Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).
Several clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells associated with blood vessels and nerves (especially the glossopharyngeal and vagus). The nonchromaffin paraganglia sense pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and participate in respiratory, and perhaps circulatory, control. They include the CAROTID BODY; AORTIC BODIES; the GLOMUS JUGULARE; and the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM.
A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)
Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)
A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.
Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.
A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)

Digoxin delays recovery from tachycardia-induced electrical remodeling of the atria. (1/37)

BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) induces electrical remodeling, which is thought to be responsible for the low success rate of antiarrhythmic treatment in AF of longer duration. Electrical remodeling seems to be related to tachycardia-induced intracellular calcium overload. Due to its vagomimetic action, digoxin is widely used to control the ventricular rate during AF, but it also increases intracellular calcium. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that digoxin would aggravate tachycardia-induced electrical remodeling. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the atrial effective refractory period (AERP) at cycle lengths of 430, 300, and 200 ms during 24 hours of rapid atrio/ventricular (300/150 bpm) pacing in 7 chronically instrumented conscious goats treated with digoxin or saline. Digoxin decreased the spontaneous heart rate but had no other effects on baseline electrophysiological characteristics. In addition to a moderate increase in the rate of electrical remodeling during rapid pacing, digoxin significantly delayed the recovery from electrical remodeling after cessation of pacing (at 430, 300, and 200 ms: P=0. 001, P=0.0015, and P=0.007, respectively). This was paralleled by an increased inducibility and duration of AF during digoxin. Multivariate analysis revealed that both a short AERP and treatment with digoxin were independent predictors of inducibility (P=0.001 and P=0.03, respectively) and duration (P=0.001 for both) of AF. CONCLUSIONS: Dioxin aggravates tachycardia-induced atrial electrical remodeling and delays recovery from electrical remodeling in the goat, which increases the inducibility and duration of AF.  (+info)

Exogenous cholecystokinin-8 reduces vagal efferent nerve activity in rats through CCK(A) receptors. (2/37)

It has been proposed that the vagus nerve plays a role in mediating cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) effect on such gastric functions as motility, emptying and gastric acid secretion. To examine the contribution of the efferent pathways in realizing these effects, efferent mass activity in the ventral gastric vagal nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats was recorded. Intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (0.1-1 nmol) suppressed the efferent activity. The effect of CCK-8 was significantly reduced in animals with total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy in comparison to those with partial vagotomy. Intravenous infusion of CCK(A) receptor antagonist L-364,718 (1-100x10(-6) g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8, but the CCK(B) receptor antagonist L-365,260 (1-100x10(-6) g) did not in the conditions of either partial or total vagotomy. Intracisternal infusion of L-364,718 (1x10(-6) g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8 i.v. Infusion of exogenous CCK-8 did not affect the activity of supradiaphragmatic vagal afferents. The results suggest that the effect of systemically administered CCK-8 on vagal efferent activity is mediated by both peripherally (subdiaphragmatically) and centrally localized CCK(A) receptors.  (+info)

Cefaclor, a cephalosporin antibiotic, delays gastric emptying rate by a CCK-A receptor-mediated mechanism in the rat. (3/37)

Studies in vitro suggest that cephalosporin antibiotics release the gut hormone cholecystokinin. Cholecystokinin is known to inhibit gastric emptying. Here we examine the effects of cefaclor on gastric emptying and intestinal motility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with gastric cannulas. Following a 3-week recovery, the rate of gastric emptying of saline, peptone (4.5%) or cefaclor was determined after instillation into the gastric cannula, while intestinal transit was measured by using the propagation of arabic gum + charcoal mixture given intraduodenally. Gastric emptying of saline was significantly delayed by the addition of cefaclor (3, 10, 30 or 100 mM). The CCK-A antagonist SR-27897B (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reversed the delay induced by 10 mM cefaclor, whereas the CCK-B antagonist CI-988 (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) had no significant effect. In capsaicin-treated rats, 10 mM cefaclor emptied more rapidly than in vehicle-treated animals. Thirty-minute intestinal transit was increased at 30 and 100 mM of cefaclor, while the gastric acid secretion following cefaclor instillation was no different than the group which received saline. The cephalosporin antibiotic cefaclor appears to be a potent stimulant of CCK release from gut endocrine cells, resembling the effects of peptone. Cefaclor delays gastric emptying via capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathways, which involve CCK-A receptor interaction.  (+info)

