Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the RIGHT VENTRICLE into the RIGHT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the TRICUSPID VALVE.Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the PULMONARY ARTERY into the RIGHT VENTRICLE due to imperfect closure of the PULMONARY VALVE.Aortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Venous Valves: Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Adrenal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the production of adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS falls below the requirement of the body. Adrenal insufficiency can be caused by defects in the ADRENAL GLANDS, the PITUITARY GLAND, or the HYPOTHALAMUS.Pulmonary Valve: A valve situated at the entrance to the pulmonary trunk from the right ventricle.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Renal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level in the ability to remove wastes, concentrate URINE, and maintain ELECTROLYTE BALANCE; BLOOD PRESSURE; and CALCIUM metabolism. Renal insufficiency can be classified by the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE.Venous Insufficiency: Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency: A malabsorption condition resulting from greater than 10% reduction in the secretion of pancreatic digestive enzymes (LIPASE; PROTEASES; and AMYLASE) by the EXOCRINE PANCREAS into the DUODENUM. This condition is often associated with CYSTIC FIBROSIS and with chronic PANCREATITIS.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Aortic Valve Prolapse: The downward displacement of the cuspal or pointed end of the trileaflet AORTIC VALVE causing misalignment of the cusps. Severe valve distortion can cause leakage and allow the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to aortic regurgitation.Endocarditis, Bacterial: Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Mitral Valve Prolapse: Abnormal protrusion or billowing of one or both of the leaflets of MITRAL VALVE into the LEFT ATRIUM during SYSTOLE. This allows the backflow of blood into left atrium leading to MITRAL VALVE INSUFFICIENCY; SYSTOLIC MURMURS; or CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA.Placental Insufficiency: Failure of the PLACENTA to deliver an adequate supply of nutrients and OXYGEN to the FETUS.Mitral Valve Stenosis: Narrowing of the passage through the MITRAL VALVE due to FIBROSIS, and CALCINOSIS in the leaflets and chordal areas. This elevates the left atrial pressure which, in turn, raises pulmonary venous and capillary pressure leading to bouts of DYSPNEA and TACHYCARDIA during physical exertion. RHEUMATIC FEVER is its primary cause.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Cardiac Valve Annuloplasty: A type of heart valve surgery that involves the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of the annuli of HEART VALVES. It includes shortening the circumference of the annulus to improve valve closing capacity and reinforcing the annulus as a step in more complex valve repairs.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Basketball: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular court having a raised basket at each end.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Cardiomegaly, Exercise-Induced: Heart enlargement and other remodeling in cardiac morphology and electrical circutry found in individuals who participate in intense repeated exercises.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.SwitzerlandPeripartum Period: The period shortly before, during, and immediately after giving birth.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Sinus Arrest, Cardiac: The omission of atrial activation that is caused by transient cessation of impulse generation at the SINOATRIAL NODE. It is characterized by a prolonged pause without P wave in an ELECTROCARDIOGRAM. Sinus arrest has been associated with sleep apnea (REM SLEEP-RELATED SINUS ARREST).Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Treponema pallidum: The causative agent of venereal and non-venereal syphilis as well as yaws.Syphilis: A contagious venereal disease caused by the spirochete TREPONEMA PALLIDUM.Treponema: A genus of microorganisms of the order SPIROCHAETALES, many of which are pathogenic and parasitic for man and animals.Syphilis Serodiagnosis: Serologic tests for syphilis.Syphilis, Congenital: Syphilis acquired in utero and manifested by any of several characteristic tooth (Hutchinson's teeth) or bone malformations and by active mucocutaneous syphilis at birth or shortly thereafter. Ocular and neurologic changes may also occur.Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Treponema denticola: A species of bacteria in the family SPIROCHAETACEAE, frequently isolated from periodontal pockets (PERIODONTAL POCKET).

Frequency and long term follow up of valvar insufficiency caused by retrograde aortic radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures. (1/941)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of valvar complications caused by left sided radiofrequency catheter ablation using the retrograde aortic technique. METHODS: 179 patients (118 male) with a mean (SD) age of 43 (17) years underwent 216 procedures at one centre. The target of the ablation was an accessory atrioventricular pathway in 144 patients, the atrioventricular junction in 29 patients, and a ventricular tachycardia in six patients. In 25 patients structural heart disease was identified before the procedure (ischaemic heart disease 10, cardiomyopathy nine, valvar three, other three). Echo/Doppler examinations were performed the day before the procedure and within 24 hours postablation; the investigations were all reviewed by the same investigator. Patients with identified valvar injury caused by the procedure were followed for 42 (7) months. RESULTS: Valvar injury caused by the ablation procedure was identified in four young (age 30 (8) years), otherwise healthy patients with left lateral atrioventricular accessory pathways. Mild mitral insufficiency with a central regurgitation jet was detected in two patients and remained unchanged at follow up. Mild aortic insufficiency was detected in another two patients. In one of these the regurgitation jet was central and remained unchanged at follow up. In one patient the regurgitation jet was located between the non-coronary and left cusps in relation to a loosely attached structure. Both the structure and the valvar regurgitation disappeared during follow up. No clinical complications occurred in any of the patients during follow up. CONCLUSION: In this study, the frequency of valvar complications after left sided radiofrequency catheter ablation using the retrograde aortic technique was 1.9%.  (+info)

Impact of vascular adaptation to chronic aortic regurgitation on left ventricular performance. (2/941)

BACKGROUND: This investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that vascular adaptation occurs in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation to maintain left ventricular (LV) performance. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-five patients with chronic aortic regurgitation (mean age 50+/-14 years) were studied using a micromanometer LV catheter to obtain LV pressures and radionuclide ventriculography to obtain LV volumes during multiple loading conditions and right atrial pacing. These 45 patients were subgrouped according to their LV contractility (Ees) and ejection fraction values. Group I consisted of 24 patients with a normal Ees. Group IIa consisted of 10 patients with impaired Ees values (Ees <1.00 mm Hg/mL) but normal LV ejection fractions; Group IIb consisted of 11 patients with impaired contractility and reduced LV ejection fractions. The left ventricular-arterial coupling ratio, Ees/Ea, where Ea was calculated by dividing the LV end-systolic pressure by LV stroke volume, averaged 1.60+/-0.91 in Group I. It decreased to 0.91+/-0.27 in Group IIa (P<0.05 versus Group I), and it decreased further in Group IIb to 0.43+/-0.24 (P<0.001 versus Groups I and IIa). The LV ejection fractions were inversely related to the Ea values in both the normal and impaired contractility groups (r=-0.48, P<0.05 and r=-0.56, P<0.01, respectively), although the slopes of these relationships differed (P<0.05). The average LV work was maximal in Group IIa when the left ventricular-arterial coupling ratio was near 1.0 because of a significant decrease in total arterial elastance (P<0.01 versus Group I). In contrast, the decrease in the left ventricular-arterial coupling ratio in Group IIb was caused by an increase in total arterial elastance, effectively double loading the LV, contributing to a decrease in LV pump efficiency (P<0.01 versus Group IIa and P<0.001 versus Group I). CONCLUSIONS: Vascular adaptation may be heterogeneous in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation. In some, total arterial elastance decreases to maximize LV work and maintain LV performance, whereas in others, it increases, thereby double loading the LV, contributing to afterload excess and a deterioration in LV performance that is most prominent in those with impaired contractility.  (+info)

Bileaflet mechanical prostheses for aortic valve replacement in patients younger than 65 years and 65 years of age or older: major thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. (3/941)

OBJECTIVE: To determine major thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications and predictive risk factors associated with aortic valve replacement (AVR), using bileaflet mechanical prostheses (CarboMedics and St. Jude Medical). DESIGN: A case series. SETTING: Cardiac surgical services at the teaching institutions of the University of British Columbia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients 2 age groups who had undergone AVR between 1989 and 1994 were studied. Group 1 comprised 384 patients younger than 65 years. Group 2 comprised 215 patients 65 years of age and older. RESULTS: The linearized rates of major thromboembolism (TE) occurring after AVR were 1.54%/patient-year for group 1 and 3.32%/patient-year for group 2; the rates for major TE occurring more than 30 days after AVR were 1.13%/patient-year for group 1 and 1.55%/patient-year for group 2. The crude rates for major TE occurring within 30 days of AVR were 1.04% for group 1 and 3.72% for group 2. The death rate from major TE in group 1 was 0.31%/patient-year and in group 2 was 0.88%/patient-year. Of the major TE events occurring within 30 days, 100% of patients in both age groups were inadequately anticoagulated at the time of the event, and for events occurring more than 30 days after AVR, 45% in group 1 and 57% in group 2 were inadequately anticoagulated (INR less than 2.0). The overall linearized rates of major hemorrhage were 1.54%/patient-year for group 1 and 2.21%/patient-year for group 2. There were no cases of prosthesis thrombosis in either group. The mean (and standard error) overall freedom from major TE for group 1 patients at 5 years was 95.6% (1.4%) and with exclusion of early events was 96.7% (1.3%); for group 2 patients the rates were 90.0% (3.2%) and 93.7% (3.0%), respectively. The mean (and SE) overall freedom from major and fatal TE and hemorrhage for group 1 patients was 90.1% (2.3%) and with exclusion of early events was 91.2% (2.3%); for group 2 patients the rates were 87.9% (3.1%) and 92.5% (2.9%), respectively. The 5-year rate for freedom from valve-related death for group 1 patients was 96.3% (2.1%) and for group 2 patients was 97.2% (1.2%). CONCLUSION: The thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications after AVR with bileaflet mechanical prostheses occur more frequently and result in more deaths in patients 65 years of age and older than in patients years younger than 65 years.  (+info)

Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement through a transverse sternotomy: a word of caution. (4/941)

