A genus of OOMYCETES in the family Saprolegniaceae. It causes root rot in plants and is also a pathogen of FISHES.
Eukaryotes in the group STRAMENOPILES, formerly considered FUNGI, whose exact taxonomic level is unsettled. Many consider Oomycetes (Oomycota) a phylum in the kingdom Stramenopila, or alternatively, as Pseudofungi in the phylum Heterokonta of the kingdom Chromista. They are morphologically similar to fungi but have no close phylogenetic relationship to them. Oomycetes are found in both fresh and salt water as well as in terrestrial environments. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, pp683-4). They produce flagellated, actively motile spores (zoospores) that are pathogenic to many crop plants and FISHES.
A plant genus of the family AMARANTHACEAE. Young leaves are used as vegetables in Asia. Members contain betacyanins, celogentins, betaxanthin, and celosian.
A superfamily of various freshwater CRUSTACEA, in the infraorder Astacidea, comprising the crayfish. Common genera include Astacus and Procambarus. Crayfish resemble lobsters, but are usually much smaller.
A cone-shaped structure in plants made up of a mass of meristematic cells that covers and protects the tip of a growing root. It is the putative site of gravity sensing in plant roots.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of algae.
An anti-infective agent most commonly used in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Its anti-infective action derives from the slow release of formaldehyde by hydrolysis at acidic pH. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p173)
Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.
A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)
Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).
Diseases of plants.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.

Factors influencing the sporulation and cyst formation of Aphanomyces invadans, etiological agent of ulcerative mycosis in Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus. (1/22)

Oomycete infections caused by Aphanomyces invadans occur in freshwater and estuarine fishes around the world. Along the east coast of the USA, skin ulcers caused by A. invadans are prevalent in Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus. From laboratory observations low salinities appear crucial to transmission of the pathogen. To better understand aspects of transmission, we characterized sporulation and cyst formation of secondary zoospores of two isolates of A. invadans at different salinities and temperatures. Sporulation occurred only at low salinities. At room temperature (ca. 20-22 C), using "pond water" augmented with artificial sea salts, the endemic strain WIC and the Thailand strain PA7 of A. invadans produced free-swimming secondary zoospores at salinities of 0, 1 and 2 psu (practical salinity unit = per thousand), but not at 4 psu or higher. Secondary zoospores of another species, ATCC-62427 (Aphanomyces sp.), were observed at 1, 2, 4 and 8 psu but not at 0 and 12 psu. Secondary zoospores of all three isolates, especially WIC, were abundant and motile 1-2 d postsporulation. Sporulation was temperature dependent and occurred over a relatively narrow range. No sporulation occurred at 4, 30 or 35 C for either WIC or PA7. For both strains zoospore production within 1-3 d after the initiation of sporulation was more prolific at 25 C than at 20 and 15 C. At 15 C production of zoospores was sustained over 11 d for WIC and 5 d for PA7. At room temperature single WIC secondary zoospores remained motile 12-18 h. Salinities exceeding 4 psu or vigorous shaking caused immediate cyst formation of WIC secondary zoospores. Exposure to menhaden tissue, but not tissues of other fishes to secondary zoospores (WIC), caused rapid (2 h) cyst formation. Cysts were capable of excysting when transferred to 1 psu water within 2-3 h of cyst formation. Cysts that had remained encysted in 6.5 psu for 24 h did not excyst when transferred to 1 psu water. Salinity and temperature requirements for sporulation indicate that juvenile menhaden must acquire infections during rain or in low salinity oligohaline waters.  (+info)

Molecular assays for detecting Aphanomyces invadans in ulcerative mycotic fish lesions. (2/22)

The pathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is the primary etiological agent in ulcerative mycosis, an ulcerative skin disease caused by a fungus-like agent of wild and cultured fish. We developed sensitive PCR and fluorescent peptide nucleic acid in situ hybridization (FISH) assays to detect A. invadans. Laboratory-challenged killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were first tested to optimize and validate the assays. Skin ulcers of Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) from populations found in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries in North Carolina were then surveyed. Results from both assays indicated that all of the lesioned menhaden (n = 50) collected in September 2004 were positive for A. invadans. Neither the FISH assay nor the PCR assay cross-reacted with other closely related oomycetes. These results provided strong evidence that A. invadans is the primary oomycete pathogen in ulcerative mycosis and demonstrated the utility of the assays. The FISH assay is the first molecular assay to provide unambiguous visual confirmation that hyphae in the ulcerated lesions were exclusively A. invadans.  (+info)