Capsaicin increases modulation of sympathetic nerve activity in rats: measurement using power spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations. (4/37)

We assessed the sympatho-vagal activities of the heart after administration of capsaicin by measuring the power spectral analysis in rats. There were major two frequency components of heart rate variability, which we defined as high (1.0 Hz <, HF) and low (LF, < 1.0 Hz) frequency components. Vagal blockade by atropine abolished the high frequency component, and lowered the amplitude of the low frequency component. On the other hand, under conditions of sympathetic blockade by propranolol, the low frequency component was reduced. Combined vagal and sympathetic blockade abolished all heart rate fluctuations. We analyzed the low and high frequency components by integrating the spectrum for the respective band width. The rats administered capsaicin had a higher heart rate and sympathetic nervous system index (LF/HF) than the control group of rats. These results suggest that power spectral analysis is an effective and noninvasive method for detecting subtle changes in autonomic activity in response to the intake of foods or drugs.  (+info)

Centrally mediated effects of bromocriptine on cardiac sympathovagal balance. (5/37)

Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, is known to lower cardiovascular mortality in L-dopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease, probably by reducing the cardiac sympathetic activity. We aimed at unmasking the central effects of bromocriptine on the heart by power spectrum analysis. Ten healthy subjects (aged 31+/-2 years) in supine and sitting positions were evaluated after the administration of bromocriptine (2.5 mg) alone and after pharmacological peripheral D(2)-like blockade by domperidone (20 mg). We calculated (autoregressive method) the following: the low-frequency (LF) component (an index of cardiac sympathetic tone), the high-frequency (HF) component (an index of cardiac vagal tone), and the LF/HF ratio (an index of cardiac sympathovagal balance). With subjects in the supine position, bromocriptine alone induced a significant increase in the LF component and the LF/HF ratio, together with a reduction in norepinephrine plasma levels and blood pressure values. These conflicting effects can be explained as the combined result of direct and indirect (reflex-mediated) actions of bromocriptine in vivo. No changes in cardiac autonomic drive were observed with subjects in the sitting position. After domperidone pretreatment, bromocriptine induced a reduction in the LF component and in the LF/HF ratio. The sitting position caused an increase in heart rate and in the LF/HF ratio. We demonstrated both peripheral and central effects of bromocriptine. In particular, pretreatment with a peripheral antagonist (domperidone) allowed us to unmask the central effect of bromocriptine on cardiac sympathetic drive.  (+info)

A role for TRPV1 in bradykinin-induced excitation of vagal airway afferent nerve terminals. (6/37)

Using single-unit extracellular recording techniques, we have examined the role of the vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1 aka TRPV1) in bradykinin-induced activation of vagal afferent C-fiber receptive fields in guinea pig isolated airways. Of 17 airway C-fibers tested, 14 responded to bradykinin and capsaicin, 2 fibers responded to neither capsaicin nor bradykinin, and 1 fiber responded to capsaicin but not bradykinin. Thus, every bradykinin-responsive C-fiber was also responsive to capsaicin. Bradykinin (200 microl of 0.3 microM solution) evoked a burst of approximately 130 action potentials in C-fibers. In the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (10 microM), bradykinin evoked 83 +/- 9% (n = 6; P < 0.01) fewer action potentials. Similarly, the TRPV1 blocker, ruthenium red (10 microM), inhibited the number of bradykinin-evoked action potentials by 75 +/- 10% (n = 4; P < 0.05). In the presence of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (10 microM), an inhibitor of lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase enzymes, the number of bradykinin-induced action potentials was reduced by 76 +/- 10% (n = 6; P < 0.05). Similarly, a combination of the 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor, baicalein (10 microM) and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 [6-[3-fluoro-5-[4-methoxy-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl])phenoxy-methyl]-1-met hyl-2-quinolone] (10 microM) caused significant inhibition of bradykinin-induced responses. Our data suggest a role for lipoxygenase products in bradykinin B(2) receptor-induced activation of TRPV1 in the peripheral terminals of afferent C-fibers within guinea pig trachea.  (+info)

Deficiency of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor beta 4 subunit causes autonomic cardiac and intestinal dysfunction. (7/37)

Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are composed of 12 subunits (alpha 2-alpha 10 and beta 2-beta 4), which play the central role in autonomic transmission. beta 4 subunits are abundantly expressed in autonomic ganglia, forming acetylcholine binding sites and ion channels with alpha 3 or alpha 3 and alpha 5 subunits as pentameric receptors. To investigate the physiological and pharmacological properties of beta 4 subunits in autonomic ganglia, we measured autonomic functions in knockout mice lacking nAChR subunit beta 4 (beta 4(-/-)) and wild-type mice. beta 4(-/-) mice had an attenuated bradycardiac response to high frequency (60 pulse/s) vagal stimulation, as well as an increased sensitivity to hexamethonium blockade at low dose (3 mg/kg) and a reduced ileal contractile response to the nicotinic agonists cytisine, dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide, nicotine (10 mg/kg each), and epibatidine (0.1 mg/kg). The results suggest that beta 4 subunits are important components of nAChRs in autonomic ganglia. Deficiency of beta 4 subunits altered ion channel properties, conductance, and sensitivity and affinity of receptors to agonists and antagonists, affecting ganglionic transmission.  (+info)

Attenuated outward potassium currents in carotid body glomus cells of heart failure rabbit: involvement of nitric oxide. (8/37)

It has been shown that peripheral chemoreceptor sensitivity is enhanced in both clinical and experimental heart failure (HF) and that impairment of nitric oxide (NO) production contributes to this enhancement. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms associated with the alterations of chemoreceptor function and the actions of NO in the carotid body (CB), we compared the outward K+ currents (IK) of glomus cells in sham rabbits with that in HF rabbits and monitored the effects of NO on these currents. Ik was measured in glomus cells using conventional and perforated whole-cell configurations. IK was attenuated in glomus cells of HF rabbits, and their resting membrane potentials (-34.7 +/- 1.0 mV) were depolarized as compared with those in sham rabbits (-47.2 +/- 1.9 mV). The selective Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel (KCa) blocker iberiotoxin (IbTx, 100 nm) reduced IK in glomus cells from sham rabbits, but had no effect on IK from HF rabbits. In perforated whole-cell mode, the NO donor SNAP (100 microm) increased IK in glomus cells from HF rabbits to a greater extent than that in sham rabbits (P < 0.01), and IbTx inhibited the effects of SNAP. However, in conventional whole-cell mode, SNAP had no effect. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, NO synthase inhibitor) decreased Ik in sham rabbits but not in HF rabbits. The guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) inhibited the effect of SNAP on Ik. These results demonstrate that IK is reduced in CB glomus cells from HF rabbits. This effect is due mainly to the suppression of KCa channel activity caused by decreased availability of NO. In addition, intracellular cGMP is necessary for the KCa channel modulation by NO.  (+info)

Aortic bodies, also known as aortic arch chemoreceptors or simply as carotid and aortic bodies, are small clusters of nerve cells located near the bifurcation of the common carotid artery (carotid body) and in the wall of the aortic arch (aortic body). They are part of the peripheral chemoreceptor system that responds to changes in chemical composition of the blood, particularly to decreases in oxygen levels, increases in carbon dioxide levels, and changes in pH. These receptors send signals to the brainstem, which in turn regulates breathing rate and depth to maintain adequate gas exchange and acid-base balance in the body.

Paraganglia, nonchromaffin are neuroendocrine tissues that originate from the neural crest and are widely distributed throughout the body. They are similar to chromaffin paraganglia (which contain catecholamines) but do not contain catecholamines or only contain them in trace amounts. Instead, they produce and secrete various neuropeptides and hormones, such as serotonin, somatostatin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

Nonchromaffin paraganglia are divided into two main groups: the head and neck (HNP) and the thoracoabdominal (TAP) paraganglia. The HNP include the carotid body, jugular body, vagal body, and laryngeal paraganglia, while the TAP include the aorticopulmonary, organ of Zuckerkandl, and other abdominal and pelvic paraganglia.

Nonchromaffin paragangliomas are rare tumors that arise from these tissues. They can be functional or nonfunctional, depending on whether they produce and secrete hormones or not. Functional tumors can cause a variety of symptoms due to the excessive release of hormones, while nonfunctional tumors usually present as masses that may compress surrounding structures.

