Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Manifest Anxiety Scale: True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Test Anxiety Scale: A self-reporting test consisting of items concerning fear and worry about taking tests and physiological activity, such as heart rate, sweating, etc., before, during, and after tests.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Anti-Anxiety Agents: Agents that alleviate ANXIETY, tension, and ANXIETY DISORDERS, promote sedation, and have a calming effect without affecting clarity of consciousness or neurologic conditions. ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS are commonly used in the symptomatic treatment of anxiety but are not included here.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Panic Disorder: A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Performance Anxiety: Anxiety related to the execution of a task. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 9th ed.)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Agoraphobia: Obsessive, persistent, intense fear of open places.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Panic: A state of extreme acute, intense anxiety and unreasoning fear accompanied by disorganization of personality function.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Hypochondriasis: Preoccupation with the fear of having, or the idea that one has, a serious disease based on the person's misinterpretation of bodily symptoms. (APA, DSM-IV)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Shyness: Discomfort and partial inhibition of the usual forms of behavior when in the presence of others.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Prostatectomy: Complete or partial surgical removal of the prostate. Three primary approaches are commonly employed: suprapubic - removal through an incision above the pubis and through the urinary bladder; retropubic - as for suprapubic but without entering the urinary bladder; and transurethral (TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF PROSTATE).Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Startle Reaction: A complex involuntary response to an unexpected strong stimulus usually auditory in nature.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Esophagectomy: Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Diazepam: A benzodiazepine with anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sedative, muscle relaxant, and amnesic properties and a long duration of action. Its actions are mediated by enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID activity.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors: Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Perioperative Period: The time periods immediately before, during and following a surgical operation.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Neurotic Disorders: Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Therapy, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems utilized as adjuncts in the treatment of disease.Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Phacoemulsification: A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Neuronavigation: Intraoperative computer-assisted 3D navigation and guidance system generally used in neurosurgery for tracking surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy. The pre-operative diagnostic scan is used as a reference and is transferred onto the operative field during surgery.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)United StatesDesensitization, Psychologic: A behavior therapy technique in which deep muscle relaxation is used to inhibit the effects of graded anxiety-evoking stimuli.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Physiological and psychological symptoms associated with withdrawal from the use of a drug after prolonged administration or habituation. The concept includes withdrawal from smoking or drinking, as well as withdrawal from an administered drug.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.
Thus, DPES may contribute to reducing the patients' pre-operative anxiety levels and to expediting the informed consent process ... However, due to the public ramifications of the act of providing dental health care, a public extension to DPES was also ... is provided by the Faculty of Dentistry as an open source of information and dental care education. It is targeted in equal ... such as post-operative care or follow-up visits. Because the patients can be instructed by their dentists to view the ...
Information obtained during preoperative assessment is used as a basis for the care plan for the patient. The preoperative ... attempt to limit preoperational anxiety and may include the preoperative fasting. The intra-operative period begins when the ... Perioperative care is the care that is given before, during and after surgery. It takes place in hospitals, in surgical centers ... It is quite common for the very last of this period to end outside of the care of the surgical team. It is uncommon to provide ...
Preoperative education is currently an important part of patient care. There is some evidence that it may slightly reduce ... anxiety before hip or knee replacement, with low risk of negative effects. Hemiarthroplasty is a surgical procedure which ... and included navigation and preoperative planning based on a preoperative CT scan of the patient. Improved patient outcomes and ... McDonald, S; Page, MJ; Beringer, K; Wasiak, J; Sprowson, A (2014). "Preoperative education for hip or knee replacement". The ...
Preoperative teaching if delivered competently is an important aspect of patient care. Positive effects of preoperative ... teaching include a reduction in patients' anxiety levels, healing time, complications post- surgery, pain relief usage and an ... A surgical nurse, also referred to as a theatre nurse or scrub nurse, specializes in preoperative care, providing care to ... "Preoperative Care - procedure, recovery, blood, removal, pain, complications, time, infection". www.surgeryencyclopedia.com. ...
... anxiety, depression, sleep disorder, and weakness. A 2012 Cochrane systematic review found evidence that preoperative physical ... Incision care is needed to avoid infection and minimize scarring. Swelling and loss of appetite are common. Recovery from open ... In addition, the researchers found that preoperative physical therapy decreased the length of hospital stay by more than three ... IQWiG (Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care). Retrieved 27 June 2013. Cohn, Lawrence H.; Edmunds, Jr, L. Henry, ...
