Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).
Several clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells associated with blood vessels and nerves (especially the glossopharyngeal and vagus). The nonchromaffin paraganglia sense pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and participate in respiratory, and perhaps circulatory, control. They include the CAROTID BODY; AORTIC BODIES; the GLOMUS JUGULARE; and the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM.
A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)
Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)
A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.
A genus of asporogenous bacteria isolated from soil that displays a distinctive rod-coccus growth cycle.
A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE).
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.
The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.
The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.
Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).
A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of cancer through education and research.
A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).
Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).
A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.
Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.
An angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that is used to treat HYPERTENSION and HEART FAILURE.
The withholding of water in a structured experimental situation.
An antagonist of ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR with antihypertensive activity due to the reduced pressor effect of ANGIOTENSIN II.
A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.
Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.
Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.
Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.
It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.
Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.
An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus. The severe form is characterized by fever, HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE, and renal damage.
The type species of the FLAVIVIRUS genus. Principal vector transmission to humans is by AEDES spp. mosquitoes.
The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.

Digoxin delays recovery from tachycardia-induced electrical remodeling of the atria. (1/37)

BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) induces electrical remodeling, which is thought to be responsible for the low success rate of antiarrhythmic treatment in AF of longer duration. Electrical remodeling seems to be related to tachycardia-induced intracellular calcium overload. Due to its vagomimetic action, digoxin is widely used to control the ventricular rate during AF, but it also increases intracellular calcium. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that digoxin would aggravate tachycardia-induced electrical remodeling. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the atrial effective refractory period (AERP) at cycle lengths of 430, 300, and 200 ms during 24 hours of rapid atrio/ventricular (300/150 bpm) pacing in 7 chronically instrumented conscious goats treated with digoxin or saline. Digoxin decreased the spontaneous heart rate but had no other effects on baseline electrophysiological characteristics. In addition to a moderate increase in the rate of electrical remodeling during rapid pacing, digoxin significantly delayed the recovery from electrical remodeling after cessation of pacing (at 430, 300, and 200 ms: P=0. 001, P=0.0015, and P=0.007, respectively). This was paralleled by an increased inducibility and duration of AF during digoxin. Multivariate analysis revealed that both a short AERP and treatment with digoxin were independent predictors of inducibility (P=0.001 and P=0.03, respectively) and duration (P=0.001 for both) of AF. CONCLUSIONS: Dioxin aggravates tachycardia-induced atrial electrical remodeling and delays recovery from electrical remodeling in the goat, which increases the inducibility and duration of AF.  (+info)

Exogenous cholecystokinin-8 reduces vagal efferent nerve activity in rats through CCK(A) receptors. (2/37)

It has been proposed that the vagus nerve plays a role in mediating cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) effect on such gastric functions as motility, emptying and gastric acid secretion. To examine the contribution of the efferent pathways in realizing these effects, efferent mass activity in the ventral gastric vagal nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats was recorded. Intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (0.1-1 nmol) suppressed the efferent activity. The effect of CCK-8 was significantly reduced in animals with total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy in comparison to those with partial vagotomy. Intravenous infusion of CCK(A) receptor antagonist L-364,718 (1-100x10(-6) g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8, but the CCK(B) receptor antagonist L-365,260 (1-100x10(-6) g) did not in the conditions of either partial or total vagotomy. Intracisternal infusion of L-364,718 (1x10(-6) g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8 i.v. Infusion of exogenous CCK-8 did not affect the activity of supradiaphragmatic vagal afferents. The results suggest that the effect of systemically administered CCK-8 on vagal efferent activity is mediated by both peripherally (subdiaphragmatically) and centrally localized CCK(A) receptors.  (+info)

Cefaclor, a cephalosporin antibiotic, delays gastric emptying rate by a CCK-A receptor-mediated mechanism in the rat. (3/37)

Studies in vitro suggest that cephalosporin antibiotics release the gut hormone cholecystokinin. Cholecystokinin is known to inhibit gastric emptying. Here we examine the effects of cefaclor on gastric emptying and intestinal motility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with gastric cannulas. Following a 3-week recovery, the rate of gastric emptying of saline, peptone (4.5%) or cefaclor was determined after instillation into the gastric cannula, while intestinal transit was measured by using the propagation of arabic gum + charcoal mixture given intraduodenally. Gastric emptying of saline was significantly delayed by the addition of cefaclor (3, 10, 30 or 100 mM). The CCK-A antagonist SR-27897B (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reversed the delay induced by 10 mM cefaclor, whereas the CCK-B antagonist CI-988 (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) had no significant effect. In capsaicin-treated rats, 10 mM cefaclor emptied more rapidly than in vehicle-treated animals. Thirty-minute intestinal transit was increased at 30 and 100 mM of cefaclor, while the gastric acid secretion following cefaclor instillation was no different than the group which received saline. The cephalosporin antibiotic cefaclor appears to be a potent stimulant of CCK release from gut endocrine cells, resembling the effects of peptone. Cefaclor delays gastric emptying via capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathways, which involve CCK-A receptor interaction.  (+info)

Capsaicin increases modulation of sympathetic nerve activity in rats: measurement using power spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations. (4/37)

We assessed the sympatho-vagal activities of the heart after administration of capsaicin by measuring the power spectral analysis in rats. There were major two frequency components of heart rate variability, which we defined as high (1.0 Hz <, HF) and low (LF, < 1.0 Hz) frequency components. Vagal blockade by atropine abolished the high frequency component, and lowered the amplitude of the low frequency component. On the other hand, under conditions of sympathetic blockade by propranolol, the low frequency component was reduced. Combined vagal and sympathetic blockade abolished all heart rate fluctuations. We analyzed the low and high frequency components by integrating the spectrum for the respective band width. The rats administered capsaicin had a higher heart rate and sympathetic nervous system index (LF/HF) than the control group of rats. These results suggest that power spectral analysis is an effective and noninvasive method for detecting subtle changes in autonomic activity in response to the intake of foods or drugs.  (+info)

Centrally mediated effects of bromocriptine on cardiac sympathovagal balance. (5/37)

Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, is known to lower cardiovascular mortality in L-dopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease, probably by reducing the cardiac sympathetic activity. We aimed at unmasking the central effects of bromocriptine on the heart by power spectrum analysis. Ten healthy subjects (aged 31+/-2 years) in supine and sitting positions were evaluated after the administration of bromocriptine (2.5 mg) alone and after pharmacological peripheral D(2)-like blockade by domperidone (20 mg). We calculated (autoregressive method) the following: the low-frequency (LF) component (an index of cardiac sympathetic tone), the high-frequency (HF) component (an index of cardiac vagal tone), and the LF/HF ratio (an index of cardiac sympathovagal balance). With subjects in the supine position, bromocriptine alone induced a significant increase in the LF component and the LF/HF ratio, together with a reduction in norepinephrine plasma levels and blood pressure values. These conflicting effects can be explained as the combined result of direct and indirect (reflex-mediated) actions of bromocriptine in vivo. No changes in cardiac autonomic drive were observed with subjects in the sitting position. After domperidone pretreatment, bromocriptine induced a reduction in the LF component and in the LF/HF ratio. The sitting position caused an increase in heart rate and in the LF/HF ratio. We demonstrated both peripheral and central effects of bromocriptine. In particular, pretreatment with a peripheral antagonist (domperidone) allowed us to unmask the central effect of bromocriptine on cardiac sympathetic drive.  (+info)

A role for TRPV1 in bradykinin-induced excitation of vagal airway afferent nerve terminals. (6/37)

Using single-unit extracellular recording techniques, we have examined the role of the vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1 aka TRPV1) in bradykinin-induced activation of vagal afferent C-fiber receptive fields in guinea pig isolated airways. Of 17 airway C-fibers tested, 14 responded to bradykinin and capsaicin, 2 fibers responded to neither capsaicin nor bradykinin, and 1 fiber responded to capsaicin but not bradykinin. Thus, every bradykinin-responsive C-fiber was also responsive to capsaicin. Bradykinin (200 microl of 0.3 microM solution) evoked a burst of approximately 130 action potentials in C-fibers. In the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (10 microM), bradykinin evoked 83 +/- 9% (n = 6; P < 0.01) fewer action potentials. Similarly, the TRPV1 blocker, ruthenium red (10 microM), inhibited the number of bradykinin-evoked action potentials by 75 +/- 10% (n = 4; P < 0.05). In the presence of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (10 microM), an inhibitor of lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase enzymes, the number of bradykinin-induced action potentials was reduced by 76 +/- 10% (n = 6; P < 0.05). Similarly, a combination of the 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor, baicalein (10 microM) and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 [6-[3-fluoro-5-[4-methoxy-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl])phenoxy-methyl]-1-met hyl-2-quinolone] (10 microM) caused significant inhibition of bradykinin-induced responses. Our data suggest a role for lipoxygenase products in bradykinin B(2) receptor-induced activation of TRPV1 in the peripheral terminals of afferent C-fibers within guinea pig trachea.  (+info)

Deficiency of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor beta 4 subunit causes autonomic cardiac and intestinal dysfunction. (7/37)

Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are composed of 12 subunits (alpha 2-alpha 10 and beta 2-beta 4), which play the central role in autonomic transmission. beta 4 subunits are abundantly expressed in autonomic ganglia, forming acetylcholine binding sites and ion channels with alpha 3 or alpha 3 and alpha 5 subunits as pentameric receptors. To investigate the physiological and pharmacological properties of beta 4 subunits in autonomic ganglia, we measured autonomic functions in knockout mice lacking nAChR subunit beta 4 (beta 4(-/-)) and wild-type mice. beta 4(-/-) mice had an attenuated bradycardiac response to high frequency (60 pulse/s) vagal stimulation, as well as an increased sensitivity to hexamethonium blockade at low dose (3 mg/kg) and a reduced ileal contractile response to the nicotinic agonists cytisine, dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide, nicotine (10 mg/kg each), and epibatidine (0.1 mg/kg). The results suggest that beta 4 subunits are important components of nAChRs in autonomic ganglia. Deficiency of beta 4 subunits altered ion channel properties, conductance, and sensitivity and affinity of receptors to agonists and antagonists, affecting ganglionic transmission.  (+info)

Attenuated outward potassium currents in carotid body glomus cells of heart failure rabbit: involvement of nitric oxide. (8/37)

It has been shown that peripheral chemoreceptor sensitivity is enhanced in both clinical and experimental heart failure (HF) and that impairment of nitric oxide (NO) production contributes to this enhancement. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms associated with the alterations of chemoreceptor function and the actions of NO in the carotid body (CB), we compared the outward K+ currents (IK) of glomus cells in sham rabbits with that in HF rabbits and monitored the effects of NO on these currents. Ik was measured in glomus cells using conventional and perforated whole-cell configurations. IK was attenuated in glomus cells of HF rabbits, and their resting membrane potentials (-34.7 +/- 1.0 mV) were depolarized as compared with those in sham rabbits (-47.2 +/- 1.9 mV). The selective Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel (KCa) blocker iberiotoxin (IbTx, 100 nm) reduced IK in glomus cells from sham rabbits, but had no effect on IK from HF rabbits. In perforated whole-cell mode, the NO donor SNAP (100 microm) increased IK in glomus cells from HF rabbits to a greater extent than that in sham rabbits (P < 0.01), and IbTx inhibited the effects of SNAP. However, in conventional whole-cell mode, SNAP had no effect. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, NO synthase inhibitor) decreased Ik in sham rabbits but not in HF rabbits. The guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) inhibited the effect of SNAP on Ik. These results demonstrate that IK is reduced in CB glomus cells from HF rabbits. This effect is due mainly to the suppression of KCa channel activity caused by decreased availability of NO. In addition, intracellular cGMP is necessary for the KCa channel modulation by NO.  (+info)

A glomus cell (type I) is a peripheral chemoreceptor, mainly located in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies, that helps the body regulate breathing. When there is a decrease in the bloods pH, a decrease in oxygen (pO2), or an increase in carbon dioxide (pCO2), the carotid bodies and the aortic bodies signal the medulla oblongata (specifically the dorsal inspiratory center in the medulla oblongata) to increase the volume and rate of breathing. The glomus cells have a high metabolic rate and good blood perfusion and thus are sensitive to changes in arterial blood gas tension. Glomus cells are very similar structurally to neurons, and they are indeed derived from the neural crest, while type II glomus cells are sustentacular cells having a similar function to neuroglia. Autonomic ganglia innervate the glomus cells, and some presynaptic sympathetic ganglia synapse with glomus cells. The nerve fibers pick up the signals sent by glomus cells and transmit them to the central nervous system for ...
Hi valerie, the change in pO2 does not help oxygen delivery because most O2 is carried on haemoglobin. Mind you, it may well blunt the hypoxic drive to the aortic body chemoreceptors so limit the CO2 wash out that comes from over hypoxia induced hyperventilation. At a pO2 of 100mmHg (normal) Hb is almost completely saturated and increasing the pO2 to 130mmHg will not add any extra to the Hb. The amount in solution is tiny and will increase with the rise in pO2 to an amount slightly more than the usual tiny amount… What does matter is that as the blood goes through the tissue capillaries they only need to take a small amount of O2 out. This shows as there being more left in the venous blood. The pH change is real but in the paper the pH change was identical between ketone types but the rise in arterial pO2 only occurred when the precursor drug generated AcAc. With BHB only there was no rise in arterial (nor presumable venous) pO2. This asks deep questions about AcAc vs BHB and what difference ...
Hi valerie, the change in pO2 does not help oxygen delivery because most O2 is carried on haemoglobin. Mind you, it may well blunt the hypoxic drive to the aortic body chemoreceptors so limit the CO2 wash out that comes from over hypoxia induced hyperventilation. At a pO2 of 100mmHg (normal) Hb is almost completely saturated and increasing the pO2 to 130mmHg will not add any extra to the Hb. The amount in solution is tiny and will increase with the rise in pO2 to an amount slightly more than the usual tiny amount… What does matter is that as the blood goes through the tissue capillaries they only need to take a small amount of O2 out. This shows as there being more left in the venous blood. The pH change is real but in the paper the pH change was identical between ketone types but the rise in arterial pO2 only occurred when the precursor drug generated AcAc. With BHB only there was no rise in arterial (nor presumable venous) pO2. This asks deep questions about AcAc vs BHB and what difference ...
Monitored by peripheral chemoreceptors - carotid/aortic bodies. Not sensitive to modest changes in PO2. Arterial PO2 must be , 60 mmHg (40% reduction) for chemoreceptors to send afferent impulses to medullary inspiratory neurons. (happens with severe pulmonary disease, reduced atmospheric pressure). Until you get to 60 mmHg, youre still in plateau range of Hb-O2 dissociation curve (safe). If it werent for peripheral chemoreceptors, the low PO2 would depress respiratory centers à stop breathing. Chemoreceptors respond to PO2, not oxygen content. Anemia, CO poisoning - PO2is normal, but total O2 is too low. ...
The basic rythum of breathing is controlled by respiratory centers located in the medulla and pons of the brainstem. This rythum is modified in response to input from sensory receptors and from other regions of the brain. Respiratory centers in the pons modify inspiration and allow for smooth transitions between inspiration and expiation. Expiratory centers in the medulla function during forced expiation stimulating the internal and abdominal muscles. The basic rythum of breathing is modified by input from the central and peripheral chemoreceptors. They respond to changes in the PCO2 and PO2 of arterial blood. Medullary chemoreceptors are located on the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata. The medullary chemoreceptors detect changes to the H+ concentration of the brain interstitial fluid, an indirect assessment of arterial PCO2. Chemoreceptors in the carotid and aortic bodies are stimulated by a rise in the PCO2, a rise in the H+ concentration, or a decline in arterial blood PO2. Peripheral ...
The control of ventilation refers to the physiological mechanisms involved in the control of breathing, which is the movement of air into and out of the lungs. Ventilation facilitates respiration. Respiration refers to the utilization of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide by the body as a whole, or by individual cells in cellular respiration. The most important function of breathing is the supplying of oxygen to the body and the removal of its waste product of carbon dioxide. Under most conditions, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) or concentration of carbon dioxide, controls the respiratory rate. The peripheral chemoreceptors that detect changes in the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide are located in the arterial aortic bodies and the carotid bodies. Central chemoreceptors are primarily sensitive to changes in the pH in the blood, (resulting from changes in the levels of carbon dioxide) and they are located on the medulla oblongata near to the medullar respiratory groups of the ...
The pH of the extracellular fluids can thus be controlled by separately regulating the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (which determines the carbonic acid concentration), and the bicarbonate ion concentration in the extracellular fluids. There are therefore at least two homeostatic negative feedback systems responsible for the regulation of the plasma pH. The first is the homeostatic control of the blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide, which determines the carbonic acid concentration in the plasma, and can change the pH of the arterial plasma within a few seconds.[5] The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the arterial blood is monitored by the central chemoreceptors of the medulla oblongata, and so are part of the central nervous system.[5][19] These chemoreceptors are sensitive to the pH and levels of carbon dioxide in the cerebrospinal fluid.[13][11][19] (The peripheral chemoreceptors are located in the aortic bodies and carotid bodies adjacent to the arch of the aorta and to the ...
baroreceptor reflex pathway. this image shows the pathway of the baroreceptor reflex the reflex that shares in the control of normal blood pressure showing: 1. aortic baroreceptor 2. aortic body 3. carotid sinus 4. carotid baroreceptor 5. inferior ganglion of vagus nerve for th
bgcolor=CEDFF2 ! ,center>Mesoderm Origin,/center> ,- , Alphabetical list of anatomical structures derived from mesoderm. ,- , * accessory foramen * acetabular notch * acetabular part of hip bone * acetabular rim * acropodial skeleton * adductor blade * adductor crest * adductor mandibulae complex * adrenal cortex * adrenal gland capsule * adrenal gland cortex zone * adrenal medulla * adrenal tissue * adrenal/interrenal gland * adult mammalian kidney * adventitia of epididymis * adventitia of seminal vesicle * adventitia of ureter * agger limitans anterior of ilium * agger limitans anterior of ischium * alisphenoid bone * amnion * ampulla of uterine tube * anterior dentation of pectoral fin spine * anterior distal condyle of femur * anterior distal serration of pectoral fin spine * anterior humeral ridge * anterior lateral mesoderm * anterior lateral plate mesoderm * anterior subdivision of masseter * antitrochanter * antotic pillar * aorta collagen fibril * aortic body * apical region of heart ...
|i|Introduction|/i|. A glomus tumor is a benign vascular tumor derived from glomus cells and occurs mainly in the subcutaneous layer of the subungual or digital pulp. Extradigital glomus tumors have been reported within the palm, wrist, forearm, foot, bone, stomach, colon, cervix, and mesentery. Glomus tumors can originate from the intraosseous, intramuscular, periosteal, intravascular, and intraneural layers. However, a glomus tumor originating from the intravascular layer of the forearm is a rare condition. |i|Case Report|/i|. A 44-year-old woman had a 7-year history of chronic pain and focal tenderness of the forearm. No hypersensitivity or sensory alterations were observed. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a mass measuring 5 × 3 × 2 mm leading to a vein. Surgical excision was performed, and the tumor was completely resected. Finding of gross examination revealed a dark-red, well-defined soft tissue tumor, and histologic examination confirmed that the mass was a
The majority of functional neuroscience studies have focused on the brains response to a task or stimulus. However, the brain is very active even in the absence of explicit input or output. In this Article we review recent studies examining spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level depende …
Looking for online definition of paraganglia in the Medical Dictionary? paraganglia explanation free. What is paraganglia? Meaning of paraganglia medical term. What does paraganglia mean?
Glomangiosarcoma- Patient with glomangiosarcoma usually developed widespread metastases.. Microscopic features: Histologically, the features are those of benign glomus tumour with sarcomatous areas consisting of short spindle cells with hyperchromatic nucleus (round cell or leiomyosarcomatous appearance) and prominent mitotic figures.. II Classification of atypical glomus tumours: (Folpe et al.) 1. Malignant ; 2. Symplastic ; 3. Glomus tumors of uncertain malignant potential, and 4. Glomangiomatosis. Atypical glomus tumour: Glomus tumours display unusual features, such as large size, deep location, infiltrative growth, mitotic activity, nuclear pleomorphism, and necrosis. Atypical features are usually observed centrally with a rim of benign-appearing glomus tumour.. Malignant glomus tumour: Tumour with a deep location and a size of more than 2 cm, or atypical mitotic figures, or moderate to high nuclear grade and 5 mitotic figures or more/50 HPF. High nuclear grade alone, infiltrative growth, ...
Glomus tumours are benign tumours arising from the glomus cells and modified smooth muscles that surround the afferent arteriole of the thermoregulatory specialized arteriovenous anastomosis in the dermis, called the glomus body.[1-3] Wood first described glomus tumours in 1812,[12] and in 1924, Masson[13] reported their histological features and origin from the Sucquet Hoyer canal. Bailey[14] coined the term glomangioma in 1935 for lesions with dilated vascular channels, seen more often in patients with multiple tumours. In 1936, Touraine was the first to report multiple tumours,[15] while in 1959, Sluiter detailed the points of differentiation between the localized and disseminated forms of glomangiomas.[16]. SGTs constitute 75-90% of all glomus tumours, and are largely found subungually in the fingernails. They are approximately twice as common in women,[7] are usually seen in adulthood, present as well-circumscribed purplish nodules of , 10 mm in size, and are invariably painful and ...
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Looking for Paraganglia? Find out information about Paraganglia. a series of endocrine glands of vertebrate animals and man that are composed of chromaffin tissue and that secrete adrenaline , noradrenaline , and possibly... Explanation of Paraganglia
A glomus tumor is a rare neoplasm usually found in the dermis or subcutaneous tissue of the extremities. It is rare for the glomus tumor to occur on the head and face. Only 26 glomus tumors of the oral region and affected bone have been reported in the English-language literature (Table 1). We report a case of a glomus tumor at the mandible. As a new point, the glomus tumor resorbed a bone and teeth roots when the tumor progressed into the mandible. The patient was a 44-year-old Japanese man who complained swelling of the right mandible. Radiographic examination showed a multilocular radiolucency area in the left mandible. Radiographic findings on our case resembled those of a common benign tumor. The lesion occupied to the premolar and molar area and revealed that the tumor resorbed the roots of the teeth. The lesion was removed surgically with the buccal cortical bone and buccal mucosa in contact with the mass of the tumor. The mass fully excised intraorally under general anesthesia, and the inferior
A glomus tumor is a rare neoplasm usually found in the dermis or subcutaneous tissue of the extremities. It is rare for the glomus tumor to occur on the head and face. Only 26 glomus tumors of the oral region and affected bone have been reported in the English-language literature (Table 1). We report a case of a glomus tumor at the mandible. As a new point, the glomus tumor resorbed a bone and teeth roots when the tumor progressed into the mandible. The patient was a 44-year-old Japanese man who complained swelling of the right mandible. Radiographic examination showed a multilocular radiolucency area in the left mandible. Radiographic findings on our case resembled those of a common benign tumor. The lesion occupied to the premolar and molar area and revealed that the tumor resorbed the roots of the teeth. The lesion was removed surgically with the buccal cortical bone and buccal mucosa in contact with the mass of the tumor. The mass fully excised intraorally under general anesthesia, and the inferior
Perry, A., Sosin, M., Weissler, J. M., Chiaffarano, J. M., & Barnard, N. J. (2015). Multiple Glomus Tumors Presenting as an Aesthetic Abnormality. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 39 (2). http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00266-015-0453-4 ...
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The focus of this paper is to improve our studies related to the novel use of the Thorpe method applied to atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using new data from Spanish field experiments. We analyse the time behaviour of the maximum Thorpe displacement (dT)max and the Thorpe-scale LT during a day cycle. We also analyse the relation between (dT)max and LT. We deduce that they confirm a power law statistically significant, with differences between convective conditions and shear-driven conditions ...
Looking for Glomus cell? Find out information about Glomus cell. A fold of the mesothelium arising near the base of the mesentery in the pronephros and containing a ball of blood vessels. A prominent portion of the... Explanation of Glomus cell
Reversal of Rotating Behavior in the Domestic Fowl by Neural Grafting. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
If the tumor appears to have invaded the jugular vein, then control of the blood vessels of the neck may be necessary with a separate incision in the neck before the tumor can be completely removed. This is the exception in glomus tumors which arise from the middle ear and mastoid, but the usual situation in glomus jugular tumors.. Ic. Invasion of the Brain. If the glomus tumor continues to expand, it may invade the brain through the bone separating the middle ear and mastoid. This bone is called the middle fossa plate, or tegmen.. If the tumor has invaded the bone and entered the brain, intracranial surgical excision of the tumor may be necessary. Depending on the size of the tumor, this part of the surgery is done in conjunction with a neurosurgeon at the operation. It can also be staged and performed at a separate operation. Staging is often chosen when very extensive tumors invade the brain.. Results of removal of glomus tumors of the middle ear and mastoid are extremely good in most cases, ...