Phenolic constituents of Celosia cristata L. susceptible to spinach root rot pathogen Aphanomyces cochlioides. (3/22)

Cochliophilin A (5-hydroxy-6,7-methylenedioxyflavone, 1), known as a host-specific attractant towards the zoospores of Aphanomyces cochlioides, a cause of root rot and damping-off diseases of Chenopodiaceae, was found in the Amaranthaceae plant, Celosia cristata, that is susceptible to the pathogen. The content of 1 in Celosia seedlings was quantified as 1.4 microg/g fresh weight. A new isoflavone, cristatein (5-hydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-7,2'-dimethoxyisoflavone, 2), and five known flavonoids were also identified.  (+info)

Detection of Aphanomyces astaci in North American crayfish by polymerase chain reaction. (4/22)

We present a PCR based method to detect Aphanomyces astaci in North American crayfish. Primers were designed to specifically amplify parts of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the 5.8 rRNA gene of A. astaci. A single round and a semi-nested assay were tested for their sensitivity and specificity. Specificity of the PCR assays was tested against several closely related Aphanomyces species, other Oomycetes and some non-A. astaci DNA that might be found in or on crayfish. The single round assay was fully specific against all DNA tested. In the semi-nested assay, cross-reaction was seen when the equivalent of 40,000 or more genomic units of A. invadans or A. frigidophilus were entered into the PCR reaction. The lower detection limit of both assays lies around 1 genomic unit of A. astaci. Investigation of various parts of the exoskeleton of 3 North American crayfish species revealed that for O. limosus and P. leniusculus the telson and soft abdominal cuticle yielded a positive PCR reaction most frequently. For the third species, Procambarus clarkii, only 1 individual tested positive, so no conclusion as to preferred infestation site(s) could be drawn.  (+info)

AphanoDB: a genomic resource for Aphanomyces pathogens. (5/22)

BACKGROUND: The Oomycete genus Aphanomyces comprises devastating plant and animal pathogens. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenicity of Aphanomyces species. In this study, we report on the development of a public database called AphanoDB which is dedicated to Aphanomyces genomic data. As a first step, a large collection of Expressed Sequence Tags was obtained from the legume pathogen A. euteiches, which was then processed and collected into AphanoDB. DESCRIPTION: Two cDNA libraries of A. euteiches were created: one from mycelium growing on synthetic medium and one from mycelium grown in contact to root tissues of the model legume Medicago truncatula. From these libraries, 18,684 expressed sequence tags were obtained and assembled into 7,977 unigenes which were compared to public databases for annotation. Queries on AphanoDB allow the users to retrieve information for each unigene including similarity to known protein sequences, protein domains and Gene Ontology classification. Statistical analysis of EST frequency from the two different growth conditions was also added to the database. CONCLUSION: AphanoDB is a public database with a user-friendly web interface. The sequence report pages are the main web interface which provides all annotation details for each unigene. These interactive sequence report pages are easily available through text, BLAST, Gene Ontology and expression profile search utilities. AphanoDB is available from URL: http://www.polebio.scsv.ups-tlse.fr/aphano/.  (+info)

Transcriptome of Aphanomyces euteiches: new oomycete putative pathogenicity factors and metabolic pathways. (6/22)

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Cell wall chitosaccharides are essential components and exposed patterns of the phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches. (7/22)

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No rosetta stone for a sense-antisense origin of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase classes. (8/22)

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Aphanomyces is a genus of fungi-like oomycetes that are widely distributed in various environments, including soil and water. These organisms are known to cause diseases in plants, particularly in crops such as rice, corn, and legumes. The most well-known species is Aphanomyces euteiches, which causes a serious disease in peas and other legumes called "root rot." This disease can lead to significant yield losses in affected crops.

It's worth noting that while Aphanomyces species are often referred to as water molds, they are not true fungi but rather stramenopiles, which are more closely related to brown algae and diatoms. Nonetheless, they share many characteristics with fungi and are commonly studied in mycology, the branch of biology that deals with fungi.

Oomycetes, also known as water molds or downy mildews, are a group of primarily aquatic, filamentous microorganisms. They were once classified as fungi due to their similar morphology and ecological roles, but they are now known to be more closely related to brown algae and diatoms.

Oomycetes have cell walls made of cellulose and unique osmotically active compounds called cell wall glycoproteins. They reproduce both sexually and asexually, producing structures such as zoospores that can swim through water to find new hosts. Oomycetes are parasites or saprophytes, feeding on other organisms or dead organic matter.

Some oomycetes are important plant pathogens, causing diseases such as potato blight (Phytophthora infestans) and sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum). They can cause significant damage to crops and natural ecosystems, making them a focus of study in plant pathology.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Celosia" is not a medical term. It is actually the name of a genus of flowering plants, also known as cockscomb or woolflower, which are often grown as ornamental plants due to their vibrant and unique flowers. If you have any medical terms or concepts that you would like me to define or explain, I'd be happy to help!

Astacoidea is a superfamily of freshwater decapod crustaceans, which includes crayfish and lobsters. This superfamily is divided into two families: Astacidae, which contains the true crayfishes, and Cambaridae, which contains the North American burrowing crayfishes. These animals are characterized by a robust exoskeleton, antennae, and pincers, and they are primarily scavengers and predators. They are found in freshwater environments around the world, and some species are of commercial importance as a food source.

The plant root cap, also known as the calyptra, is the protective tissue found at the extreme tip of the primary root and lateral roots in plants. It consists of a group of cells that encloses and shields the apical meristem, which is the region responsible for the growth and elongation of the root.

The root cap plays a crucial role in guiding the direction of root growth by sensing and responding to environmental stimuli such as gravity, touch, and moisture gradients. As the root grows and penetrates the soil, the root cap cells are constantly worn away and replaced by new cells produced by the underlying meristematic tissue.

In addition to its protective function, the root cap also secretes a slimy mucilage that helps reduce friction between the root and the soil, facilitating the movement of the root through the substrate. This mucilage also contains enzymes and other compounds that aid in the breakdown and uptake of nutrients from the soil.

I'm not a medical expert, but I can provide you with some information about algal DNA.

Algal DNA refers to the genetic material found in algae, which are simple, photosynthetic organisms that live in various aquatic environments. The DNA of algae is similar to that of other living organisms, as it carries the genetic instructions necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of these single-celled or multicellular life forms.

Algal DNA can be found in different types of algae, including:

1. Chlorophyta (green algae)
2. Rhodophyta (red algae)
3. Phaeophyceae (brown algae)
4. Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae or cyanoprokaryotes, which are actually bacteria with photosynthetic capabilities)

These different groups of algae have unique characteristics and ecological roles in their environments. Studying the DNA of algae can help researchers understand their evolutionary relationships, genetic diversity, and potential applications in various fields such as biotechnology, bioenergy, and environmental science.

Methenamine is a medication that is used as a urinary antiseptic. It's a chemical compound that, when ingested and enters the urine, releases formaldehyde, which helps to kill bacteria in the urinary tract. Methenamine is often combined with other medications, such as sodium phosphate or hydroxyzine, to make it more effective.

It's important to note that methenamine is not typically used as a first-line treatment for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is usually reserved for preventing recurrent UTIs in people who are prone to them. Additionally, methenamine should be taken in adequate amounts and under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as excessive formaldehyde release can cause adverse effects.

Fungal spores are defined as the reproductive units of fungi that are produced by specialized structures called hyphae. These spores are typically single-celled and can exist in various shapes such as round, oval, or ellipsoidal. They are highly resistant to extreme environmental conditions like heat, cold, and dryness, which allows them to survive for long periods until they find a suitable environment to germinate and grow into a new fungal organism. Fungal spores can be found in the air, water, soil, and on various surfaces, making them easily dispersible and capable of causing infections in humans, animals, and plants.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "peas" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Peas are a type of legume that is commonly consumed as a vegetable. They are rich in nutrients such as protein, fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K. If you have any questions about the health benefits or potential risks of consuming peas, I would be happy to try to help with that.