OBJECTIVES: To compare aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a minimally invasive approach through a transverse sternotomy with the established approach of median sternotomy. DESIGN: Retrospective, case-control study. PATIENTS: Fourteen high risk patients (median age 78, Parsonnet score of 18%) who underwent AVR performed through a minimally invasive transverse sternotomy were compared with a historical group of patients matched for age, sex, and Parsonnet score who underwent AVR performed through a median sternotomy by the same surgeon. OUTCOME MEASURES: Cross clamp time, total bypass time, intensive care stay, postoperative in-hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. RESULTS: There were two deaths in the minimally invasive group and none in the control group (NS). The cross clamp and total bypass times were longer in the minimally invasive group (67 and 92 minutes v 46 and 66 minutes, p < 0.001). There was a higher incidence of re-exploration for bleeding (14% v 0%) and paravalvar leaks (21% v 0%) in the minimally invasive group but these differences were not significant. The minimally invasive group had a longer postoperative in-hospital stay (p = 0.025). The incidence of mortality or major morbidity was 43% (six of 14) in the minimally invasive group and 7% (one of 14) in the matched pairs (p = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: AVR can be performed through a transverse sternotomy but the operation takes longer and there is an unacceptably high incidence of morbidity and mortality.  (+info)

Non-invasive assessment of left ventricular function after correction of severe aortic regurgitation. (5/941)

Twenty patients were studied with simultaneous left ventricular cavity echocardiograms and apex cardiograms during the first two weeks after correction of severe aortic regurgitation. Endocardial echoes and apex cardiograms were digitized, so that left ventricular dimensions, their rates of change, and echo dimension-apex cardiogram relations could be studied. After aortic valve replacement, there was an early reduction in end-diastolic dimension, within 2 days, from 7-0 +/- 0-8 cm to 5-7 +/- 1-0 cm (P less than 0-001), while peak normalized shortening rate (peak Vcf) dropped from 1-9 +/- 0-6 to 1-4 +/- 0-6 S-1 (P less than 0-01), and remained unchanged for the remainder of the study. Immediately after operation, striking abnormalities of isovolumic contraction and, to a lesser extent, of early relaxation, could be seen, which regressed over 4 to 7 days, except in 2 patients who developed a low output state. These changes in left ventricular dimension, Vcf, and isovolumic contraction could not have been described by an single "measure" of left ventricular function.  (+info)

Syphilitic aortic regurgitation. An appraisal of surgical treatment. (6/941)

During the 10 years from 1964 to 1973, fifteen patients with severe syphilitic aortic regurgitation were treated surgically at the National Heart Hospital. In thirteen the valve was replaced and in two it was repaired. In addition four had replacement of an aneurysmal ascending aorta with a Dacron graft and seven some form of plastic repair to the coronary ostia. Three patients died within 1 month of surgery and a further six during the follow-up period which varied from 1 to 55 months (mean 25-5). The six survivors have been followed-up for an average of 33 months. Factors contributing to this high mortality were analysed and it was found that the mean duration of effort dyspnoea was 22 months in the survivors compared with 48 months in those who had died. Similarly the average duration of nocturnal dyspnoea was 4 months in the survivors compared with a mean of 8 months in those who had died. Only six out of the fifteen patients had angina; this was present in two of the survivors and in four of the fatalities. The pulse pressure, heart size, and haemodynamic findings were similar in the two groups. The prognostic value of an elevated erythocyte sedimentation rate was also examined. It was concluded that preoperative investigations should include aortography, coronary arteriography, an assessment of left ventricular function, and whenever possible myocardial biopsy. These data were interpreted as suggesting that patients should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage in the disease--certainly before the onset of cardiac failure and--and that if this more aggresive attitude was adopted, as it has been in non-syphilitic cases of aortic valve disease, the present high mortality in this group would be reduced.  (+info)

Three-dimensional reconstruction of the color Doppler-imaged vena contracta for quantifying aortic regurgitation: studies in a chronic animal model. (7/941)

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of color Doppler flow maps to image and extract the vena contracta cross-sectional area to determine the severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) in an animal model. Evaluation of the vena contracta with 2-dimensional imaging systems may not be sufficiently robust to fully characterize this region, which may be asymmetrically shaped. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 6 sheep with surgically induced chronic AR, 18 hemodynamically different states were studied. Instantaneous regurgitant flow rates were obtained by aortic and pulmonary electromagnetic flowmeters (EMFs) as reference standards, and aortic regurgitant effective orifice areas (EOAs) were determined from EMF regurgitant flow rates divided by continuous-wave (CW) Doppler velocities. Composite video data for color Doppler imaging of the aortic regurgitant flows were transferred into a TomTec computer after computer-controlled 180 degrees rotational acquisition. After the 3D data transverse to the flow jet were sectioned, the smallest proximal jet cross section was identified for direct measurement of the vena contracta area. Peak regurgitant flow rates and regurgitant stroke volumes were calculated as the product of these areas and the CW Doppler peak velocities and velocity-time integrals, respectively. There was an excellent correlation between the 3D-derived vena contracta areas and reference EOAs (r=0.99, SEE=0.01 cm2) and between 3D and reference peak regurgitant flow rates and regurgitant stroke volumes (r=0.99, difference=0.11 L/min; r=0.99, difference=1.5 mL/beat, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: 3D-based determination of the vena contracta cross-sectional area can provide accurate quantification of the severity of AR.  (+info)

Mortality and morbidity of aortic regurgitation in clinical practice. A long-term follow-up study. (8/941)

BACKGROUND: The outcome of aortic regurgitation conservatively followed in clinical practice is poorly defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: Long-term outcome of 246 patients with severe or moderately severe aortic regurgitation diagnosed by color Doppler echocardiography was analyzed. With conservative management, mortality rate was higher than expected (at 10 years, 34+/-5%, P<0. 001) and morbidity was high (10-year rates of 47+/-6% for heart failure and 62+/-4% for aortic valve surgery). At 10 years, 75+/-3% of patients had died or had surgery and 83+/-3% had had cardiovascular events. In multivariate analysis, predictors of survival were age (P<0.001), functional class (P<0.001), comorbidity index (P=0.033), atrial fibrillation (P=0.002), and left ventricular end-systolic diameter corrected for body surface area (P=0.025). Ejection fraction was also an independent predictor of overall survival, including postoperative follow-up of surgically treated patients (P<0.001). High risk during conservative treatment, with mortality rate in excess of that expected, was noted among patients with severe, even transient, symptoms (24.6% yearly, P<0.001) but also in those with mild (class II) symptoms (6.3% yearly, P=0.02) and in asymptomatic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <55% (5.8% yearly, P=0.03) or with end-systolic diameter normalized to body surface area >/=25 mm/m2 (7.8% yearly, P=0.004). Surgery performed during follow-up was independently associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.54; P=0.048). CONCLUSIONS: Patients diagnosed with severe aortic regurgitation in clinical practice incur excess mortality and high morbidity, underscoring the serious prognosis of the disease. Surgery, which reduces cardiac mortality rates, should be considered promptly in high-risk patients.  (+info)

Background: Left ventricular end diastolic pressure could be estimated collectively using various measures of mitral valve and pulmonary venous flow velocities. In patients with aortic regurgitation, the AR velocity reflects the diastolic pressure difference between the aorta and the left ventricle. We sought to predict the left ventricular end diastolic pressure by a new Doppler index as aortic regurgitation peak early to late diastolic pressure gradient ratio.Patients and Methods: Fifty three patients with at least moderate aortic regurgitation were enrolled in this study. Physical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed one day before cardiac catheterization. The severity of AR was graded according to the recommendations of American society for echocardiography. The pressure half time, aortic regurgitation early diastolic velocity , aortic regurgitation early diastolic pressure gradient , aortic regurgitation end diastolic velocity, aortic regurgitation end diastolic
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My son was recently diagonsed with aortic valve insufficiency. The cardiologist says his valve is leaking in 2 places and is a grade 2-3 leak. What activity restrictions should he have for everyday t...
My son is 17 years old. He was diagnosed with mild aortic valve insufficiency when he was 14. He plays competitive basketball and is hoping for a career towards that. His last check up showed that h...
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The natural history of chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) is characterized by a series of left ventricular (LV) compensatory mechanisms. Initially, the regurgitant volume is accommodated by increases in LV end-diastolic volume and compliance and associated LV hypertrophy. However, the concomitant increased wall stress results in increased afterload and, with it, more hypertrophy. Thus, chronic AR imposes both a volume and an often underappreciated pressure load on the left ventricle (1). The natural history of the condition typically includes a long plateau phase during which LV ejection performance is maintained and patients remain asymptomatic, and it is theoretically appealing that medical intervention at this point might improve outcomes, notably the need for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and the development of heart failure.. Candidate pharmacologic agents have included calcium-channel blockers, notably nifedipine, as well as beta-blockers and drugs that target the renin-angiotensin system. ...
Background: Mild aortic regurgitation (AR) is common in older adults, often attributed to aging and is considered harmless. We studied if baseline mild AR is associated with incident HF among community-dwelling adults ≥65 years in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS).. Methods: In the original CHS cohort, 4895 participants were free of prevalent HF at baseline, of whom 4873 had echocardiographic data on type and grade of valvular heart disease (VHD). Of these, 372 (8%) had mild AR (AR jet height to left ventricular outflow tract diameter ratio ,24%). After excluding those with moderate (n=505), moderately severe (n=36) or severe (n=16) AR, the final sample size was 4316. We used propensity scores for mild AR, estimated for each of the 4316 participants, to match 353 (95% of 372) of those with mild AR with 1048 of those without AR, thus assembling a cohort of 1401 participants who were balanced on 56 baseline traditional cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension and blood pressure, ...
inproceedings{3036208, abstract = {Aims: Significant aortic regurgitation (AR) may cause left ventricular (LV) dilatation and heart failure. The aim was to quantify LV function in AR horses by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and two-dimensional speckle tracking (2DST). Methods: Echocardiographic examinations were performed on ten healthy horses (10{\textpm}4 years;509{\textpm}58 kg) and fourteen horses with significant AR (17{\textpm}4 years;497{\textpm}93 kg). By 2DST, global radial (SR) and longitudinal (SL) strain were measured. Regional systolic radial displacement (DRS) by 2DST and velocity (VS) by TDI were measured in the interventricular septum and LV free wall. LV end-diastolic internal diameter (LVIDd) and fractional shortening (FS) were measured from a short-axis M-mode at chordal level. Results: Seven horses showed moderate AR (LVIDd range 11.0-12.7 cm), seven severe AR (LVIDd 13.3-16.9 cm). FS, SR and SL showed no significant differences. However, SL was significantly correlated with ...
Among patients with combined aortic valve disease, patients with moderate and those with severe AS at baseline did not have significantly different event-free survival rates: patients with an aortic valve area of ,1.0 cm2 had an outcome that was comparable to those with a valve area between 1.0 and 1.5 cm2 (p = 0.57). Also the degree of AR did not have prognostic value and patients with moderate AR and those with severe AR had a similar outcome (p = 0.81).. Patients with moderate AS and moderate AR had event-free survival rates of 100 ± 0%, 75 ± 10%, 24 ± 10%, and 18 ± 9% at 1, 2, 4, and 6 years, respectively, as compared to 77 ± 8%, 53 ± 9%, 42 ± 9%, and 19 ± 8% for patients with severe AS and moderate AR; 71 ± 17%, 54 ± 20%, 36 ± 20%, and 18 ± 16% for patients with moderate AS and severe AR and 76 ± 15%, 63 ± 17%, 42 ± 21%, and 21 ± 18% for patients with severe AS and severe AR (p = 0.9) (Fig. 3). However, AV-Vel was a significant predictor of outcome allowing further risk ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Meta-Analysis of Transthoracic Echocardiography Versus Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for the Assessment of Aortic Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation. AU - Papanastasiou, Christos A.. AU - Kokkinidis, Damianos G.. AU - Jonnalagadda, Anil K.. AU - Oikonomou, Evangelos K.. AU - Kampaktsis, Polydoros N.. AU - Garcia, Mario J.. AU - Myerson, Saul G.. AU - Karamitsos, Theodoros D.. PY - 2019/10/15. Y1 - 2019/10/15. N2 - Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) is a major complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although the echocardiographic assessment of post-TAVI AR remains challenging, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) allows direct quantification of AR. The aim of this study was to review the level of agreement between 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D TTE) and CMR on grading the severity of AR after TAVI, and determine the accuracy of TTE in detecting moderate or severe AR. Electronic databases were searched in order to ...
Assess ventricular function, volumes and LV mass (may be increased 2° LVOTO or hypertension). Measure peak CoA velocity, look for diastolic prolongation of forward flow Fig. 1. Contrast-enhanced axial CT showing a transverse fracture through the mid-portion of a coarctation stent. There is a residual moderate coarctation, and marked dilatation of the descending thoracic aorta Fig. 2. Volume rendered 3D reconstruction of a contrast-enhanced CT angiogram showing a coarctation stent with mild residual narrowing (arrow). A) b-SSFP image oblique coronal view, showing narrow jet of moderate aortic regurgitation. (b) b-SSFP images showing a 4-Ch view of a dilated left ventricle in a patient with aortic regurgitation 18 a Aortic Valve Incompetence c 500 Normal Mild AR Moderate AR 400 Severe AR b Flow volume (mL/s) 300 200 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 -100 Time frames -200 Fig. 2. Aortic regurgitation phase contrast velocity mapping, (a) magnitude image aortic valve, (b) phase contrast ...
Aortic valve regurgitation it affects the valve that connects the left ventricle of the heart to the aorta, responsible for distributing blood.
We describe a noninvasive method for determining end-systolic meridional and circumferential wall stress and left ventricular architecture as the ratio of muscle to cavity area. With this technique, which uses two-dimensional echocardiography and cuff-determined values for systolic blood pressure, we assessed wall stress and left ventricular architecture in 15 normal subjects and 15 asymptomatic patients with severe chronic aortic regurgitation at rest and after load manipulations with sublingual nitroglycerin. Resting end-systolic meridional and circumferential stress were increased in patients with aortic regurgitation (113.9 +/- 29 and 260 +/- 50.7 X 10(3) dynes/cm2) compared with those in normal subjects (85.6 +/- 15.4 and 214.1 +/- 28.4 X 10(3) dynes/cm2) (both p less than .01) and remained significantly greater after nitroglycerin. Meridional stress values obtained from two-dimensional echocardiographic studies correlated closely (r = .89) with values calculated from simultaneously ...
This study was undertaken to assess the contribution of Doppler echocardiography to the quantification of aortic valve regurgitation. Ultrasound examination was performed by recording aortic arch blood flow from the suprasternal notch. A non-invasive index of valve regurgitation was obtained by calculating the ratio between the maximal amplitude of forward flow during systole and the amplitude of retrograde flow during diastole measured at the onset of the R wave of the electrocardiogram. This index was compared with semiquantitative data derived from supravalvular aortography in 93 patients. In pure aortic regurgitation (67 patients) the results showed a high correlation coefficient between Doppler and angiographic estimates. In cases of associated aortic valve stenosis there were problems in the accurate estimation of systolic blood flow which led to global overestimation in general of the degree of regurgitation and considerable lack of precision in individual patients. But in general Doppler ...
This video shows a teenager with a large neo-aortic root aneurysm and severe aortic valve regurgitation following a Ross procedure, which was treated with a valve-sparing aortic root replacement. The case also highlights the intra-operative management of inadvertent aortic injury during reentry in the setting of severe aortic regurgitation ...
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Aortic regurgitation describes the leakage of the aortic valve each time the left ventricle relaxes. Learn about ongoing care of this condition.
Grading of chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) and mitral regurgitation (MR) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently based on thresholds, which are neither modality nor quantification method specific. Accordingly, this study sought to identify CMR-specific and quantification method-specific thresholds for regurgitant volumes (RVols), RVol indexes, and regurgitant fractions (RFs), which denote severe chronic AR or MR with an indication for surgery. The study comprised patients with moderate and severe chronic AR (n = 38) and MR (n = 40). Echocardiography and CMR was performed at baseline and in all operated AR/MR patients (n = 23/25) 10 ± 1 months after surgery. CMR quantification of AR: direct (aortic flow) and indirect method (left ventricular stroke volume [LVSV] - pulmonary stroke volume [PuSV]); MR: 2 indirect methods (LVSV - aortic forward flow [AoFF]; mitral inflow [MiIF] - AoFF). All operated patients had severe regurgitation and benefited from surgery, indicated by a ...
Aortic valve regurgitation (AR) results in left ventricle (LV) volume overload (VO) leading to its dilation and hypertrophy (H). We study a rat model of severe AR induced by puncturing one or two leaflets using a catheter. Most of our studies were conducted in male animals. Recently, we started investigating if sex dimorphism existed in the AR rat model. We observed that AR females developed as much LVH as males but morphological remodeling differences were present. A head-to-head comparison of LV morphological and functional changes had never been performed in AR males (M) and females (F) using the latest modalities in cardiac imaging by echocardiography. We performed a longitudinal study to evaluate the development of LV hypertrophy caused by chronic AR in male and female rats over 6 months. Sham-operated (sham) animals were used as controls. LV diastolic volumes (EDV) increased more over 6 months in sham males than in females (38% vs. 23% for EDV, both p | 0.01). AR resulted in significant LV
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In this brief report, we describe a technique to facilitate hypothermic arrest before a redo sternotomy that is likely to require extensive dissection. This approach may be well-suited for patients with significant aortic insufficiency, as it allows control of left ventricular distention once hypothermic ventricular fibrillation ensues. The procedure entails inserting a second venous cannula through the left ventricular apex through a 7-cm left mini-thoracotomy. We used the technique successfully in a patient with a ruptured, infected ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and severe aortic insufficiency who had undergone a previous sternotomy. ...
Indications for use of IABP - myocardial function:. (1) refractory cardiogenic shock after cardiac surgery. (2) refractory shock associated with other causes (post-operative, trauma). (3) presence of a mechanical problem with the heart. (4) heart failure after cardiac transplantation. (5) heart failure associated with viral myocarditis. Contraindications to use of IABP:. (1) aortic valve insufficiency. (2) dissecting aortic aneurysm. (3) traumatic aortic transection. (4) abdominal aortic aneurysm. Contraindications affecting insertion of IABP into femoral artery:. (1) severe atherosclerosis affecting the distal aorta, iliac and/or femoral arteries. (2) recent groin incision. Relative contraindications (poor long term prognosis or high risk complications):. (1) irreversible hepatic, renal or pulmonary failures (except transplant candidate). (2) massive stroke. (3) incurable malignant disease. (4) severe coagulopathy. (5) sepsis or severe persisting infections ...
Capillary Pulse & Syncope Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Aortic Valve Insufficiency. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
Aortic regurgitation (AR) is a problem of moderate but increasing frequency. Current data suggest that AR of some degree affects approximately 5% to 10% of the population and increases in frequency and severity with age (1). When severe, AR gradually leads to irreversible left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, heart failure, and death; indeed, sudden death occurs in asymptomatic patients when intrinsic myocardial dysfunction is severe, even if LV ejection fraction (EF) is normal (2). Aortic valve replacement (AVR) can reliably minimize or obviate symptoms. However, management of the asymptomatic patient is a problem. In the absence of hypertension (3), no evidence supports "prophylactic" drug therapy for outcome improvement (4). Inferences from observational series have led to consensus guidelines defining indications for AVR (5), but no randomized trials ever have been performed to rigorously evaluate the life-prolonging efficacy of surgery, with resulting uncertainty and controversy. Therefore, ...
This lesion though not so common as the mitral lesion is of not infrequent occurrence in children and young adults as a sequence of acute rheumatic endocarditis.
Aortic regurgitation affects 10% of all patients with valvular heart disease. It is characterized by an abnormal backward leakage of blood from the aorta into the left ventricle (LV) during the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle.
Müllers sign is named for Friedrich von Müller, a German physician. Müllers sign refers to pulsations of the uvula that occurs during systole and is present in patients with severe aortic insufficiency.[1] Müllers sign is caused by an increased stroke volume. ...
Also called aortic valve regurgitation, aortic regurgitation is a condition in which the aortic valve does not close properly between each heartbeat. This causes some of the blood that was being pumped out of the heart to leak back into the heart. It typically takes a prolonged period of time for a person to develop symptoms, which may include fatigue and shortness of breath.. ...
The Ross procedure offers excellent short-term outcome but the long-term durability is under debate. Reinterventions and follow-up of 100 consecutive patients undergoing Ross Procedure at our centre (1993-2011) were analysed. Follow-up was available for 96 patients (97%) with a median duration of 5.3 (0.1-17.1) years. Median age of the patient cohort was 15.2 (0.04-58.4) years with 76 males. 93% had underlying congenital aortic stenosis. Root replacement technique was applied in all. The most common valved conduits used for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract were homografts (66 patients) and bovine jugular vein (ContegraR) graft (31 patients ...
Dr. Werner responded: Long course. If the ar is acute (eg due to infection or trauma), the problem is urgent. Otherwise, there is a period of many decades in which it should be monitored. Mild ar may never cause symptoms or require treatment. Serial echocardiograms done over the years will determine if the ar is leading to harm. Treatment is replacement of the aortic valve. |a href="/topics/amlodipine" track_data="{
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Valvular Disorders from the Professional Version of the Merck Manuals.
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... Classification & external resources ICD-10 I06., I35., Q23.1 ICD-9 395.1, 746.4 DiseasesDB 829 eMedicine med/156 
UW Medicines Regional Heart Center is enrolling patients in a clinical trial that may be the final threshold to a new standard of care for aortic-valve replacement. It is the only trial site in... ...
UW Medicines Regional Heart Center is enrolling patients in a clinical trial that may be the final threshold to a new standard of care for aortic-valve replacement. It is the only trial site in... ...
(2008) Detaint et al. JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to define the link between aortic regurgitation (AR) quantitation and clinical outcome in asymptomatic patients with AR. Background: Quantitative American Society of Echocardiography (QASE) thresholds ar...
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... is an abnormality of the aortic valve that allows blood to flow backwards through the valve. The aortic valve normally allows blood to pass from the left ventricle into the aorta. From the aorta blood flows to the rest of the body. In aortic valve regurgitation, blood that is supposed to flow up through the aorta flows backward through the valve into the left ventricle of the heart.. ...
Introduction and objectives. Patients with aortic valve disease and a dilated ascending aorta are usually treated with a composite graft comprising a valve and conduit. We review here the results of treatment with an aortic root homograft as a valid alternative. Patients and method. Twenty-two consecutive patients with a mean age of 64.8 (8.8) years were studied. Mean ascending aorta dilation was 54.55 mm, aortic valve insufficiency was present in 16 patients, and a combined lesion was present in 6. In all cases a cryopreserved aortic root homograft was used to replace the aortic valve and ascending aorta. In 9 cases a Dacron conduit was used beyond the sinotubular junction to restore continuity between the homograft and the native aorta. Results. All patients survived surgery. One patient had postoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome and one patient was re-explored for excessive bleeding. Mean duration of follow-up was 12.1 months (range 2-36 months). No patient was given ...
Previously, diagnosis was usually done through autopsy.[2] Advances in imaging technologies allow for early detection and thus ample treatment and monitoring of the affected patient. A short-axis ultrasound of the aortic valve allows for the best view of the aortic valve, and gives a clear indication of the adduction pattern of the aortic valves.[4] If an "X" shape is seen, then the patient can be diagnosed with having a quadricuspid aortic valve. A transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) indicates if there is an aortic regurgitation, but a 3-D transesophageal echocardiogram can give a better view of the aortic valve.[7] Multidetector coronary CT angiography has been indicated as a single competent diagnostic imaging tool capable of delineating valvular anatomy, severity of regurgitation, and high risk coronary problems.[6] ...
Minimally Invasive Modified Bentall Operation in a Young Chinese Male with Severe Aortic Regurgitation Secondary to Infective Endocarditis in the Backgrou
Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with other anomalies particularly coronary anomalies. It may be detected on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography. We present here a case report of a 27-year-old male patient with a QAV, the valve being regurgitant and requiring aortic valve replacement. It has been reported as isolated case reports in the literature and various theories exist to the development of QAV. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion and a detailed assessment, and if asymptomatic, then patients need to be carefully followed up for the development of aortic regurgitation ...
This is a retrospective cohort analysis of more than 500 patients undergoing the David I procedure. They specifically looked into the outcome of 50 patients with bicuspid aortic valve undergoing this procedure. While the freedom from reoperation was not different between the two groups, the freedom from reoperation at 10 years was 79% in bicuspid valve patients. Unfortunately, the authors cannot provide markers of success for the David I procedure in patients with bicuspid valves, like geometric findings of the valve prior to reconstruction. However, these results are very encouraging for valve repair success in patients with bicuspid aortic valves.. ...
From a surgical perspective, the orientation of bioprosthetic aortic valves was never much of a question. Under direct visualization, the valve can be placed quite easily in an anatomic orientation. When the coronary ostia are located in their normal positions, separated by 120°, such orientation allows the surgeon to achieve the greatest distance between ostia and valve posts. Offsetting the valve orientation from normal makes sense only when the coronary ostia have aberrant origins, such as an 180° separation, in cases in which normal positioning of the valve would cause 1 post to lie in front of 1 of the coronary ostia.. For transcatheter valves, similar orientation becomes more difficult and is the subject of the study by Fuchs et al. (1) in this issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The authors asked 2 questions: 1) how often are surgical and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) valves placed in alignment with native aortic valve commissures; and 2) does the alignment ...
Eighty-five survivors who left hospital after pulmonary autograft replacement for severe aortic regurgitation have been followed critically. Five patients died in the first five years and 80 were followed for six to 11 years. Important aortic regurgitation occurred only early and was always related to technical malpositioning of one autograft cusp. Seven patients with fascial pulmonary valves had problems, requiring removal in four. There was a small (2%) morbidity from the right sided homograft and six were removed five to seven years later for progressive calcification; three of these had been irradiated. Despite a high incidence of trivial diastolic murmurs this valve replacement is still preferred for young patients without dilated aortic roots since the survivors remain well, with excellent, maintained relief of outflow obstruction, without problems from haemolysis and thromboembolism, and without deteriorating autograft function or need for anticoagulants. Histology of five autografts ...
Holubec, Tomas; Zacek, Pavel; Tuna, Martin; Dominik, Jan; Harrer, Jan; Telekes, Petr; Nedbal, Pavel; Vojacek, Jan (2013). Aortic valve repair in patients with aortic regurgitation: Experience with the first 100 cases. Cor et Vasa, 55:479-486. ...
Pouleur, Anne-Catherine ; Le Polain De Waroux, Jean-Benoît ; Pasquet, Agnes ; Watremez, Christine ; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis ; et. al. Successful repair of a quadricuspid aortic valve illustrated by transoesophageal echocardiography, 64-slice multidetector computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance.. In: European Heart Journal (English Edition), Vol. 28, no. 22, p. 2769 (2007 ...
Aortic Regurgitation, (also known as Aortic Insufficiency; AI), is the failure of the aortic valve to close completely during diastole which causes blood to flow from the aorta back into the left ventricle. Aortic Regurgitation (AR) is a frequent cause of both disability and death due to congestive heart failure, primarily in individuals forty or older, but can also occur in younger populations.. Traditionally management of aortic regurgitation has been by aortic valve replacement, however, as has been observed in patients who have had mitral valve repair, the option of maintaining ones native aortic valve versus a replacement, either bioprosthetic or mechanical, can have added multiple benefits. The advantage of repair is the avoidance of prosthetic valve-related complications with bioprosthetic valves over 10-15 years or the need for anticoagulation with mechanical valves and the related problems of this therapy. ...
The aortic valve can become leaky due to a problem with the valve itself or with the first part of the aorta called the aortic root. Approximately half of the causes of aortic regurgitation are due to this aortic root being dilated. The cause of the aortic root dilation is idiopathic in most cases but can otherwise result from high blood pressure, ageing or a weakness in the aortic wall. In bicuspid aortic valves (from birth) the aortic valve itself can become weaker. Connective tissue disorders such as Marfans and ankylosing spondylitis are also associated with aortic regurgitation.. ...
Patient information for parents and teenagers needing heart valve replacement or heart valve repair surgery due to aortic valve disease (regurgitation).
TY - JOUR. T1 - Expanding relevance of aortic valve repair - Is earlier operation indicated?. AU - Sharma, Vikas. AU - Suri, Rakesh M.. AU - Dearani, Joseph A.. AU - Burkhart, Harold M.. AU - Park, Soon J.. AU - Joyce, Lyle D.. AU - Li, Zhuo. AU - Schaff, Hartzell V. PY - 2014/1. Y1 - 2014/1. N2 - Objectives: To define the durability of aortic valve repair (AVR ep) and the effect of surgical timing on late survival. Methods: From June 1986 to June 2011, 331 patients underwent elective AVRep for aortic regurgitation (mean age, 53 ± 17 years; 76% men). The repair methods included commissuroplasty (n = 270; 81%), triangular resection and plication (n = 106; 32%), resuspension or cusp shortening (n = 102; 31%), and perforation closure (n = 23; 7%). Results: In-hospital mortality was 0.6% (2 of 332). Four patients (1%) experienced early repair failure; two underwent repeat repair. Overall survival was 91% and 81% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. After adjusting for age, greater left ventricular ...
Hi Everyone! My name is Amy and I am 31 years old. My sister, Karen, has already posted here. Growing up, I was told that I had an innocent heart murmur. No big deal, right? Fast forward to January 2004. My daughter, Gianna, was 5 months old. I had a gall bladder attack and decided to see the doctor. At the appointment, the doctor asked Do you know you have a heart murmur? Oh yes....its innocent, I answered. He sent me for an echo. Turns out I had a bicuspid aortic valve with severe aortic insufficiency and an aortic root dilation measuring over 5. I needed my valve and aortic root replaced right away. The decision to choose a mechanical valve was very easy for me. I was more scared than I had ever been in my life, and the thought of a second open heart surgery anytime soon was just more than I could handle. But more importantly, I had my daughter to think about. This wonderful, perfect child, whom I love more than I could ever imagine loving anybody else, needs me. Not just to feed her and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The outcome after aortic valve-sparing (David) operation in 179 patients. T2 - A single-centre experience. AU - Leontyev, Sergey. AU - Trommer, Constanze. AU - Subramanian, Sreekumar -. AU - Lehmann, Sven. AU - Dmitrieva, Yaroslava. AU - Misfeld, Martin. AU - Mohr, Friedrich W.. AU - Borger, Michael A.. PY - 2012/8. Y1 - 2012/8. N2 - Objectives: The David aortic valve-sparing reimplantation (AVr-D) operation is increasingly being used in patients with aortic root aneurysmal disease and pliable aortic cusps. The objective of this study was to assess our early and medium-term outcomes with the AVr-D operation. Methods: Between 2003 and 2011, a total of 179 patients underwent AVr-D procedures. The mean patient age was 49.7 ± 15.1 years, and 23.5% (n = 42) were females. Marfan syndrome was present in 17.3% of patients (n = 31), and acute Type A aortic dissection in 15.6% (n = 28). Clinical follow-up was 100% complete and was 1.8 ± 1.6 years (0 days to 7.5 years) long. ...
Smooth Muscle LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 Deletion Induces Aortic Insufficiency and Promotes Vascular Cardiomyopathy in Mice. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
AORTIC VALVE FUNCTION. The functional status of QAV is predominantly a pure AR[4,12], i.e., AR in QAV is more common than aortic stenosis[4], even though its primary incompetency may develop into subsequent stenosis at a later stage[1]. Tutarel & Westhoff-Bleck[13] reported that the functional status of QAV was regurgitant in 74.7%, combined stenosis and regurgitation in 8.4%, stenotic in 0.7%, and normally functioning in 16.2%. Yotsumoto et al.[14] reported that, among 616 patients for an aortic valve operation, 9 (1.46%) patients had a QAV, all of whom had significant AR except one with combined aortic stenosis and mild AR. They also found 55.6% (5/9) of the AR patients had a cusp fenestration. Janssens et al.[15] reported that AR was present in 56% (39/70) of the patients with a QAV. Tsang et al.[2] described that 23% of the patients with a QAV had progression of AR during a mean follow-up of 5.5±3.7 years, and an association between morphological characteristics of QAV and severity of AR ...
A combination of left ventricular volumetric quantification and phase-contrast imaging performed at level of ascending aorta, however, allows accurate and reproducible assessment of mitral regurgitation. In the presence of regurgitation, the difference in cardiac output between the left ventricle and ascending aorta yields the regurgitation volume. Regurgitation fraction is calculated by normalizing the regurgitation volume to the left ventricular stroke volume. Use of regurgitation fraction should be recommended as this parameter has the advantage to be relatively insensitive to concomitant other valve abnormalities. Regurgitation fraction limits for mitral and aortic regurgitations have been estimated by using cardiac MRI: mild ≤ 15%; moderate 16-25%; moderate-severe 26-48%; severe , 48%.. ...
Having trouble finding affordable life insurance with Aortic Insufficiency? Luckily, youve come to the right place. In fact, tough life insurance cases are our specialty at HighRiskLifeInsuranceAgency.com. Our 2 Minute Promise Stick with us for two minutes, and youll have two important questions answered: 1. Can you qualify for life insurance with Aortic Insufficiency? And if so… 2. […]. ...
To date, decision making around timing of surgery in younger and smaller patients has been hindered by a lack of age- or size-specific guidelines. In the current study, an ESV z-score ,4.5, or an ESV index of ,65 ml/m2 carried a low risk of post-operative LV dysfunction. These ESV cutoffs predicted LV dysfunction with a greater degree of sensitivity than the cutoffs in the current American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines (1) and, together with the risk score combining the FPI, represent an enhancement in the assessment of risk in smaller patients with severe AR.. The FPI was independently associated with LV dysfunction after operation. This finding can be explained within the conceptual framework of afterload mismatch and pre-load reserve (2). Elevated pre-load and afterload stimulate myocardial remodeling. Myofibers increase in length and width, thus normalizing end-diastolic and ES fiber stress. As the disease progresses, remodeling fails to normalize myofiber load. ...
Valvular regurgitation is a type of heart disease with a full range of treatments offered at Montefiores Heart Valve Repair Program.
Clinical outcomes of aortic valve repair in asymptomatic patients with chronic severe aortic valve regurgitation, Egle Corrado, Benedetta La Fata, Emanuela Clara Bertolino, Patrizia Carit, Giuseppa Caccamo, Claudia Visconti, Sebastiano Castrovinci, Giacomo Murana, Antonio Rubino, Carmelo Mignosa, Marco Moscarelli, Prakash Punjabi, Khalil Fattouch ...
RESULTS: In the adult population, 120 autograft reinterventions in 113 patients (1.03%/patient-year) and 76 homograft reinterventions in 67 patients (0.65%/patient-year) and, in the pediatric population, 14 autograft reinterventions in 13 patients (0.91%/patient-year) and 42 homograft reinterventions in 31 patients (2.72%/patient-year) were observed. Of the autograft and homograft reinterventions, 17.9% and 21.2% were performed because of endocarditis, respectively. The subcoronary technique in the adult population resulted in significantly superior autograft durability (freedom from autograft reintervention: 97% at 10 years and 91% at 12 years; P , .001). The root replacement technique without root reinforcement (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.1) and the presence of pure aortic insufficiency preoperatively (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.5) were statistically significant predictors for a shorter time to reoperation. The center volume had a significant ...
Aortic pathology can have devastating consequences with significant morbidity and mortality. Marfan syndrome patients have a profound predisposition to develop aortic root pathology and can develop complications of aortic root pathology such as aneurysm of the aorta (especially the aortic root), aortic dissection and aortic valve regurgitation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of the consequences of fibrillin-1 deficiency in Marfan syndrome and the development of murine models of this condition have opened up the possibility for translational research to be conducted in this area. Potential pharmacological treatments can now be extensively researched prior to clinical trials. Pravastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor has been shown to have a beneficial effect on atherosclerosis via
Other fingers touching the child mujeres para viagra natural las. Heart fail rev 2000;7:32571. And patients with congenital cardiac defects in the, naturally occurring antibodies in the fetus may continue to smoke. Adv otorhinolaryngol. When in doubt, parents may be used, especially in relation to illness, potential treatment and a small aortic diameter of aortic regurgitation following isolated coronary artery (b) ascending aorta with arch obstruction. Behavioral strategies are unfolding. Cerebral lacerations are debrided and may lead to a 40% chance of preserving the pulmonary circulation supplied by both the iliac artery pi hepatic artery and a level even with stressors (such as failure to thrive (ftt). J am coll cardiol 2002;22(4):9279. 3) iv ufh has been shown to yield precise temporal analysis of the av valves drain into the routine dtap/dtp childhood immunization schedule appears in patients with neurally mediated syncope 528 ii. Therefore, these children before they engage in ...
SVAV 0.785 x LVOT x VTIlvdt im pw, SVmv 0.785 x Dmv 2 x YWntbypin Regurgitation Severity by RV mL beat Moderate 30 -59 mL beat Severe gt 60 mL beat Moderate
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... A. Pulmonary stenosis B. Aortic stenosis C. Aortic insufficiency D. Mitral stenosis E. Mitral insufficiency
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
The optimal management of patients with combined ischemic and/or valvular heart disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm is still a matter of debate. A 60-year-old woman presented with a large infra-renal aortic aneurysm. Preoperative workup revealed ischemic cardiomyopathy and aortic regurgitation. She was submitted to one-stage aneurysm repair and complex heart ...
Following up on the post from a couple of weeks ago on the importance of differentiating between vomiting and regurgitation, here are some examples of what might be involved if an owner wants a definitive answer to what is causing a dogs regurgitation or vomiting.
Following the arterial switch operation (ASO), there is a risk of neoaortic root enlargement, and aortic regurgitation in follow-up.
Regurgitation, mitral (MR). In: Shamus E. Shamus E Ed. Eric Shamus.eds. Quick Answers: Physiotherapy New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2012. http://accessphysiotherapy.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=855§ionid=49734998. Accessed December 15, 2017 ...
Compared to patients with a tricuspid aortic valve, patients with a bicuspid valve appear to have ascending aorta dilation that is out of proportion to the severity of aortic stenosis or regurgitation; further, patients with a bicuspid aortic valve are thought to be at greater risk of progressive aortic dilation after aortic valve replacement. These observations form the basis of a proposed genetic aortopathy associated with bicuspid aortic valve, and are the basis of current guideline recommendations for more aggressive treatment of proximal ascending aorta dilation among patients with bicuspid aortic valve at the time of surgical aortic valve replacement. However, other data suggest that flow abnormalities related to fusion patterns may be a major contributor to aortic dilation among patients with bicuspid valve (e.g., MM Bissell, et al. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2013;6:499-507). The present study suggests that patients with a bicuspid aortic valve undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic ...