Bradt, Joke; Dileo, Cheryl; Shim, Minjung; Bradt, Joke (2013). "Music interventions for preoperative anxiety". Reviews. doi: ... Preoperative care refers to health care provided before a surgical operation. The aim of preoperative care is to do whatever is ... At some point before surgery a health care provider conducts a preoperative assessment to verify that a person is fit and ready ... At some point before the surgery the health care provider will assess the fitness of the person to have surgery. This ...
Other trends include displaying a calm and relaxed attitude during preoperative care. They don't usually experience any ... Preoperational anxiety, or preoperative anxiety, is a common reaction experienced by patients who are admitted to a hospital ... The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) is a widespread method of measuring preoperative anxiety for research purposes. It ... Treatment of preoperative anxiety may include: Preoperative patient teaching or tours Accurate and thorough information about ...
For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider." Passionflower is ... In initial study in 2001 for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, maypop extract performed as well as oxazepam but with ... Saliminia, Alireza; Azimaraghi, Omid (June 12, 2017). "Preoperative Oral Passiflora Incarnata Reduces Coughing Following ... UMMC (2008)[dead link] Duke (2008) "Passionflower in the treatment of generalized anxiety: a pilot double-blind randomized ...
Care must be taken under such circumstances to avoid potentially fatal complications of refeeding syndrome. Psyhogeos, Matina ( ... Other drugs may be used to intentionally cause anorexia in order to help a patient preoperative fasting prior to general ... AIDS Anorexia nervosa Anxiety disorder Appendicitis Cancer Chronic pain Chronic kidney disease Celiac disease Congestive heart ... Home Care After Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy Jáuregui-Garrido, B; Jáuregui-Lobera, I (2012). "Sudden death in eating ...
page needed] John Vanin; James Helsley (19 June 2008). Anxiety Disorders: A Pocket Guide For Primary Care. Springer Science & ... "Preoperative Anxiety Management, Emergence Delirium, and Postoperative Behavior". Anesthesiology Clinics. 32 (1): 1-23. doi: ... Shearer, Steven L. (2007). "Recent Advances in the Understanding and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders". Primary Care: Clinics in ... Given that many anxiety sufferers are more prone to alcohol and opioid addiction, the potential danger in prescribing opioids ...
An increasingly common aid to both pre-operative wound maintenance and post-operative graft healing is the use of negative ... Graft recipients wear compression garments for several months and are at risk for depression and anxiety consequent to long- ... J Trauma Acute Care Surg. doi:10.1097/TA.0000000000001615. PMID 28598907. emedicine >Skin, Grafts Author: Benjamin C Wood. ...
Bae, H; Bae, H; Min, BI; Cho, S (2014). "Efficacy of acupuncture in reducing preoperative anxiety: a meta-analysis". Evidence- ... A meta-analysis found that acupuncture for chronic low back pain was cost-effective as an adjunct to standard care, while a ... preoperative anxiety, restless legs syndrome, schizophrenia, sensorineural hearing loss, smoking cessation, stress urinary ... A 2013 meta-analysis found that acupuncture for chronic low back pain was cost-effective as a complement to standard care, but ...
The patient is advised to avoid exercise and strenuous physical activity until 3-weeks post-operative; how to properly care for ... Such unmet aesthetic expectations can be avoided at the pre-operative consultation stage, whereby, with informed consent, the ... occurrences of drug-induced anxiety, apprehension, restlessness, nervousness, disorientation, confusion, dizziness, blurred ...
Day care, high volume, minimally invasive, small incision phacoemulsification with quick post-op recovery has become the ... An eye examination or pre-operative evaluation by an eye surgeon is necessary to confirm the presence of a cataract and to ... Oral or intravenous sedation may also be used to reduce anxiety. General anesthesia is rarely necessary, but may be employed ... Preoperative patient selection and good counselling is extremely important to avoid unrealistic expectations and post-operative ...