"Fish diseases" is a broad term that refers to various health conditions and infections affecting fish populations in aquaculture, ornamental fish tanks, or wild aquatic environments. These diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or environmental factors such as water quality, temperature, and stress.

Some common examples of fish diseases include:

1. Bacterial diseases: Examples include furunculosis (caused by Aeromonas salmonicida), columnaris disease (caused by Flavobacterium columnare), and enteric septicemia of catfish (caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri).

2. Viral diseases: Examples include infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) in salmonids, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and koi herpesvirus (KHV).

3. Fungal diseases: Examples include saprolegniasis (caused by Saprolegnia spp.) and cotton wool disease (caused by Aphanomyces spp.).

4. Parasitic diseases: Examples include ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich), costia, trichodina, and various worm infestations such as anchor worms (Lernaea spp.) and tapeworms (Diphyllobothrium spp.).

5. Environmental diseases: These are caused by poor water quality, temperature stress, or other environmental factors that weaken the fish's immune system and make them more susceptible to infections. Examples include osmoregulatory disorders, ammonia toxicity, and low dissolved oxygen levels.

It is essential to diagnose and treat fish diseases promptly to prevent their spread among fish populations and maintain healthy aquatic ecosystems. Preventative measures such as proper sanitation, water quality management, biosecurity practices, and vaccination can help reduce the risk of fish diseases in both farmed and ornamental fish settings.

A plant disease is a disorder that affects the normal growth and development of plants, caused by pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or nematodes, as well as environmental factors like nutrient deficiencies, extreme temperatures, or physical damage. These diseases can cause various symptoms, including discoloration, wilting, stunted growth, necrosis, and reduced yield or productivity, which can have significant economic and ecological impacts.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. The term "fishes" is not typically used in a medical context. "Fish" or "fishes" refers to any aquatic organism belonging to the taxonomic class Actinopterygii (bony fish), Chondrichthyes (sharks and rays), or Agnatha (jawless fish).

However, if you are referring to a condition related to fish or consuming fish, there is a medical issue called scombroid fish poisoning. It's a foodborne illness caused by eating spoiled or improperly stored fish from the Scombridae family, which includes tuna, mackerel, and bonito, among others. The bacteria present in these fish can produce histamine, which can cause symptoms like skin flushing, headache, diarrhea, and itchy rash. But again, this is not related to the term "fishes" itself but rather a condition associated with consuming certain types of fish.

Species include: Aphanomyces acinetophagus Aphanomyces americanus Aphanomyces amphigynus Aphanomyces apophysii Aphanomyces ... Aphanomyces balboensis Aphanomyces bosminae Aphanomyces brassicae Aphanomyces camptostylus Aphanomyces cladogamus Aphanomyces ... Aphanomyces ovidestruens Aphanomyces parasiticus Aphanomyces patersonii Aphanomyces phycophilus Aphanomyces pisci Aphanomyces ... Aphanomyces coniger Aphanomyces daphniae Aphanomyces euteiches Aphanomyces exoparasiticus Aphanomyces frigidophilus Aphanomyces ...
... , also known as Radish black root disease, is a fungal plant pathogen of various species of Brassicaceae. It ... UK, CAB International; Hall, G. (December 1989). "Aphanomyces raphani . [Descriptions of Fungi and Bacteria]". Descriptions of ...
... is a species of water mould. It causes red spot disease, or epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS), in many ...
"msu.edu aphanomyces presentation - Google Search". www.google.com. Retrieved 2019-11-21. "Aphanomyces Root Rot of Sugarbeet". ... Aphanomyces cochlioides is a plant pathogen that can affect commodity crops like spinach, Swiss chard, beets and related ... "Aphanomyces Diagnostic Guide". www.plantmanagementnetwork.org. Retrieved 2019-11-21. Dyer, Alan T.; Windels, Carol E. (March ... 2003). "Viability and Maturation of Aphanomyces cochlioides Oospores". Mycologia. 95 (2): 321-6. doi:10.2307/3762043. ISSN 0027 ...
... is a water mould, or oomycete, plant pathogen responsible for the disease Aphanomyces root rot. The ... Pea (Pisum sativum) is the crop where Aphanomyces causes the greatest economic damage. Aphanomyces root rot can account for ... Aphanomyces root rot is an example of a monocyclic disease, causing only one infection cycle per season. This is in contrast to ... Aphanomyces euteiches was first described by Drechsler in 1925 as the causal pathogen of root rot in peas. At the time, the ...
Infection with Aphanomyces astaci is accompanied by few signs in its early stages, and the first indication of infection may be ... Crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci) is a water mold that infects crayfish, most notably the European Astacus which dies within ... Paul Kirk (2010). "Aphanomyces astaci Schikora, 1906". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved June 29, 2011. Susan M. ... ISBN 978-1-4020-0837-5. David Alderman (December 18, 2006). "Aphanomyces astaci" (PDF). Delivering Alien Invasive Species ...
It caused by the fungus Aphanomyces raphani. The pathogen can persist for long times in the soil, therefore crop rotations are ...
Yokosawa, Ryozo; Kuninaga, Shiro; Sekizaki, Harua (1986). "Aphanomyces euteiches zoospore attractant isolated from pea root; ... Prunetin isolated from pea roots can act as an attractant for Aphanomyces euteiches zoospores. It is also an allosteric ...
"Root rot disease of legumes caused by Aphanomyces euteiches". Molecular Plant Pathology. 8 (5): 539-548. doi:10.1111/j.1364- ...
In turn, the fish is attacked by Achlya, Aphanomyces, and Pythium. In the wild, the fish spawns in small streams. The fish does ...
... are also a known carrier of a crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci. Marbled crayfish inhabit ...
Achlya, Aphanomyces, Aplanopsis, Apodachlya, Aquastella, Geolegnia, Leptomitus, Newbya, Pythiopsis, Protoachlya, Salisapilia, ...
Rhizoctonia or Aphanomyces) which spread in warm, damp conditions and parasitize roots and lower stems. Damping off is a common ...
Dynamic rearrangement of F-actin organization triggered by host-specific plant signal is linked to morphogenesis of Aphanomyces ... Disruption of ultrastructure and cytoskeletal network is involved with biocontrol of damping-off pathogen Aphanomyces ... triggers differentiation of zoospores of the phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces cochlioides. M. T. Islam, T. Ito, S. Tahara. ... activity of polyflavonoid tannin identified in Lannea coromandelica stem bark against phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces ...
He studied oomycete fungal plant diseases, many from the Genera Pythium, Phytophthora, and Aphanomyces, and identified several ...
"Pathogenicity studies with the fungi Aphanomyces invadans, Achlya bisexualis, and Phialemonium dimorphosporum: induction of ...
In Europe, they are particularly threatened by crayfish plague, which is caused by the North American water mold Aphanomyces ...
Osman, A (January 2010). "Genotoxicity of two pathogenic strains of zoosporic fungi (Achlya klebsiana and Aphanomyces laevis) ...
From 1907, crayfish plague, an infectious disease caused by the water mould Aphanomyces astaci, damaged stocks of the native ...
Aphanomyces invadans. Roberts was nominated for both the Japan Prize and the King Baodouin Prize for this work. He was also ...
... is a disease caused by the water mould Aphanomyces invadans. It infects many freshwater and brackish fish species in the Asia- ...
The pathogen causing crayfish plague, Aphanomyces astaci, has remained present in the lake, which may have prevented the local ...
... a disease caused by the fungus Aphanomyces astaci, which they carry. Among the numerous species that inhabit the Mediterranean ...
... aphanomyces MeSH B02.650.500 - lagenidium MeSH B02.650.710 - peronospora MeSH B02.650.725 - phytophthora MeSH B02.650.750 - ...
It may outcompete the native crayfish species and is a vector for the crayfish plague fungus Aphanomyces astaci, for crayfish ...
Aphanomyces invadans) and viruses can cause stunted growth and severe mortality in the C. striatus. Channa striatus rely on ...
Species include: Aphanomyces acinetophagus Aphanomyces americanus Aphanomyces amphigynus Aphanomyces apophysii Aphanomyces ... Aphanomyces balboensis Aphanomyces bosminae Aphanomyces brassicae Aphanomyces camptostylus Aphanomyces cladogamus Aphanomyces ... Aphanomyces ovidestruens Aphanomyces parasiticus Aphanomyces patersonii Aphanomyces phycophilus Aphanomyces pisci Aphanomyces ... Aphanomyces coniger Aphanomyces daphniae Aphanomyces euteiches Aphanomyces exoparasiticus Aphanomyces frigidophilus Aphanomyces ...
Some Observations on Spore Formation and Discharge in Leptolegnia, Achlya, and Aphanomyces ... Post a Comment for Some Observations on Spore Formation and Discharge in Leptolegnia, Achlya, and Aphanomyces ... Add tags for Some Observations on Spore Formation and Discharge in Leptolegnia, Achlya, and Aphanomyces ... Some Observations on Spore Formation and Discharge in Leptolegnia, Achlya, and Aphanomyces. ...
... the AeCRN13 effector from the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches and the AtWRKY22 defensive transcription factor from Arabidopsis ... Genomics analysis of Aphanomyces spp. identifies a new class of oomycete effector associated with host adaptation *Elodie ... Genomics analysis of Aphanomyces spp. identifies a new class of oomycete effector associated with host adaptation *Elodie ... the AeCRN13 effector from the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches and the AtWRKY22 defensive transcription factor from Arabidopsis ...
What pulse crops want to tell you about Aphanomyces and Fusarium. Speaker: Eric Schick, Nufarm. For pulse growers, theres ... This presentation will review best management strategies and tools to help manage Aphanomyces and Fusarium root rot in peas and ...
... scientists have studied host-pathogen interactions between the crayfish plague disease agent Aphanomyces astaci and freshwater ... Host‑pathogen coevolution drives innate immune response to Aphanomyces astaci infection in freshwater crayfish: transcriptomic ... scientists have studied host-pathogen interactions between the crayfish plague disease agent Aphanomyces astaci and freshwater ...
Effective measures to detect Aphanomyces euteiches, one of the devastating pathogen of pea, are lacking. An indirect ELISA and ... Aphanomyces euteiches ,. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ,. Legumes -- Diseases and pests ,. Root rots ... Development of a real time immuno-PCR assay for the detection of pea root rot causal agent, Aphanomyces euteiches. ... Effective measures to detect Aphanomyces euteiches, one of the devastating pathogen of pea, are lacking. An indirect ELISA and ...
Knowledge and management of aquatic ecosystems (formerly Bulletin Français de la Pèche et de la Pisciculture), an international journal on freshwater ecosystem
2003 ACSC Aphanomyces specialty infected trial - Table 27. *. September 24, 2018. *onsharp.admin ...
Title: Aphanomyces root rot of alfalfa: widespread distribution of race 2 Author. Samac, Deborah - Debby ... Aphanomyces root rot: widespread distribution of race 2. Forage Focus. August 2012. p. 8-9.. Interpretive Summary: ... wet soil conditions in many parts of the country resulted in reports of poor performance of alfalfa due to Aphanomyces root rot ...
Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris (A. B. Frank) Donk, Aphanomyces cochlioides Drechs., Pythium ... most important pathogens consistently causing both seedling and root rot diseases include Rhizoctonia solani and Aphanomyces ...
Infection with Aphanomyces invadans (EUS): Bangladesh in catla (Catla catla) and mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala); and, India in ...
Highly resistant to Aphanomyces root rot race 1 & 2. *Exhibits unique ability to modify root structure to match conditions ...
A Medium to Enhance Recovery of Aphanomyces from Infected Plant Tissue. W. F. Pfender, P. A. Delwiche, C. R. Grau, and D. J. ...
Aphanomyces Race 1. Aphanomyces Race 2. Phyto. Root Rot. Vertic. Root Rot. Bacterial Wilt. Fusarium Wilt. Anthracnose. Stem ...
Aphanomyces Race 1. Aphanomyces Race 2. Phyto. Root Rot. Vertic. Root Rot. Bacterial Wilt. Fusarium Wilt. Anthracnose. Stem ...
Rapid Aphanomyces Root Rot (Pcr) Test for Alfalfa (2012) - PDF. Herbicide Evaluation to Control Smooth Bedstraw in Forages ... Rapid Aphanomyces Root Rot (PCR) Test for Alfalfa - PDF. Healthy Soils, Healthy Farms, Healthy Environment Project 2012 - PDF. ...
