A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
A major deviation from normal patterns of behavior.
A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)
Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.
Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.
Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)
A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.
Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.
A personality disorder in which there are oddities of thought (magical thinking, paranoid ideation, suspiciousness), perception (illusions, depersonalization), speech (digressive, vague, overelaborate), and behavior (inappropriate affect in social interactions, frequently social isolation) that are not severe enough to characterize schizophrenia.
A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
Disorders stemming from the misuse and abuse of alcohol.
Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.
An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.
'Prisoners,' in a medical context, refer to individuals who are incarcerated and may face challenges in accessing adequate healthcare services due to various systemic and individual barriers, which can significantly impact their health status and outcomes.
A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)
Disorders related to substance abuse.
A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.
Disorder characterized by an emotionally constricted manner that is unduly conventional, serious, formal, and stingy, by preoccupation with trivial details, rules, order, organization, schedules, and lists, by stubborn insistence on having things one's own way without regard for the effects on others, by poor interpersonal relationships, and by indecisiveness due to fear of making mistakes.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Standardized objective tests designed to facilitate the evaluation of personality.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
A personality disorder characterized by the avoidance of accepting deserved blame and an unwarranted view of others as malevolent. The latter is expressed as suspiciousness, hypersensitivity, and mistrust.
Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.
The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.
A personality disorder manifested by a profound defect in the ability to form social relationships, no desire for social involvement, and an indifference to praise or criticism.
A personality disorder characterized by a pervasive and excessive need to be taken care of that leads to submissive and clinging behavior and fears of separation, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
A personality disorder characterized by overly reactive and intensely expressed or overly dramatic behavior, proneness to exaggeration, emotional excitability, and disturbances in interpersonal relationships.
A triangular double membrane separating the anterior horns of the LATERAL VENTRICLES of the brain. It is situated in the median plane and bounded by the CORPUS CALLOSUM and the body and columns of the FORNIX (BRAIN).
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
A state in which attention is largely directed outward from the self.
The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.
A personality disorder characterized by an indirect resistance to demands for adequate social and occupational performance; anger and opposition to authority and the expectations of others that is expressed covertly by obstructionism, procrastination, stubbornness, dawdling, forgetfulness, and intentional inefficiency. (Dorland, 27th ed)
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A psychoanalytic term meaning self-love.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.
Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of naturally occurring monoamines. It is a flavin-containing enzyme that is localized in mitochondrial membranes, whether in nerve terminals, the liver, or other organs. Monoamine oxidase is important in regulating the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and serotonin in neural or target tissues. Hepatic monoamine oxidase has a crucial defensive role in inactivating circulating monoamines or those, such as tyramine, that originate in the gut and are absorbed into the portal circulation. (From Goodman and Gilman's, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p415) EC 1.4.3.4.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Disorders affecting TWINS, one or both, at any age.
Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.
A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.
The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.
A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)
In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.
Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.
Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.
A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.
Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Health facilities providing therapy and/or rehabilitation for substance-dependent individuals. Methadone distribution centers are included.
Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Disorders whose essential features are the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the individual or to others. Individuals experience an increased sense of tension prior to the act and pleasure, gratification or release of tension at the time of committing the act.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.

Subtypes of family history and conduct disorder: effects on P300 during the stroop test. (1/584)

The goal of the present study was to identify neurophysiological differences associated with a family history of substance dependence, and its subtypes (paternal alcohol, cocaine, or opiate dependence), and with conduct disorder, and its subtypes (aggression, deceitfulness/theft, and rules violations). P300 event-related brain potentials were recorded from 210 males and females, aged 15-20 years while they performed the Stroop color-word compatibility test. Analyses revealed no significant effects of familial substance dependence on P300. However, an elevated number of conduct disorder problems was associated with a statistically significant reduction in P300 amplitude. The P300 amplitude reduction was related to the severity of the "rules violation" subtype, but was unrelated to aggression or deceitfulness and theft. It is concluded that conduct disorder can explain many of the P300 findings previously attributed to a family history of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, it appears that conduct disorder may be a heterogenous classification comprised of neurophysiologically different subtypes.  (+info)

Mice with reduced NMDA receptor expression display behaviors related to schizophrenia. (2/584)

N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) represent a subclass of glutamate receptors that play a critical role in neuronal development and physiology. We report here the generation of mice expressing only 5% of normal levels of the essential NMDAR1 (NR1) subunit. Unlike NR1 null mice, these mice survive to adulthood and display behavioral abnormalities, including increased motor activity and stereotypy and deficits in social and sexual interactions. These behavioral alterations are similar to those observed in pharmacologically induced animal models of schizophrenia and can be ameliorated by treatment with haloperidol or clozapine, antipsychotic drugs that antagonize dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors. These findings support a model in which reduced NMDA receptor activity results in schizophrenic-like behavior and reveals how pharmacological manipulation of monoaminergic pathways can affect this phenotype.  (+info)

Parent-infant interactions among families with alcoholic fathers. (3/584)

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fathers' alcoholism and the quality of parent-infant interactions during free play. A related goal was to study the potential mediating or moderating role of comorbid parental psychopathology, such as depression and antisocial behavior, difficult infant temperament, and parental aggression. The sample consisted of 204 families with 12-month-old infants (104 alcoholic and 100 control families), recruited from New York State birth records. Results indicated that fathers' alcoholism was associated with a number of other risk factors (depression, antisocial behavior, and family aggression). Fathers' alcoholism was also associated with more negative father-infant interactions as indicated by lower paternal sensitivity, positive affect, verbalizations, higher negative affect, and lower infant responsiveness among alcoholic fathers. As expected, fathers' depression mediated the relationship between fathers' alcoholism and sensitivity, while maternal depression mediated the association between maternal alcohol problems and maternal sensitivity. Parents' psychopathology did not moderate the association between alcoholism and parent-infant interactions. The results from the present study suggest that the origins of risk for later maladjustment among children of alcoholic fathers are apparent as early as infancy and highlight the role of comorbid parental risk factors.  (+info)

Clinical correlates of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence in alcohol-dependent men and women. The Collaborative Study Group on the Genetics of Alcoholism. (4/584)

This paper examines the clinical characteristics associated with tobacco use and nicotine dependence in a large sample of alcohol-dependent subjects. The goal was to determine if the characteristics of the alcohol use history were associated with the smoking status, even after controlling for additional characteristics, such as the antisocial personality disorder, other drug dependence and gender. As part of the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism, a semi-structured interview, including a detailed history of alcohol and tobacco use, was administered to 1005 alcohol-dependent men and women, made up of 658 (65.5%) current smokers, 167 (16.6%) former smokers, and 180 (17.9%) non-smokers. Among former smokers, 50.3%, and among current smokers, 72.8% had ever been nicotine-dependent (DSM-III-R). Current smokers and nicotine-dependent subjects had a greater severity of alcohol dependence, even as evaluated through logistic regression analyses in which gender and associated diagnoses were considered. The data also enabled us to study the relationships among depression, nicotine dependence, and alcohol dependence, with most of the correlation occurring for substance-induced, not independent, mood disorders.  (+info)

Impaired social response reversal. A case of 'acquired sociopathy'. (5/584)

In this study, we report a patient (J.S.) who, following trauma to the right frontal region, including the orbitofrontal cortex, presented with 'acquired sociopathy'. His behaviour was notably aberrant and marked by high levels of aggression and a callous disregard for others. A series of experimental investigations were conducted to address the cognitive dysfunction that might underpin his profoundly aberrant behaviour. His performance was contrasted with that of a second patient (C.L.A.), who also presented with a grave dysexecutive syndrome but no socially aberrant behaviour, and five inmates of Wormwood Scrubs prison with developmental psychopathy. While J.S. showed no reversal learning impairment, he presented with severe difficulty in emotional expression recognition, autonomic responding and social cognition. Unlike the comparison populations, J.S. showed impairment in: the recognition of, and autonomic responding to, angry and disgusted expressions; attributing the emotions of fear, anger and embarrassment to story protagonists; and the identification of violations of social behaviour. The findings are discussed with reference to models regarding the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in the control of aggression. It is suggested that J.S.'s impairment is due to a reduced ability to generate expectations of others' negative emotional reactions, in particular anger. In healthy individuals, these representations act to suppress behaviour that is inappropriate in specific social contexts. Moreover, it is proposed that the orbitofrontal cortex may be implicated specifically either in the generation of these expectations or the use of these expectations to suppress inappropriate behaviour.  (+info)

Merging universal and indicated prevention programs: the Fast Track model. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (6/584)

Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive intervention for young children at high risk for long-term antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental model, this intervention includes a universal-level classroom program plus social-skill training, academic tutoring, parent training, and home visiting to improve competencies and reduce problems in a high-risk group of children selected in kindergarten. The theoretical principles and clinical strategies utilized in the Fast Track Project are described to illustrate the interplay between basic developmental research, the understanding of risk and protective factors, and a research-based model of preventive intervention that integrates universal and indicated models of prevention.  (+info)

Peer rejection in childhood, involvement with antisocial peers in early adolescence, and the development of externalizing behavior problems. (7/584)

A longitudinal, prospective design was used to examine the roles of peer rejection in middle childhood and antisocial peer involvement in early adolescence in the development of adolescent externalizing behavior problems. Both early starter and late starter pathways were considered. Classroom sociometric interviews from ages 6 through 9 years, adolescent reports of peers' behavior at age 13 years, and parent, teacher, and adolescent self-reports of externalizing behavior problems from age 5 through 14 years were available for 400 adolescents. Results indicate that experiencing peer rejection in elementary school and greater involvement with antisocial peers in early adolescence are correlated but that these peer relationship experiences may represent two different pathways to adolescent externalizing behavior problems. Peer rejection experiences, but not involvement with antisocial peers. predict later externalizing behavior problems when controlling for stability in externalizing behavior. Externalizing problems were most common when rejection was experienced repeatedly. Early externalizing problems did not appear to moderate the relation between peer rejection and later problem behavior. Discussion highlights multiple pathways connecting externalizing behavior problems from early childhood through adolescence with peer relationship experiences in middle childhood and early adolescence.  (+info)

Antisocial personality disorder, alcohol, and aggression. (8/584)

Epidemiologic studies and laboratory research consistently link alcohol use with aggression. Not all people, however, exhibit increased aggression under the influence of alcohol. Recent research suggests that people with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) may be more prone to alcohol-related aggression than people without ASPD. As a group, people with ASPD have higher rates of alcohol dependence and more alcohol-related problems than people without ASPD. Likewise, in laboratory studies, people with ASPD show greater increases in aggressive behavior after consuming alcohol than people without ASPD. The association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may result from biological factors, such as ASPD-related impairments in the functions of certain brain chemicals (e.g., serotonin) or in the activities of higher reasoning, or "executive," brain regions. Alternatively, the association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may stem from some as yet undetermined factor(s) that increase the risk for aggression in general.  (+info)

Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) is a mental health condition characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregard for the rights of others, lack of empathy, and manipulative behaviors. It is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), as follows:

A. A consistent pattern of behavior that violates the basic rights of others and major age-appropriate societal norms and rules, as indicated by the presence of at least three of the following:

1. Failure to conform to social norms and laws, indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest.
2. Deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure.
3. Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead; indication of this symptom may include promiscuity.
4. Irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults.
5. Reckless disregard for safety of self or others.
6. Consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations.
7. Lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.

B. The individual is at least 18 years of age.

C. There is evidence of conduct disorder with onset before the age of 15 years.

D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

E. The individual's criminal behavior has not been better explained by a conduct disorder diagnosis or antisocial behavior that began before the age of 15 years.

It's important to note that ASPD can be challenging to diagnose, and it often requires a comprehensive evaluation from a mental health professional with experience in personality disorders.

Personality disorders are a class of mental health conditions characterized by deeply ingrained, inflexible patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving that deviate significantly from the norms of their culture. These patterns often lead to distress for the individual and/or impairments in personal relationships, work, or social functioning.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), identifies ten specific personality disorders, which are grouped into three clusters based on descriptive similarities:

1. Cluster A (Odd or Eccentric) - characterized by odd, eccentric, or unusual behaviors:
* Paranoid Personality Disorder
* Schizoid Personality Disorder
* Schizotypal Personality Disorder
2. Cluster B (Dramatic, Emotional, or Erratic) - marked by dramatic, emotional, or erratic behaviors:
* Antisocial Personality Disorder
* Borderline Personality Disorder
* Histrionic Personality Disorder
* Narcissistic Personality Disorder
3. Cluster C (Anxious or Fearful) - featuring anxious, fearful behaviors:
* Avoidant Personality Disorder
* Dependent Personality Disorder
* Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder

It is important to note that personality disorders can be challenging to diagnose and treat. They often require comprehensive assessments by mental health professionals, such as psychologists or psychiatrists, who specialize in personality disorders. Effective treatments typically involve long-term, specialized psychotherapies, with some cases potentially benefiting from medication management for co-occurring symptoms like anxiety or depression.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a mental health disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image, affect, and mood, as well as marked impulsivity that begins by early adulthood and is present in various contexts.

Individuals with BPD often experience intense and fluctuating emotions, ranging from profound sadness, anxiety, and anger to feelings of happiness or calm. They may have difficulty managing these emotions, leading to impulsive behavior, self-harm, or suicidal ideation.

People with BPD also tend to have an unstable sense of self, which can lead to rapid changes in their goals, values, and career choices. They often struggle with feelings of emptiness and boredom, and may engage in risky behaviors such as substance abuse, reckless driving, or binge eating to alleviate these feelings.

Interpersonal relationships are often strained due to the individual's fear of abandonment, intense emotional reactions, and difficulty regulating their emotions. They may experience idealization and devaluation of others, leading to rapid shifts in how they view and treat people close to them.

Diagnosis of BPD is typically made by a mental health professional using criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which is published by the American Psychiatric Association. Treatment for BPD may include psychotherapy, medication, and support groups to help individuals manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

In the context of medicine and psychology, personality is a complex concept that refers to the unique patterns of thoughts, behaviors, and emotions that define an individual and differentiate them from others. It is the set of characteristics that influence how we perceive the world, how we relate to other people, and how we cope with stress and challenges.

Personality is thought to be relatively stable over time, although it can also evolve and change in response to life experiences and maturation. It is shaped by a combination of genetic factors, environmental influences, and developmental experiences.

There are many different theories and models of personality, including the Five Factor Model (FFM), which identifies five broad domains of personality: openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Other approaches to understanding personality include psychoanalytic theory, humanistic psychology, and trait theory.

It's important to note that while the term "personality" is often used in everyday language to describe someone's behavior or demeanor, in medical and psychological contexts it refers to a more complex and multifaceted construct.

A criminal is an individual who has been found guilty of committing a crime or offense, as defined by law. Crimes can range from minor infractions to serious felonies and can include acts such as theft, fraud, assault, homicide, and many others. The legal system determines whether someone is a criminal through a formal process that includes investigation, arrest, charging, trial, and sentencing. It's important to note that being accused of a crime does not automatically make someone a criminal; they are only considered a criminal after they have been found guilty in a court of law.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is a publication of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) that provides diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. It is widely used by mental health professionals in the United States and around the world to diagnose and classify mental health conditions.

The DSM includes detailed descriptions of symptoms, clinical examples, and specific criteria for each disorder, which are intended to facilitate accurate diagnosis and improve communication among mental health professionals. The manual is regularly updated to reflect current research and clinical practice, with the most recent edition being the DSM-5, published in 2013.

It's important to note that while the DSM is a valuable tool for mental health professionals, it is not without controversy. Some critics argue that the manual medicalizes normal human experiences and that its categories may be too broad or overlapping. Nonetheless, it remains an essential resource for clinicians, researchers, and policymakers in the field of mental health.

Conduct Disorder is a mental health disorder that typically begins in childhood or adolescence and is characterized by a repetitive pattern of behavior that violates the rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms and rules. The behaviors fall into four main categories: aggression to people and animals, destruction of property, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violation of rules.

The specific symptoms of Conduct Disorder can vary widely among individuals, but they generally include:

1. Aggression to people and animals: This may include physical fights, bullying, threatening others, cruelty to animals, and use of weapons.
2. Destruction of property: This may include deliberate destruction of others' property, arson, and vandalism.
3. Deceitfulness or theft: This may include lying, shoplifting, stealing, and breaking into homes, buildings, or cars.
4. Serious violation of rules: This may include running away from home, truancy, staying out late without permission, and frequent violations of school rules.

Conduct Disorder can have serious consequences for individuals who suffer from it, including academic failure, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and difficulties in interpersonal relationships. It is important to note that Conduct Disorder should be diagnosed by a qualified mental health professional based on a comprehensive evaluation.

A Personality Inventory is a standardized test used in psychology to assess an individual's personality traits and characteristics. It typically consists of a series of multiple-choice questions or statements that the respondent must rate according to their level of agreement or disagreement. The inventory measures various aspects of an individual's behavior, attitudes, and temperament, providing a quantifiable score that can be compared to normative data to help diagnose personality disorders, assess personal strengths and weaknesses, or provide insights into an individual's likely responses to different situations. Examples of well-known personality inventories include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the California Psychological Inventory (CPI).

Schizotypal Personality Disorder is defined by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a pervasive pattern of social and interpersonal deficits marked by acute discomfort with, and reduced capacity for, close relationships, as well as by cognitive or perceptual distortions and eccentricities of behavior. The disorder is often characterized by individuals having difficulty with expressing emotions and relating to others. They may also experience unusual perceptions, such as hearing voices or seeing things that aren't there, but these are not as severe as in Schizophrenia. It is important to note that this disorder can cause significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, and other areas of functioning.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "crime" is typically not used in a medical context. A crime is a violation of laws or regulations established by a government and enforced by its authorities. It's a legal concept, not a medical one. However, there are some overlaps between criminal behavior and mental health, as certain mental health conditions may increase the risk of criminal behavior. But it's essential to understand that having a mental health condition does not automatically make someone a criminal.

Psychiatric Status Rating Scales are standardized assessment tools used by mental health professionals to evaluate and rate the severity of a person's psychiatric symptoms and functioning. These scales provide a systematic and structured approach to measuring various aspects of an individual's mental health, such as mood, anxiety, psychosis, behavior, and cognitive abilities.

The purpose of using Psychiatric Status Rating Scales is to:

1. Assess the severity and improvement of psychiatric symptoms over time.
2. Aid in diagnostic decision-making and treatment planning.
3. Monitor treatment response and adjust interventions accordingly.
4. Facilitate communication among mental health professionals about a patient's status.
5. Provide an objective basis for research and epidemiological studies.

Examples of Psychiatric Status Rating Scales include:

1. Clinical Global Impression (CGI): A brief, subjective rating scale that measures overall illness severity, treatment response, and improvement.
2. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): A comprehensive scale used to assess the symptoms of psychosis, including positive, negative, and general psychopathology domains.
3. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) or Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS): Scales used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms.
4. Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS): A scale used to assess the severity of manic or hypomanic symptoms.
5. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) or Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R): Scales that measure a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and psychopathology.
6. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF): A scale used to rate an individual's overall psychological, social, and occupational functioning on a hypothetical continuum of mental health-illness.

It is important to note that Psychiatric Status Rating Scales should be administered by trained mental health professionals to ensure accurate and reliable results.

A personality assessment is a systematic process used by healthcare professionals to evaluate and understand an individual's characteristic patterns of thought, emotion, and behavior. It typically involves the use of standardized measures, such as self-report questionnaires, interviews, and observational techniques, to gather information about an individual's personality traits, attitudes, values, and behaviors.

The goal of a personality assessment is to provide a comprehensive and integrated understanding of an individual's unique personality style, including their strengths, weaknesses, and potential vulnerabilities. This information can be useful in a variety of contexts, including clinical treatment planning, vocational counseling, and forensic evaluation.

It is important to note that personality assessments should always be conducted by qualified professionals with appropriate training and expertise in the use of these measures. Additionally, while personality assessments can provide valuable insights into an individual's personality style, they are not infallible and should always be considered alongside other sources of information when making important decisions about treatment or management.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), alcohol-induced disorders are a category of mental disorders that are directly caused by substance/medication use. Specifically, alcohol-induced disorders refer to conditions where the primary cause is the use of alcohol or its withdrawal.

There are several types of alcohol-induced disorders, including:

1. Alcohol intoxication delirium: A state of confusion and disorientation that occurs due to excessive alcohol consumption.
2. Alcohol withdrawal delirium: A serious condition characterized by confusion, hallucinations, and tremors that can occur after a person stops drinking heavily and suddenly.
3. Alcohol-induced bipolar and related disorders: Mood disturbances that are directly caused by alcohol use or withdrawal.
4. Alcohol-induced depressive disorder: Depressive symptoms that are directly caused by alcohol use or withdrawal.
5. Alcohol-induced anxiety disorder: Anxiety symptoms that are directly caused by alcohol use or withdrawal.
6. Alcohol-induced sleep disorder: Sleep disturbances that are directly caused by alcohol use or withdrawal.
7. Alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction: Sexual problems that are directly caused by alcohol use or withdrawal.
8. Alcohol-induced major neurocognitive disorder: A severe decline in cognitive abilities, such as memory and decision-making skills, that is directly caused by alcohol use or withdrawal.

It's important to note that these disorders are distinct from alcohol use disorder (AUD), which refers to a pattern of problematic alcohol use that can lead to clinically significant impairment or distress. However, AUD can increase the risk of developing alcohol-induced disorders.

Aggression is defined in medical terms as behavior that is intended to cause harm or damage to another individual or their property. It can take the form of verbal or physical actions and can be a symptom of various mental health disorders, such as intermittent explosive disorder, conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and dementia. Aggression can also be a side effect of certain medications or a result of substance abuse. It is important to note that aggression can have serious consequences, including physical injury, emotional trauma, and legal repercussions. If you or someone you know is experiencing problems with aggression, it is recommended to seek help from a mental health professional.

Impulsive behavior can be defined medically as actions performed without proper thought or consideration of the consequences, driven by immediate needs, desires, or urges. It often involves risky or inappropriate behaviors that may lead to negative outcomes. In a clinical context, impulsivity is frequently associated with certain mental health conditions such as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, and some neurological conditions. It's important to note that everyone can exhibit impulsive behavior at times, but when it becomes a persistent pattern causing distress or functional impairment, it may indicate an underlying condition requiring professional assessment and treatment.

I apologize for any confusion, but "prisoners" is not a medical term. It generally refers to individuals who are deprived of their personal freedom and are being held in a prison or jail as a result of being convicted of a crime or while awaiting trial. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help!

Alcoholism is a chronic and often relapsing brain disorder characterized by the excessive and compulsive consumption of alcohol despite negative consequences to one's health, relationships, and daily life. It is also commonly referred to as alcohol use disorder (AUD) or alcohol dependence.

The diagnostic criteria for AUD include a pattern of alcohol use that includes problems controlling intake, continued use despite problems resulting from drinking, development of a tolerance, drinking that leads to risky behaviors or situations, and withdrawal symptoms when not drinking.

Alcoholism can cause a wide range of physical and psychological health problems, including liver disease, heart disease, neurological damage, mental health disorders, and increased risk of accidents and injuries. Treatment for alcoholism typically involves a combination of behavioral therapies, medications, and support groups to help individuals achieve and maintain sobriety.

Substance-related disorders, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), refer to a group of conditions caused by the use of substances such as alcohol, drugs, or medicines. These disorders are characterized by a problematic pattern of using a substance that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. They can be divided into two main categories: substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders. Substance use disorders involve a pattern of compulsive use despite negative consequences, while substance-induced disorders include conditions such as intoxication, withdrawal, and substance/medication-induced mental disorders. The specific diagnosis depends on the type of substance involved, the patterns of use, and the presence or absence of physiological dependence.

A psychological interview is a clinical assessment tool used by mental health professionals to gather information about a person's cognitive, emotional, and behavioral status. It is a structured or unstructured conversation between the clinician and the client aimed at understanding the client's symptoms, concerns, personal history, current life situation, and any other relevant factors that contribute to their psychological state.

The interview may cover various topics such as the individual's mental health history, family background, social relationships, education, occupation, coping mechanisms, and substance use. The clinician will also assess the person's cognitive abilities, emotional expression, thought processes, and behavior during the interview to help form a diagnosis or treatment plan.

The psychological interview is an essential component of a comprehensive mental health evaluation, as it provides valuable insights into the individual's subjective experiences and helps establish a therapeutic relationship between the clinician and the client. It can be conducted in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, or community centers.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

Violence is not typically defined in medical terms, but it can be described as the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment, or deprivation. This definition is often used in public health and medical research to understand the impact of violence on health outcomes.

Compulsive Personality Disorder (CPD) is a mental health condition characterized by an obsessive need for order, control, and perfection, which can interfere with the individual's ability to function in daily life. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), classifies CPD as a type of personality disorder.

The following are some of the diagnostic criteria for Compulsive Personality Disorder:

1. Rigid adherence to rules, regulations, and schedules.
2. Overconscientiousness, preoccupation with details, and perfectionism that interferes with task completion.
3. Excessive devotion to work and productivity at the expense of leisure activities and friendships.
4. Unwillingness to delegate tasks or to work with others unless they submit to exactly the individual's way of doing things.
5. Rigidity and stubbornness.
6. Inability to discard worn-out or worthless objects even when they have no sentimental value.
7. Reluctance to take vacations or engage in leisure activities due to a fear of something unexpected happening that would disrupt the individual's routine.
8. Overly restrained and inhibited in expressing emotions and affection towards others.

Individuals with CPD may experience significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, and other areas of functioning due to their rigid and inflexible behavior. Treatment typically involves psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which can help individuals learn more adaptive ways of thinking and behaving. In some cases, medication may also be recommended to manage symptoms of anxiety or depression that often co-occur with CPD.

Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional health conditions or diseases alongside a primary illness or condition. These co-occurring health issues can have an impact on the treatment plan, prognosis, and overall healthcare management of an individual. Comorbidities often interact with each other and the primary condition, leading to more complex clinical situations and increased healthcare needs. It is essential for healthcare professionals to consider and address comorbidities to provide comprehensive care and improve patient outcomes.

Personality tests are psychological assessments used to measure an individual's personality traits, characteristics, and behaviors. These tests are designed to evaluate various aspects of an individual's personality, such as their temperament, interpersonal style, emotional stability, motivation, values, and preferences. The results of these tests can help healthcare professionals, researchers, and organizations better understand a person's behavior, predict their performance in different settings, and identify potential strengths and weaknesses.

There are several types of personality tests, including self-report measures, projective tests, and objective tests. Self-report measures, such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) or the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI), ask individuals to rate themselves on a series of statements or questions about their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Projective tests, like the Rorschach Inkblot Test or the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), present ambiguous stimuli that respondents must interpret, revealing unconscious thoughts, feelings, and motivations. Objective tests, such as the California Psychological Inventory (CPI) or the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF), use a standardized set of questions to assess specific personality traits and characteristics.

It is important to note that while personality tests can provide valuable insights into an individual's behavior, they should not be used as the sole basis for making important decisions about a person's life, such as employment or mental health treatment. Instead, these tests should be considered one piece of a comprehensive assessment that includes other sources of information, such as interviews, observations, and collateral reports.

Mood disorders are a category of mental health disorders characterized by significant and persistent changes in mood, affect, and emotional state. These disorders can cause disturbances in normal functioning and significantly impair an individual's ability to carry out their daily activities. The two primary types of mood disorders are depressive disorders (such as major depressive disorder or persistent depressive disorder) and bipolar disorders (which include bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and cyclothymic disorder).

Depressive disorders involve prolonged periods of low mood, sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of interest in activities. Individuals with these disorders may also experience changes in sleep patterns, appetite, energy levels, concentration, and self-esteem. In severe cases, they might have thoughts of death or suicide.

Bipolar disorders involve alternating episodes of mania (or hypomania) and depression. During a manic episode, individuals may feel extremely elated, energetic, or irritable, with racing thoughts, rapid speech, and impulsive behavior. They might engage in risky activities, have decreased sleep needs, and display poor judgment. In contrast, depressive episodes involve the same symptoms as depressive disorders.

Mood disorders can be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Proper diagnosis and treatment, which may include psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of both, are essential for managing these conditions and improving quality of life.

Paranoid Personality Disorder (PPD) is a mental health condition characterized by a persistent pattern of distrust and suspicion, such that others' intentions are interpreted as malevolent. This disorder is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), used by mental health professionals to diagnose mental conditions.

To be diagnosed with PPD, an individual must display at least four of the following symptoms:

1. Suspects, without sufficient reason, that others are exploiting, harming, or deceiving them.
2. Is preoccupied with unjustified doubts about the loyalty or trustworthiness of friends or associates.
3. Is reluctant to confide in others because of unwarranted fear that the information will be used maliciously against them.
4. Reads hidden demeaning or threatening meanings into benign remarks or events.
5. Persistently bears grudges, i.e., is unforgiving of insults, injuries, or slights.
6. Perceives attacks on their character or reputation that are not apparent to others and is quick to react angrily or to counterattack.
7. Has recurrent suspicions, without justification, regarding fidelity of spouse or sexual partner.

These symptoms must be present for a significant period, typically at least one year, and must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. Additionally, the symptoms cannot be better explained by another mental disorder, such as Schizophrenia, a Mood Disorder with Psychotic Features, or Substance/Medication-Induced Psychotic Disorder.

There is no formal medical definition for "child of impaired parents." However, it generally refers to a child who has at least one parent with physical, mental, or psychological challenges that impact their ability to care for themselves and/or their children. These impairments may include substance abuse disorders, mental illnesses, chronic medical conditions, or developmental disabilities.

Children of impaired parents often face unique challenges and stressors in their lives, which can affect their emotional, social, and cognitive development. They may have to take on additional responsibilities at home, experience neglect or abuse, or witness disturbing behaviors related to their parent's impairment. As a result, these children are at higher risk for developing mental health issues, behavioral problems, and academic difficulties.

Support services and interventions, such as family therapy, counseling, and community resources, can help mitigate the negative effects of growing up with impaired parents and improve outcomes for these children.

"Marijuana Abuse" is not a term that is typically used in the medical field. Instead, the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which is used by mental health professionals to diagnose mental conditions, uses the term "Cannabis Use Disorder." This disorder is defined as a problematic pattern of cannabis use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, with symptoms including:

1. Taking larger amounts of cannabis over a longer period than intended.
2. A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control cannabis use.
3. Spending a lot of time obtaining, using, or recovering from the effects of cannabis.
4. Craving or a strong desire to use cannabis.
5. Recurrent cannabis use resulting in failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
6. Continued cannabis use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of cannabis.
7. Giving up or reducing important activities because of cannabis use.
8. Recurrent cannabis use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
9. Continued cannabis use despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by cannabis.
10. Tolerance, as defined by either:
a) A need for markedly increased amounts of cannabis to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
b) Markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of cannabis.
11. Withdrawal, as manifested by either:
a) The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for cannabis.
b) Cannabis is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

The diagnosis of a mild, moderate, or severe Cannabis Use Disorder depends on the number of symptoms present.

Schizoid Personality Disorder is defined by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as a long-standing pattern of detachment from social relationships, a reduced capacity for emotional expression, and an unusual degree of introversion. This disorder is characterized by:

1. A lack of desire for close relationships,
2. Difficulty expressing emotions and finding enjoyment in most activities,
3. Limited range of emotional expression,
4. Inattention to social norms and conventions,
5. Preference for being alone,
6. Indifference to praise or criticism from others.

These symptoms must be stable and of long duration, typically present for at least a year. The individual's lifestyle, attitudes, and behavior are often seen as eccentric and distant by others. It is important to note that this disorder is different from Schizophrenia and does not include psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations or delusions.

Dependent Personality Disorder (DPD) is a mental health condition in which an individual has an extreme fear of being abandoned or rejected, leading them to rely excessively on others for support and decision-making. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), to be diagnosed with DPD, an individual must exhibit at least five of the following symptoms:

1. Difficulty making everyday decisions without excessive advice and reassurance from others.
2. Need for others to assume responsibility for most major areas of their life.
3. Has difficulty expressing disagreement with others due to fear of loss of support or approval.
4. Has difficulty initiating projects or doing things on their own due to a lack of self-confidence in judgment or abilities.
5. Goes to excessive lengths to obtain nurturance and support from others, including volunteering to do things that are not enjoyable.
6. Feels uncomfortable or helpless when alone because of exaggerated fears of being unable to care for themselves.
7. Urgently seeks another relationship as a source of care and support when a close relationship ends.
8. Is unrealistically preoccupied with fears of being left to take care of themselves.

These symptoms must be present for an extended period, typically lasting for at least two years or more, and cause significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. Additionally, the symptoms cannot be better explained by another mental health condition, such as bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder.

It is important to note that seeking help from a mental health professional is essential for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan if you suspect you may have DPD.

Histrionic Personality Disorder (HPD) is a mental health condition, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association.

It's characterized by a pattern of excessive emotionality and attention-seeking behavior, beginning in early adulthood and present in various contexts. Individuals with HPD may exhibit rapidly shifting and exaggerated emotions, seductive or provocative behavior, and an excessive need for approval. They may also be uncomfortable when not the center of attention.

Please note that only a qualified healthcare professional can diagnose mental health conditions. If you or someone else has symptoms of Histrionic Personality Disorder, it's important to seek professional help.

The Septum Pellucidum is a thin, delicate, and almost transparent partition in the brain that separates the lateral ventricles, which are fluid-filled spaces within the brain. It consists of two laminae (plates) that fuse together during fetal development, forming a single structure. The Septum Pellucidum is an essential component of the brain's ventricular system and plays a role in maintaining the structural integrity of the brain. Any abnormalities or damage to the Septum Pellucidum can lead to neurological disorders or cognitive impairments.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Anxiety disorders are a category of mental health disorders characterized by feelings of excessive and persistent worry, fear, or anxiety that interfere with daily activities. They include several different types of disorders, such as:

1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): This is characterized by chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even when there is little or nothing to provoke it.
2. Panic Disorder: This is characterized by recurring unexpected panic attacks and fear of experiencing more panic attacks.
3. Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD): Also known as social phobia, this is characterized by excessive fear, anxiety, or avoidance of social situations due to feelings of embarrassment, self-consciousness, and concern about being judged or viewed negatively by others.
4. Phobias: These are intense, irrational fears of certain objects, places, or situations. When a person with a phobia encounters the object or situation they fear, they may experience panic attacks or other severe anxiety responses.
5. Agoraphobia: This is a fear of being in places where it may be difficult to escape or get help if one has a panic attack or other embarrassing or incapacitating symptoms.
6. Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD): This is characterized by excessive anxiety about separation from home or from people to whom the individual has a strong emotional attachment (such as a parent, sibling, or partner).
7. Selective Mutism: This is a disorder where a child becomes mute in certain situations, such as at school, but can speak normally at home or with close family members.

These disorders are treatable with a combination of medication and psychotherapy (cognitive-behavioral therapy, exposure therapy). It's important to seek professional help if you suspect that you or someone you know may have an anxiety disorder.

In the context of medicine and public health, "socialization" typically refers to the process by which individuals learn and internalize the norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors that are considered appropriate within their particular cultural, social, or community group. This process is critical for developing a sense of identity, fostering social connections, and promoting mental and emotional well-being.

Socialization can have important implications for health outcomes, as individuals who are able to effectively navigate social norms and relationships may be better equipped to access resources, seek support, and make healthy choices. On the other hand, inadequate socialization or social isolation can contribute to a range of negative health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and poor physical health.

Healthcare providers may play an important role in promoting socialization and addressing social isolation among their patients, for example by connecting them with community resources, support groups, or other opportunities for social engagement.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder is not listed as a separate disorder. Instead, its criteria have been incorporated into a new category called "Emotional Dysregulation Disorder" in the upcoming ICD-11.

However, in previous versions of the DSM (DSM-IV-TR), Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder was defined as:

A pervasive pattern of negativistic attitudes and passive resistance to demands for performance at work, home, or in other contexts, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. The individual's passivity and apparent lack of motivation may mask underlying anger and resentment, which are expressed indirectly through such methods as stubbornness, procrastination, sullenness, or intentional inefficiency.

This disorder is characterized by at least five of the following:

1. Passively resists fulfilling routine social, occupational, or domestic responsibilities.
2. Complains of being misunderstood and unappreciated by others.
3. Is sullen and argumentative.
4. Unreasonably criticizes and scorns authority, openly and privately.
5. Expresses resentments indirectly rather than confronting others directly.
6. Neurotically calm and compliant on the surface, but covertly angry and rebellious.
7. Frequently becomes sulky or stubborn in response to minor slights or frustrations.

Please note that this definition is based on the DSM-IV-TR and may not be applicable in current clinical settings. Always consult with a mental health professional for accurate information.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Narcissism is a personality trait characterized by a grandiose sense of self-importance, a lack of empathy for others, a need for excessive admiration, and feelings of entitlement. It's named after the Greek mythological figure Narcissus, who fell in love with his own reflection.

In clinical psychology, narcissism is often used to describe a personality disorder, known as Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD), which is characterized by these traits in a pervasive and persistent manner that interferes significantly with an individual's social relationships and functioning. However, it's important to note that narcissism exists on a spectrum, and while some people may have traits of narcissism, they do not necessarily meet the criteria for NPD.

Remember, only a qualified mental health professional can diagnose a personality disorder.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "personality development" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that is more commonly found in psychology and personal growth contexts. In those fields, personality development refers to the process by which a person's character, behaviors, thoughts, and patterns of emotion are formed, structured, and changed throughout their life. This process can be influenced by genetic factors, environmental influences, and individual experiences. If you have any questions related to mental health or psychology, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), neurotic disorders are not a recognized category. However, the term "neurosis" has been used historically in psychiatry and psychology to refer to a group of mental disorders characterized by anxiety, obsessions, depressive moods, phobias, or hypochondriacal fears. These symptoms are often considered to be the result of internal conflicts, typically related to stress, frustration, or interpersonal difficulties.

The DSM-5 has replaced the category of neurotic disorders with several specific mental disorders that were previously classified under this heading. These include:

1. Anxiety Disorders (e.g., panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder)
2. Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, hoarding disorder)
3. Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress disorder, adjustment disorders)
4. Mood Disorders (e.g., major depressive disorder, persistent depressive disorder)
5. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders (e.g., illness anxiety disorder, conversion disorder)

These specific disorders are defined by their own unique diagnostic criteria and should be evaluated based on those guidelines.

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme found on the outer membrane of mitochondria in cells throughout the body, but primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and central nervous system. It plays a crucial role in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and dietary amines by catalyzing the oxidative deamination of monoamines. This enzyme exists in two forms: MAO-A and MAO-B, each with distinct substrate preferences and tissue distributions.

MAO-A preferentially metabolizes serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, while MAO-B is mainly responsible for breaking down phenethylamines and benzylamines, as well as dopamine in some cases. Inhibition of these enzymes can lead to increased neurotransmitter levels in the synaptic cleft, which has implications for various psychiatric and neurological conditions, such as depression and Parkinson's disease. However, MAO inhibitors must be used with caution due to their potential to cause serious adverse effects, including hypertensive crises, when combined with certain foods or medications containing dietary amines or sympathomimetic agents.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

'Diseases in Twins' is a field of study that focuses on the similarities and differences in the occurrence, development, and outcomes of diseases among twins. This research can provide valuable insights into the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to various medical conditions.

Twins can be classified into two types: monozygotic (identical) and dizygotic (fraternal). Monozygotic twins share 100% of their genes, while dizygotic twins share about 50%, similar to non-twin siblings. By comparing the concordance rates (the likelihood of both twins having the same disease) between monozygotic and dizygotic twins, researchers can estimate the heritability of a particular disease.

Studying diseases in twins also helps understand the role of environmental factors. When both twins develop the same disease, but they are discordant for certain risk factors (e.g., one twin smokes and the other does not), it suggests that the disease may have a stronger genetic component. On the other hand, when both twins share similar risk factors and develop the disease, it implies that environmental factors play a significant role.

Diseases in Twins research has contributed to our understanding of various medical conditions, including infectious diseases, cancer, mental health disorders, and developmental disorders. This knowledge can lead to better prevention strategies, early detection methods, and more targeted treatments for these diseases.

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) refers to the intentional, direct injuring of one's own body without suicidal intentions. It is often repetitive and can take various forms such as cutting, burning, scratching, hitting, or bruising the skin. In some cases, individuals may also ingest harmful substances or objects.

SIB is not a mental disorder itself, but it is often associated with various psychiatric conditions, including borderline personality disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and eating disorders. It is also common in individuals with developmental disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorder.

The function of SIB can vary widely among individuals, but it often serves as a coping mechanism to deal with emotional distress, negative feelings, or traumatic experiences. It's essential to approach individuals who engage in SIB with compassion and understanding, focusing on treating the underlying causes rather than solely addressing the behavior itself. Professional mental health treatment and therapy can help individuals develop healthier coping strategies and improve their quality of life.

Factor analysis is a statistical technique used to identify patterns or structures in a dataset by explaining the correlations between variables. It is a method of simplifying complex data by reducing it to a smaller set of underlying factors that can explain most of the variation in the data. In other words, factor analysis is a way to uncover hidden relationships between multiple variables and group them into meaningful categories or factors.

In factor analysis, each variable is represented as a linear combination of underlying factors, where the factors are unobserved variables that cannot be directly measured but can only be inferred from the observed data. The goal is to identify these underlying factors and determine their relationships with the observed variables. This technique is commonly used in various fields such as psychology, social sciences, marketing, and biomedical research to explore complex datasets and gain insights into the underlying structure of the data.

There are two main types of factor analysis: exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). EFA is used when there is no prior knowledge about the underlying factors, and the goal is to discover the potential structure in the data. CFA, on the other hand, is used when there is a theoretical framework or hypothesis about the underlying factors, and the goal is to test whether the observed data support this framework or hypothesis.

In summary, factor analysis is a statistical method for reducing complex datasets into simpler components called factors, which can help researchers identify patterns, structures, and relationships in the data.

Juvenile delinquency is a term used in the legal system to describe illegal activities or behaviors committed by minors, typically defined as individuals under the age of 18. It's important to note that the specific definition and handling of juvenile delinquency can vary based on different jurisdictions and legal systems around the world.

The term is often used to describe a pattern of behavior where a young person repeatedly engages in criminal activities or behaviors that violate the laws of their society. These actions, if committed by an adult, would be considered criminal offenses.

Juvenile delinquency is handled differently than adult offenses, with a focus on rehabilitation rather than punishment. The goal is to address the root causes of the behavior, which could include factors like family environment, social pressures, mental health issues, or substance abuse. Interventions may include counseling, education programs, community service, or, in more serious cases, residential placement in a juvenile detention facility.

However, it's important to remember that the specifics of what constitutes juvenile delinquency and how it's handled can vary greatly depending on the legal system and cultural context.

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). When you become depressed, you may feel sad or hopeless and lose interest or pleasure in most activities. When your mood shifts to mania or hypomania (a less severe form of mania), you may feel euphoric, full of energy, or unusually irritable. These mood swings can significantly affect your job, school, relationships, and overall quality of life.

Bipolar disorder is typically characterized by the presence of one or more manic or hypomanic episodes, often accompanied by depressive episodes. The episodes may be separated by periods of normal mood, but in some cases, a person may experience rapid cycling between mania and depression.

There are several types of bipolar disorder, including:

* Bipolar I Disorder: This type is characterized by the occurrence of at least one manic episode, which may be preceded or followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes.
* Bipolar II Disorder: This type involves the presence of at least one major depressive episode and at least one hypomanic episode, but no manic episodes.
* Cyclothymic Disorder: This type is characterized by numerous periods of hypomania and depression that are not severe enough to meet the criteria for a full manic or depressive episode.
* Other Specified and Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders: These categories include bipolar disorders that do not fit the criteria for any of the other types.

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but it appears to be related to a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurochemical factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes to help manage symptoms and prevent relapses.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with hyperactivity is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects both children and adults. The condition is characterized by symptoms including:

1. Difficulty paying attention or staying focused on a single task
2. Impulsivity, or acting without thinking
3. Hyperactivity, or excessive fidgeting, restlessness, or talking

In order to be diagnosed with ADHD with hyperactivity, an individual must exhibit these symptoms to a degree that is developmentally inappropriate and interferes with their daily functioning. Additionally, the symptoms must have been present for at least six months and be present in multiple settings (e.g., at home, school, work).

It's important to note that ADHD can manifest differently in different people, and some individuals may experience predominantly inattentive or impulsive symptoms rather than hyperactive ones. However, when the hyperactive component is prominent, it is referred to as ADHD with hyperactivity.

Effective treatments for ADHD with hyperactivity include a combination of medication (such as stimulants) and behavioral therapy. With appropriate treatment, individuals with ADHD can learn to manage their symptoms and lead successful, fulfilling lives.

In medical terms, "character" is not a term that has a specific or technical definition. It is a common English word that can have various meanings depending on the context in which it is used. In general, "character" refers to the personality traits, behaviors, and qualities that define an individual. However, in a medical or clinical setting, healthcare professionals may use the term "character" to describe certain aspects of a patient's symptoms, such as the quality, intensity, or duration of a particular symptom. For example, a patient's pain might be described as sharp, stabbing, or dull in character.

It is important to note that while healthcare professionals may use the term "character" to describe certain aspects of a patient's symptoms or condition, it is not a medical diagnosis or a specific medical term with a standardized definition.

In the context of medicine and psychology, "temperament" refers to a person's natural disposition or character, which is often thought to be inherited and relatively stable throughout their life. It is the foundation on which personality develops, and it influences how individuals react to their environment, handle emotions, and approach various situations.

Temperament is composed of several traits, including:

1. Activity level: The degree of physical and mental energy a person exhibits.
2. Emotional intensity: The depth or strength of emotional responses.
3. Regularity: The consistency in biological functions like sleep, hunger, and elimination.
4. Approach/withdrawal: The tendency to approach or avoid new situations or people.
5. Adaptability: The ease with which a person adapts to changes in their environment.
6. Mood: The general emotional tone or baseline mood of an individual.
7. Persistence: The ability to maintain focus and effort on a task despite challenges or distractions.
8. Distractibility: The susceptibility to being diverted from a task by external stimuli.
9. Sensitivity: The degree of responsiveness to sensory input, such as touch, taste, sound, and light.
10. Attention span: The length of time a person can concentrate on a single task or activity.

These traits combine to create an individual's unique temperamental profile, which can influence their mental and physical health, social relationships, and overall well-being. Understanding temperament can help healthcare professionals tailor interventions and treatments to meet the specific needs of each patient.

Forensic psychiatry is a subspecialty of psychiatry that intersects with the law. It involves providing psychiatric expertise to legal systems and institutions. Forensic psychiatrists conduct evaluations, provide treatment, and offer expert testimony in criminal, civil, and legislative matters. They assess issues such as competency to stand trial, insanity, risk assessment, and testamentary capacity. Additionally, they may be involved in the treatment of offenders in correctional settings and providing consultation on mental health policies and laws. Forensic psychiatry requires a thorough understanding of both psychiatric and legal principles, as well as the ability to communicate complex psychiatric concepts to legal professionals and laypersons alike.

Psychotherapy is a type of treatment used primarily to treat mental health disorders and other emotional or behavioral issues. It involves a therapeutic relationship between a trained psychotherapist and a patient, where they work together to understand the patient's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, identify patterns that may be causing distress, and develop strategies to manage symptoms and improve overall well-being.

There are many different approaches to psychotherapy, including cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), psychodynamic therapy, interpersonal therapy, and others. The specific approach used will depend on the individual patient's needs and preferences, as well as the training and expertise of the therapist.

Psychotherapy can be conducted in individual, group, or family sessions, and may be provided in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, or online platforms. The goal of psychotherapy is to help patients understand themselves better, develop coping skills, improve their relationships, and enhance their overall quality of life.

Psychological models are theoretical frameworks used in psychology to explain and predict mental processes and behaviors. They are simplified representations of complex phenomena, consisting of interrelated concepts, assumptions, and hypotheses that describe how various factors interact to produce specific outcomes. These models can be quantitative (e.g., mathematical equations) or qualitative (e.g., conceptual diagrams) in nature and may draw upon empirical data, theoretical insights, or both.

Psychological models serve several purposes:

1. They provide a systematic and organized way to understand and describe psychological phenomena.
2. They generate hypotheses and predictions that can be tested through empirical research.
3. They integrate findings from different studies and help synthesize knowledge across various domains of psychology.
4. They inform the development of interventions and treatments for mental health disorders.

Examples of psychological models include:

1. The Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality, which posits that individual differences in personality can be described along five broad dimensions: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism.
2. The Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) model, which suggests that maladaptive thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interconnected and can be changed through targeted interventions.
3. The Dual Process Theory of Attitudes, which proposes that attitudes are formed and influenced by two distinct processes: a rapid, intuitive process (heuristic) and a slower, deliberative process (systematic).
4. The Social Cognitive Theory, which emphasizes the role of observational learning, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations in shaping behavior.
5. The Attachment Theory, which describes the dynamics of long-term relationships between humans, particularly the parent-child relationship.

It is important to note that psychological models are provisional and subject to revision or replacement as new evidence emerges. They should be considered as useful tools for understanding and explaining psychological phenomena rather than definitive truths.

Substance abuse treatment centers are healthcare facilities that provide a range of services for individuals struggling with substance use disorders (SUDs), including addiction to alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription medications, and other substances. These centers offer comprehensive, evidence-based assessments, interventions, and treatments aimed at helping patients achieve and maintain sobriety, improve their overall health and well-being, and reintegrate into society as productive members.

The medical definition of 'Substance Abuse Treatment Centers' encompasses various levels and types of care, such as:

1. **Medical Detoxification:** This is the first step in treating substance abuse, where patients are closely monitored and managed for withdrawal symptoms as their bodies clear the harmful substances. Medical detox often involves the use of medications to alleviate discomfort and ensure safety during the process.
2. **Inpatient/Residential Treatment:** This level of care provides 24-hour structured, intensive treatment in a controlled environment. Patients live at the facility and receive various therapeutic interventions, such as individual therapy, group counseling, family therapy, and psychoeducation, to address the underlying causes of their addiction and develop coping strategies for long-term recovery.
3. **Partial Hospitalization Programs (PHP):** Also known as day treatment, PHPs offer structured, intensive care for several hours a day while allowing patients to return home or to a sober living environment during non-treatment hours. This level of care typically includes individual and group therapy, skill-building activities, and case management services.
4. **Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOP):** IOPs provide flexible, less intensive treatment than PHPs, with patients attending sessions for a few hours per day, several days a week. These programs focus on relapse prevention, recovery skills, and addressing any co-occurring mental health conditions.
5. **Outpatient Treatment:** This is the least restrictive level of care, where patients attend individual or group therapy sessions on a regular basis while living at home or in a sober living environment. Outpatient treatment often serves as step-down care after completing higher levels of treatment or as an initial intervention for those with milder SUDs.
6. **Aftercare/Continuing Care:** Aftercare or continuing care services help patients maintain their recovery and prevent relapse by providing ongoing support, such as 12-step meetings, alumni groups, individual therapy, and case management.

Each treatment modality has its unique benefits and is tailored to meet the specific needs of individuals at various stages of addiction and recovery. It's essential to consult with a healthcare professional or an addiction specialist to determine the most appropriate level of care for each person's situation.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) are a group of psychiatric conditions characterized by the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to oneself or others. This leads to negative consequences such as distress, anxiety, or disruption in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) recognizes several specific ICDs, including:

1. Kleptomania - the recurrent failure to resist impulses to steal items, even though they are not needed for personal use or financial gain.
2. Pyromania - the deliberate and purposeful fire-setting on more than one occasion.
3. Intermittent Explosive Disorder - recurrent behavioral outbursts representing a failure to control aggressive impulses, resulting in serious assaultive acts or destruction of property.
4. Pathological Gambling - persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior that disrupts personal, family, or vocational pursuits.
5. Internet Gaming Disorder - the excessive and prolonged use of the internet for gaming, which leads to clinically significant impairment or distress.

These disorders are typically associated with a range of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms that can vary depending on the specific disorder and individual presentation. Treatment often involves a combination of psychotherapy, medication, and self-help strategies to manage symptoms and improve overall functioning.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), also simply referred to as depression, is a serious mental health condition characterized by the presence of one or more major depressive episodes. A major depressive episode is a period of at least two weeks during which an individual experiences a severely depressed mood and/or loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities, accompanied by at least four additional symptoms such as significant changes in appetite or weight, sleep disturbances, psychomotor agitation or retardation, fatigue or loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt, difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions, and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

MDD can significantly impair an individual's ability to function in daily life, and it is associated with increased risks of suicide, substance abuse, and other mental health disorders. The exact cause of MDD is not fully understood, but it is believed to result from a complex interplay of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of psychotherapy (such as cognitive-behavioral therapy) and medication (such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants).

Psychometrics is a branch of psychology that deals with the theory and technique of psychological measurement, such as the development and standardization of tests used to measure intelligence, aptitude, personality, attitudes, and other mental abilities or traits. It involves the construction and validation of measurement instruments, including the determination of their reliability and validity, and the application of statistical methods to analyze test data and interpret results. The ultimate goal of psychometrics is to provide accurate, objective, and meaningful measurements that can be used to understand individual differences and make informed decisions in educational, clinical, and organizational settings.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "An attempted suicide is a non-fatal self-directed, potentially injurious behavior with intent to die as a result of the behavior. It's a clear expression of intention to die."

It's important to note that anyone who has attempted suicide requires immediate professional medical attention and support. They should be assessed for their level of suicidal ideation and any underlying mental health conditions, and provided with appropriate care and treatment. If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide, please reach out to a healthcare provider or a trusted mental health professional immediately.

Neuropsychological tests are a type of psychological assessment that measures cognitive functions, such as attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and perception. These tests are used to help diagnose and understand the cognitive impact of neurological conditions, including dementia, traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and other disorders that affect the brain.

The tests are typically administered by a trained neuropsychologist and can take several hours to complete. They may involve paper-and-pencil tasks, computerized tasks, or interactive activities. The results of the tests are compared to normative data to help identify any areas of cognitive weakness or strength.

Neuropsychological testing can provide valuable information for treatment planning, rehabilitation, and assessing response to treatment. It can also be used in research to better understand the neural basis of cognition and the impact of neurological conditions on cognitive function.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder characterized by the presence of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or images that are intrusive, unwanted, and often distressing. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that an individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rigid rules, and which are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation. These obsessions and/or compulsions cause significant distress, take up a lot of time (an hour or more a day), and interfere with the individual's daily life, including social activities, relationships, and work or school performance. OCD is considered a type of anxiety disorder and can also co-occur with other mental health conditions.

Interpersonal relations, in the context of medicine and healthcare, refer to the interactions and relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, as well as among healthcare professionals themselves. These relationships are crucial in the delivery of care and can significantly impact patient outcomes. Positive interpersonal relations can lead to improved communication, increased trust, greater patient satisfaction, and better adherence to treatment plans. On the other hand, negative or strained interpersonal relations can result in poor communication, mistrust, dissatisfaction, and non-adherence.

Healthcare professionals are trained to develop effective interpersonal skills, including active listening, empathy, respect, and cultural sensitivity, to build positive relationships with their patients. Effective interpersonal relations also involve clear and concise communication, setting appropriate boundaries, and managing conflicts in a constructive manner. In addition, positive interpersonal relations among healthcare professionals can promote collaboration, teamwork, and knowledge sharing, leading to improved patient care and safety.

... disorder Bipolar disorder Borderline personality disorder Histrionic personality disorder Narcissistic personality disorder ... "Antisocial personality disorder". NHS. Retrieved 11 May 2016. "Antisocial personality disorder: prevention and management". ... "Antisocial Personality Disorder". Antisocial Personality Disorder: Treatment, Management and Prevention. Leicester (UK): ... additional information DSM-IV-TR Criteria for Antisocial personality disorder Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder: ...
... anti-social behaviour. Antisocial Personality Disorder can only be diagnosed when a pattern of anti-social behaviour began ... diagnoses persistent anti-social behaviour as antisocial personality disorder. Genetic factors include abnormalities in the ... Asociality Antisocial personality disorder Breach of the peace Callous and unemotional traits Criminality Conduct disorder ... "How to Treat Antisocial Personality Disorder". The Ranch. 2017. Archived from the original on 27 March 2018. Retrieved 22 March ...
Individuals with antisocial personality disorder, for example, are known to have limited guilt or anxiety when it comes to ... "Antisocial Personality Disorder". Psychology Today. New York City: Sussex Publishers. Retrieved 18 February 2018. (Articles ...
"Antisocial Personality Disorder". Psychology Today. Sussex Publishers. April 19, 2017. Archived from the original on April 14, ... Two doctors concluded he had an antisocial personality disorder (the clinical term for sociopathy and/or psychopathy), was ... Gacy attempted to convince the doctors that he had multiple personality disorder. He claimed to have four personalities: the ... People with antisocial personality disorder, People with psychopathy, Serial killers from Illinois, Torture in the United ...
Antisocial personality disorder. Similarly, individuals with antisocial personality disorder are not generous, but miserly ... Schizoid personality disorder. Schizoid personality disorder and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder may both display ... eating disorders, anxiety, mood disorders, and substance use disorders. The disorder is the most common personality disorder in ... Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) is a cluster C personality disorder marked by a spectrum of obsessions with ...
Paranoid Personality Disorder, SzPD - Schizoid Personality Disorder, StPD - Schizotypal Personality Disorder, ASPD - Antisocial ... Paranoid Personality Disorder, SzPD - Schizoid Personality Disorder, StPD - Schizotypal Personality Disorder, ASPD - Antisocial ... Unspecified personality disorder - general criteria for a personality disorder are met but the personality disorder is not ... Depressive Personality Disorder, SDPD - Self-Defeating Personality Disorder, SaPD - Sadistic Personality Disorder, and n/a - ...
... of personality. Antisocial personality disorder, a personality disorder characterized by a long term pattern of disregard for, ... "Treating antisocial personality disorder". Clinical Psychiatry News. 34 (9): 18-19. Personality Disorders in Modern Life 2nd Ed ... masochistic personality disorder) Sexual sadism disorder Zoosadism Sociopathy Hucker, Stephen J. Sadistic Personality Disorder ... Sadistic personality disorder is a personality disorder defined by a pervasive pattern of sadistic and cruel behavior. People ...
"Antisocial Personality Disorder." https://www.psychdb.com/personality/antisocial "Lombroso, Cesare". Encyclopedia of the Social ... in its description of antisocial personality disorder. Furthermore, these ideas promoted the concept that when a crime is ... Research in the 1990s indicated that three elements of personality in particular - power, warmth and honesty - can be reliably ... Phrenology, a form of physiognomy, measures the bumps on the skull in order to determine mental and personality characteristics ...
Conduct Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy". In Pietz, Christina A.; Mattson, Curtis A. (eds.). Violent ... Drislane, Laura E.; Patrick, Christopher J. (2014). "Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy". In Blaney, Paul H.; ... Patrick, Christopher J. (2014). "Psychological Correlates of Psychopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, Habitual Aggression ... Drislane, Laura E.; Venables, Noah C.; Patrick, Christopher J. (2014). "Aggressive Externalizing Disorders: ...
... other personality disorders, including schizotypal, antisocial and dependent personality disorder substance use disorder (SUD) ... Thus, anti-social personality disorder (ASPD) and borderline personality disorders might derive from similar underlying ... Borderline personality disorder (BPD), also known as emotionally unstable personality disorder (EUPD), is a personality ... "Antisocial Personality Disorder: A Review". In Maj M, Akiskal HS, Mezzich JE (eds.). Personality disorders. New York City: John ...
For example, alcohol- and substance-related disorders and antisocial personality disorder are adult externalizing disorders. ... oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), pyromania, kleptomania, ... A conduct disorder diagnosis, manic episode, or antisocial personality disorder diagnosis must not better account for the fire ... "the stealing is not better explained by conduct disorder, a manic episode, or antisocial personality disorder." IED symptoms ...
Antisocial personality disorder is seen in adults. AWESOME: Affect flat Weight change (loss or gain) Energy, loss of Sad ... Personality disorders (primarily borderline personality disorder) Substance abuse disorders Anxiety disorders (panic disorder ... Somatization disorder, eating disorders (these two disorders are combined because both involve disorders of bodily perception) ... Cognitive disorders (dementia, delirium) Psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, delusional disorder and psychosis accompanying ...
People with psychotic disorder, People with psychopathy, People with antisocial personality disorder, Rape of males, Serial ... Psychiatrists diagnosed him with antisocial personality disorder. Garavito died at a hospital in Valledupar on 12 October 2023 ... which was later noted by various experts to be highly contributive to his later development of antisocial personality disorder ... Despite this, Zabaleta was wary of Garavito's alcoholism, which often spurred scandalous and antisocial behaviour. Like Luz ...
"Alcibiades: Aristocratic Ideal or Antisocial Personality Disorder". Archived from the original on 28 August 2006. Retrieved 5 ... The Mask of Sanity: An Attempt to Clarify Some Issues about the So-Called Psychopathic Personality. Martino Fine Books; 2 ...
Gardner was diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder. In June 1985, Gardner pleaded guilty to the murder of Otterstrom ... People with antisocial personality disorder, Prisoners sentenced to life imprisonment by Utah, Escapees from Utah detention). ...
A separate GWAS on antisocial personality disorder likewise did not report a significant effect of MAOA. Another study, while ... panic disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Effects of parenting ... September 2016). "Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder". Translational Psychiatry. 6 (9): e883. doi ... This gene has also been associated with a variety of other psychiatric disorders, including antisocial behavior. Alternatively ...
It depicts his downward spiral into depression, apathy and an apparent anti-social personality disorder. The novel depicts many ... Most likely, David has anti-social personality disorder. David hallucinates a creature called the Llapasllaly doing heinous ... most likely with anti-social personality disorder) begins the story by moving back to Georgia after spending several months in ... and who takes the form of an eating disorder. At the time of this discovery a police investigation into the killing of David's ...
Angela discovers Emma has anti-social personality disorder. Later that night, Emma finds the research Angela was doing on her ...
Specifically, he has a severe antisocial personality disorder. Having killed both his parents and his former tutor at the age ...
Recklessness has been linked to antisocial personality disorder. "Reck" is a regard or reckoning, particularly of a situation. ...
He developed conduct disorder and antisocial personality disorder. In March 1979, Pardon, then fourteen, was temporarily ...
... antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and the ICD-10 diagnosis, dissocial personality disorder. Hare takes the stance that ... antisocial personality disorder) and BPD (borderline personality disorder) relate to factor 2, whereas psychopathy relates to ... R Factors 2a and 2b are particularly strongly correlated to antisocial personality disorder and borderline personality disorder ... Hare RD, Hart SD, Harpur TJ (August 1991). "Psychopathy and the DSM-IV criteria for antisocial personality disorder" (PDF). ...
Bateman, A.W.; Fonagy, P. (2008). "Comorbid antisocial and borderline personality disorders: mentalization-based treatment". ... Bateman, A.W.; Fonagy, P. (2004). "Mentalization-based treatment of BPD". Journal of Personality Disorders. 18 (1): 36-51. doi: ... Fonagy, Bateman, and colleagues have done extensive outcome research on MBT for borderline personality disorder. The first ... Bateman, A.W.; Fonagy, P. (2008). "8-Year Follow-Up of Patients Treated for Borderline Personality Disorder: Mentalization- ...
Daqamseh was arrested and later diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder by a Jordanian medical team. He was tried and ... A specialized medical team diagnosed him with antisocial personality disorder. On March 16, 1997, a few days after the attack, ...
Because traits of antisocial personality disorder are present in malignant narcissism, the "malignant narcissist" has a more ... Malignant narcissism could include aspects of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) alongside a mix of antisocial, paranoid ... Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), ... "Antisocial personality disorder, sexual sadism, malignant narcissism, and serial murder". Journal of Forensic Sciences. Hoboken ...
Instead, they diagnosed antisocial personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder. Breivik expressed hope at being ... People with antisocial personality disorder, People with narcissistic personality disorder, Spree killers, 20th-century farmers ... that he was not psychotic during the attacks but did have narcissistic personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder ... According to Malt, Breivik primarily had Asperger syndrome, Tourette syndrome, narcissistic personality disorder and possibly ...
In 1987, he was officially diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder. Between June and August 1990, Russell sexually ...
Antisocial personality disorder Forensic psychology "Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003". www.legislation.gov.uk. The ...
... as well as with antisocial personality disorder. CSP is one of the distinguishing features of individuals displaying symptoms ... "Neurodevelopmental marker for limbic maldevelopment in antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy". British Journal of ... CSP has been loosely associated with schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, ... relationship to posttraumatic stress disorder" (PDF). Biol. Psychiatry. 55 (6): 656-8. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2003.09.018. PMC ...
... post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, as well as with antisocial personality disorder. CSP is one of the ... "Neurodevelopmental marker for limbic maldevelopment in antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy". BJPsych". The British ... The scientific study of CT scans of the ventricles in the late 1970s gave new insight into the study of mental disorders. ... relationship to posttraumatic stress disorder" (PDF). Biol. