Aortic Bodies: Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).Paraganglia, Nonchromaffin: Several clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells associated with blood vessels and nerves (especially the glossopharyngeal and vagus). The nonchromaffin paraganglia sense pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and participate in respiratory, and perhaps circulatory, control. They include the CAROTID BODY; AORTIC BODIES; the GLOMUS JUGULARE; and the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM.Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal: A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Carotid Body: A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.Chemoreceptor Cells: Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.American Cancer Society: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of cancer through education and research.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Yellow Fever: An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus. The severe form is characterized by fever, HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE, and renal damage.Dictionaries, ChemicalYellow fever virus: The type species of the FLAVIVIRUS genus. Principal vector transmission to humans is by AEDES spp. mosquitoes.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Bronchodilator Agents: Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Meninges: The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.Spinal Dysraphism: Congenital defects of closure of one or more vertebral arches, which may be associated with malformations of the spinal cord, nerve roots, congenital fibrous bands, lipomas, and congenital cysts. These malformations range from mild (e.g., SPINA BIFIDA OCCULTA) to severe, including rachischisis where there is complete failure of neural tube and spinal cord fusion, resulting in exposure of the spinal cord at the surface. Spinal dysraphism includes all forms of spina bifida. The open form is called SPINA BIFIDA CYSTICA and the closed form is SPINA BIFIDA OCCULTA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p34)Spina Bifida Occulta: A common congenital midline defect of fusion of the vertebral arch without protrusion of the spinal cord or meninges. The lesion is also covered by skin. L5 and S1 are the most common vertebrae involved. The condition may be associated with an overlying area of hyperpigmented skin, a dermal sinus, or an abnormal patch of hair. The majority of individuals with this malformation are asymptomatic although there is an increased incidence of tethered cord syndrome and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p34)Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Spina Bifida Cystica: A form of spinal dysraphism associated with a protruding cyst made up of either meninges (i.e., a MENINGOCELE) or meninges in combination with spinal cord tissue (i.e., a MENINGOMYELOCELE). These lesions are frequently associated with spinal cord dysfunction, HYDROCEPHALUS, and SYRINGOMYELIA. (From Davis et al., Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp224-5)Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Histology, Comparative: The study of the similarities and differences in the structures of homologous tissues across various species.Histology: The study of the structure of various TISSUES of organisms on a microscopic level.Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Vagus Nerve Stimulation: An adjunctive treatment for PARTIAL EPILEPSY and refractory DEPRESSION that delivers electrical impulses to the brain via the VAGUS NERVE. A battery implanted under the skin supplies the energy.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Vagus Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.Respiratory Center: Part of the brain located in the MEDULLA OBLONGATA and PONS. It receives neural, chemical and hormonal signals, and controls the rate and depth of respiratory movements of the DIAPHRAGM and other respiratory muscles.HistoryFamous PersonsRespiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.

Digoxin delays recovery from tachycardia-induced electrical remodeling of the atria. (1/37)

BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) induces electrical remodeling, which is thought to be responsible for the low success rate of antiarrhythmic treatment in AF of longer duration. Electrical remodeling seems to be related to tachycardia-induced intracellular calcium overload. Due to its vagomimetic action, digoxin is widely used to control the ventricular rate during AF, but it also increases intracellular calcium. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that digoxin would aggravate tachycardia-induced electrical remodeling. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the atrial effective refractory period (AERP) at cycle lengths of 430, 300, and 200 ms during 24 hours of rapid atrio/ventricular (300/150 bpm) pacing in 7 chronically instrumented conscious goats treated with digoxin or saline. Digoxin decreased the spontaneous heart rate but had no other effects on baseline electrophysiological characteristics. In addition to a moderate increase in the rate of electrical remodeling during rapid pacing, digoxin significantly delayed the recovery from electrical remodeling after cessation of pacing (at 430, 300, and 200 ms: P=0. 001, P=0.0015, and P=0.007, respectively). This was paralleled by an increased inducibility and duration of AF during digoxin. Multivariate analysis revealed that both a short AERP and treatment with digoxin were independent predictors of inducibility (P=0.001 and P=0.03, respectively) and duration (P=0.001 for both) of AF. CONCLUSIONS: Dioxin aggravates tachycardia-induced atrial electrical remodeling and delays recovery from electrical remodeling in the goat, which increases the inducibility and duration of AF.  (+info)

Exogenous cholecystokinin-8 reduces vagal efferent nerve activity in rats through CCK(A) receptors. (2/37)

It has been proposed that the vagus nerve plays a role in mediating cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) effect on such gastric functions as motility, emptying and gastric acid secretion. To examine the contribution of the efferent pathways in realizing these effects, efferent mass activity in the ventral gastric vagal nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats was recorded. Intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (0.1-1 nmol) suppressed the efferent activity. The effect of CCK-8 was significantly reduced in animals with total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy in comparison to those with partial vagotomy. Intravenous infusion of CCK(A) receptor antagonist L-364,718 (1-100x10(-6) g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8, but the CCK(B) receptor antagonist L-365,260 (1-100x10(-6) g) did not in the conditions of either partial or total vagotomy. Intracisternal infusion of L-364,718 (1x10(-6) g) blocked the response of vagal efferent activity to 0.1 nmol CCK-8 i.v. Infusion of exogenous CCK-8 did not affect the activity of supradiaphragmatic vagal afferents. The results suggest that the effect of systemically administered CCK-8 on vagal efferent activity is mediated by both peripherally (subdiaphragmatically) and centrally localized CCK(A) receptors.  (+info)

Cefaclor, a cephalosporin antibiotic, delays gastric emptying rate by a CCK-A receptor-mediated mechanism in the rat. (3/37)

Studies in vitro suggest that cephalosporin antibiotics release the gut hormone cholecystokinin. Cholecystokinin is known to inhibit gastric emptying. Here we examine the effects of cefaclor on gastric emptying and intestinal motility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with gastric cannulas. Following a 3-week recovery, the rate of gastric emptying of saline, peptone (4.5%) or cefaclor was determined after instillation into the gastric cannula, while intestinal transit was measured by using the propagation of arabic gum + charcoal mixture given intraduodenally. Gastric emptying of saline was significantly delayed by the addition of cefaclor (3, 10, 30 or 100 mM). The CCK-A antagonist SR-27897B (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reversed the delay induced by 10 mM cefaclor, whereas the CCK-B antagonist CI-988 (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) had no significant effect. In capsaicin-treated rats, 10 mM cefaclor emptied more rapidly than in vehicle-treated animals. Thirty-minute intestinal transit was increased at 30 and 100 mM of cefaclor, while the gastric acid secretion following cefaclor instillation was no different than the group which received saline. The cephalosporin antibiotic cefaclor appears to be a potent stimulant of CCK release from gut endocrine cells, resembling the effects of peptone. Cefaclor delays gastric emptying via capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathways, which involve CCK-A receptor interaction.  (+info)

Capsaicin increases modulation of sympathetic nerve activity in rats: measurement using power spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations. (4/37)

We assessed the sympatho-vagal activities of the heart after administration of capsaicin by measuring the power spectral analysis in rats. There were major two frequency components of heart rate variability, which we defined as high (1.0 Hz <, HF) and low (LF, < 1.0 Hz) frequency components. Vagal blockade by atropine abolished the high frequency component, and lowered the amplitude of the low frequency component. On the other hand, under conditions of sympathetic blockade by propranolol, the low frequency component was reduced. Combined vagal and sympathetic blockade abolished all heart rate fluctuations. We analyzed the low and high frequency components by integrating the spectrum for the respective band width. The rats administered capsaicin had a higher heart rate and sympathetic nervous system index (LF/HF) than the control group of rats. These results suggest that power spectral analysis is an effective and noninvasive method for detecting subtle changes in autonomic activity in response to the intake of foods or drugs.  (+info)

Centrally mediated effects of bromocriptine on cardiac sympathovagal balance. (5/37)

Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, is known to lower cardiovascular mortality in L-dopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease, probably by reducing the cardiac sympathetic activity. We aimed at unmasking the central effects of bromocriptine on the heart by power spectrum analysis. Ten healthy subjects (aged 31+/-2 years) in supine and sitting positions were evaluated after the administration of bromocriptine (2.5 mg) alone and after pharmacological peripheral D(2)-like blockade by domperidone (20 mg). We calculated (autoregressive method) the following: the low-frequency (LF) component (an index of cardiac sympathetic tone), the high-frequency (HF) component (an index of cardiac vagal tone), and the LF/HF ratio (an index of cardiac sympathovagal balance). With subjects in the supine position, bromocriptine alone induced a significant increase in the LF component and the LF/HF ratio, together with a reduction in norepinephrine plasma levels and blood pressure values. These conflicting effects can be explained as the combined result of direct and indirect (reflex-mediated) actions of bromocriptine in vivo. No changes in cardiac autonomic drive were observed with subjects in the sitting position. After domperidone pretreatment, bromocriptine induced a reduction in the LF component and in the LF/HF ratio. The sitting position caused an increase in heart rate and in the LF/HF ratio. We demonstrated both peripheral and central effects of bromocriptine. In particular, pretreatment with a peripheral antagonist (domperidone) allowed us to unmask the central effect of bromocriptine on cardiac sympathetic drive.  (+info)

A role for TRPV1 in bradykinin-induced excitation of vagal airway afferent nerve terminals. (6/37)

Using single-unit extracellular recording techniques, we have examined the role of the vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1 aka TRPV1) in bradykinin-induced activation of vagal afferent C-fiber receptive fields in guinea pig isolated airways. Of 17 airway C-fibers tested, 14 responded to bradykinin and capsaicin, 2 fibers responded to neither capsaicin nor bradykinin, and 1 fiber responded to capsaicin but not bradykinin. Thus, every bradykinin-responsive C-fiber was also responsive to capsaicin. Bradykinin (200 microl of 0.3 microM solution) evoked a burst of approximately 130 action potentials in C-fibers. In the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (10 microM), bradykinin evoked 83 +/- 9% (n = 6; P < 0.01) fewer action potentials. Similarly, the TRPV1 blocker, ruthenium red (10 microM), inhibited the number of bradykinin-evoked action potentials by 75 +/- 10% (n = 4; P < 0.05). In the presence of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (10 microM), an inhibitor of lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase enzymes, the number of bradykinin-induced action potentials was reduced by 76 +/- 10% (n = 6; P < 0.05). Similarly, a combination of the 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor, baicalein (10 microM) and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 [6-[3-fluoro-5-[4-methoxy-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl])phenoxy-methyl]-1-met hyl-2-quinolone] (10 microM) caused significant inhibition of bradykinin-induced responses. Our data suggest a role for lipoxygenase products in bradykinin B(2) receptor-induced activation of TRPV1 in the peripheral terminals of afferent C-fibers within guinea pig trachea.  (+info)

Deficiency of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor beta 4 subunit causes autonomic cardiac and intestinal dysfunction. (7/37)

Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are composed of 12 subunits (alpha 2-alpha 10 and beta 2-beta 4), which play the central role in autonomic transmission. beta 4 subunits are abundantly expressed in autonomic ganglia, forming acetylcholine binding sites and ion channels with alpha 3 or alpha 3 and alpha 5 subunits as pentameric receptors. To investigate the physiological and pharmacological properties of beta 4 subunits in autonomic ganglia, we measured autonomic functions in knockout mice lacking nAChR subunit beta 4 (beta 4(-/-)) and wild-type mice. beta 4(-/-) mice had an attenuated bradycardiac response to high frequency (60 pulse/s) vagal stimulation, as well as an increased sensitivity to hexamethonium blockade at low dose (3 mg/kg) and a reduced ileal contractile response to the nicotinic agonists cytisine, dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide, nicotine (10 mg/kg each), and epibatidine (0.1 mg/kg). The results suggest that beta 4 subunits are important components of nAChRs in autonomic ganglia. Deficiency of beta 4 subunits altered ion channel properties, conductance, and sensitivity and affinity of receptors to agonists and antagonists, affecting ganglionic transmission.  (+info)

Attenuated outward potassium currents in carotid body glomus cells of heart failure rabbit: involvement of nitric oxide. (8/37)

It has been shown that peripheral chemoreceptor sensitivity is enhanced in both clinical and experimental heart failure (HF) and that impairment of nitric oxide (NO) production contributes to this enhancement. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms associated with the alterations of chemoreceptor function and the actions of NO in the carotid body (CB), we compared the outward K+ currents (IK) of glomus cells in sham rabbits with that in HF rabbits and monitored the effects of NO on these currents. Ik was measured in glomus cells using conventional and perforated whole-cell configurations. IK was attenuated in glomus cells of HF rabbits, and their resting membrane potentials (-34.7 +/- 1.0 mV) were depolarized as compared with those in sham rabbits (-47.2 +/- 1.9 mV). The selective Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel (KCa) blocker iberiotoxin (IbTx, 100 nm) reduced IK in glomus cells from sham rabbits, but had no effect on IK from HF rabbits. In perforated whole-cell mode, the NO donor SNAP (100 microm) increased IK in glomus cells from HF rabbits to a greater extent than that in sham rabbits (P < 0.01), and IbTx inhibited the effects of SNAP. However, in conventional whole-cell mode, SNAP had no effect. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, NO synthase inhibitor) decreased Ik in sham rabbits but not in HF rabbits. The guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) inhibited the effect of SNAP on Ik. These results demonstrate that IK is reduced in CB glomus cells from HF rabbits. This effect is due mainly to the suppression of KCa channel activity caused by decreased availability of NO. In addition, intracellular cGMP is necessary for the KCa channel modulation by NO.  (+info)

*Aortic body

Aortic Bodies at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Para-Aortic Bodies at the US National ... and supporting cells located along the aortic arch. Some sources equate the "aortic bodies" and "paraaortic bodies", while ... A paraganglioma is a tumor that may involve the aortic body. Swelling can also occur. Carotid body Control of respiration ... "aortic bodies" are chemoreceptors which regulate the circulatory system, while the "paraaortic bodies" are the chromaffin cells ...

*Peripheral chemoreceptors

Carotid and aortic bodies are clusters of cells located on the common carotid artery and the aortic arch, respectively. Each of ... However, in the chronic absence of the carotid body, the aortic body is able to perform a similar respiratory regulatory role, ... However, because carotid and aortic bodies detect variation within the body's internal organs, they are considered ... such as the aortic body or central chemoreceptors. However, non-carotid body chemoreceptors are sometimes not enough to ensure ...

*Chemoreceptor

... consists of aortic and carotid bodies. Aortic body detects changes in blood oxygen and carbon dioxide, but not pH, while ... Carotid bodies and aortic bodies detect changes primarily in oxygen. They also sense increases in CO2 partial pressure and ... The resulting output from the CNS (central nervous system) makes body actions that will engage the food and enhance survival.[ ... Nurse, Colin A. (2013). "Signal processing at mammalian carotid body chemoreceptors". Semin Cell Dev Biol. 24: 22-30. doi: ...

*Carotid body

Aortic body Peripheral chemoreceptors Gonzalez C, Almaraz L, Obeso A, Rigual R (1994). "Carotid body chemoreceptors: from ... The type I (glomus) cells in the carotid (and aortic bodies) are derived from neuroectoderm and are thus electrically excitable ... The afferent fibres of the aortic body chemoreceptors are relayed by the vagus nerve. These centers, in turn, regulate ... The carotid body contains the most vascularized tissue in the human body[citation needed]. The thyroid gland is very vascular, ...

*Sustentacular cell

Another type of sustentacular cell is found with glomus cells of the carotid and aortic bodies. About 40% of carcinoids have a ...

*Central chemoreceptors

Peripheral chemoreceptors (carotid and aortic bodies) and central chemoreceptors (medullary neurons) primarily function to ...

*Organ of Zuckerkandl

Some sources equate the "aortic bodies" and "paraaortic bodies", while other sources explicitly distinguish between the two. ... When a distinction is made, the "aortic bodies" are chemoreceptors which regulate circulation, while the "paraaortic bodies" ... The term para-aortic body is also sometimes used to describe it, as it usually arises near the abdominal aorta, but this term ... synd/3111 at Who Named It? "organs of Zuckerkandl" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary Aortic Bodies at the US National Library of ...

*Medullary inspiratory neuron

Inputs to this neuron come from the peripheral chemoreceptors, carotid body, aortic body, and central chemoreceptors. It ...

*Glomus cell

... mainly located in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies, that helps the body regulate breathing. When there is a decrease in the ... Clusters of glomus cells, of which the carotid bodies and aortic bodies are the most important, are called non-chromaffin or ... the carotid bodies and the aortic bodies signal the medulla oblongata (specifically the dorsal inspiratory center in the ... Allen, A. M. (1 August 1998). "Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity ...

*Sensory nervous system

Direct chemoreceptors include the taste buds in the gustatory system as well as receptors in the aortic bodies which detect ... detects temperatures above body temperature. Ruffini's end organ detects temperatures below body temperature. Nociceptors ... The receptive field is the area of the body or environment to which a receptor organ and receptor cells respond. For instance, ... They are found in internal organs, as well as on the surface of the body. Nociceptors detect different kinds of damaging ...

*Control of ventilation

... that detect changes in the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide are located in the arterial aortic bodies and the carotid bodies ... The most important function of breathing is the supplying of oxygen to the body and the removal of its waste product of carbon ... Respiration refers to the utilization of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide by the body as a whole, or by individual cells in ... Maintenance and continuity of the human body. 12th Edition. Danvers: Wiley Kuna, Samuel T (2000). "Respiratory-related ...

*Sensory neuron

Internal receptors that respond to changes inside the body are known as interoceptors. The aortic bodies and carotid bodies ... The stimulus can come from extoreceptors outside the body, for example light and sound, or from interoreceptors inside the body ... The cell bodies of the sensory neurons are located in the dorsal ganglia of the spinal cord. This sensory information travels ... They are found in internal organs as well as on the surface of the body. Nociceptors detect different kinds of damaging stimuli ...

*Glomus body

... body is not to be confused with the glomus cell which is a kind of chemoreceptor found in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies ... Glomus bodies are most numerous in the fingers and toes. The role of the glomus body is to shunt blood away from the skin ... A glomus body (or glomus apparatus) is a component of the dermis layer of the skin, involved in body temperature regulation. ... These glomus bodies control small arteriovenous shunts or anastomoses. The arteriovenous shunt in the glomus body is a normal ...

*Paraganglion

Nonchromaffin paraganglia include carotid bodies and aortic bodies, some are distributed in the ear, along the vagus nerve, in ... They are generally present at the head and neck, most often at carotid body or jugulo-tympanic, they rarely secrete hormones ... Chromaffin paraganglia (also called chromaffin bodies) are connected with the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk and the ganglia ... and can occur at a number of sites throughout the body. Chromaffin paragangliomas are issued from chromaffin cells, and are ...

*Acid-base homeostasis

The peripheral chemoreceptors are located in the aortic bodies and carotid bodies adjacent to the arch of the aorta and to the ... Many extracellular proteins such as the plasma proteins and membrane proteins of the body's cells are very sensitive for their ... Acid-base homeostasis is the homeostatic regulation of the pH of the body's extracellular fluid (ECF). The proper balance ... the renal tubular cells secrete the H+ ions into the tubular fluid from where they exit the body via the urine. The HCO− 3 ions ...

*Hypoxemia

... as determined by central and peripheral chemoreceptors located in the central nervous system and carotid and aortic bodies, ... If the alveolar ventilation is insufficient, there will not be enough oxygen delivered to the alveoli for the body's use. This ... or the body as a whole. Hypoxemia can cause hypoxia (hypoxemic hypoxia), but hypoxia can also occur via other mechanisms, such ... and can cause tissue hypoxia as the blood is not supplying enough oxygen to the body. Hypoxemia refers to low oxygen in the ...

*Heart

The left ventricle pumps blood to the body through the aortic valve and into the aorta. Two small openings above the aortic ... Chemoreceptors present in the carotid body or adjacent to the aorta in an aortic body respond to the blood's oxygen, carbon ... Baroreceptors are stretch receptors located in the aortic sinus, carotid bodies, the venae cavae, and other locations, ... Galen, noting the heart as the hottest organ in the body, concluded that it provided heat to the body. The heart did not pump ...

*Solitary nucleus

... in the carotid body via glossopharyngeal nerve, aortic bodies, and the sinoatrial node, via the vagus nerve Chemically and ... the aortic reflex, the cough reflex, the baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes, several respiratory reflexes and reflexes ... clusters of nerve cell bodies) forming a vertical column of grey matter embedded in the medulla oblongata. Through the center ...

*Cardiovascular centre

When a change of blood pH is detected by central chemoreceptors or by peripheral chemoreceptors in aortic bodies and in carotid ... bodies, or a change of blood pressure is detected by baroreceptors in the aortic sinuses or carotid sinuses, the cardiovascular ... Normally, the heart beats without nervous control, but in some situations (e.g., exercise, body trauma), the cardiovascular ...

*Paraganglioma

... and in aortic bodies (near the aortic arch). Accordingly, paragangliomas are categorised as originating from a neural cell line ... A paraganglioma is a rare neuroendocrine neoplasm that may develop at various body sites (including the head, neck, thorax and ... Micrograph of a carotid body tumor Glomus jugulare tumor Ectopic functional paraganglioma (glomus jugulare) in a patient with ... carotid body tumor): Is the most common of the head and neck paragangliomas. It usually presents as a painless neck mass, but ...

*International Classification of Diseases for Oncology

Jugular/jugulotympanic paranglioma M8691/1 Aortic body tumor (C75.5) Aortic/aorticopulmonary paraganglioma M8692/1 Carotid body ... The topography axis is for of the tumor's site in the body. It is standardized with the C section of ICD-10. There were no ...

*List of MeSH codes (A08)

... aortic bodies MeSH A08.800.550.700.120.600.150 --- carotid body MeSH A08.800.550.700.120.600.350 --- glomus jugulare MeSH ... mamillary bodies MeSH A08.186.211.730.385.800 --- subthalamus MeSH A08.186.211.730.385.800.240 --- entopeduncular nucleus MeSH ... geniculate bodies MeSH A08.186.211.730.385.826.701.460 --- intralaminar thalamic nuclei MeSH A08.186.211.730.385.826.701.485 ... neuroepithelial bodies MeSH A08.800.550.700.120.540 --- olfactory receptor neurons MeSH A08.800.550.700.120.600 --- paraganglia ...

*List of MeSH codes (A06)

... para-aortic bodies MeSH A06.224.736 --- paraganglia, chromaffin MeSH A06.390.021 --- enterochromaffin cells MeSH A06.390.043 ...

*ICD-10 Chapter II: Neoplasms

Carotid body (D35.6) Aortic body and other paraganglia (D35.7) Other specified endocrine glands (D35.8) Pluriglandular ... Carotid body (D44.7) Aortic body and other paraganglia (D44.8) Pluriglandular involvement Multiple endocrine adenomatosis ( ... Body of pancreas (C25.2) Tail of pancreas (C25.3) Pancreatic duct (C25.4) Endocrine pancreas (C25.7) Other parts of pancreas ( ... Ciliary body (C69.5) Lacrimal gland and duct (C69.6) Orbit (C69.7) Overlapping lesion of eye and adnexa (C70) Malignant ...

*Gas exchange

... by the aortic bodies, the carotid bodies, and the blood gas and pH sensor on the anterior surface of the medulla oblongata in ... The carbon dioxide that is breathed out with each breath could probably be more correctly be seen as a byproduct of the body's ... Each cell of the sponge's body is therefore exposed to a constant flow of fresh oxygenated water. They can therefore rely on ... All the blood returning from the body tissues to the right side of the heart flows through the alveolar capillaries before ...