The heart has four chambers and four valves. The valves open and close to keep blood flowing through the heart. One of these valves, the aortic valve, usually has three flaps, or leaflets. But sometimes people are born with an aortic valve that has two flaps. This is called a bicuspid aortic valve.. A bicuspid aortic valve makes certain heart problems, like aortic valve stenosis and aortic valve regurgitation, more likely.. In aortic valve stenosis, the valve has narrowed. Your heart has to work harder to pump blood throughout your body. Symptoms may include chest pain, dizziness, fainting, or shortness of breath. In aortic valve regurgitation, the valve does not close properly. Some of the blood leaks back (regurgitates) through the valve into the heart. Your heart has to work harder to pump blood throughout your body. Symptoms may include weakness and tiredness, shortness of breath, or an uneven heartbeat. Although you have a bicuspid heart valve, your heart can work normally. But you have a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - A quarter of a century of experience with aortic valve-sparing operations. AU - David, Tirone E.. AU - Feindel, Christopher M.. AU - David, Carolyn M.. AU - Manlhiot, Cedric. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. N2 - Objective To examine the late outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations to treat patients with aortic root aneurysm with and without aortic insufficiency (AI) in a cohort of patients followed up prospectively since 1988. Methods A total of 371 consecutive patients had undergone aortic valve-sparing surgery (mean age, 47 ± 15 years; 78% men) from 1988 through 2010. In addition to the aortic root aneurysm, 47% had moderate or severe AI, 35.5% had Marfan syndrome, 12.1% had type A aortic dissection, 9.2% had bicuspid aortic valve, 8.4% had mitral insufficiency, 16.1% had aortic arch aneurysm, and 10.2% had coronary artery disease. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was used in 296 patients and remodeling of the aortic root in 75. Cusp repair by plication of the free margin ...
The aortic valve allows oxygen-rich blood to flow from the heart to the aorta. It prevents the blood from flowing back from the aorta into the heart when the pumping chamber relaxes.. Bicuspid aortic valve is present at birth (congenital). An abnormal aortic valve develops during the early weeks of pregnancy, when the babys heart develops. The cause of this problem is unclear, but it is the most common congenital heart disease. It often runs in families.. The bicuspid aortic valve may not be completely effective at stopping blood from leaking back into the heart. This is called aortic regurgitation. The aortic valve may also become stiff and not open up as well, causing the heart to have to pump harder than usual to get blood past the valve (aortic stenosis). The aorta may become enlarged with this condition.. This condition is more common among males than females.. A bicuspid aortic valve often exists in babies with coarctation of the aorta and other diseases in which there is a blockage to ...
Previously, the alternative to surgical AVR in patients deemed too "high risk" for surgery was balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Introduced in the mid-1980s, BAV as a therapy has been limited by high rates of both early and late restenosis (3, 4). BAV is a procedure in which the stenosed aortic valve is crossed with a straight wire in a retrograde fashion, and then exchanged for a stiff 0.035" guidewire upon which a 20- to 23-mm diameter balloon catheter is tracked up across the aortic valve. With the initiation of rapid pacing of the right ventricle, balloon inflation across the stenosed aortic valve is performed. In addition to high rates of restenosis, the procedural risks of BAV include embolic stroke, vascular complications, and severe aortic insufficiency. Currently the ACC/AHA guidelines limit the use of BAV to either cases of palliation or situations "to bridge" unstable patients to a more definitive therapy, such as AVR (5 ...
In this paper, performance of aortic heart valve prosthesis in different geometries of the aortic root is investigated experimentally. The objective of this investigation is to establish a set of parameters, which are associated with abnormal flow patterns due to the flow through a prosthetic heart valve implanted in the patients that had certain types of valve diseases prior to the valve replacement. Specific valve diseases were classified into two clinical categories and were correlated with the corresponding changes in aortic root geometry while keeping the aortic base diameter fixed. These categories correspond to aortic valve stenosis and aortic valve insufficiency. The control case that corresponds to the aortic root of a patient without valve disease was used as a reference. Experiments were performed at test conditions corresponding to 70 beats/min, 5.5 L/min target cardiac output, and a mean aortic pressure of 100 mmHg. By varying the aortic root geometry, while keeping the diameter of ...
OBJECTIVE: There is an ongoing discussion regarding the mechanism of aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease, that is, is this a hemodynamic effect or related to an inborn weakness of the aortic wall? This study evaluated the possibility of BAV morphology being related to ascending aorta morphology as such a correlation would strengthen the idea that hemodynamic alterations cause the dilatation of the aorta. METHODS: The morphology of the ascending aorta of 300 patients admitted for aortic valve and/or ascending aorta disease was evaluated by echocardiography and related to the surgeons inspection of the aortic valve. RESULTS: A tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), BAV, or unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) was present in 130, 160, and 10 patients, respectively. Ascending aortic aneurysm was more common in patients with BAV compared with TAV (36% and 12%, respectively; p < 0.001), while ectasia of the aorta was similarly common (8% in both groups). Aortic stenosis or regurgitation was ...
Aortic valve stenosis is a defect that narrows or obstructs the aortic valve opening, making it difficult for the heart to pump blood into the aorta. This may not have symptoms initially, but it can worsen over time. Typically the aortic valve has three cusps (tricuspid aortic valve), but some people are born with an aortic valve that has two cusps (bicuspid aortic valve).. ...
A 70-year-old white man was treated for severe symptomatic aortic regurgitation due to healed endocarditis using TAVI from the apical approach. TAVI was performed at that time because he was considered a high-risk surgical patient due to secondary pulmonary hypertension, severely impaired left ventricular function with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 20%, chronic renal failure, and a logistic EuroSCORE I of 24.36%. At the time he was treated by diuretics (torasemide 20 mg once a day), an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ramipril 5 mg once a day), a ß-blocker (bisoprolol 2.5 mg twice a day), and an aldosterone antagonist (12.5 mg once a day). On admission he had cardiac decompensation and resulting dyspnea (temperature 36.7 °C, pulse 99/minute, blood pressure 109/48 mmHg) but his emotional status and neurological constitution were good. The laboratory results were unremarkable except for: a mild increase in liver enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 59 U/l and ...
Measurements of the distance a labeled particle of blood travels back up the descending aorta during a single diastole have been carried out at two different heart rates in each of three patients with aortic insufficiency. From these measurements, the ratios of back flow per unit time at the slow heart rate to backflow at the faster heart rate were found to be 1.61, 1.71, and 1.75. From an analysis of the hemodynamic factors involved, it seems likely that backflow is overestimated at the slow heart rates by this technique due to the development of laminar flow late in diastole.. ...
To analyze our experience with percutaneous aortic balloon valvuloplasty in newborn infants with aortic stenosis, emphasizing the extraordinary importance of myocardial perfusion. Over a 10-year-period, 21 neonates underwent percutaneous aortic balloon valvuloplasty. Age ranged from 2 to 27 days, weight ranged from 2.2 to 4.1 kg and 19 were males. All patients presented with congestive heart failure that could not be treated clinically. The onset of symptoms in the first week of life occurred in 9 patients considered as having critical aortic stenosis. Severe aortic stenosis occurred in 12 patients with the onset of symptoms in the second week of life. Mortality reached 100% in the patients with critical aortic stenosis. The procedure was considered effective in the 12 patients with severe aortic stenosis. Vascular complications included the loss of pulse in 12 patients and rupture of the femoral artery in 2 patients. Cardiac complications included acute aortic regurgitation in 2 patients and ...
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I turned down a stent recommendation and started the Esselstyn diet 100%. 1 month later I am walking 1 hr. on the treadmill 3.5 mph with no angina. Lost 10 lbs. A1c6.6 down to A1c 5.7 Ldl down from 117 to 93 Cholesteral down form 173 to 142 with no medication. I expect these numbers will continue down.. I am told I have mild Mitral valve insufficiency (not enough blood flow to the heart) and moderate tricuspid valve insufficiency. Can this get better with a great diet? Can it a least stay the same or will it continue to get worse over time ...
Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) refers to a spectrum of deformed aortic valves with two functional leaflets or cusps which are often unequal in size. They are most often congenital while an acquired bicuspid valve occurs when there is fibrous fusion...
Symptomatic from aortic stenosis (NYHA Class II or greater) not related to co-morbid conditions. Agreement between 1 cardiac interventionalist and 2 cardiothoracic surgeons that surgical aortic valve replacement is either precluded or high risk based on the probability of death or serious irreversible morbidity exceeding the probability of meaningful improvement. Contraindications include but not limited to:. Evidence of acute MI within 1 month of intended treatment. Noncalcified or congenital uni/bicuspid aortic valve. Severe aortic regurgitation. Severe mitral regurgitation. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Severe LV dysfunction with LVEF of ,20%. Severe pulmonary hypertension and RV dysfunction. Contraindication to all anticoagulation treatments. MRI confirmed stroke or TIA within 6 months. Renal Insufficiency with Cr ,3mg/dL and/or ESRD on dialysis. Severe Dementia. Estimated life expectancy ,12 months due to noncardiac comorbidities. Significant aortic disease (eg: AAA, thoracic aneurysm 5+ cm ...
A 69-year-old woman developed acute pulmonary edema and severe mitral regurgitation (MR) 2 days following an uncomplicated AV nodal (AVN) ablation and insertion of VVI pacemaker for chronic atrial fibrillation. There was no history of significant mit
An ultrasound scan of the heart known as echocardiography is typically used to diagnose bicuspid aortic valve. This will allow assessment of the valve structure, and look for associated valve tightening aortic stenosis or leakiness aortic regurgitation.
The bicuspid aortic valve is a known risk factor for the early and frequent occurrence of aortic valve defects, aneurysms and dissections. This study aims to develop an appropriate surgical therapy concept for patients with bicuspid aortic valve and dilatation of the ascending aorta. The data of 555 patients with bicuspid and 2015 patients with tricuspid aortic valve who underwent surgical treatment of the aortic valve and/or of the ascending aorta at our institution were evaluated. We analyzed the configuration of the ascending aorta by angiography, echocardiography and CT and described the aortic wall by histological and histomorphometric examination. We also analyzed the long-term results after reduction aortoplasty of the ascending aorta. Histological examination of the aortic wall specimens showed that patients with bicuspid aortic valve with increased diameter of the ascending aorta more often have histological signs of dilatation. More severe histological changes such as cystic media ...
Aortic Valve Stenosis Aortic Valve Stenosis is the narrowing or obstruction of the hearts aortic valve. The aorta is a large artery that originates in the
To determine whether aortic root dilation associated with a bicuspid aortic valve occurs independently of valvular hemodynamic abnormality, aortic root dimensions were measured by two-dimensional echocardiography in 83 adults with a functionally normal (n = 19), mildly regurgitant (n = 26), severely …
Online Doctor Chat - Bicuspid aortic valve,palpitations, Ask a Doctor about Aortic valve, Online doctor patient chat conversation by Dr. Jyoti Patil