Preferred examination Imaging is the primary investigative modality for glomus tumors of the head and neck. A combination of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiography is ideal for proper diagnosis and localization of the tumors.
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A blue-red, extremely painful vascular neoplasm involving a glomeriform arteriovenous anastomosis (glomus body), which may be found anywhere in the skin, most often in the distal portion of the fingers and toes, especially beneath the nail. It is composed of specialized pericytes (sometimes termed glomus cells), usually in single encapsulated nodular masses which may be several millimeters in diameter (From Stedman, 27th ed). CHEMODECTOMA, a tumor of NEURAL CREST origin, is also sometimes called a glomus tumor ...
paraganglioma,chemodectoma, glomus tumor,middle ear benign tumors,types,pathology,symptoms,signs,investigations,diagnosis,cranial nerve palsies,high ICT manifestations.
A glomus, also called a paraganglioma, is a noncancerous tumor that is locally invasive and arises from the glomus cells of the middle ear.
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Chemoreceptors are specialized nerve cells designed to respond to chemical stimuli. There are two types of chemoreceptors in the...
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The overall mean egg weight in the current experiment was 42.5g. This was higher compared to 36.8g from Nigerian local domestic fowls (Adedokun and Sonaiya 2001), 37g from Bangladesh desi domestic fowls (Barua and Yoshimura 1997), 38.2g from Tanzanian local domestic fowls (Katule 1990) and 34.4g from Malian local domestic fowls (Wilson et al 1987). There are other studies that have reported higher mean egg weights compared to the current experiment. Mwalusanya (1998) reported overall mean egg weight of 43.6g from local domestic fowls from three ecological zones of Tanzania. In a different study, Zaza (1992) reported mean egg weight of 48g in Dandrawi domestic fowl (a local Egyptian domestic fowl).. It was observed that except for the Mbeya ecotype, mean egg weights for the other local domestic fowl ecotypes were lower compared to those reported in an earlier study for Kuchi and Singamagazi; two relatively large local ecotypes from Tanzania (Msoffe et al 2001). Katule (1990) had earlier shown ...
The carotid body is a small structure weighing 12 mg located in the adventitia of carotid artery bifurcation acting as a chemoreceptor. Carotid body tumour (CBT); formerly known as chemodectoma is a rare, highly vascular, mostly benign tumour arising from the paraganglia of carotid body; hence, the name (carotid paraganglioma). The high vascularity and proximity to cranial nerves and major vessels make this tumour a surgical challenge. Abundant literature has been written about CBT in the last century with a continuous debate regarding its etiology, natural history, biological behavior, proper technique of excision, and the morbidity and mortality associated with its resection. The purpose of this review article is to simplify understanding the basic and clinical aspects of this challenging neoplasm.
Dent et al [16] demonstrated that differences in diastolic function might be noninvasively quantified in diabetic hearts; however, these authors recognized that the lack of in vivo hemodynamic data was one limitation of their study. In our experiments, direct measurements of cardiac function corroborate diastolic and systolic LV function impairment observed after 30-day-induced diabetes by the echocardiographic approach. In vivo LV function evidenced reduced LVSP and +dP/dt max, reflecting a systolic dysfunction, increased LVEDP and attenuated -dP/dt max, showing diastolic dysfunction. These data associated with the impairment in MPI reported in the diabetic group in the present study corroborate the positive correlation between these ventricular indexes, as previously shown in mice [21]. In fact, similar alterations in LVEDP, contractility, bradycardia, reduced cardiac output, and renal damage were evidenced after 21 days of STZ in rats. Reduction in HR in diabetic rats has been attributed to ...
These are sensitive to pH and CO 2. peripheral chemoreceptors: consists of aortic and carotid bodies. Aortic body detects ... Carotid bodies and aortic bodies detect changes primarily in pCO2 and H+ ion concentration. They also sense decrease in partial ... The resulting output from the CNS (central nervous system) makes body actions that will engage the food and enhance survival.[ ... Nurse, Colin A.; Piskuric, Nikol A. (January 2013). "Signal processing at mammalian carotid body chemoreceptors". Seminars in ...
Aortic body. Низходяща аорта/. Гръдна аорта. visceral: *Bronchial artery. *Esophageal branches of thoracic part of aorta ...
Left heart failure compromises aortic flow to the body and brain. Mixed presentations are common; left heart failure often ... Tamparo, Carol (2011). Fifth Edition: Diseases of the Human Body. Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company. p. 329. ISBN 978-0-8036 ... Heart failure is a physiological state in which cardiac output is insufficient to meet the needs of the body and lungs.[2] The ... Heart murmurs may indicate the presence of valvular heart disease, either as a cause (e.g. aortic stenosis) or as a result (e.g ...
... s are the cell type mainly located in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies. Glomus type I cells are peripheral ... Clusters of glomus cells, of which the carotid bodies and aortic bodies are the most important, are called non-chromaffin or ... the carotid bodies and the aortic bodies signal the dorsal respiratory group in the medulla oblongata to increase the volume ... Alternatively, the glomus type I cells of the aortic body are innervated by sensory neurons found in the inferior ganglion of ...
Both carotid bodies and aortic bodies increase sensory discharge during hypoxia. Carotid bodies are considered the primary ... Carotid and aortic bodies are clusters of cells located on the common carotid artery and the aortic arch, respectively. Each of ... However, in the chronic absence of the carotid body, the aortic body is able to perform a similar respiratory regulatory role, ... However, because carotid and aortic bodies detect variation within the body's internal organs, they are considered ...
Peripheral chemoreceptors (carotid and aortic bodies) and central chemoreceptors (medullary neurons) primarily function to ...
change of blood pH, detected by peripheral chemoreceptors in the aortic bodies and in the carotid bodies. change of blood ... pressure , detected by arterial baroreceptors in the aortic sinuses and the carotid sinuses. various other inputs from the ...
Some sources equate the "aortic bodies" and "paraaortic bodies", while other sources explicitly distinguish between the two. ... When a distinction is made, the "aortic bodies" are chemoreceptors which regulate circulation, while the "paraaortic bodies" ... Bodies at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Para-Aortic+Bodies at the US National Library of ... The term para-aortic body is also sometimes used to describe it, as it usually arises near the abdominal aorta, but this term ...
"Relative importance of aneurysm diameter and body size for predicting abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture in men and women." ... "Results of a multicenter, prospective trial of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injury (RESCUE ... "Relative importance of aneurysm diameter and body size for predicting abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture in men and women". J ... McPhee JT, Hill JS, Eslami MH (May 2007). "The impact of gender on presentation, therapy, and mortality of abdominal aortic ...
Another type of sustentacular cell is found with glomus cells of the carotid and aortic bodies.[citation needed] About 40% of ...
Together the latter is known as the peripheral chemoreceptors which are situated in the aortic and carotid bodies. Information ... Body tissues are therefore not exposed to large swings in oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions in the blood caused by the ... The body's circulatory system transports these gases to and from the cells, where "cellular respiration" takes place. The ... The saturated vapor pressure of water is dependent only on temperature; at a body core temperature of 37 °C it is 6.3 kPa (47.0 ...
the system which includes cells stained by chromic salts, consisting of renal medulla, para ganglia, and para aortic bodies. It ... The coccygeal glomus (coccygeal gland or body; Luschka's gland) is a vestigial structure placed in front of, or immediately ...
It receives blood from the right atrium through the mitral valve, and pumps it to the body through the aortic valve. It ... Right coronary artery usually takes of just above the aortic valve, within the aortic root, in the right coronary sinus, that ... Its primary role is to receive the blood from the body, pump it to lungs to be oxygenated once more, received it once more to ... Left ventricle is made by thick muscle walls, as power is needed to push blood to the arterial system of the body. It is of ...
... can refer to: Aortic body (glomus aorticum) Organ of Zuckerkandl This disambiguation page lists articles ...
The left ventricle pumps blood to the body through the aortic valve and into the aorta. Two small openings above the aortic ... Chemoreceptors present in the carotid body or adjacent to the aorta in an aortic body respond to the blood's oxygen, carbon ... Baroreceptors are stretch receptors located in the aortic sinus, carotid bodies, the venae cavae, and other locations, ... Galen, noting the heart as the hottest organ in the body, concluded that it provided heat to the body. The heart did not pump ...
Snorkel: A covered stent placed into a visceral vessel adjacent to the main body of the EVAR device. The aortic lumen of the ... particularly to address aortic branch points near the diseased aortic segment. One example in the treatment of thoracic aortic ... With most devices, the "main body" of the endograft is placed first, followed by the "limbs" which join the main body and ... After partial deployment of the main body of an endograft, separate endograft limbs are deployed from the main body to each ...
Aortic aneurysm (abdomen) An abdominal aortic aneurysm is swelling of the main abdominal artery and can cause sudden chest pain ... Cystic fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease that causes the body to produce abnormally thick and sticky mucus. ... Aortic dissection (abdomen) An abdominal aortic dissection is a medical emergency and causes sudden abdominal or back pain. ... Allergic reaction Allergic reaction causes sneezing, runny nose and hives and can lead to anaphylaxis, a whole body reaction. ...
The axons of the neurons which innervate the aortic bodies, aortic arch, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, synapse in the ... the chemoreceptors of the aortic bodies and baroreceptors in the aortic arch. Most importantly, the majority of neurons in the ...
... that detect changes in the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide are located in the arterial aortic bodies and the carotid bodies ... Respiration refers to the utilization of oxygen and balancing of carbon dioxide by the body as a whole, or by individual cells ... The most important function of breathing is the supplying of oxygen to the body and balancing of the carbon dioxide levels. ... Maintenance and continuity of the human body. 12th Edition. Danvers: Wiley Kuna, Samuel T (2000). "Respiratory-related ...
Aortic valve - blood goes out of the left ventricle to the body (through the aorta) ... It is on the left side of the body in humans and is about the size of a fist. It pumps blood throughout the body. It has ... These bring blood from the body to the right heart. The veins going into the left atrium are the pulmonary veins. These bring ... The left atrium and ventricle send the blood out to the body. The left ventricle works six times harder than the right ...
The aortic bodies and carotid bodies contain clusters of glomus cells - peripheral chemoreceptors that detect changes in ... The stimulus can come from extoreceptors outside the body, for example light and sound, or from interoreceptors inside the body ... The cell bodies of the sensory neurons are located in the dorsal ganglia of the spinal cord. This sensory information travels ... They are found in internal organs as well as on the surface of the body to "detect and protect". Nociceptors detect different ...
Nonchromaffin paraganglia include carotid bodies and aortic bodies, some are distributed in the ear, along the vagus nerve, in ... They are generally present at the head and neck, most often at carotid body or jugulo-tympanic, they rarely secrete hormones ... Chromaffin paraganglia (also called chromaffin bodies) are connected with the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk and the ganglia ... and can occur at a number of sites throughout the body. Chromaffin paragangliomas are issued from chromaffin cells, and are ...
... vasopressin secretion in response to cardiovascular stimuli arising from chemoreceptors in the carotid body and aortic arch, ... The hypothalamus functions as a type of thermostat for the body. It sets a desired body temperature, and stimulates either heat ... Stress Invading microorganisms by increasing body temperature, resetting the body's thermostat upward. Olfactory stimuli are ... The hypothalamus controls body temperature, hunger, important aspects of parenting and attachment behaviours, thirst, fatigue, ...
Similarly, baroreceptors are stretch receptors located in the aortic sinus, carotid bodies, the venae cavae, and other ... The last variable is body temperature. Elevated body temperature is called hyperthermia, and suppressed body temperature is ... Heart rate is not a stable value and it increases or decreases in response to the body's need in a way to maintain an ... This pulse rate can be found at any point on the body where the artery's pulsation is transmitted to the surface by pressuring ...
... as determined by central and peripheral chemoreceptors located in the central nervous system and carotid and aortic bodies, ... If the alveolar ventilation is low, there will not be enough oxygen delivered to the alveoli for the body's use. This can cause ... Hypoxemia has many causes, and often causes hypoxia as the blood is not supplying enough oxygen to the tissues of the body. ... or the body as a whole. Hypoxemia can cause hypoxia (hypoxemic hypoxia), but hypoxia can also occur via other mechanisms, such ...
... that detect stimuli in liquids include the taste buds in the gustatory system as well as receptors in the aortic bodies which ... detects temperatures above body temperature. Ruffini's end organ detects temperatures below body temperature. TRPV1 is a heat- ... The receptive field is the area of the body or environment to which a receptor organ and receptor cells respond. For instance, ... They are found in internal organs, as well as on the surface of the body. Nociceptors detect different kinds of damaging ...
Similarly, baroreceptors are stretch receptors located in the aortic sinus, carotid bodies, the venae cavae, and other ... The function of the right heart, is to collect de-oxygenated blood, in the right atrium, from the body via the superior vena ... Eventually in the systemic capillaries exchange with the tissue fluid and cells of the body occurs; oxygen and nutrients are ... The two semilunar valves, the pulmonary and aortic valves, are closed, preventing backflow of blood into the right and left ...
... para-aortic catecholamine-secreting body Zucker (disambiguation) Zuckermann This page lists people with the surname Zuckerkandl ...