Liverpool Care Pathway (January 2005). "Care of the Dying Pathway (lcp) (Hospital)" (PDF). United Kingdom. Archived from the ... It works by inducing sleepiness, decreasing anxiety, and causing a loss of ability to create new memories. It is also useful ... for preoperative sedation, for the induction of general anesthesia, and for sedation of people who are ventilated in critical ... In the final stages of end-of-life care, midazolam is routinely used at low doses via subcutaneous injection to help with ...
Medicines for pain and palliative care[edit]. Non-opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs)[edit]. ... Anaesthetics, preoperative medicines and medical gases[edit]. General anaesthetics and oxygen[edit]. Inhalational medicines[ ... Medicines for anxiety disorders[edit]. *Diazepam. Medicines used for obsessive compulsive disorders[edit]. *Clomipramine ... Medicines for reproductive health and perinatal care[edit]. Contraceptives[edit]. Oral hormonal contraceptives[edit]. * ...
Pre-operative depressive disorders tended not to do well. Smoking has been shown to increase the incidence of post operative ... Fee for service and easy access to care was thought to encourage spinal surgery in the United States, whereas salaried position ... 1997). "The influence of psychological variables on postoperative anxiety and physical complaints in patients undergoing lumbar ... This effect was very clear in patients with total block in the preoperative myelography. The surgical result of a patient with ...
Disadvantages are that it is necessary to get measured to ensure proper fit and you need a health care professional to write a ... Preoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in men undergoing radical prostatectomy was not effective in reducing urinary ... unwillingness to toilet because of depression or anxiety or inebriation due to alcohol. Functional incontinence can also occur ... It has been identified as an important issue in geriatric health care. Urinary incontinence is often a result of an underlying ...
D'Amico AV, Chen MH, Roehl KA, Catalona WJ (Jul 2004). "Preoperative PSA velocity and the risk of death from prostate cancer ... This means that PSA screening may reduce mortality from prostate cancer by up to 25%. Expected harms include anxiety for 100 - ... so care must be taken with the interpretation of such results. The physiological function of KLK3 is the dissolution of the ... The likelihood of developing recurrent prostate cancer after curative treatment is related to the pre-operative variables ...
... and generalised anxiety disorder) in adults in primary, secondary and community care" (PDF). National Institute for Health and ... Broscheit J, Kranke P (February 2008). "[The preoperative medication: background and specific indications for the selection of ... "Clinical Guideline 22 (amended). Anxiety: management of anxiety (panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia, ... As for insomnia, they may also be used on an irregular/"as-needed" basis, such as in cases where said anxiety is at its worst. ...
Many include the 'functional limitation' or 'anxiety' to determine classification which is not mentioned in the actual ... implants and especially the level of post-operative care etc. are often far more important than multiple ASA classification. In ... The scale they proposed addressed the patient's preoperative state only, not the surgical procedure or other factors that could ... "the operative procedure and the patient's preoperative condition". [copyright violation?] They described a six-point scale, ...
Manyande, A., Berg, S., Gettins, D., Stanford, S. C., Mazhero, S., Marks, D. F., and Salmon, P., Preoperative rehearsal of ... 1, 1981, pp76-79 McKenna, G., Hevey, D., & Martin, E., Patients' and providers' perspectives on bibliotherapy in primary care. ... Is guided self-help as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy for depression and anxiety disorders? A systematic review and ... "Pragmatic evaluation of computer-aided self-help for anxiety and depression". The British Journal of Psychiatry Vol. 183, 2003 ...
Incorrect pre-operative assessments or preparations are the root cause of 11% of all adverse anesthetic events. One part of the ... In preparing for a medical procedure, the health care provider giving anesthesia chooses and determines the doses of one or ... Sedation suppresses the central nervous system to a lesser degree, inhibiting both anxiety and creation of long-term memories ... Diagnosing a person's pre-operative physical status allows the clinician to minimize anesthetic risks. A well completed medical ...
"Change in anxiety following successful and unsuccessful attempts at smoking cessation: cohort study". BJP. American Cancer ... Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research ... examined six randomized trials and 15 observational studies to look at the effects of preoperative smoking cessation on ... In one systematic review and meta-analysis, multi-component interventions increased quit rates in primary care settings. "Multi ...