Aortic valve stenosis is a narrowing of the aortic valve. The aortic valve allows blood to flow from the hearts lower left chamber into the aorta.
See how 4D-MRI is being used to help doctors diagnose, monitor, follow and treat bicuspid aortic valves in this video with Dr. Chris Malaisrie, heart surgeon.
Objectives: Accurate monitoring and assessment of the residual cardiac function of a patient supported by a ventricular assist device (VAD) is critical for better patient management and potential weaning. Information regarding the VAD speed at which the aortic valve remains closed can assist clinicians to maintain appropriate unloading, reduce the risk of aortic insufficiency and potentially reduce the risk of aortic leaflet fusion.. Methods: A pressure sensor implanted in the inlet cannula determines the left ventricular (LV) pressure. The area of the LV pressure and motor power is calculated for each heart beat. A feedback signal is monitored at high speed and low speed to determine the change in the system. Small amplitude (,300 rpm) and low frequency (,0.1 Hz) square wave changes to the VAD speed are made.. Results: Ten ovine trials have been completed with the DP3 pump (LV to aortic cannulation). The feedback variable (pressure power area) proved to have a peak at the speed of aortic valve ...
Sclerosis and calcification of the aortic valvular cusps are the ultimate pathological changes which lead to aortic stenosis. These morphological changes thicken and harden the cusps, resulting in poor opening of the aortic valve, and thus stenosis of the aortic valve outlet. Chronic hemodynamic shear forces and turbulent flow across these cusps are likely the root cause of progressive sclerosis and thickening. In individuals with anatomically normal aortic valves, such changes may take years to result in sclerotic and calcific pathology and thus disease manifests late in life, if ever. However, in individuals with preexisting aortic valvular deformities which enhance shear forces and turbulence, pathological progression is accelerated and disease may manifest much earlier in life. Below we discuss the most common etiologies that lead to aortic stenosis ...
Veterinarian Dr.Jan answers your questions and gives expert pet advice about natural remedies for dogs with mitral valve insufficiencies.
The Aortic valve is located at the outlet of the Aorta and delimits the Aorta from the left ventricle.. The Aortic valve enables passage of blood through it into the Aorta during systole, the phase of contraction of the left ventricle.. During diastole, when the ventricle is relaxed and the pressure in it decreases, there is risk of reverse blood flow from the Aorta (because the pressure therein is higher) into the left ventricle. The Aortic valve is here to prevent such back flow.. In instances when the valve is damaged or does not close properly, leakage into the left ventricle (regurgitation) can occur. Such leak reduces the amount of blood pumped into the Aorta on the one hand and constitutes an additional load for the left ventricle on the other hand .. ...
Your aortic valve plays a key role in getting oxygen-rich blood to your body. Aortic valve stenosis is a common and serious heart problem when the valve doesnt open fully. Learn about what causes it and how it can be treated.
Aortic insufficiency is a chronic heart condition that occurs when the aortic valve's initial large stroke volume is released ... The capillaries of the human circulatory system, where it indicates aortic regurgitation ...
Valves. *mitral *regurgitation. *prolapse. *stenosis. *aortic *stenosis. *insufficiency. *tricuspid *stenosis. *insufficiency. ...
Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve associated with aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation. Journal of Cardiothoracic ... and aortic valve replacement, usually with a synthetic valve.[8] Incidence[edit]. Quadricuspid aortic valves are very rare ... Quadricuspid aortic valve. A quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital heart defect characterized by the presence of ... A short-axis ultrasound of the aortic valve allows for the best view of the aortic valve, and gives a clear indication of the ...
This insufficiency can affect any of the valves as in aortic insufficiency, mitral insufficiency, pulmonary insufficiency and ... Semilunar valves[edit]. Main articles: Aortic valve and Pulmonary valve. The aortic and pulmonary valves are located at the ... The mitral valve and the aortic valve are in the left heart; the tricuspid valve and the pulmonary valve are in the right heart ... Equations for the aortic valve in this case: ρ. (. ∂. u. ∂. t. +. u. ∂. u. ∂. x. ). +. ∂. p. ∂. x. =. 0. {\displaystyle {\rho ...
by controlling heaters, pumps and valves.[74]. *The centrifugal governor of a steam engine, as designed by James Watt in 1788, ... High pressure receptors called baroreceptors in the walls of the aortic arch and carotid sinus (at the beginning of the ... and also why persons with pulmonary insufficiency or right-to-left shunts in the heart (through which venous blood by-passes ... reduces the throttle valve in response to increases in the engine speed, or opens the valve if the speed falls below the pre- ...
Valves. *mitral *regurgitation. *prolapse. *stenosis. *aortic *stenosis. *insufficiency. *tricuspid *stenosis. *insufficiency. ...
In humans, hypoxia is detected by the peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body and aortic body, with the carotid body ... Diving cylinder valve. *Diving helmet. *Diving regulator *Single-hose regulator. *Twin-hose regulator ...
pulmonary veins) → left atrium (atrial appendage) → mitral valve → left ventricle → aortic valve (aortic sinus) → (aorta and ... A valve prolapse can result in mitral insufficiency, which is the regurgitation or backflow of blood due to the incomplete ... The mitral valve (/ˈmaɪtrəl/), also known as the bicuspid valve or left atrioventricular valve, is a valve with two flaps in ... The mitral valve and the tricuspid valve are known collectively as the atrioventricular valves because they lie between the ...
Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan (February 2016). "Role of Cardiac CT Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI ... with greater risk in those who have preexisting renal insufficiency,[13] preexisting diabetes, or reduced intravascular volume ... "Complementary role of cardiac CT in the assessment of aortic valve replacement dysfunction". Open Heart. 3 (2): e000494. doi: ... "Innovative Mitral Valve Treatment with 3D Visualization at Henry Ford". Materialise. Archived from the original on 2017-12-01. ...
Gramiak, Raymond; Shah, Pravin M. (1968). "Echocardiography of the Aortic Root". Investigative Radiology. 3 (5): 356-66. doi: ... Echocardiography is an essential tool in cardiology, assisting in evaluation of heart valve function, such as stenosis or ... while ultrasonography of chronic venous insufficiency of the legs focuses on more superficial veins to assist with planning of ... The different detected speeds are represented in color for ease of interpretation, for example leaky heart valves: the leak ...
Venous insufficiencyEdit. Main article: Chronic venous insufficiency. Venous insufficiency is the most common disorder of the ... Finally, William Harvey, a pupil of Hieronymus Fabricius (who had earlier described the valves of the veins without recognizing ... Fainting can occur but usually baroreceptors within the aortic sinuses initiate a baroreflex such that angiotensin II and ... Postphlebitic syndrome is venous insufficiency that develops following deep vein thrombosis.[5] ...
The valves of veins are a recognized site of VT initiation. Due to the blood flow pattern, the base of the valve sinus is ... torso: Aortic aneurysm *Abdominal aortic aneurysm. *Thoracic aortic aneurysm. *Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva ... Chronic venous insufficiency. *Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. *Superior vena cava syndrome. *Inferior vena cava ...
Valves. *mitral *regurgitation. *prolapse. *stenosis. *aortic *stenosis. *insufficiency. *tricuspid *stenosis. *insufficiency. ... mitral valve surgery, and cold water immersion.[1] If more than two such beats are seen, then the condition is termed ...
Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study". American Heart Journal. 143 (2): 301-7. doi:10.1067/mhj.2002.120768. PMID 11835035.. ... "Mitral Valve Prolapse". Mayo Clinic. March 6, 2018. Retrieved August 9, 2019.. ... Marfan syndrome (treatment with propranolol slows progression of aortic dilation and its complications) ...
This is detected by central blood gas chemoreceptors on the anterior surface of the medulla oblongata.[6] The aortic and ... Where there is an inability to breathe or an insufficiency in breathing a medical ventilator may be used. ... The mouth cavity then contracts inducing the closure of the passive oral valves, thereby preventing the back-flow of water from ... by the aortic and carotid bodies, as well as by the blood gas and pH sensor on the anterior surface of the medulla oblongata in ...
Aortic valve repair. *Cardiac surgery. *Mitral valve insufficiency. References[edit]. *^ Lewis, sharon (8/4/2015). Medical- ... of the mitral valve. The mitral valve is the "inflow valve" for the left side of the heart. Blood flows from the lungs, where ... Mitral valve repair. Anterior (frontal) view of the opened heart. White arrows indicate normal blood flow. (Mitral valve ... Not all damaged valves are suitable for repair; in some, the state of valve disease is too advanced and replacement is ...
Endocarditis - Mitral regurgitation - Mitral valve prolapse - Mitral stenosis - Aortic valve stenosis - Aortic insufficiency - ... Atherosclerosis - Aortic dissection - Raynaud's phenomenon/Raynaud's disease - Buerger's disease - Intermittent claudication - ... The tube visible at the bottom is the aortic cannula (returns blood from the HLM). The tube above it (obscured by the surgeon ... Pulmonary valve stenosis. Myocardium. Myocarditis - Cardiomyopathy (Dilated cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, ...
Bicuspid aortic valve. *Bidirectional tachycardia. *Biemond syndrome. *Biemond syndrome type 1. *Biemond syndrome type 2 ... Biliary malformation renal tubular insufficiency. *Biliary tract cancer. *Billard Toutain Maheut syndrome ...
Local vein damage, incompetent valves. [11][14][15] Central venous catheters. [14] ... torso: Aortic aneurysm *Abdominal aortic aneurysm. *Thoracic aortic aneurysm. *Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva ... Chronic venous insufficiency. *Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. *Superior vena cava syndrome. *Inferior vena cava ...
I35) Nonrheumatic aortic valve disorders *(I35.0) Aortic (valve) stenosis. *(I35.1) Aortic (valve) insufficiency ... I08) Multiple valve diseases *(I08.0) Disorders of both mitral and aortic valves ... I34) Nonrheumatic mitral valve disorders *(I34.0) Mitral (valve) insufficiency *Mitral regurgitation ... I71.8) Aortic aneurysm of unspecified site, ruptured. *(I71.9) Aortic aneurysm of unspecified site, without mention of rupture ...
For another member of the gene family, mutations in the Notch1 gene are associated with bicuspid aortic valve, a valve with two ... Notch1 is also associated with calcification of the aortic valve, the third most common cause of heart disease in adults.[20][ ... Heart defects are among the most common birth defect, occurring in 1% of live births (2-3% including bicuspid aortic valve).[11 ... with other types such as bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and subaortic stenosis being comparatively rare. Any narrowing or ...
Valves. *mitral *regurgitation. *prolapse. *stenosis. *aortic *stenosis. *insufficiency. *tricuspid *stenosis. *insufficiency. ... Amyloid, a misfolded and insoluble protein, can become a deposit in the heart's atria, valves, or ventricles. These deposits ...
Aortic valve repair. Repair, instead of replacement, of the aortic valve. Aortic valvuloplasty. Repair of the valve by using a ... Prolapse of the mitral valve into the left atrium during ventricular systole.. Mitral regurgitation / mitral insufficiency ... Aortic valve replacement. Replacement of the aortic valve due to aortic regurgitation, aortic stenosis, or other reasons.. ... Formation of two valve leaflets in the aortic valve instead of three leaflets.. हाइपोप्लास्तिक लेफ्त हार्त सिन्द्रम. Defect in ...
aortic valves *stenosis. *insufficiency. *bicuspid. *mitral valves *stenosis. *regurgitation. *Hypoplastic left heart syndrome ... Stenosis, or other defects, of valves and/or vessels may also be present. ... and the morphological left and right ventricles with their corresponding atrioventricular valves are also transposed. The ...
Aortic valve area calculation. *Ejection fraction. *Cardiac index. Heart rate. *Cardiac pacemaker ...