The aorta is the largest artery in the body, and the major aortic branches continue to divide multiple times, giving way to ... Acute aortic dissection can be difficult to diagnose but is more common than aortic aneurysm rupture. Thoracic aortic ... Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR) refers to treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, while Thoracic Endovascular Aortic ... The largest vein in the body is the vena cava. The superior vena cava (SVC) drains blood from the top half of the body while ...
... region of the neck anterolateral system antidromic antihelix antrum anulus fibrosus anulus tendineus anus aorta aortic body ... viscera visceromotor nuclei viscus Visible Human Project visual cortex visual fields visual radiation vitreous body vitreous ... bilateral symmetry bile duct biology bipolar cells of the retina bitemporal heminopia blastomere blood blood brain barrier body ... history of anatomy Hoffmann's reflex homologous hormone horn human anatomical parts named after people human anatomy human body ...
wide-set eyes • split uvula or cleft palate • arterial tortuosity • aortic root dilatation • aneurysms 609192 610168 613795 ... Syndromal craniosynostosis presents with a skull deformity as well as deformities affecting other parts of the body.[42] ... the assessment of the skull deformity and the search for deformities affecting other parts of the body.[16] The head ...
He suffered from aortic stenosis and no longer had access to follow-up treatment for his earlier cancer.[391] A stroke left him ... On 15 April 1998, Pol Pot died in his sleep, apparently of heart failure.[398] His body was preserved with ice and formaldehyde ... which are more likely to produce an under-count of bodies rather than an over-estimate."[315] Demographer Patrick Heuveline ... his wife cremated his body on a pyre of tyres and rubbish, utilising traditional Buddhist funerary rites.[398] There were ...
In 10-20% of untreated cases, EM rashes develop at sites across the body that bear no relation to the original tick bite.[23] ... "Detection of Borrelia bissettii in cardiac valve tissue of a patient with endocarditis and aortic valve stenosis in the Czech ... The EM (Erythema migrans) rash is often accompanied by symptoms of a viral-like illness, including fatigue, headache, body ... B. burgdorferi can spread throughout the body during the course of the disease, and has been found in the skin, heart, joints, ...
Talk:Aortic arch. *Talk:Aortic body. *Talk:Aortic valve. *Talk:Aorticopulmonary septum ...
Body and cervix to internal iliac lymph nodes, fundus to para-aortic lymph nodes, lumbar and superficial inguinal lymph nodes. ...
"Iguana Internal Body Parts". Reptile & Parrots Forum. Retrieved 2017-04-22.. *^ Wang, Tobias; Altimiras, Jordi; Klein, Wilfried ... and paired aortic arches.[69] ... The Vertebrate Body. 5th ed. Saunders, Philadelphia. (6th ed. ... These pits allow the snakes to sense the body heat of birds and mammals, enabling pit vipers to hunt rodents in the dark.[ ... Charles Darwin noted that the Galapagos tortoise had a bladder which could store up to 20% of its body weight.[97] Such ...
Al-Motarreb, A. L.; Broadley, K. J. (October-December 2003). "Coronary and aortic vasoconstriction by cathinone, the active ... the body to recycle these neurotransmitters more slowly, resulting in the wakefulness and insomnia associated with khat use.[32 ...
80-90% of the total body reserves of vitamin A are in the liver (with 80-90% of this amount being stored in hepatic stellate ... "Increased dietary intake of vitamin A promotes aortic valve calcification in vivo". Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular ... as conversion from carotenoids to the active form of vitamin A is regulated by the body to maintain an optimum level of the ... with daily intakes of 1500 IU/kg body weight reportedly leading to toxicity.[20] ...
... medications will not remove the blockages from the body. Instead, they simply improve blood flow to the affected area.[6] ... torso: Aortic aneurysm *Abdominal aortic aneurysm. *Thoracic aortic aneurysm. *Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva ...
... of combat trauma through the use of moulage applied to soldiers, dummies or fake body parts to emulate ... for the Apple Macintosh very accurately simulated operating on an aortic aneurysm.[3] Others followed, such as Life & Death ( ... a visually animated representation of blood flow within a body or other physiological processes occurring within the body that ...
... aortic disease (e.g. aortic aneurysm),[56] high blood pressure,[57][58] stroke,[59] diabetes, clinical depression,[60] weight ... Many people benefit from sleeping at a 30-degree elevation of the upper body[34] or higher, as if in a recliner. Doing so helps ... The chest muscles and diaphragm contract and the entire body may thrash and struggle.[citation needed] ... As the muscle tone of the body ordinarily relaxes during sleep, and the airway at the throat is composed of walls of soft ...
The most basic preparation is that people who have body hair on the chest may want to remove the hair by clipping just prior to ... The epicardial pacemaker leads were placed after the patient collapsed during aortic valve surgery. In the first half of the ... The outer casing of pacemakers is so designed that it will rarely be rejected by the body's immune system. It is usually made ... The pacing wire is then connected to an external pacemaker outside the body. Transvenous pacing is often used as a bridge to ...
... was to prove a new autopharmacological principle, i.e., a substance that is released in the body by a metabolic ... forming the ligamentum arteriosum between the pulmonary trunk and aortic arch. It also plays a role in the constriction and ...
It passes beneath the aortic arch, crosses in front of the esophagus, the thoracic duct, and the descending aorta, and has the ... If food, liquids, or foreign bodies are aspirated, they will tend to lodge in the right main bronchus. Bacterial pneumonia and ... Mainstem bronchi seen branching off the trachea (labeled at top), with the left mainstem bronchi passing below the aortic arch ... this can lead to a lack of oxygen reaching the body for cellular processes. In this case an inhaler can be used to rectify the ...
The body has several feedback mechanisms to maintain adequate blood flow and blood pressure. If blood pressure decreases, the ... the heart pumps less efficiently and provides less blood flow to the rest of the body, including the heart itself. The ...
aortic aneurysm (Cardarelli's sign, Oliver's sign). *pulmonary embolism (McConnell's sign). *radial artery sufficiency (Allen's ... Bracht-Wachter bodies. Pericardium. *Cardiac tamponade/Pericardial effusion: Beck's triad. *Ewart's sign ...
At ambient temperatures below their body temperatures (thermal neutral zone (TNZ)), common ostriches decrease body surface ... The coronary arteries start in the right and left aortic sinus and provide blood to the heart muscle in a similar fashion to ... causing the body temperature to increase further.[62] When the body heat is allowed to increase the temperature gradient ... If the ambient temperature is lower than the thermo-neutral zone, heat is produced to maintain body temperature.[61] So, the ...
Endogenous production with full body exposure to sunlight is comparable to taking an oral dose between 250 µg and 625 µg ( ... "Relation of oral 1alpha-hydroxy vitamin D3 to the progression of aortic arch calcification in hemodialysis patients". Heart and ...
The development of prosthetic mitral and aortic valves, which have prolonged and enhanced the lives of millions of people with ... Discovery of leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite and body weight-a breakthrough that opened obesity research to molecular ... The discovery of dendritic cells-the preeminent component of the immune system that initiates and regulates the body's response ...
Aortic bifurcation, the point at which the abdominal aorta bifurcates into the left and right common iliac arteries ... Bifurcation means the splitting of a main body into two parts.. Bifurcation or bifurcated may refer to:. *Bifurcation (law), ...
"Body Hot Spots: The Anatomy of Human Social Organs and Behavior. Archived from the original on 21 June 2007. Retrieved 19 ... In birds, the main arteries taking blood away from the heart originate from the right aortic arch (or pharyngeal arch), unlike ... This adaptation is also known from marine mammals.[167] Communal roosting is common because it lowers the loss of body heat and ... The arrangement and appearance of feathers on the body, called plumage, may vary within species by age, social status,[101] and ...
... does not govern every activity in the body.[19][20] For instance the signal (be it via neurons or hormones) from ... High pressure receptors called baroreceptors in the walls of the aortic arch and carotid sinus (at the beginning of the ... The body water homeostat can be compromised by the inability to secrete ADH in response to even the normal daily water losses ... Circadian variation in body temperature, ranging from about 7002310650000000000♠37.5 °C from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and falling to ...
It lies beneath the sternum, rests on the pericardium, and is separated from the aortic arch and great vessels by a layer of ... T cells are critical to the adaptive immune system, where the body adapts specifically to foreign invaders. The thymus is ... T cells that attack the body's own proteins are eliminated in the thymus. Thymic epithelial cells express major proteins from ... Computed Body Tomography with MRI Correlation. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 311-324. ISBN 0-7817-4526-8. ...
... is a rare inherited genetic disorder in which the body cannot process the amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine, ... Valvular heart disease, mainly calcification and regurgitation of the aortic and mitral valves, may occur, and in severe and ... Normally these enter the bloodstream through protein-containing food and the natural turnover of protein in the body. Tyrosine ... the body accumulates an intermediate substance called homogentisic acid in the blood and tissues. Homogentisic acid and its ...
When the myocardium is stimulated it contracts, and if this occurs in an orderly manner allows blood to be pumped to the body. ... Pulse oximetry may confirm the presence of too little oxygen reaching the body's tissues, related to any precipitating factors ... and therefore oxygen delivery to the rest of the body. Common symptoms of uncontrolled atrial fibrillation may include ...
The diameter of the aortic arch increases as it leaves the heart. This bulbous expansion acts as a windkessel, ensuring a ... Sperm whales are prodigious feeders and eat around 3% of their body weight per day. The total annual consumption of prey by ... Goold, J.C. (1996). "Signal processing techniques for acoustic measurement of sperm whale body lengths". Journal of the ... The sperm whale's unique body is unlikely to be confused with any other species. The sperm whale's distinctive shape comes from ...
In humans, hypoxia is detected by the peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body and aortic body, with the carotid body ... Hypoxia[1] is a condition in which the body or a region of the body is deprived of adequate oxygen supply at the tissue level. ... Hypoxia may be classified as either generalized, affecting the whole body, or local, affecting a region of the body. Although ... A condition in which the body or a region of the body is deprived of adequate oxygen at the tissue level ...
Rebound hypertension is avoided by gradually reducing the dose (also known as "dose tapering"), thereby giving the body enough ... torso: Aortic aneurysm *Abdominal aortic aneurysm. *Thoracic aortic aneurysm. *Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva ...
Aortic Arch and Descending Thoracic Aorta. The aorta supplies all of the systemic circulation, which means that the entire body ... Aortic archEdit. Main article: Aortic arch. The aortic arch loops over the left pulmonary artery and the bifurcation of the ... Between the aortic arch and the pulmonary trunk is a network of autonomic nerve fibers, the cardiac plexus or aortic plexus. ... The left aortic sinus contains the origin of the left coronary artery and the right aortic sinus likewise gives rise to the ...
As a hormone, epinephrine acts on nearly all body tissues. Its actions vary by tissue type and tissue expression of adrenergic ... While epinephrine does increase aortic, cerebral, and carotid circulation pressure, it lowers carotid blood flow and end-tidal ... providing substrates for energy production within cells throughout the body.[39] ... dosage for people in a dental setting requiring local anesthesia with a peripheral vasoconstrictor is 10 µg/lb of total body ...
The aortic bodies are collections of chemoreceptors present on the aortic arch. Most are located above the aortic arch, while ... The aortic bodies are one of several small clusters of peripheral chemoreceptors located along the aortic arch. They are ... They are more sensitive detectors of arterial blood oxygen content than the carotid body chemoreceptors. The aortic bodies give ... Some sources equate the "aortic bodies" and "paraaortic bodies", while other sources explicitly distinguish between the two. ...
VATS for Removal of Para-Aortic Metallic Foreign Body. Monday, November 9, 2015 ... Among his multiple traumas was a metallic foreign body abutting the aorta in the left pleural cavity associated with the small ... the use of VATS in a hemodynamically stable trauma patient is both safe and effective in removing metallic foreign bodies and ...
Aortic pseudoaneurysm caused by ingested foreign body. By Mohamed Nadeem Ahmed, MD; Syed Nabir, MD; Zahoor Ahmed, MD; Shatha ... Ahmed MN, Nabir S, Ahmed Z, MD; Hilli SAAA, Ravikumar V, Momin U. Aortic pseudoaneurysm caused by ingested foreign body. Appl ... Perforated esophageal foreign body complicated by mediastinal abscess and aortic pseudoaneurysm. DISCUSSION. Ingested foreign ... Foreign bodies in the esophagus can occasionally result in complications. A rare complication is aortic pseudoaneurysm ...
Univariate Associations With Aortic PWV. Table 2 summarizes correlations between log aortic PWV and age, MAP, and body ... Aortic stiffness is a major subclinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease; however, the effect of body composition on aortic ... and measures of body composition with aortic PWV, cardiac output, and LV mass. To assess for sex by body composition and age by ... Body Fat Is Associated With Reduced Aortic Stiffness Until Middle AgeNovelty and Significance. Ben Corden, Niall G. Keenan, ...
This vertebral destruction is usually seen after aortic graft surgery; nevertheless, it is not expected in primary aortic ... Erosion of vertebral bodies because of abdominal aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. ... BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Erosion of vertebral bodies because of abdominal aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. This ... Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal / complications*, surgery. Aortic Rupture / complications*, surgery. Back Pain / etiology*. Chronic ...
A: An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the lower part of the aorta due to a weakening of the artery wall. Most often ... What to know about abdominal aortic aneurysms * By Howard LeWine, M.D., Tribune Content Agency ... The USPSTF recommends a one-time ultrasound of the abdomen to screen for an abdominal aortic aneurysm with ultrasonography in ... Because of the association of aortic aneurysms with atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), a heart healthy lifestyle ...