Palliative care is medical care which focuses on treatment of symptoms of serious illness, like cancer, and improving quality ... This approach is not used for aggressive cancers, but it may cause anxiety for people who wrongly believe that all cancer is ... It offers comparable accuracy as the Kattan preoperative nomogram and can be calculated without paper tables or a calculator. ... One of the goals of treatment in palliative care is symptom control rather than a cure of the underlying cancer. Pain is common ...
See also: Preoperative fasting, Body cleansing, and Nothing by mouth. Fasting is often practiced prior to surgery or other ... Fasting can help alleviate some symptoms of depression.[7] However the psychological effects may also include anxiety and ... but a decision to fully obey God's commands to care for the poor and oppressed. Zechariah, chapter 7:5-10, also repeats this ...
Cesarean Section ; Emergencies ; Preoperative Care ; Postoperative Care ; Anxiety ; Hospitals, Private ; Hospitals, Public ; ... Anxiety experience and preoperative nursing care evaluation among postoperative emergency caesarian section patients in two ... Preoperative nursing care rendered during this period greatly influence patients care perception, a concept underpinned in ... A structured questionnaire was used to assess participants demographics and care satisfaction. Anxiety levels were evaluated ...
Patients who received a 10-minute hand massage before undergoing surgery experienced significantly less preoperative anxiety in ... Annual Self Care Issue: Stay Healthy and In Practice. - Myofascial Release by John Barnes. » View Current Issue ... The main outcome measure for this study was preoperative anxiety. In order to measure each patients level of preoperative ... Participants in the control group also were presented with the visual analog scale for anxiety when waiting in the preoperative ...
J Pediatr Health Care. 2009 Nov-Dec;23(6):372-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pedhc.2008.08.002. Epub 2008 Oct 23. ... J Pediatr Health Care. 2009 Nov-Dec;23(6):372-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pedhc.2008.08.002. Epub 2008 Oct 23. ... parental preoperative anxiety was measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. Anxiety was correlated to ... Association between parental anxiety and compliance with preoperative requirements for pediatric outpatient surgery.. Chahal N1 ...
The Effects of Preoperative Anxiety on Anesthetic Recovery and Postoperative Pain in Donor Nephrectomy. p.pp. S116-S117, 2017. ... Pre-operative discussion and agreement on ones wishes, goals of care, and treatments helps the care team to understand what ... Pre-Operative Education. Counseling and education are vital components of pre-operative preparation, care, and the informed ... Home Guidelines White Papers Optimizing Outcomes in Urological Surgery: Pre-Operative Care for the Patient Undergoing Urologic ...
Bradt, Joke; Dileo, Cheryl; Shim, Minjung; Bradt, Joke (2013). "Music interventions for preoperative anxiety". Reviews. doi: ... Preoperative care refers to health care provided before a surgical operation. The aim of preoperative care is to do whatever is ... At some point before surgery a health care provider conducts a preoperative assessment to verify that a person is fit and ready ... At some point before the surgery the health care provider will assess the fitness of the person to have surgery. This ...
Supportive Care. Official Title:. Effects of Centering Pre-operative Counseling on Patient Reported Anxiety. ... Effects of Centering Pre-operative Counseling on Patient Reported Anxiety. The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... Comprehensive pre-operative counseling and education has been shown to play an important role in quality of life, anxiety and ... where as a score of 50-60 represents mild anxiety, 60-70 represents moderate anxiety, and ,70 represents severe anxiety. PROMIS ...
N: number, SD: standard deviation, CPB time: cardiopulmonary bypass time, ICU: intensive care unit, BDI: Beck Depression ... State anxiety subscale in the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory. STAI-T. Trait anxiety subscale in the Spielberger ... In a parallel analysis of preoperative anxiety and depression, only anxiety was significantly associated with increased ... patients had both anxiety and depression. Compared the survivals and deaths patients with anxiety and anxiety and depression ...
Max Institute of Cancer Care-Lajpat Nagar. *Max Multi Speciality Centre, Panchsheel Park ... How to deal with Preoperative Anxiety. *Home. Home ,, Blogs ,, Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences ,, How to deal with ... Preoperative anxiety has been known to prolong recovery process, increase susceptibility to infections, cause pains post ... Anxiety is described as an unpleasant emotional state. Hospitalization and surgery evoke anxiety in most of the patients. It ...