*Spinal cord

The cell bodies of these primary neurons are located in the dorsal root ganglia. In the spinal cord, the axons synapse and the ... especially during surgical procedures that involve abrupt disruption of blood flow through the aorta for example during aortic ... The spinal cord is continuous with the caudal portion of the medulla, running from the base of the skull to the body of the ... In the fetus, the spinal cord extends the full length of the spine and regresses as the body grows. Spinal tumours can occur in ...
A glomus cell (type I) is a peripheral chemoreceptor, mainly located in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies, that helps the body regulate breathing. When there is a decrease in the bloods pH, a decrease in oxygen (pO2), or an increase in carbon dioxide (pCO2), the carotid bodies and the aortic bodies signal the medulla oblongata (specifically the dorsal inspiratory center in the medulla oblongata) to increase the volume and rate of breathing. The glomus cells have a high metabolic rate and good blood perfusion and thus are sensitive to changes in arterial blood gas tension. Glomus cells are very similar structurally to neurons, and they are indeed derived from the neural crest, while type II glomus cells are sustentacular cells having a similar function to neuroglia. Autonomic ganglia innervate the glomus cells, and some presynaptic sympathetic ganglia synapse with glomus cells. The nerve fibers pick up the signals sent by glomus cells and transmit them to the central nervous system for ...
Hi valerie, the change in pO2 does not help oxygen delivery because most O2 is carried on haemoglobin. Mind you, it may well blunt the hypoxic drive to the aortic body chemoreceptors so limit the CO2 wash out that comes from over hypoxia induced hyperventilation. At a pO2 of 100mmHg (normal) Hb is almost completely saturated and increasing the pO2 to 130mmHg will not add any extra to the Hb. The amount in solution is tiny and will increase with the rise in pO2 to an amount slightly more than the usual tiny amount… What does matter is that as the blood goes through the tissue capillaries they only need to take a small amount of O2 out. This shows as there being more left in the venous blood. The pH change is real but in the paper the pH change was identical between ketone types but the rise in arterial pO2 only occurred when the precursor drug generated AcAc. With BHB only there was no rise in arterial (nor presumable venous) pO2. This asks deep questions about AcAc vs BHB and what difference ...
Hi valerie, the change in pO2 does not help oxygen delivery because most O2 is carried on haemoglobin. Mind you, it may well blunt the hypoxic drive to the aortic body chemoreceptors so limit the CO2 wash out that comes from over hypoxia induced hyperventilation. At a pO2 of 100mmHg (normal) Hb is almost completely saturated and increasing the pO2 to 130mmHg will not add any extra to the Hb. The amount in solution is tiny and will increase with the rise in pO2 to an amount slightly more than the usual tiny amount… What does matter is that as the blood goes through the tissue capillaries they only need to take a small amount of O2 out. This shows as there being more left in the venous blood. The pH change is real but in the paper the pH change was identical between ketone types but the rise in arterial pO2 only occurred when the precursor drug generated AcAc. With BHB only there was no rise in arterial (nor presumable venous) pO2. This asks deep questions about AcAc vs BHB and what difference ...
Monitored by peripheral chemoreceptors - carotid/aortic bodies. Not sensitive to modest changes in PO2. Arterial PO2 must be , 60 mmHg (40% reduction) for chemoreceptors to send afferent impulses to medullary inspiratory neurons. (happens with severe pulmonary disease, reduced atmospheric pressure). Until you get to 60 mmHg, youre still in plateau range of Hb-O2 dissociation curve (safe). If it werent for peripheral chemoreceptors, the low PO2 would depress respiratory centers à stop breathing. Chemoreceptors respond to PO2, not oxygen content. Anemia, CO poisoning - PO2is normal, but total O2 is too low. ...
The basic rythum of breathing is controlled by respiratory centers located in the medulla and pons of the brainstem. This rythum is modified in response to input from sensory receptors and from other regions of the brain. Respiratory centers in the pons modify inspiration and allow for smooth transitions between inspiration and expiation. Expiratory centers in the medulla function during forced expiation stimulating the internal and abdominal muscles. The basic rythum of breathing is modified by input from the central and peripheral chemoreceptors. They respond to changes in the PCO2 and PO2 of arterial blood. Medullary chemoreceptors are located on the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata. The medullary chemoreceptors detect changes to the H+ concentration of the brain interstitial fluid, an indirect assessment of arterial PCO2. Chemoreceptors in the carotid and aortic bodies are stimulated by a rise in the PCO2, a rise in the H+ concentration, or a decline in arterial blood PO2. Peripheral ...
The control of ventilation refers to the physiological mechanisms involved in the control of breathing, which is the movement of air into and out of the lungs. Ventilation facilitates respiration. Respiration refers to the utilization of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide by the body as a whole, or by individual cells in cellular respiration. The most important function of breathing is the supplying of oxygen to the body and the removal of its waste product of carbon dioxide. Under most conditions, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) or concentration of carbon dioxide, controls the respiratory rate. The peripheral chemoreceptors that detect changes in the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide are located in the arterial aortic bodies and the carotid bodies. Central chemoreceptors are primarily sensitive to changes in the pH in the blood, (resulting from changes in the levels of carbon dioxide) and they are located on the medulla oblongata near to the medullar respiratory groups of the ...
The pH of the extracellular fluids can thus be controlled by separately regulating the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (which determines the carbonic acid concentration), and the bicarbonate ion concentration in the extracellular fluids. There are therefore at least two homeostatic negative feedback systems responsible for the regulation of the plasma pH. The first is the homeostatic control of the blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide, which determines the carbonic acid concentration in the plasma, and can change the pH of the arterial plasma within a few seconds.[5] The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the arterial blood is monitored by the central chemoreceptors of the medulla oblongata, and so are part of the central nervous system.[5][18] These chemoreceptors are sensitive to the pH and levels of carbon dioxide in the cerebrospinal fluid.[12][10][18] (The peripheral chemoreceptors are located in the aortic bodies and carotid bodies adjacent to the arch of the aorta and to the ...
... this image shows the pathway of the baroreceptor reflex the reflex that shares in the control of normal blood pressure showing: 1. aortic baroreceptor 2. aortic body 3. carotid sinus 4. carotid baroreceptor 5. inferior ganglion of vagus nerve for th
bgcolor="CEDFF2" ! ,center>Mesoderm Origin,/center> ,- , Alphabetical list of anatomical structures derived from mesoderm. ,- , * accessory foramen * acetabular notch * acetabular part of hip bone * acetabular rim * acropodial skeleton * adductor blade * adductor crest * adductor mandibulae complex * adrenal cortex * adrenal gland capsule * adrenal gland cortex zone * adrenal medulla * adrenal tissue * adrenal/interrenal gland * adult mammalian kidney * adventitia of epididymis * adventitia of seminal vesicle * adventitia of ureter * agger limitans anterior of ilium * agger limitans anterior of ischium * alisphenoid bone * amnion * ampulla of uterine tube * anterior dentation of pectoral fin spine * anterior distal condyle of femur * anterior distal serration of pectoral fin spine * anterior humeral ridge * anterior lateral mesoderm * anterior lateral plate mesoderm * anterior subdivision of masseter * antitrochanter * antotic pillar * aorta collagen fibril * aortic body * apical region of heart ...
Looking for online definition of paraganglia in the Medical Dictionary? paraganglia explanation free. What is paraganglia? Meaning of paraganglia medical term. What does paraganglia mean?
Glomangiosarcoma- Patient with glomangiosarcoma usually developed widespread metastases.. Microscopic features: Histologically, the features are those of benign glomus tumour with sarcomatous areas consisting of short spindle cells with hyperchromatic nucleus (round cell or leiomyosarcomatous appearance) and prominent mitotic figures.. II Classification of atypical glomus tumours: (Folpe et al.) 1. Malignant ; 2. Symplastic ; 3. Glomus tumors of uncertain malignant potential, and 4. Glomangiomatosis. Atypical glomus tumour: Glomus tumours display unusual features, such as large size, deep location, infiltrative growth, mitotic activity, nuclear pleomorphism, and necrosis. Atypical features are usually observed centrally with a rim of benign-appearing glomus tumour.. Malignant glomus tumour: Tumour with a deep location and a size of more than 2 cm, or atypical mitotic figures, or moderate to high nuclear grade and 5 mitotic figures or more/50 HPF. High nuclear grade alone, infiltrative growth, ...
Glomus tumours are benign tumours arising from the glomus cells and modified smooth muscles that surround the afferent arteriole of the thermoregulatory specialized arteriovenous anastomosis in the dermis, called the glomus body.[1-3] Wood first described glomus tumours in 1812,[12] and in 1924, Masson[13] reported their histological features and origin from the Sucquet Hoyer canal. Bailey[14] coined the term glomangioma in 1935 for lesions with dilated vascular channels, seen more often in patients with multiple tumours. In 1936, Touraine was the first to report multiple tumours,[15] while in 1959, Sluiter detailed the points of differentiation between the localized and disseminated forms of glomangiomas.[16]. SGTs constitute 75-90% of all glomus tumours, and are largely found subungually in the fingernails. They are approximately twice as common in women,[7] are usually seen in adulthood, present as well-circumscribed purplish nodules of , 10 mm in size, and are invariably painful and ...
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Looking for Paraganglia? Find out information about Paraganglia. a series of endocrine glands of vertebrate animals and man that are composed of chromaffin tissue and that secrete adrenaline , noradrenaline , and possibly... Explanation of Paraganglia
Perry, A., Sosin, M., Weissler, J. M., Chiaffarano, J. M., & Barnard, N. J. (2015). Multiple Glomus Tumors Presenting as an Aesthetic Abnormality. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 39 (2). http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00266-015-0453-4 ...
OA Text is an independent open-access scientific publisher showcases innovative research and ideas aimed at improving health by linking research and practice to the benefit of society.
The focus of this paper is to improve our studies related to the novel use of the Thorpe method applied to atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using new data from Spanish field experiments. We analyse the time behaviour of the maximum Thorpe displacement (dT)max and the Thorpe-scale LT during a day cycle. We also analyse the relation between (dT)max and LT. We deduce that they confirm a power law statistically significant, with differences between convective conditions and shear-driven conditions ...
Looking for Glomus cell? Find out information about Glomus cell. A fold of the mesothelium arising near the base of the mesentery in the pronephros and containing a ball of blood vessels. A prominent portion of the... Explanation of Glomus cell
Reversal of Rotating Behavior in the Domestic Fowl by Neural Grafting. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
If the tumor appears to have invaded the jugular vein, then control of the blood vessels of the neck may be necessary with a separate incision in the neck before the tumor can be completely removed. This is the exception in glomus tumors which arise from the middle ear and mastoid, but the usual situation in glomus jugular tumors.. Ic. Invasion of the Brain. If the glomus tumor continues to expand, it may invade the brain through the bone separating the middle ear and mastoid. This bone is called the middle fossa plate, or tegmen.. If the tumor has invaded the bone and entered the brain, intracranial surgical excision of the tumor may be necessary. Depending on the size of the tumor, this part of the surgery is done in conjunction with a neurosurgeon at the operation. It can also be staged and performed at a separate operation. Staging is often chosen when very extensive tumors invade the brain.. Results of removal of glomus tumors of the middle ear and mastoid are extremely good in most cases, ...
Preferred examination Imaging is the primary investigative modality for glomus tumors of the head and neck. A combination of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiography is ideal for proper diagnosis and localization of the tumors.
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Chemoreceptors are specialized nerve cells designed to respond to chemical stimuli. There are two types of chemoreceptors in the...
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The overall mean egg weight in the current experiment was 42.5g. This was higher compared to 36.8g from Nigerian local domestic fowls (Adedokun and Sonaiya 2001), 37g from Bangladesh desi domestic fowls (Barua and Yoshimura 1997), 38.2g from Tanzanian local domestic fowls (Katule 1990) and 34.4g from Malian local domestic fowls (Wilson et al 1987). There are other studies that have reported higher mean egg weights compared to the current experiment. Mwalusanya (1998) reported overall mean egg weight of 43.6g from local domestic fowls from three ecological zones of Tanzania. In a different study, Zaza (1992) reported mean egg weight of 48g in Dandrawi domestic fowl (a local Egyptian domestic fowl).. It was observed that except for the Mbeya ecotype, mean egg weights for the other local domestic fowl ecotypes were lower compared to those reported in an earlier study for Kuchi and Singamagazi; two relatively large local ecotypes from Tanzania (Msoffe et al 2001). Katule (1990) had earlier shown ...
The carotid body is a small structure weighing 12 mg located in the adventitia of carotid artery bifurcation acting as a chemoreceptor. Carotid body tumour (CBT); formerly known as chemodectoma is a rare, highly vascular, mostly benign tumour arising from the paraganglia of carotid body; hence, the name (carotid paraganglioma). The high vascularity and proximity to cranial nerves and major vessels make this tumour a surgical challenge. Abundant literature has been written about CBT in the last century with a continuous debate regarding its etiology, natural history, biological behavior, proper technique of excision, and the morbidity and mortality associated with its resection. The purpose of this review article is to simplify understanding the basic and clinical aspects of this challenging neoplasm.
Dent et al [16] demonstrated that differences in diastolic function might be noninvasively quantified in diabetic hearts; however, these authors recognized that the lack of in vivo hemodynamic data was one limitation of their study. In our experiments, direct measurements of cardiac function corroborate diastolic and systolic LV function impairment observed after 30-day-induced diabetes by the echocardiographic approach. In vivo LV function evidenced reduced LVSP and +dP/dt max, reflecting a systolic dysfunction, increased LVEDP and attenuated -dP/dt max, showing diastolic dysfunction. These data associated with the impairment in MPI reported in the diabetic group in the present study corroborate the positive correlation between these ventricular indexes, as previously shown in mice [21]. In fact, similar alterations in LVEDP, contractility, bradycardia, reduced cardiac output, and renal damage were evidenced after 21 days of STZ in rats. Reduction in HR in diabetic rats has been attributed to ...