Malignant neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia Source:http://linkedlifedata.com/resource/umls/id/C0438413 ...
Nonspecific esterase activity expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies of cloned guinea pig aortic endothelial cells. J Histochem ... Nonspecific esterase activity expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies of cloned guinea pig aortic endothelial cells. ... Nonspecific esterase activity expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies of cloned guinea pig aortic endothelial cells. ...
Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies Modality: CT (C+ ... From the case: Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies ... View full size version of Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies ... From the case: Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies. ...
... in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation or Surgical Aortic Valve ... which is associated with increased mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve ... Outcomes of underweight (body mass index [BMI] ,20 kg/m2) TAVI and SAVR patients were compared using propensity score weighting ... Prognostic Impact of Underweight (Body Mass Index ,20 kg/m2) ... on mortality in underweight patients from the German Aortic ...
CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ... CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ... CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ... CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ...
Acute aortic dissection in a patient with extremely low Body Mass Index due to anorexia nervosa. Kolsrud O. 1, Lepore V. 1, ... Body Max Index [BMI] 11.3 kg/m2) and essential hypertension. The case is of interest since 1) acute aortic dissection in ... We report a case of successful surgical repair of an acute aortic dissection (Stanford Type A) in a severely malnourished 39- ... We conclude that extremely low BMI due to anorexia nervosa is not an absolute contraindication for major aortic surgery. ...
... aortic bifurcation. Relative aortic dia were calculated by dividing a given aortic dia by the suprarenal aortic dia. The ... Thoracic and abdominal aortic dimension in 70-year-old men and women: a population-based whole-body magnetic resonance imaging ... between normal aorta and aneurysm for different aortic segments in 70-year-old men and women by means of whole-body magnetic ... The smallest outer diameter (dia) was measured on the axial survey scan on six predefined aortic segments: (1) ascending aorta ...
... severe aortic stenosis in small-body patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). ... Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR ... Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR ... Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR ...
A normal population (n = 158, age range 6 to 62 years, 89 (56%) men, body surface area 1.6 ± 0.4 m2, body mass index 22 ± 4.4 ... Conversely, risk scores generated from the ESV z-score were independent of body surface area. Hence, ESV uncorrected for body ... This most probably relates to the near-linear relationship between body size and cardiac chamber size over the range of body ... 4). Interestingly, risk scores generated from models incorporating ESV uncorrected for body size were related to body surface ...
Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code *D44.7 is a billable ... D44.7 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia D44.9 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of unspecified ... Short description: Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body and oth paraganglia ... D44.6 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body ... aortic body D44.7. * extra-adrenal D44.7* unspecified site ...
keywords = "Aortic calcification, Body mass index, Body size, Bone mineral density, Calcification paradox, Obesity paradox", ... Role of bone mineral density in the inverse relationship between body size and aortic calcification: Results from the Baltimore ... title = "Role of bone mineral density in the inverse relationship between body size and aortic calcification: Results from the ... Role of bone mineral density in the inverse relationship between body size and aortic calcification: Results from the Baltimore ...
Body, Aortic, and Cardiac Mass. Body weight was significantly less in untreated SHR than normotensive WKY-C (P,.05); however, ... Body Weight Aortic and Cardiac Mass Indexes After 12 Weeks of Treatment With Enalapril (30 mg·kg−1· d−1), Losartan (30 mg·kg−1 ... Aortic mass index was significantly lower in the WKY-C than the SHR-C; and all treatments diminished aortic mass index in SHR ... Ventricular weights were normalized for body weight and expressed as RV and LV mass (mg/g). A fixed segment (4.5 cm) of the ...
D35.6 - Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia. ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D35.6. Benign neoplasm of aortic body and ... Short Description: Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia Long Description: Benign neoplasm of aortic body and ... Neoplasm of para-aortic body. Index of Diseases and Injuries References found for the code D35.6 in the Index of Diseases and ... They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as ...
Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient justification for ... D35.6 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia. A billable ... ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index References for D35.6 - Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia The ICD-10-CM Neoplasms ... A paraganglioma is rare neuroendocrine neoplasm that may develop at various body sites (including the head, neck, thorax and ...
The aorta is the main blood vessel that carries oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the organs in your body.. ... Before we talk about treatment, lets start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. ... Your doctor has recommended that you have surgery to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm. But what does that actually mean?. ...
Aortic body. One of the cellular aggregations traditionally known as chemoreceptors which are generally found adjacent to the ... Characteristics such as body parts or timing of reproductive events do not necessarily change in direct proportion to body size ... A chemical substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in a human or other animal body. ... A stimulating drug that affects the brain and the body. Amphetamine is a stimulant of the central nervous system. Chemically, ...
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal / surgery. Blood Loss, Surgical / statistics & numerical data. Body Height. Body Weight. Breath ... 1 tumor of aortic body drug therapy 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 25 results Searchbox Export PDF RSS Email Delete Email this ... Aortic banding produced significant elevation of fore- and hindlimb blood pressure (BP), heart-to-body weight ratios, plasma ... Whole-body computerized tomography showed enlarged lymph nodes in mediastinal, right axillary, abdominal para-aortic, ileum, ...
Aortic stiffness and Body Mass Index (BMI) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Artery Research 16 , pp. 64-65. ... Aortic stiffness and Body Mass Index (BMI) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) ...
Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient ... D44.7 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia ... ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index References for D44.7 - Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia The ICD- ... ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index References for D44.7 - Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia The ...
Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body and oth paraganglia. ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.7. Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body ... Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body and oth paraganglia Long Description: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and ... Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes ... They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too ...
Aortic Stiffness May Be Affected by Body Mass Index. Abstract Gulgun M. Med Princ Pract 2017;26:495 (DOI:10.1159/000480084) ... Blood Pressure and Age Are the Main Determinants of Aortic Stiffness. Abstract Güçlü A. · Nar G. · İçli A. · Özhan N. · Sezer S ...
... yellow body explanation free. What is yellow body? Meaning of yellow body medical term. What does yellow body mean? ... Looking for online definition of yellow body in the Medical Dictionary? ... Nissl body. See: Nissl, Franz. olivary body. Oliva.. pacchionian body. Arachnoid granulation.. para-aortic body. One of the ... See: foreign bodies in ear; foreign bodies in the esophagus; foreign body in nose; foreign bodies in the skin; foreign bodies ...
Aortic Body/Paraganglia. *Benign or malignant-primary. *Fixed tissue block or frozen tissue ... Apex, left ventricle, septum, mitral leaflet, aortic valve, aortic valve leaflet, mitral valve, unspecified valve or other ...
  • Among his multiple traumas was a metallic foreign body abutting the aorta in the left pleural cavity associated with the small hemothorax. (ctsnet.org)
  • The wall of aorta is weakened and friable due to the surrounding inflammatory process, and leads to formation of an aortic pseudoaneurysm. (appliedradiology.com)
  • A: An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the lower part of the aorta due to a weakening of the artery wall. (beatricedailysun.com)
  • The aorta is the main blood vessel that carries oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the organs in your body. (medselfed.com)
  • One of a number of bodies composed principally of chromaffin cells, arranged serially along both sides of the dorsal aorta and in the kidney, liver, and gonads. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In patients with arch and descending aorta involvement (DeBakey Type I), a total aortic arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk (F. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Fate of distal aorta after frozen elephant trunk and total arch replacement for type A aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Open Repair Versus Branched Endograft Repair for Treatment of Residual Chronic Aortic Arch Dissection During Follow-up After Open Type A Acute Ascending Aorta Replacement: Results From an International Multicenter Study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • There were 1 case performed with D. K.S. operation for the severe hypogenetic aortic valve and ascending aorta, and 1 case with left ventricular double outlet channel operation for the severe subvalvular aortic stenosis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Instead of "uncrossing" the arch, posterior aortic translocation aorta is required for the mirr. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A dynamic aortic patch is a device which is permanently surgically implanted in the wall of the aorta to augment the pumping action of the heart. (google.com)
  • Located between the left ventricle and the aorta, our largest artery, the aortic valve has three doors that open and close with each heartbeat to allow the blood to flow out and not return into the heart. (umiamihealth.org)
  • Another valve disease is aortic insufficiency or aortic regurgitation, when the valve becomes leaky, causing blood to flow back from the aorta into the left ventricle. (umiamihealth.org)
  • The most common aneurysm of the aorta is an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Less commonly, a thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) can affect the part of the aorta running through the chest. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Aneurysms can form in any artery throughout your body, but they're most common in your body's largest artery (aorta). (mayoclinic.org)
  • The aortic bodies located near the arch of the aorta also respond to acute changes in the partial pressure of oxygen, but less well than the carotid body responds to changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. (britannica.com)
  • PAD reduces blood circulation in the pelvis and lower extremities, and aortic aneurysms result in a weakening of the aortic wall that can cause lethal rupture of the aorta, the largest artery in the body. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The ascending aorta is defined as the portion of the aorta arising from the aortic root and terminating into the aortic arch. (reference.com)
  • Due to size of body and other factors, the average normal human ascending aorta is 33 millimeters. (reference.com)
  • Where Is the Aorta Located in the Human Body? (reference.com)
  • Coarctation of the aorta refers to a condition when a portion of the aorta (the large artery that carries oxygenated blood out of the heart) is too narrow, resulting in reduced blood flow to the lower body. (chop.edu)
  • Aortic valve was repaired, bypass surgery performed, the dissected aorta was reconstructed with artificial vein. (neu.edu.tr)
  • During the surgery the tear in the upper aorta (ascending aorta) which extended into the right coronary artery (artery that supply blood to the right ventricle) and consequently an aortic valve leakage was detected. (neu.edu.tr)
  • The cardiovascular team removed as much of the dissected aorta as possible and reconstructed the aorta with artificial vein, the aortic valve which was leaking as a result of damaged aorta was repaired and a bypass surgery was performed for the right coronary artery. (neu.edu.tr)
  • Thoracic aortic aneurysms can weaken the aorta, your body's largest blood vessel. (medtronic.com)
  • The artery that carries oxygen-rich blood to the body (aorta) is shifted toward the right side of the heart. (rochester.edu)
  • Finally, it's pumped through the aortic valve to the aorta and out to the body. (rochester.edu)
  • The death certificate and autopsy report were completed by the state medical examiner's office On July 8, 2013, a 37-year-old male career fire and listed "aortic dissection due to hypertensive fighter died from a dissected aorta while on duty. (cdc.gov)
  • An aortic aneurysm (say 'a-OR-tik AN-yuh-rih-zum') is a bulge in a section of the aorta, the body's main artery. (cigna.com)
  • The aorta carries oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the rest of the body. (cigna.com)
  • Aneurysms can form in any section of the aorta, but they are most common in the belly area ( abdominal aortic aneurysm ). (cigna.com)
  • The aortic valve is located between the aorta and the heart's left ventricle. (healthline.com)
  • An aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition in which a tear in the wall of the aorta - the major artery carrying blood out of the heart - allows blood to rush between the wall's layers. (heart.org)
  • nevertheless, it is not expected in primary aortic aneurysms. (biomedsearch.com)
  • CONCLUSION: It was concluded that back pain caused by chronic aortic aneurysms is a rare condition and may be one of the possible etiologies in differential diagnosis of low back pain and/or sciatica in some patients. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Because of the association of aortic aneurysms with atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), a heart healthy lifestyle makes sense. (beatricedailysun.com)
  • Patients with complex aortic arch aneurysms and severe arterial tortuosity represent a unique challenge because of extreme angulations, mixed aneurysm and stenotic disease, and fragile tissues. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts for treatment of aortic arch aneurysms is a new option for endovascular aortic arch repair. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise that aortic aneurysms contribute to over 25,000 deaths in the United States (U.S.) each year. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Aneurysms are classified by their location in the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It is a rare condition, as only 25 percent of aortic aneurysms occur in the chest. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Peripheral aneurysms are less likely to rupture than aortic aneurysms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The purpose of this observational Post-Market Surveillance Registry is to gather post-market data on the performance of the CE marked Vascutek Anaconda™ Stent Graft System for the repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Aortic graft infections are one of the most serious complications in patients undergoing aortic grafting procedures for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and aortic aneurysms. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Patients with PAD and aortic aneurysms often require surgery, and aortic grafting procedures using synthetic grafts are typically the first line of treatment. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Genetically engineered mice that lack the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) do not develop aortic aneurysms, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . (news-medical.net)
  • We think DPPI is a viable therapeutic target that may keep the growth of aortic aneurysms in check, so they don't become life threatening," says Robert W. Thompson, M.D., professor of surgery and one of the senior investigators on the article. (news-medical.net)
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysms kill about 15,000 Americans each year and have claimed the lives of such notables as Albert Einstein and Lucille Ball. (news-medical.net)
  • In the current study, the researchers used an experimental model in mice that mimics aortic aneurysms in humans. (news-medical.net)
  • An estimated 1.2 million Americans have aortic aneurysms, a bulge in the body's main artery. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The hospital says it could make stents the standard of care of abdominal aortic aneurysms, when the bulge is in the belly verses the chest. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Endovascular stent grafting, or endovascular aortic repair (EVAR), is a newer form of treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms that is less invasive than open surgery. (medtronic.com)
  • Thoracic aortic aneurysms are also known as ascending or descending aortic aneurysms. (cigna.com)
  • Most aortic aneurysms don't cause symptoms. (cigna.com)
  • Severe erosion of lumbar vertebral body because of a chronic ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. (biomedsearch.com)
  • BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Erosion of vertebral bodies because of abdominal aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The USPSTF recommends a one-time ultrasound of the abdomen to screen for an abdominal aortic aneurysm with ultrasonography in men ages 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked. (beatricedailysun.com)
  • Your doctor has recommended that you have surgery to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm. (medselfed.com)
  • Surgery is the only treatment for an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a weak spot in the body's main artery that dilates dangerously over time. (news-medical.net)
  • It's a misconception for people to think there is one event that activates an abdominal aortic aneurysm and that its progression is inevitable," Thompson explains. (news-medical.net)
  • Obese aortic stenosis patients undergoing surgical replacement have improved survival in comparison with underweight patients. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Currently there are scarce data regarding BMI impact on outcome of severe aortic stenosis patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Underweight severe aortic stenosis patients undergoing TAVR have increased risk for long term mortality in comparison with normal weight or obese patients, however obesity doesn't seem to portend significantly higher survival rates when compared with normal weight TAVR patients. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Objectives This study aimed to analyze the prognostic impact of low-flow (LF) severe aortic stenosis in small-body patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). (onlinejacc.org)
  • To date, 5 patients have undergone 6 reoperations of the cardiovascular system: 3 cases because of pulmonary artery stenosis, 2 cases because of severe aortic arch stenosis, and 1 case because of aortic subvalvular obstruction. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Aortic stenosis is the most common, affecting two percent of people 65 years and older. (umiamihealth.org)
  • For example, patients with aortic stenosis who don't receive treatment have a 50 percent chance of death at five years and 90 percent at 10. (umiamihealth.org)
  • To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). (forskningsdatabasen.dk)
  • Narrowing of the main artery of the body (aortic stenosis). (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Relation of Lipid-Lowering Therapy to Need for Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Asymptomatic Mild to Moderate Aortic Stenosis. (uio.no)
  • In this study, we aimed to determine if pretreatment low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and aortic stenosis (AS) severity alter the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy on reducing aortic valve replacement (AVR). (uio.no)
  • placebo in the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) trial. (uio.no)
  • MAAVR should therefore be considered as an alternative surgical strategy to reduce obesity-related complications in patients requiring aortic valve replacement. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most are located above the aortic arch, while some are located on the posterior side of the aortic arch between it and the pulmonary artery below. (wikipedia.org)
  • There was a 7 x 5 cm pseudoaneurysm arising from the proximal descending thoracic aortic just distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery (Figures 2-4). (appliedradiology.com)
  • The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. (bioportfolio.com)
  • An aortic aneurysm affects the body's main artery. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Eventually, your artery walls become less elastic, limiting blood flow throughout your body. (mayoclinic.org)
  • We report a case of successful surgical repair of an acute aortic dissection (Stanford Type A) in a severely malnourished 39-year old patient with anorexia nervosa (Body Max Index [BMI] 11.3 kg/m2) and essential hypertension. (minervamedica.it)
  • Early and mid-term outcomes of total arch replacement with the frozen elephant trunk technique for type A acute aortic dissection. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique, using the J Graft FROZENIX for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection, in comparison with the unfrozen. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Acute Type A aortic dissection (AAAD) is a surgical emergency. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The use of the frozen elephant trunk technique for type A aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome is limited by the lack of imaging evidence for long-term aortic remodeling. (bioportfolio.com)
  • OBJECTIVES: Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is known as a risk factor for death after surgery for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection under hypothermic circulatory arrest. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • METHODS: We reviewed 191 patients undergoing surgical repair for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although surgical repair for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection showed favourable results, the incidence of postoperative AKI is still high, closely associated with hospital death. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • The patient, who was diagnosed with aortic dissection at the Near East university Hospital, underwent a successful surgery. (neu.edu.tr)
  • Having been diagnosed with aortic dissection, the patient was immediately admitted to the cardiovascular intensive care unit. (neu.edu.tr)
  • Since aortic dissection is a medical emergency requiring immediate treatment, the vital signs of the patient were taken under control and the patient was prepared for a surgery in the shortest time possible. (neu.edu.tr)
  • Underlining that the mortality rates recorded during the surgery or post-surgery procedures at the Near East University Hospital are much lower than world's data, Prof Dr. Sanisoğlu highlights that aortic dissection surgery is performed by only experienced teams and rare centers across the world and the Near East University Hospital is one of these centers. (neu.edu.tr)
  • NIOSH con- previous medical call (1230 hours) triggered the tacted the affected FD on July 9, 2013, to gather aortic dissection. (cdc.gov)
  • The sharp and sudden pain from an aortic dissection, along with the emergency treatment that follows, can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder years later, a new study finds. (heart.org)
  • In a study of aortic dissection patients treated at the Cleveland Clinic, researchers reached out to 295 people with an online survey that included four questions commonly used to screen for PTSD. (heart.org)
  • The average age of the patient responding to the survey was 54, and the average time that had passed since their aortic dissection was about seven years, she said. (heart.org)
  • While the study is one of only a few to look specifically at aortic dissection patients, related research has found that about 15 to 25 percent of heart attack and stroke survivors also screen positive for PTSD, said Donald Edmondson, director of Columbia University's Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health in New York. (heart.org)
  • An aortic dissection has all of the characteristics of a PTSD-inducing cardiovascular event, he said. (heart.org)
  • But what's unique and special about medical events like this is that unlike combat or sexual assault, where people can find a safe place where they're not at risk, someone who's had an aortic dissection or a heart attack or stroke can never get away from their heart (or brain). (heart.org)
  • According to the Valve Academic Resortium, underweight is one parameter in the definition of frailty, which is associated with increased mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). (onmedica.com)
  • Reconstruction of the aortic valve using the tri-leaflet repair technique is non-inferior with regard to effective orifice area (EOA) to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a bio. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A procedure known as a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) repairs the aortic valve by wedging a replacement valve into the disease valve's place without removing it. (umiamihealth.org)
  • Minimal-access aortic valve replacement (MAAVR) may reduce post-operative blood loss and transfusion requirements, decrease post-operative pain, shorten length stay and enhance cosmesis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) via conventional median sternotomy has been established worldwide as a safe and feasible intervention for aortic valvular pathology [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The effects of body mass index on outcomes for patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • It descends on the left side of the aortic arch, which separates it from the left pleura, and travels behind the phrenic nerve. (medscape.com)
  • A paraganglioma, also known as a chemodectoma, is a tumor that may involve an aortic body. (wikipedia.org)
  • A paraganglioma is rare neuroendocrine neoplasm that may develop at various body sites (including the head, neck, thorax and abdomen). (icd.codes)
  • Micrograph of a carotid body tumor (a type of paraganglioma). (icd.codes)
  • Usually aortic body paraganglioma has benign biological behavior, when it is malignant, rarely promotes metastases. (bvsalud.org)
  • The aim of this study was to report a case of the aortic body paraganglioma as death cause in a dog. (bvsalud.org)
  • A case of malignant aortic body paraganglioma grade II was diagnosed. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1 Nandi et al reported that among 2,394 cases of foreign body ingestion, only 25 (1%) of patients had esophageal perforation caused by ingestion of fish or chicken bones, and two of these patients developed aorto-esophageal fistula. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Aims of our study were (1) to examine the impact of underweight on mortality after TAVI and SAVR and (2) to determine the effect of intervention mode (TAVI vs SAVR) on mortality in underweight patients from the German Aortic Valve Registry. (onmedica.com)
  • However, this poor prognosis is contested in Japan owing to the smaller body size of Japanese patients relative to that of Western patients. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Additionally, there are no reports of the prognostic implication of paradoxical LF or LF-LG severe AS in small-body patients undergoing TAVR. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Pre-load reserve is an independent risk factor for LV dysfunction after aortic valve surgery in patients with severe aortic regurgitation. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Guidelines for the timing of aortic valve surgery, developed on the basis of symptoms, LV end-systolic (ES) chamber size, and function have been validated in adult patients ( 3 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Objective: There is a J-shaped relationship between body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular outcomes in elderly patients (obesity paradox). (elsevier.com)
  • For some patients, the choice of aortic arch reconstruction depends on the specific situation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • While the dynamic aortic patch is restricted in use to patients who have some functioning myocardium, parallel systems require the use of valves. (google.com)
  • In this retrospective analysis, we assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on post-operative outcomes in unselected consecutive patients referred to a single surgeon for surgical AVR over a 7-year period. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Conclusions Results of this study suggest that obesity ai fects aortic compliance in patients with essential hypertension. (viamedica.pl)
  • This effect is shown only in elederly patients and is dependent upon fat weight but not lean body mass. (viamedica.pl)
  • For patients with PAD, the procedure restores blood circulation to the legs, and for patients with aneurysm, it replaces the weakened aortic wall and prevents rupture. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In a recent study published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery , Dr. Clagett and his team reported on 187 patients at UT Southwestern treated for aortic graft infections who underwent the NAIS procedure from 1990 to 2006. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Patients new to HD have multiple cardiac and aortic abnormalities as characterised by tagged CMR. (springer.com)
  • Methods Of 1,415 consecutive patients with AF, 825 had a body mass index ≥27 kg/m 2 and were offered weight management. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The dynamic aortic patch, as noted above, acts to assist or augment the function of the left ventricle and is best described as an in-series system, as opposed to parallel systems which are capable of taking over the entire function of the left ventricle. (google.com)
  • D35.6 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia. (icd.codes)
  • Paraganglia form a system formed by widely dispersed collections of specialized neural crest cells that arise in association with the segmental or collateral autonomic ganglia throughout the body. (humpath.com)
  • An intra aortic balloon pumping device comprises a pumping balloon, an attached inflation catheter, a supporting member which is disposed within and extends from the catheter into the balloon. (google.com)
  • Also, in the disclosed embodiments, the catheter is an intra-aortic balloon catheter. (google.com.au)
  • Is debranching thoracic endovascular aortic repair acceptable as the first choice for arch aneurysm in the elderly? (bioportfolio.com)
  • This study aimed to assess differences in midterm outcomes between total arch replacement (TAR) and debranching thoracic endovascular aortic repair (d-TEVAR) and to evaluate the validity of d-TEVAR as. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A chronic ruptured thrombosed aortic aneurysm was identified by magnetic resonance imaging. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The aortic bodies are one of several small clusters of peripheral chemoreceptors located along the aortic arch. (wikipedia.org)
  • vague] Carotid body Control of respiration Peripheral chemoreceptors Russell, D. S. (2014-01-01), McManus, Linda M. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peripheral chemoreceptors (carotid and aortic bodies) and central chemoreceptors (medullary neurons) primarily function to regulate respiratory activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • This signal may be in the form of an action potential, if the chemoreceptor is a neuron, or in the form of a neurotransmitter that can activate a nerve fiber if the chemoreceptor is a specialized cell, such as taste receptors, or an internal peripheral chemoreceptor, such as the carotid bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Short and midterm results of surgical treatment of interrupted aortic arch. (bioportfolio.com)
  • surgical treatment of interrupted aortic arch. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To analyze the early and midterm results of surgical treatment of interrupted aortic arch (IAA) with double-ventricular procedure. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Surgical Approach for Hypoplastic Mirror Circumflex Aortic Arch. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Surgical approach for mirror-form of circumflex aortic arch with a long-segment hypoplasia is described. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Lower body ischaemic time should be recognized specifically as a modifiable surgical risk factor for postoperative AKI. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • Blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury, which is usually accompanied by multiple organ injuries involving the head, abdomen or pelvis, is considered a dangerous, potentially life-threatening condition that requires rapid diagnosis and immediate surgical treatment. (viamedica.pl)
  • DALLAS Dec. 30 2009 A vascular surgical technique pioneered at UT S...Aortic graft infections are one of the most serious complications in p. (bio-medicine.org)
  • DALLAS Dec. 30, 2009 A vascular surgical technique pioneered at UT Southwestern Medical Center and designed to replace infected aortic grafts with the body's own veins has proved more durable and less prone to new infection than similar procedures using synthetic and cadaver grafts. (bio-medicine.org)
  • During the surgery, Total Circulation Arrest surgical technique, which is a form of carefully managed clinical death, was used to cool the patient's body temperature to 17°C, and to stop blood circulation and brain function for up to 20 minutes for organ and cerebral protection. (neu.edu.tr)
  • The aortic bodies are collections of chemoreceptors present on the aortic arch. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a distinction is made, the "aortic bodies" are chemoreceptors which regulate the circulatory system, while the "paraaortic bodies" are the chromaffin cells which manufacture catecholamines. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are more sensitive detectors of arterial blood oxygen content than the carotid body chemoreceptors. (wikipedia.org)
  • carotid body chemoreceptors respond greater to. (brainscape.com)
  • Hypoxia , or the reduction of oxygen supply to tissues to below physiological levels (produced, for example, by a trip to high altitudes), stimulates the carotid and aortic bodies, the principal arterial chemoreceptors. (britannica.com)
  • Aortic bodies, as carotid bodies, are chemoreceptors specialized to detect changes in the blood pH and oxygen tension. (humpath.com)
  • Body mass index, fat weight, lean body mass, serum cholesterol and triglycerydes as well as pulse wave velocity were measured. (viamedica.pl)
  • Significant positive correlation was found between pulse wave velocity and body mass index as well as fat weight. (viamedica.pl)
  • No relationship was found between pulse wave velocity and lean body mass, serum cholesterol and triglycerydes. (viamedica.pl)
  • Left ventricular (LV) mass, volumes, ejection fraction (EF), concentric remodelling, peak-systolic circumferential strain (PSS), peak diastolic strain rate (PDSR), LV dyssynchrony, aortic distensibility and aortic pulse wave velocity were determined. (springer.com)
  • Diastolic function was inversely correlated to LV dyssynchrony, concentric remodelling, age and aortic pulse wave velocity. (springer.com)
  • median body surface area 1.4 m 2 ) who underwent TAVR for severe AS at 9 sites in Japan. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Pre-operative end-systolic volume (ESV) is predictive of outcome after surgery for severe aortic regurgitation. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Progressive left ventricular (LV) dilation and systolic dysfunction occur in the context of chronic severe aortic regurgitation (AR). (onlinejacc.org)
  • They can also happen in the upper body ( thoracic aortic aneurysm ). (cigna.com)
  • Experts recommend screening tests for a thoracic aneurysm for anyone who has a close relative who has had a thoracic aortic aneurysm. (cigna.com)
  • and 3) successful aortic repair in a patient with so low BMI has not been reported before. (minervamedica.it)
  • Since the cerebral protection is the cornerstone of successful aortic arch surgery, the cardiovascular surgery team put the patient into a carefully managed clinical death state by stopping blood circulation and brain function and cooling the patient's body temperature to 17°C. The patient's health was restored after three successful operations on aortic arch that lasted 12 hours. (neu.edu.tr)
  • Background Increased aortic stiffness is one of the factors in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. (viamedica.pl)
  • The mitral valve pumps freshly oxygenated blood out of the heart to the rest of the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Background: Aortic body paragangliomas are uncommon neoplasms that develop mainly in aortic and carotid bodies. (bvsalud.org)
  • The iliac limbs are fully supported with Nitinol and the bifurcate bodies feature a distal contra-lateral lumen Nitinol support, which in conjunction with a unique intrinsic magnet guidewire system facilitates cannulation of the bifurcate section. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • the providing step is carried out with the cutting element being movable to a position away from the distal end of the aortic occlusion device. (google.com.au)
  • the inserting step is carried out with the distal end of the aortic occlusion device having a conical shape. (google.com.au)
  • Multicenter analysis of endovascular aortic arch in situ stent graft fenestrations for aortic arch pathologies. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Dr. G. Patrick Clagett, chief of vascular surgery at UT Southwestern, pioneered a technique called the neo-aortoiliac system (NAIS) that repairs these aortic-graft infections. (bio-medicine.org)
  • 4 mmol/L) and peak aortic jet velocity (3 m/s) were used to partition study participants into 4 groups, which were followed for a primary endpoint of AVR. (uio.no)
  • One of two bodies forming elevations on the lateral portion of the posterior part of the thalamus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • An autoinflatable catheter is disclosed which comprises an elongated first catheter tube section forming a main catheter body, a short second catheter tube section forming a catheter tip, a balloon support extending between the posterior end of the catheter tip and the anterior end of the main catheter body and an inflatable balloon surrounding the balloon support. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • d. an inflatable and deflatable balloon surrounding the balloon support having an anterior end sealed about the posterior end of the catheter tip and a posterior end sealed about the anterior end of the main catheter body. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • a structural part of a system of the body that is composed of tissues and cells that enable it to perform a particular function, such as the liver, spleen, digestive organs, reproductive organs, or organs of special sense. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The two carotid bodies are small organs located in the neck at the bifurcation of each of the two common carotid arteries into the internal and external carotid arteries. (britannica.com)
  • HLHS is a life-threatening condition where the left side of the heart is under-developed, and blood cannot adequately get to the organs of the body, leading to death. (chop.edu)
  • Serious complications arising from ingested foreign bodies are, however, rare. (appliedradiology.com)
  • 2 The second most common site for perforation is at the level of the aortic arch where there is increased risk for fatal vascular complications, as seen in our case. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Foreign bodies in the esophagus can occasionally result in complications. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The Buffalo Trunk Technique for Aortic Arch Reconstruction. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A total of 55 cases of end-to-end or end-to-side anastomosis were performed in all aortic arch reconstruction. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Because the aortic reconstruction is fashioned with the patient's own tissue, there is no foreign material that is prone to re-infection. (bio-medicine.org)
  • PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to present a patient who suffers from back and hip pain because of a chronic ruptured primary aortic aneurysm. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis identified age, body mass index, preoperative chronic kidney disease and lower body ischaemic time as risk factors for postoperative AKI. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • The new research shows that DPPI is critical for the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the aortic wall, and that these cells push the inflammation from an acute phase into a chronic phase. (news-medical.net)
  • The blood circulatory system, also called the cardiovascular system, consists of the heart and the blood vessels that run throughout the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • There are many different circulatory system diseases all of which interrupt this complex process of distributing blood around the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the body. (thefullwiki.org)
  • An earthworm's circulatory system is a closed system, and there are three main vessels that run through an earthworm's body, including the aortic arches and the dorsal and ventral blood vessels. (reference.com)
  • The aortic arches are an important part of the circulatory system. (reference.com)
  • The frozen elephant trunk technique facilitates repair of aortic arch and proximal descending aortic pathologies. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We conclude that extremely low BMI due to anorexia nervosa is not an absolute contraindication for major aortic surgery. (minervamedica.it)
  • Even though the lower part of the body does receive some blood supply during Cardiopulmonary Bypass(CPB) surgery, it may not be enough. (bioportfolio.com)
  • When the aortic valve isn't working properly, surgery is the only cure - and a life-saving option. (umiamihealth.org)
  • For years, aortic valve repair was limited to a heart surgery, which involved opening the chest, breaking the breast bone and operating while a machine did the pumping of the stopped heart. (umiamihealth.org)
  • At a recent meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, an international association of cardiothoracic surgeons, Dr. Lamelas sat on a roundtable discussion of the future of aortic valve intervention. (umiamihealth.org)
  • A large or rapidly growing aortic aneurysm is more likely to need surgery. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. (icdlist.com)
  • If pregnancy does not occur, the body is called a corpus luteum spurium (corpus luteum of menstruation), which undergoes progressive retrogression to a corpus albicans. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If pregnancy does occur, the body is called a corpus luteum verum (corpus luteum of pregnancy), which increases in size, persisting to the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy before retrogression. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A chemoreceptor in the wall of the aortic arch that detects changes in blood gases, esp. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In physiology, a chemoreceptor detects changes in the normal environment, such as an increase in blood levels of carbon dioxide (hypercapnia) or a decrease in blood levels of oxygen (hypoxia), and transmits that information to the central nervous system which engages body responses to restore homeostasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • It delivers nutrients and oxygen to all cells of the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The oxygen we breathe gets mixed into the blood in the lungs, and the heart pumps this blood to all parts of the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The sensory nerve from the carotid body increases its firing rate hyperbolically as the partial pressure of oxygen falls. (britannica.com)
  • It is possible to interfere independently with the responses of the carotid body to carbon dioxide and oxygen, which suggests that the same mechanisms are not used to sense or transmit changes in oxygen or carbon dioxide. (britannica.com)
  • Pickering and Paton (2006) pioneered the use of a decerebrate and artificially perfused rat preparation to investigate brainstem function involved in respiration, circulation, and sympathetic tone, using artificial cardiopulmonary bypass to deliver oxygen to the body. (frontiersin.org)
  • In a healthy heart, oxygen-poor (blue) blood returns to the right chamber of the heart (right atrium) from the body. (rochester.edu)
  • The diagnosis of perforated esophageal foreign body complicated by mediastinal abscess and aortic pseudoaneurysm resulting in massive hemothorax was made. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Subsequent infection of the esophagus and/or mediastinum could further contribute to the formation of aortic pseudoaneurysm. (appliedradiology.com)
  • the accompanying aortic pseudoaneurysm and esophagitis and/or mediastinitis must be managed promptly. (appliedradiology.com)
  • A rare complication is aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to mediastinitis, which can have catastrophic consequences. (appliedradiology.com)