Preoperative anxiety is assessed by the child life specialist in the preoperative holding area. Ease of induction and emergence ... Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our ... Preoperative Preparation for Children. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study ... It is hypothesized that children receiving the intervention will have less anxiety, easier induction and emergence from ...
ASCO Guidelines: Integrating palliative care. Take Quiz. Cancer survivors: Medication use for anxiety & depression. Take Quiz. ... ATA Guidelines: Preoperative neck ultrasound & laboratory tests for DTC. Take Quiz. ATA Guidelines: Use of CT, MRI, and PET for ... ATA Guidelines: Preoperative neck ultrasound & laboratory tests for DTC. Take Quiz. ATA Guidelines: Use of CT, MRI, and PET for ... ATA Guidelines: Preoperative neck ultrasound & laboratory tests for DTC. Take Quiz. Epidemiology & clinical presentation of ...
ROC-curve analysis was used to define benchmarks in preoperative measures associated with good outcome. Preoperative HOOS (p, ... Presurgical HOOS can predict outcome in THA better than other preoperative outcome measures. Patients with a preoperative HOOS ... compared to all other preoperative measures. Multivariable analysis confirmed preoperative HOOS as an independent parameter ... However, preoperative HOOS revealed best predictive power (OR=0.84 95%CI=0.78-0.90, p,0.001, Pseudo R-Squared according to ...
Anxiety score of Yale Mulhouse and Colmar). The children will be filmed at 3 times of their care on the day of the intervention ... m-Ypass scale (Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale), a hetero-evaluation scale, is designed to assess preoperative anxiety ... m-Ypass scale (Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale), a hetero-evaluation scale, is designed to assess preoperative anxiety ... m-Ypass scale (Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale), a hetero-evaluation scale, is designed to assess preoperative anxiety ...
To examine the effects of music interventions with standard care versus standard care alone on preoperative anxiety in surgical ... trials that compared music interventions and standard care with standard care alone for reducing preoperative anxiety in ... Music interventions for preoperative anxiety.. Bradt J1, Dileo C, Shim M. ... One large study found that music listening was more effective than the sedative midazolam in reducing preoperative anxiety and ...
Other trends include displaying a calm and relaxed attitude during preoperative care. They dont usually experience any ... Preoperational anxiety, or preoperative anxiety, is a common reaction experienced by patients who are admitted to a hospital ... The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) is a widespread method of measuring preoperative anxiety for research purposes. It ... Treatment of preoperative anxiety may include: Preoperative patient teaching or tours Accurate and thorough information about ...
Anesthetic assessment in an outpatient consultation clinic reduces preoperative anxiety. Can J Anaesth, 2000; 47:511-515. [ ... The objective of the present study was to evaluate the costs of preoperative care performed by the surgeon compared to the care ... In form II (surgeons care), ancillary exams performed and referrals in the preoperative care, as well as physical status ... Guidelines for preoperative assessment: impact on clinic practice and costs. Int J Qual Health Care, 2005;17:323-329. [ Links ] ...
... oil increased the sleep quality and reduced the level of anxiety in patients with colorectal surgery in the preoperative period ... The control group received standard nursing care in compliance with the hospital procedure. Data were obtained by the State ... The effects of preoperative aromatherapy massage on anxiety and sleep quality of colorectal surgery patients: A randomized ... oil increased the sleep quality and reduced the level of anxiety in patients with colorectal surgery in the preoperative period ...
We quantified the added predictive value of preoperative anxiety to established predictors of PONV in 1389 surgical inpatients ... Preoperative anxiety has been suggested as a predictor of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), but supporting data are ... Department of Perioperative Care and Emergency Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; †Julius ... Anxiety was measured by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information ...
Intubation Physical diagnosis Postoperative care Preoperative care Respiration Respiratory organs--Diseases--Nursing Surgery, ... Deals also with relieving the patients anxiety before surgery and providing comfort after surgery ... A nursing team demonstrates its approach to preoperative and postoperative care, showing the duties of each member. ... Tracheostomy care by Chris Buretta( Visual ). 12 editions published between 1966 and 1978 in English and held by 43 WorldCat ...
Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting ... The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ready for discharge from the post anaesthesia care unit (in ... of elements such as providing the patient with thorough preoperative information and education concerning perioperative care, ... Preoperative period. * ○ Preoperative anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory: STAI [20]). * ▪ at baseline ...
Preoperative Care - Reducing Pre-Surgery Anxiety. CPD. 7m. Subscription Needed. Postoperative Delirium ...
Preoperative Surgery Meditation. Reduce your preoperative surgery anxiety with this hospital meditation. Promote rapid healing ... Fear that nobody cares. • Unfamiliar situations causing fear or feelings of panic. • A strange bed and a change of routine. • ... Studies have shown that reducing pre-operative anxiety can lead to a better and more thorough recovery. • Reducing anxiety in ... This CD will help provide a safe, relaxing and effective self help way of reducing preoperative anxiety for patients going ...
Anxiety experience and preoperative nursing care evaluation among postoperative emergency caesarian section patients in two ... Preoperative nursing care rendered during this period greatly influence patients care per[...] ... Caesarean section deliveries: Experiences of mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay ... Introduction: the contribution of the health workforce for better health care service provision is undoubtedly of great merit ...
Intensive Nursing Care. It is suggested that head and neck surgery patients are admitted to Critical Care Unit (CCU) for 24- ... Pre-operative psychological nursing measures included encouraging patients, and family support. It is difficult to accept the ... pictorial guides or hand signals had resulted in less anxiety and depression. Expressing the feeling, thoughts and aspiration ... it will lead to the delay of treatment and care. Nurses play a critical role in patients care throughout the pre- and ...
Ruiz-Bueno, J.B. (1988). Preferences for health care, pre-event anxiety, informational interventions and coping during genetic ... Sime, A.M. (1976). Relationship of preoperative fear, type of coping, and information received about surgery to recovery from ... State anxiety was measured before the procedure. Pre-event anxiety scores of women who had received genetic counseling before ... Spielberger, CD., Gorsuch, R.L., Lushene, R., Vagg, P.R., & Jacobs, G.A. (1983). Manual for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. ...
Effect of holistic cares with family participation on attitude and preoperative anxiety of patients ... Anxiety and preoperative information were measured using the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale at the ... Intervention outcomes were the scores of attitude and anxiety of patients. The attitude toward preoperative cares was measured ... Thus, its use is recommended in providing all medical and nursing cares. Keywords: Preoperative care, patient satisfaction, ...
  • They are also proud of the crucial role they play on surgical, emergency response and palliative care teams. (innerbody.com)
  • They can also be found in the offices of surgeons, dentists, ophthalmologists, palliative care specialists and podiatrists. (innerbody.com)
  • A compound called POH that may have come from lavender or other plants was developed as a nasal spray and showed some benefit in palliative care patients with recurrent gliomas. (mskcc.org)
  • Nurses are responsible for the vast majority of anesthesiology care in rural areas and other places experiencing a critical shortage of health care professionals. (innerbody.com)
  • Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, Texas (S.T.J.S.-P. (asahq.org)
  • Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, D.C. (D.R.B. (asahq.org)
  • However, a range of factors related to the sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics of the patient also need to be considered, for example, personal anxiety levels, personality traits, sensitivity to pain, and the use of coping strategies. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In order to help patients cope effectively today, we must first understand their preoperative coping efforts and informational preferences. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Health care providers can help those SCT survivors facing ongoing health problems with coping and adaptation by providing education, counseling and aggressively treating active health problems. (cancerlinks.com)
  • But there is still no consensus on which music is most effective (selfchosen or calming music) Are coping strategies and sense of controle of patients related to the kind of music that is applied in the preoperative fase. (trialregister.nl)
  • Emotion-focused coping strategies are therefore more effective when calming music is offered in the preoperative fase. (trialregister.nl)
  • Relatively few trials measured anxiety, coping skills and self-efficacy, and the majority found no effect. (prolekare.cz)
  • The objective of this study was to establish a transitional care program (TCP) with the goal of decreasing length of stay (LOS), improving discharge efficiency, and reducing readmissions of neurosurgical patients by optimizing patient education and postdischarge surveillance. (thejns.org)
  • Discharge planner- A health-care professional who helps patients arrange for health and home care needs after they go home from the hospital. (encyclopedia.com)