Taking a break from peas or lentils for six years is a tall order for fields where aphanomyces has been a problem. Are there in ... Its recommended that farmers not plant pea or lentil for five to six years if aphanomyces has been confirmed in a field, but ... Tough to say and even harder to control, aphanomyces has the potential to significantly reduce pea and lentil yields, and can ... While one of the main culprits - aphanomyces - was first confirmed in Saskatchewan in 2012 and in Alberta in 2013, testing on ...
or Aphanomyces euteiches) which causes yellowing and die-back of foliage from the ground up. The best control is to ensure well ...
The most common pathogens are Fusarium solani, Didymella pinodella and Aphanomyces euteiches. These pathogens can occur ...
Aphanomyces euteiches has become more prevalent in Saskatchewan in the past few years with devastating effects on field peas. ... Dry beans have a variable response to Aphanomyces. They are not resistant, and can be a host, but will only produce a few ...
Aphanomyces root rot was also detected in 98% of fields in 2022. (Read more about this disease on page 44). ... Soil samples were collected for Aphanomyces root rot detection. ...
Induction of skin ulcers in Atlantic menhaden by injection and aqueous exposure to the zoospores of Aphanomyces invadans. ... Dose response and pathogenicity of secondary zoospores of the oomycete, Aphanomyces invadans, to Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia ...
... where reduced ROS accumulation in roots show enhanced resistance to root-rot pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches 28. ...
Of the many genera of water molds, Saprolegnia, Branchiomyces, and Aphanomyces are the most frequently associated with disease ... Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS), caused by Aphanomyces invadans, is a reportable disease and endemic to much of the US and ...
Sw4113 is highly resistant to multi-race Aphanomyces. *Sw114 is highly resitant to wilt ...
Prevalence of the crayfish plague pathogen Aphanomyces astaci in invasive American crayfishes in the Czech Republic. ...
Aphanomyces astaci), which is lethal to European crayfish (including our native white-clawed crayfish) and has resulted in ...
  • To illustrate our approach, we provide experimental procedures to detect the interaction between plant DNA and two proteins (the AeCRN13 effector from the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches and the AtWRKY22 defensive transcription factor from Arabidopsis ). (nature.com)
  • Effective measures to detect Aphanomyces euteiches, one of the devastating pathogen of pea, are lacking. (uleth.ca)
  • The most common pathogens are Fusarium solani, Didymella pinodella and Aphanomyces euteiches. (pgro.org)
  • Background: For over a century, scientists have studied host-pathogen interactions between the crayfish plague disease agent Aphanomyces astaci and freshwater crayfish. (hbz-nrw.de)
  • 7. Crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci). (advocatekhoj.com)
  • To compound the situation further, North American crayfish species, including the signal crayfish, carry a fungal infection called the crayfish plague ( Aphanomyces astaci ), which is lethal to European crayfish (including our native white-clawed crayfish) and has resulted in their eradication from a number of waters in England. (thefishsite.com)
  • This is mainly due to the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci), a lethal disease that, among other things, can be spread through the stocking of fish from contaminated water or contaminated fishing gear. (dissertations.se)
  • 2006). Molecular assays for detecting Aphanomyces invadans in ulcerative mycotic fish lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2003). Molecular characterization of the fish-pathogenic fungus Aphanomyces invadans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dose response and pathogenicity of secondary zoospores of the oomycete, Aphanomyces invadans , to Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus. (vims.edu)
  • Aphanomyces invadans str. (ensembl.org)
  • This presentation will review best management strategies and tools to help manage Aphanomyces and Fusarium root rot in peas and lentils so that it doesn't become a nightmare. (cropproductionshow.com)
  • Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris (A. B. Frank) Donk, Aphanomyces cochlioides Drechs. (unl.edu)
  • All of these seedling pathogens can additionally be involved with root rot diseases throughout the season, however, the two most important pathogens consistently causing both seedling and root rot diseases include Rhizoctonia solani and Aphanomyces cochlioides. (unl.edu)
  • The early spring of 2012 with prolonged wet soil conditions in many parts of the country resulted in reports of poor performance of alfalfa due to Aphanomyces root rot (ARR). (usda.gov)
  • Soil samples were collected for Aphanomyces root rot detection. (manitobapulse.ca)
  • The disease that manifests in plants infected with these water moulds is sometimes known simply as Aphanomyces root rot or common root rot. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphanomyces root rot: widespread distribution of race 2. (usda.gov)
  • Aphanomyces root rot was also detected in 98% of fields in 2022. (manitobapulse.ca)
  • Aphanomyces root rot (ARR) is a serious disease of both recently seeded alfalfa and established alfalfa stands. (wisc.edu)
  • 2001). A fatal oomycotic disease of the fresh water fish Aplocheilus panchax in India caused by Aphanomyces laevis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulse School: Assessing In-Field Tools for Managing Aphanomyces (Do I Have to Wait Six Years? (realagriculture.com)
  • A Medium to Enhance Recovery of Aphanomyces from Infected Plant Tissue. (apsnet.org)
  • Aphanomyces water moulds are "one of the most important yield-limiting factors in production of legumes and sugarbeet. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1978). Factors affecting in vitro growth and zoospore production by Aphanomyces raphani. (wikipedia.org)
  • The oomycete Aphanomyces cochlioides is one of the most important root pathogens in sugar beet due to its worldwide distribution and the ability to induce infection at any stage of the sugar beet lifecycle, causing both seedling damping-off and chronic root rot on mature roots. (slu.se)
  • High soil-moisture levels favour development of destructive water mold fungi, such as species of Aphanomyces , Pythium , and Phytophthora . (britannica.com)
  • Seed treatments may also provide early-season protection from Aphanomyces in peas and Phytophthora root rot in soybeans. (manitobapulse.ca)
  • Important facts about Pythium seed and seedling rot are: 1) there are highly effective chemical seed treatments available for management of both metalaxyl-resistant and sensitive Pythium, 2) avoid planting into wet soils that promote soil compaction and reduce plant vigor, and 3) Pythium can often be confused with Aphanomyces and Rhizoctonia root rots and damage from water logging. (usda.gov)
  • 2001). A fatal oomycotic disease of the fresh water fish Aplocheilus panchax in India caused by Aphanomyces laevis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Armed with the knowledge that Weber has gleaned on crop inputs and their success on peas, she has been conducting research into Aphanomyces root rot on peas, and trying to protect yield in infected fields through focusing on various combinations of trifluralin, starter fertilizer rates, seed treatments, and foliar nutrient applications. (saskpulse.com)
  • As both peas and lentils are equally sensitive to Aphanomyces, the current recommendation is to try and get the pathogen levels in the soil to diminish over time through longer rotations. (saskpulse.com)
  • Fields diagnosed with Aphanomyces should be cropped to peas only once every 7-8 years to reduce inoculum levels in soil and avoid yield loss from this disease. (manitobapulse.ca)
  • Peas infected by Aphanomyces with caramel-coloured roots (left), compared to healthy plants (right). (manitobapulse.ca)
  • Although the Perley site had high levels of Aphanomyces root rot, non-uniformity across the commercial trial resulted in high variability, so there are no yield results under Aphanomyces conditions for 2022. (crystalsugar.com)
  • Thriving in wet, soggy soils (and thus seldom acknowledged as a problem-pathogen in Canada), aphanomyces is difficult to differentiate from other root rot microorganisms based on symptomology alone. (realagriculture.com)
  • Elizabeth Butler, Patricia Crigler, Glenn Robbins & Jaime E. Blair (2020) Preliminary survey of Aphanomyces sp. (fandm.edu)
  • 2010). A new species, Aphanomyces salsuginosus sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphanomyces water moulds are "one of the most important yield-limiting factors in production of legumes and sugarbeet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also known as "water mould" for its preference for waterlogged fields, Aphanomyces affects both annual and perennial legume crops and is one of. (adama.com)
  • This research is focused on identifying the distribution of Aphanomyces across western Canada, DNA detection in soils, threshold inoculum levels, changes in inoculum over time and management options such as crop rotation and seed treatments. (manitobapulse.ca)
  • Presence or absence of Aphanomyces can be confirmed by sending soil or plant tissue samples to 20/20 Seed Labs . (manitobapulse.ca)
  • 1978). Factors affecting in vitro growth and zoospore production by Aphanomyces raphani. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research on Aphanomyces is ongoing at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Lethbridge, led by Dr. Syama Chatterton. (manitobapulse.ca)