). n. See sensory aphasia. ...
  • Four patients with primary progressive aphasia displayed a greater deficit in understanding words they heard than words they read, and a further deficiency in naming objects orally rather than in writing. (northwestern.edu)
  • These features of language impairment are not characteristic of any currently recognized primary progressive aphasia variant. (northwestern.edu)
  • From a practical point of view, the identification of these features in patients with primary progressive aphasia should help in the design of therapeutic interventions where written communication modalities are promoted to circumvent some of the oral communication deficits. (northwestern.edu)
  • Many other tests are sometimes used by neurologists and speech language pathologists on a case-by-case basis, and other comprehensive tests exist like the Western Aphasia Battery . (wikipedia.org)
  • The Examination is designed to go beyond simple functional definitions of aphasia into the components of language dysfunctions (symptoms) that have been shown to underlie the various aphasic syndromes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standardization of the revised Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination is based on a normative sample of 242 patients with aphasic symptoms tested at the Boston VA Medical Center between 1976-1982. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reliability of the subtests was studied by selecting protocols of 34 patients with a degree of severity of aphasia ranging from slight to severe. (wikipedia.org)
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