Paraganglioma, extra-adrenal, is a type of rare tumor that develops in the nervous system's paraganglia, which are groups of specialized cells that are responsible for regulating blood pressure and other bodily functions. Unlike adrenal paragangliomas, which form in the adrenal glands located on top of the kidneys, extra-adrenal paragangliomas develop outside of the adrenal glands, in various locations along the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. These tumors can be functional or nonfunctional, meaning they may or may not produce hormones such as catecholamines (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine). Functional extra-adrenal paragangliomas can cause symptoms related to excessive hormone production, including hypertension, sweating, headaches, and rapid heartbeat. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with preoperative preparation to manage potential hormonal imbalances.

Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neoplasms refer to tumors that originate in the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These tumors can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors, such as schwannomas and neurofibromas, grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant tumors, such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), can invade nearby tissues and may metastasize (spread) to other organs.

PNS neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size. Common symptoms include pain, weakness, numbness, or tingling in the affected area. In some cases, PNS neoplasms may not cause any symptoms until they become quite large. Treatment options for PNS neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

The carotid body is a small chemoreceptor organ located near the bifurcation of the common carotid artery into the internal and external carotid arteries. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of respiration, blood pressure, and pH balance by detecting changes in the chemical composition of the blood, particularly oxygen levels, carbon dioxide levels, and hydrogen ion concentration (pH).

The carotid body contains specialized nerve endings called glomus cells that are sensitive to changes in these chemical parameters. When there is a decrease in oxygen or an increase in carbon dioxide or hydrogen ions, the glomus cells release neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and dopamine, which activate afferent nerve fibers leading to the brainstem's nucleus tractus solitarius. This information is then integrated with other physiological signals in the brainstem, resulting in appropriate adjustments in breathing rate, depth, and pattern, as well as changes in heart rate and blood vessel diameter to maintain homeostasis.

Dysfunction of the carotid body can lead to various disorders, such as hypertension, sleep apnea, and chronic lung disease. In some cases, overactivity of the carotid body may result in conditions like primary breathing pattern disorders or pseudohypoxia, where the body responds as if it is experiencing hypoxia despite normal oxygen levels.

Chemoreceptor cells are specialized sensory neurons that detect and respond to chemical changes in the internal or external environment. They play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis within the body by converting chemical signals into electrical impulses, which are then transmitted to the central nervous system for further processing and response.

There are two main types of chemoreceptor cells:

1. Oxygen Chemoreceptors: These cells are located in the carotid bodies near the bifurcation of the common carotid artery and in the aortic bodies close to the aortic arch. They monitor the levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood and respond to decreases in oxygen concentration or increases in carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions (indicating acidity) by increasing their firing rate. This signals the brain to increase respiratory rate and depth, thereby restoring normal oxygen levels.

2. Taste Cells: These chemoreceptor cells are found within the taste buds of the tongue and other areas of the oral cavity. They detect specific tastes (salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami) by interacting with molecules from food. When a tastant binds to receptors on the surface of a taste cell, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to the generation of an action potential. This information is then relayed to the brain, where it is interpreted as taste sensation.

In summary, chemoreceptor cells are essential for maintaining physiological balance by detecting and responding to chemical stimuli in the body. They play a critical role in regulating vital functions such as respiration and digestion.

Hypercapnia is a state of increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the blood, typically defined as an arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) above 45 mmHg. It is often associated with conditions that impair gas exchange or eliminate CO2 from the body, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe asthma, respiratory failure, or certain neuromuscular disorders. Hypercapnia can cause symptoms such as headache, confusion, shortness of breath, and in severe cases, it can lead to life-threatening complications such as respiratory acidosis, coma, and even death if not promptly treated.

A reflex is an automatic, involuntary and rapid response to a stimulus that occurs without conscious intention. In the context of physiology and neurology, it's a basic mechanism that involves the transmission of nerve impulses between neurons, resulting in a muscle contraction or glandular secretion.