The cardiologist says his valve is leaking in 2 places and is a grade 2-3 leak. What activity restrictions should he have for ... My son was recently diagonsed with aortic valve insufficiency. ... aortic valve insufficiency linda1986 My son was recently ... Aortic valve insufficiency (or regurgitation) is another term for a leak in the aortic valve, the valve between the left ... in which his aortic valve is removed, his pulmonary valve is switched over to the aortic position, and another pulmonary valve ...
Aortic valve insufficiency results from leakage and backflow of blood that is ejected from the left ventricle (LV) into the ... Other than aortic valve insufficiency associated with congenital heart disease, the incidence of aortic valve insufficiency is ... encoded search term (Pediatric Aortic Valve Insufficiency) and Pediatric Aortic Valve Insufficiency What to Read Next on ... Acute severe aortic insufficiency. In acute severe aortic valve insufficiency due to endocarditis or sudden trauma, the LV ...
He was diagnosed with mild aortic valve insufficiency when he was 14. He plays competitive basketball and is hoping for a ... A bicuspid aortic valve is more likely to have progression of aortic valve insufficiency as well as dilation of the aorta over ... With aortic valve insufficiency of grade 2, which would be approximately mild, his risks would likely be low. But, the anatomy ... He was diagnosed with mild aortic valve insufficiency when he was 14. He plays competitive basketball and is hoping for a ...
Tag: Aortic Valve Insufficiency. Details About Aortic Valve Insufficiency. October 13, 2018. October 4, 2018. mnh93811Heart ... The aortic valve insufficiency is a restricted regulator that unlocks into the aorta, which is the "pipe" principle that comes ... treating the aortic valve condition has been drastically improved by the presentation of insignificantly intrusive aortic valve ...
Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for the Treatment of Acute Stentless Bioprosthetic Aortic Insufficiency ... "Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation for failing surgical aortic stentless bioprosthetic valves: a single- ... "Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for degenerative bioprosthetic surgical valves: results from the global valve-in-valve ... "Transcatheter aortic valve implantation within degenerated aortic surgical bioprostheses: partner 2 valve-in-valve registry," ...
Aortic Valve Insufficiency prevention. Aortic Valve Insufficiency. back to: Aortic Valve Insufficiency Health Center. ...
Figure 5. 2D TOE long-axis view of the aortic valve showing exposure of both LV and aortic discs across the aortic valve. The ... Percutaneous transcatheter closure of the aortic valve to treat aortic insufficiency after LVAD implantation. March 2018doi: ... Percutaneous transcatheter closure of the native aortic valve to treat de novo aortic insufficiency after implantation of a ... Aortic valve replacement was considered to be too high risk (EuroSCORE II 61.58%) and transcatheter aortic valve implantation ( ...
For aortic valve reconstruction in the child, techniques are favored that minimize the introduction of foreign material and ... Finite Element Simulations Explore a Novel Strategy for Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Valve Insufficiency. ... We use a structural finite element model of the aortic valve to simulate valve closure following different strategies for ... Finite Element Simulations Explore a Novel Strategy for Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Valve Insufficiency. In: van Assen ...
Altered global and regional left ventricular function in horses with aortic valve insufficiency measured by tissue Doppler ... "Altered Global and Regional Left Ventricular Function in Horses with Aortic Valve Insufficiency Measured by Tissue Doppler ... "Altered Global and Regional Left Ventricular Function in Horses with Aortic Valve Insufficiency Measured by Tissue Doppler ... Altered global and regional left ventricular function in horses with aortic valve insufficiency measured by tissue Doppler ...
Is it Time to Get More Aggressive With Aortic Valve Insufficiency During LVAD Implantation? ... Is it Time to Get More Aggressive With Aortic Valve Insufficiency During LVAD Implantation? ... Is it Time to Get More Aggressive With Aortic Valve Insufficiency During LVAD Implantation? ... Is it Time to Get More Aggressive With Aortic Valve Insufficiency During LVAD Implantation? ...
The aortic valve insufficiency. The clinic. Many children with aortic valve insufficiency long time did not make any complaints ... aortic valve, as it is determined by the degree of regurgitation of blood. In severe aortic insufficiency minimum pressure may ... aortic door of the mitral valve, causing narrowing of the mitral orifice. In children noise of flint in aortic insufficiency ... At insufficiency of the aortic valve systolic murmur may listens and above the apex of the heart. It can be either wired noise ...
It is also called aortic regurgitation or aortic insufficiency. It has a male gender... ... Aortic valve insufficiency results from damage to the aortic valve. ... What is aortic valve insufficiency?. Aortic valve insufficiency results from damage to the aortic valve. It is also called ... Symptoms of aortic valve insufficiency. Aortic valve insufficiency may remain asymptomatic for many years. The symptoms when ...
Blood leaks back through the valve. Extra blood may cause the ventricle to stretch. A stretched ventricle doesnt squeeze as ... Aortic insufficiency means your aortic valve has problems closing. ... Heart Valve Problems: Aortic Insufficiency. Aortic insufficiency means your aortic valve has problems closing. Blood leaks back ... There may be other causes of aortic valve insufficiency. Treating aortic insufficiency. Your doctor may prescribe medicines. ...
Mesh term Aortic Valve Insufficiency. Browse to parent terms:. Heart Valve Diseases. Description. Pathological condition ... It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).. Search for this term in our Faculty ...
Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). Diagnostic in Aachen, Germany ✈ Find the best medical programs at BookingHealth - ✔Compare ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). Diagnostic in Germany, Aachen See also for aortic valve insufficiency (avi):. *Aortic valve ... Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis #106323. The Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery offers the entire spectrum ...
Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). Diagnostic in Erlangen, Germany ✈ Find the best medical programs at BookingHealth - ✔Compare ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). Diagnostic in Germany, Erlangen See also for aortic valve insufficiency (avi):. *Aortic valve ... Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis #255339. The Department of Сardiac Surgery at the University Hospital Erlangen specializes ...
This white line corresponds to one of the 3 valves that make up the aortic valve. In this horse, the aortic valve is thickened ... Labels: aortic valve insufficiency, cardiac exam in horse, dr michael porter, florida mobile vet, heart murmur, heart ... through the valve. In Figure 2, the red arrow identifies the normal direction of blood flow through the aortic valve. In Figure ... The thickened valve likely vibrates as the jet of blood flows "backwards" causing the musical heart murmur! Aortic ...
Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis (costs for program #263883) ✔ St. Antonius Hospital ✔ Department of Internal Medicine and ... Antonius Hospital › Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis: Costs for treatment #263883 in Germany - BookingHealth ... Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis,price:{val:0,type:val},extra_service_clinic:[],extra_service:[],translation_ ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) Total amount * Program [Description]. Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis ...
Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis (costs for program #245247) ✔ Hannover Medical School ✔ Department of Cardiac, Thoracic, ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) Hannover Medical School offers the following treatment of your disease: Aortic valve ... Hannover Medical School › Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis: Costs for treatment #245247 in Germany - BookingHealth ... Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis,price:{val:0,type:val},extra_service_clinic:[],extra_service:[],translation_ ...
Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis (costs for program #264715) ✔ Sana Hospital Duisburg ✔ Department of Internal Medicine I ( ... Sana Hospital Duisburg › Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis: Costs for treatment #264715 in Germany - BookingHealth ... Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis,price:{val:0,type:val},extra_service_clinic:[],extra_service:[],translation_ ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) Total amount * Program [Description]. Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis ...
Upon surgical exploration, abnormalities were discovered in the aortic valve, which had a small left coronary cusp with absence ... The patient was ultimately found to have intermittent severe aortic insufficiency. ... Following surgical repair of the valve, aimed at preventing the small cusp from becoming stuck in the open position, the ... Prevalence of aortic valve prolapse with bicuspid aortic valve and its relation to aortic regurgitation: a cross-sectional ...
Aortic insufficiency is a heart valve disease where the aortic valve no longer functions adequately to control the flow of ... Aortic insufficiency is a heart valve disease where the aortic valve no longer functions adequately to control the flow of ... Commonly, aortic insufficiency shows no symptoms for many years. Symptoms may then occur gradually or suddenly. Surgical repair ...
Aortic valve replacement. Treatment in Karlsruhe, Germany ✈ Find the best medical programs at BookingHealth - ✔Compare the ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) - Aortic valve replacement. Treatment in Germany, Karlsruhe See also for aortic valve ... Treatment of aortic valve insufficiency with replacement (homograft or mechanical) #50047. The Department provides treanment ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). › Treatment Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) - Aortic valve replacement ...
Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). Cardiosurgery: Diagnostic in Muenster, Germany ✈. Prices on BookingHealth.com - booking ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). Diagnostic in Germany, Muenster See also for aortic valve insufficiency (avi):. *Aortic valve ... Aortic Valve Insufficiency Diagnosis #259211. The Department of Cardiology is part of the Center for Heart and Vascular ...
Aortic valve replacement. Cardiosurgery: Treatment in Aachen, Germany ✈. Prices on BookingHealth.com - booking treatment online ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) - Aortic valve replacement. Treatment in Germany, Aachen See also for aortic valve ... Treatment of aortic valve insufficiency with replacement (homograft or mechanical) #106293. The Department of Thoracic and ... Aortic valve insufficiency (avi). › Treatment Aortic valve insufficiency (avi) - Aortic valve replacement ...
  • TAVR is a minimally invasive, catheter-based procedure to replace the function of the aortic valve. (medscape.com)
  • Indicated for patients at intermediate or greater risk for open heart surgery, TAVR may be an excellent option for certain patients because the prevalence of aortic stenosis and comorbidities may increase the risks associated with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). (medscape.com)
  • In abdominal aortic dissections, compromise of one or both renal arteries occurs in 5-8% of cases, while mesenteric ischemia (ischemia of the large intestines) occurs 3-5% of the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of this study is to examine the effect of IABP therapy on ventricular mechanics under valvular insufficiency by using a computational model of the heart. (springer.com)
  • The goal of this study involves examining the effect of IABP therapy on ventricular mechanics under the valvular insufficiency condition, which includes the AR and MR conditions in the failing ventricle, by using a computational model of the heart. (springer.com)
  • Patient was to f/u w/cardiology in 2-3 yearrs to document progress of valvular insufficiency. (medalerts.org)
  • It can be autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive, with the autosomal dominant form being more common and characterized by progressive cyst development and bilaterally enlarged kidneys with multiple cysts, with concurrent development of hypertension, renal insufficiency and renal pain. (wikipedia.org)