Aortic body - WikipediaAortic body - Wikipedia

Aortic Bodies at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Para-Aortic Bodies at the US National ... and supporting cells located along the aortic arch. Some sources equate the "aortic bodies" and "paraaortic bodies", while ... A paraganglioma is a tumor that may involve the aortic body. Swelling can also occur. Carotid body Control of respiration ... "aortic bodies" are chemoreceptors which regulate the circulatory system, while the "paraaortic bodies" are the chromaffin cells ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aortic_body

CONCEPT Malignant neoplasm of aortic body and other paragangliaCONCEPT Malignant neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia

Malignant neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia Source:http://linkedlifedata.com/resource/umls/id/C0438413 ...
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2018 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code D44.7: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia2018 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code D44.7: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code *D44.7 is a billable ... D44.7 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia D44.9 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of unspecified ... Short description: Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body and oth paraganglia ... D44.6 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body ... aortic body D44.7. * extra-adrenal D44.7* unspecified site ...
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ICD-10-CM Code D35.6 - Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paragangliaICD-10-CM Code D35.6 - Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia

Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient justification for ... D35.6 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia. A billable ... ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index References for D35.6 - Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia The ICD-10-CM Neoplasms ... A paraganglioma is rare neuroendocrine neoplasm that may develop at various body sites (including the head, neck, thorax and ...
more infohttps://icd.codes/icd10cm/D356

ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D35.6 Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paragangliaICD-10 Diagnosis Code D35.6 Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia

D35.6 - Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia. ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D35.6. Benign neoplasm of aortic body and ... Short Description: Benign neoplasm of aortic body and other paraganglia Long Description: Benign neoplasm of aortic body and ... Neoplasm of para-aortic body. Index of Diseases and Injuries References found for the code D35.6 in the Index of Diseases and ... They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as ...
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What to know about abdominal aortic aneurysms | Body & More | beatricedailysun.comWhat to know about abdominal aortic aneurysms | Body & More | beatricedailysun.com

A: An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the lower part of the aorta due to a weakening of the artery wall. Most often ... What to know about abdominal aortic aneurysms * By Howard LeWine, M.D., Tribune Content Agency ... The USPSTF recommends a one-time ultrasound of the abdomen to screen for an abdominal aortic aneurysm with ultrasonography in ... Because of the association of aortic aneurysms with atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), a heart healthy lifestyle ...
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tumor of aortic body drug therapy 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search enginetumor of aortic body drug therapy 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal / surgery. Blood Loss, Surgical / statistics & numerical data. Body Height. Body Weight. Breath ... 1 tumor of aortic body drug therapy 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 25 results Searchbox Export PDF RSS Email Delete Email this ... Aortic banding produced significant elevation of fore- and hindlimb blood pressure (BP), heart-to-body weight ratios, plasma ... Whole-body computerized tomography showed enlarged lymph nodes in mediastinal, right axillary, abdominal para-aortic, ileum, ...
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ICD-10-CM Code D44.7 - Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paragangliaICD-10-CM Code D44.7 - Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient ... D44.7 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia ... ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index References for D44.7 - Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia The ICD- ... ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index References for D44.7 - Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia The ...
more infohttps://icd.codes/icd10cm/D447

ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.7 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paragangliaICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.7 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and other paraganglia

Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body and oth paraganglia. ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.7. Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body ... Neoplasm of uncrt behav of aortic body and oth paraganglia Long Description: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of aortic body and ... Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes ... They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too ...
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Body Fat Is Associated With Reduced Aortic Stiffness Until Middle AgeNovelty and Significance | HypertensionBody Fat Is Associated With Reduced Aortic Stiffness Until Middle AgeNovelty and Significance | Hypertension

Univariate Associations With Aortic PWV. Table 2 summarizes correlations between log aortic PWV and age, MAP, and body ... Aortic stiffness is a major subclinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease; however, the effect of body composition on aortic ... and measures of body composition with aortic PWV, cardiac output, and LV mass. To assess for sex by body composition and age by ... Body Fat Is Associated With Reduced Aortic Stiffness Until Middle AgeNovelty and Significance. Ben Corden, Niall G. Keenan, ...
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Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR | JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingPrognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR | JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging

... severe aortic stenosis in small-body patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). ... Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR ... Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR ... Prognostic Impact of Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis in Small-Body Patients Undergoing TAVR ...
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Normalized End-Systolic Volume and Pre-Load Reserve Predict Ventricular Dysfunction Following Surgery for Aortic Regurgitation...Normalized End-Systolic Volume and Pre-Load Reserve Predict Ventricular Dysfunction Following Surgery for Aortic Regurgitation...

A normal population (n = 158, age range 6 to 62 years, 89 (56%) men, body surface area 1.6 ± 0.4 m2, body mass index 22 ± 4.4 ... Conversely, risk scores generated from the ESV z-score were independent of body surface area. Hence, ESV uncorrected for body ... This most probably relates to the near-linear relationship between body size and cardiac chamber size over the range of body ... 4). Interestingly, risk scores generated from models incorporating ESV uncorrected for body size were related to body surface ...
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Search Results - AccessScience from McGraw-Hill EducationSearch Results - AccessScience from McGraw-Hill Education

Aortic body. One of the cellular aggregations traditionally known as chemoreceptors which are generally found adjacent to the ... Characteristics such as body parts or timing of reproductive events do not necessarily change in direct proportion to body size ... A chemical substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in a human or other animal body. ... A stimulating drug that affects the brain and the body. Amphetamine is a stimulant of the central nervous system. Chemically, ...
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Severe erosion of lumbar vertebral body because of a chronic ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.Severe erosion of lumbar vertebral body because of a chronic ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

This vertebral destruction is usually seen after aortic graft surgery; nevertheless, it is not expected in primary aortic ... Erosion of vertebral bodies because of abdominal aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. ... BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Erosion of vertebral bodies because of abdominal aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. This ... Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal / complications*, surgery. Aortic Rupture / complications*, surgery. Back Pain / etiology*. Chronic ...
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Yellow body | definition of yellow body by Medical dictionaryYellow body | definition of yellow body by Medical dictionary

... yellow body explanation free. What is yellow body? Meaning of yellow body medical term. What does yellow body mean? ... Looking for online definition of yellow body in the Medical Dictionary? ... Nissl body. See: Nissl, Franz. olivary body. Oliva.. pacchionian body. Arachnoid granulation.. para-aortic body. One of the ... See: foreign bodies in ear; foreign bodies in the esophagus; foreign body in nose; foreign bodies in the skin; foreign bodies ...
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Aortic stiffness and Body Mass Index (BMI) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)  -ORCAAortic stiffness and Body Mass Index (BMI) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) -ORCA

Aortic stiffness and Body Mass Index (BMI) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Artery Research 16 , pp. 64-65. ... Aortic stiffness and Body Mass Index (BMI) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) ...
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Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies | Image | Radiopaedia.orgChronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies | Image | Radiopaedia.org

Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies Modality: CT (C+ ... From the case: Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies ... View full size version of Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies ... From the case: Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive erosion of the vertebral bodies. ...
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Prófspurningar 1 Flashcards by Elín Dóra Elíasdóttir | BrainscapePrófspurningar 1 Flashcards by Elín Dóra Elíasdóttir | Brainscape

Carotid body, Aortic bodies, (Lungum, Medulla.? ) 32 Einstaklingur hefur "tidal" rúmmál 600ml. og öndunartíðnina 20 á mínútu. " ... Browse over 1 million classes created by top students, professors, publishers, and experts, spanning the worlds body of " ...
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CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve...CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve...

CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ... CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ... CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ... CRT-806 Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes of Severe Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve ...
more infohttp://interventions.onlinejacc.org/content/8/2_Supplement/S50.1

Free Anatomy Flashcards about Respiratory systemFree Anatomy Flashcards about Respiratory system

aortic bodies. -aortic arch & subclavian arteries -afferents in vagus nerve Central chemo receptors. -ventral surface of ... carotid & aortic bodies -detect changes in P(CO2&O2) -informs resp. control centre -maintain blood gases. ...
more infohttps://www.studystack.com/flashcard-734613

CVC Tissue Bank | Medical College of WisconsinCVC Tissue Bank | Medical College of Wisconsin

Aortic Body/Paraganglia. *Benign or malignant-primary. *Fixed tissue block or frozen tissue ... Apex, left ventricle, septum, mitral leaflet, aortic valve, aortic valve leaflet, mitral valve, unspecified valve or other ...
more infohttps://www.mcw.edu/departments/cardiovascular-center-heart/research/cvc-tissue-bank

Meet One of the Wonders of the Human Body: the Aortic Valve - Health News | University of Miami Hospitals and ClinicsMeet One of the Wonders of the Human Body: the Aortic Valve - Health News | University of Miami Hospitals and Clinics

Aortic stenosis is the most common, affecting two percent of people 65 years and older. Another valve disease is aortic ... When the aortic valve isnt working properly, surgery is the only cure - and a life-saving option. Thats because if left ... For years, aortic valve repair was limited to a heart surgery, which involved opening the chest, breaking the breast bone and ... Less invasive aortic valve surgery. Starting in the early 2000s, Dr. Lamelas developed a series of minimally invasive ...
more infohttps://news.umiamihealth.org/en/meet-one-wonder-human-body-aortic-valve/
  • Guidelines for the timing of aortic valve surgery, developed on the basis of symptoms, LV end-systolic (ES) chamber size, and function have been validated in adult patients ( 3 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Because of the association of aortic aneurysms with atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), a heart healthy lifestyle makes sense. (beatricedailysun.com)
  • The blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the body. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Message Body (Your Name) thought you would like to see this page from the JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions web site. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The type-I cells transduce the signals from the bloodstream and are innervated by afferent nerve fibers leading back to (in the carotid body) the carotid sinus nerve and then on to the glossopharyngeal nerve and medulla of the brainstem. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the relationship between body size and LV size is nonlinear and heteroscedastic (i.e., confidence intervals increase with increasing body size), so that simple indexing may increase rather than decrease body size-related variability. (onlinejacc.org)
  • As transducers of patterns of variability in the surrounding environment, carotid and aortic bodies count as chemosensors in a similar way as taste buds and photoreceptors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. (icdlist.com)
  • The body also contains proprioceptors, which respond to the amount of stretch within the organ, usually muscle, that they occupy. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, this poor prognosis is contested in Japan owing to the smaller body size of Japanese patients relative to that of Western patients. (onlinejacc.org)
  • CONCLUSION: It was concluded that back pain caused by chronic aortic aneurysms is a rare condition and may be one of the possible etiologies in differential diagnosis of low back pain and/or sciatica in some patients. (biomedsearch.com)
  • However, in the chronic absence of the carotid body, the aortic body is able to perform a similar respiratory regulatory role, suggesting that it possesses efficacious mechanisms of signal transduction as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • The USPSTF recommends a one-time ultrasound of the abdomen to screen for an abdominal aortic aneurysm with ultrasonography in men ages 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked. (beatricedailysun.com)
  • When the aortic valve isn't working properly, surgery is the only cure - and a life-saving option. (umiamihealth.org)
  • For years, aortic valve repair was limited to a heart surgery, which involved opening the chest, breaking the breast bone and operating while a machine did the pumping of the stopped heart. (umiamihealth.org)
  • At a recent meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, an international association of cardiothoracic surgeons, Dr. Lamelas sat on a roundtable discussion of the future of aortic valve intervention. (umiamihealth.org)
  • Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. (icdlist.com)
  • In children, measures of cardiac size are typically expressed as z -scores that quantify the measured parameter in terms of its relationship to the expected range at a given body size in a normal population. (onlinejacc.org)
  • ESV is influenced by body size and reflects function and afterload, but not pre-load. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Indexing volume (or dimension) to body surface area has been proposed as a solution to this problem ( 4 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. (icdlist.com)