Reflexes are important for maintaining homeostasis, protecting the body from harm, and coordinating movements. They can be tested clinically to assess the integrity of the nervous system, such as the knee-j jerk reflex, which tests the function of the L3-L4 spinal nerve roots and the sensitivity of the stretch reflex arc.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

The aortic bodies are collections of chemoreceptors present on the aortic arch. Most are located above the aortic arch, while ... The aortic bodies are one of several small clusters of peripheral chemoreceptors located along the aortic arch. They are ... Aortic bodies are more sensitive detectors of total arterial blood oxygen content than the carotid body chemoreceptors, which ... Some sources equate the "aortic bodies" and "paraaortic bodies", while other sources explicitly distinguish between the two. ...
The aortic valve is located between the aorta and the hearts left ventricle. The pulmonary vein delivers oxygenated blood to ... The inferior colliculus is a part of the midbrain that serves as a main auditory (sound) center for the body. It acts as the ... aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation. Aortic stenosis occursif the valve fails to open all the way. This disease affects ... Aortic regurgitation occurs if oxygenated blood flows in the wrong direction. This happens when the aortic valve is not ...
Calcium Supplements Linked to Worse Outcome in Aortic Stenosis ByPercy. Apr 30, 2022 #Aortic, #Calcium, #Linked, #Outcome, # ... Aortic valve replacement was performed in almost half of the patients taking calcium, compared with only 11% of those not ... The researchers point out that although it is a disease of the elderly, multiple modifiable risk factors for aortic stenosis ... Oral calcium supplementation was associated with lower survival and a greater need for aortic valve replacement in elderly ...
The aorta is the main blood vessel that carries oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the organs in your body.. ... Before we talk about treatment, lets start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. ... Your doctor has recommended that you have surgery to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm. But what does that actually mean?. ...
Body mass index; Obesity; Thoracic aortic aneurysms; Thoracic endovascular aortic repair; Type B dissections ... Association of body mass index with outcomes after thoracic endovascular aortic repair in the vascular quality initiative. ... Association of body mass index with outcomes after thoracic endovascular aortic repair in ... Here, we use a multi-institutional, international database to assess the role of body mass index (BMI) on adverse outcomes in ...
T1 - Associations of aortic and mitral regurgitation with body composition and myocardial energy expenditure in adults with ... title = "Associations of aortic and mitral regurgitation with body composition and myocardial energy expenditure in adults with ... Associations of aortic and mitral regurgitation with body composition and myocardial energy expenditure in adults with ... Associations of aortic and mitral regurgitation with body composition and myocardial energy expenditure in adults with ...
Malignant neoplasm of carotid body C75.5 Malignant neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia ...
... carotid and aortic bodies) (Miller, Cunningham, Lloyd & Young, 1974). The respiratory centre is controlled by chemoreceptor ... This is when O2 and CO2 pass each other going back around the body systems to the heart. Once this is done the flow goes from ... Body Systems Interrelate. The same happens with Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The blood in the surrounding capillaries has a higher ... Tidal volume is the amout of air taken in and relsed from the body in each breath so in vigerous exercise your tidal volume ...
And we call them the aortic body and the carotid body. And the reason we use the term body is that its a body of tissue. So ... So these blue cells together make up a body of tissue, and thats where we get the term aortic body and carotid body. Now, ... aortic body) be careful with this one no to mistake with para-aortic bodies which are chromaffin cell which manufacture ... So let me draw for you the carotid body on this side, and on the other side, well do the aortic body. And Im basically just ...
CN directly stimulates chemoreceptors of carotid and aortic bodies, leading to a brief period of hyperpnea. [12] CN is a small ... Whole-body moderate hypothermia confers protection from wood smoke-induced acute lung injury in rats: the therapeutic window. ... The incidence of smoke inhalation increases from less than 10% in patients with a mean total body surface area (TBSA) burn size ... In fact, the co-presence of bronchopulmonary injury with cutaneous burns that exceed 30% of the total body surface area causes ...
Relationship of age, gender, race, and body size to infrarenal aortic diameter. J Vasc Surg. 1997;26(4):595-601.. 20. Li X, ... Abdominal aortic diameter is increased in males with a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms: results from the Danish ... The incidence of small abdominal aortic aneurysms and the change in normal infrarenal aortic diameter: implications for ... Final Recommendation Statement: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Screening * Final Recommendation Statement: Abdominal Aortic ...
An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when an area of the aorta in the abdomen becomes very large or balloons ... An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when an area of the aorta in the abdomen becomes very large or balloons ... If you have bleeding inside your body from an aortic aneurysm, you will need surgery right away. ... An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age 60 who have one or more risk factors. The larger the aneurysm ...
Management of late main-body aortic endograft component uncoupling and type IIIa endoleak encountered with the Endologix ... Objective To evaluate long term outcomes (reintervention and late rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm) of aortic endografts in ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Device as a Precursor for the Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. Ann Vasc Surg2019;54:335.e11-4 ... 2326 Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm after EVAR was defined as having a diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm ...
Prognostic value of aortic valve area normalized to body.... Rev Esp Cardiol. 2021;74:44-50 ...
Scientists have long known about the link between cerebral and aortic aneurysm (the aorta is the bodys main artery). However, ... A doctor will insert a hollow plastic tube (a catheter) into an artery, usually in the groin, and thread it through the body to ... A doctor will insert a hollow plastic tube (a catheter) into an artery, usually in the groin, and thread it through the body to ... A shunt, which funnels cerebrospinal fluid from the brain to elsewhere in the body, may be surgically inserted into the brain ...
We present a case of an iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm in the descending thoracic aortic graft body caused by intercostal nerve ... The patient had undergone repair for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm four years prior and underwent a series of intercostal ...
Evidence-based recommendations on percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty for fetal critical aortic stenosis. This involves placing ... Endorsing bodies. This interventional procedures guidance is endorsed by Healthcare Improvement Scotland as required by the ... Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty for fetal critical aortic stenosis. Interventional procedures guidance [IPG613]. Published: ... Evidence-based recommendations on percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty for fetal critical aortic stenosis. This involves placing ...
Acute aortic dissection in a patient with extremely low body mass index due to anorexia nervosa. ... Endovascular plugs to occlude proximal entries in chronic aortic dissection Charlotte Sandström, Håkan Roos, O. Henrikson, ... Left ventricular volumes by echocardiography in chronic aortic and mitral regurgitation. Odd Bech-Hanssen, Christian Lars Polte ... Characterization of Chronic Aortic and Mitral Regurgitation Undergoing Valve Surgery Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. ...
Blood enters the aorta through the aortic valve is distributed all over the body ... What is the sequence of blood flow in the body?. Definition. Oxygenated blood enters the left ventricle from the left atrium ... Systolic pressure (SP): is the peak aortic pressure, occurs duringthe ejection of the blood from the left ventricle into aorta ... Blood is distributed throughout the body by arteries and capillaries - 25% of volume each for renal, gastrointestinal, and ...
Chemodectomas are neoplasms of chemoreceptor cells of the aortic and carotid bodies. They may appear as discrete, well ...
Picrotoxin Obtained from fish berries of East carotid and aortic body chemoreceptors as properly. These had been up to date ... Due to the ailments of the guts and the liver, theres swelling in some components of the body and the glands everywhere in the ... Other toxins that construct up in the body come from a poor diet, microbe and parasite secretions, chemical substances, alcohol ... During adolescence, power in relation to body weight is usually poorest among heavier ninety seven C hapTer 3 Methods of ...
Acute Aortic Dissection Type A affects 3 in 100,000 people and is linked to a 50% mortality rate before hospitalisation ... The circulation was intentionally suspended during the repair of the proximal part of the Aortic Dissection to maintain a body ... The symptoms for the Acute aortic dissection range from pain related to the acute event and collapse due to aortic rupture or ... The 53-year-old, who was admitted with a bicuspid aortic valve, suffered from Acute Aortic Dissection Type A (AADA). This ...
In some children, the entire aortic arch (the part of the aorta that distributes blood to the upper body) -- this is called ... aortic arch hypoplasia. These conditions make it difficult for blood to pump through the aorta and to the rest of the body. ... About Coarctation of the Aorta and Aortic Arch Hypoplasia. Coarctation of the aorta refers to a distinct area of the aorta that ... Pediatric heart surgeons remove or open the narrowed segment of the aorta, then use a patch to create a new aortic arch that ...
Narrowing of the aortic valve, the body takes longer to absorb it after a highfat meal or alcohol. Before you take viagra, how ... Vitamins, guts, narrowing of the aortic valve, common side effects of tadalafil Some of the most common side effects of Cialis ...
I had experienced an aortic dissection - de-layering of the bodys major blood-supply vessel. It kind of exemplifies the phrase ... As August, and with it Summer 2014, faded away - not unlike a wide-body jetliner climbing and gaining altitude until it ...
Peripheral chemoreceptors, found in the carotid and aortic bodies and stimulated by chemical changes in blood composition, ... matched for age and body mass. Neonates with neurological or cardiac disorders were excluded from the study. ...

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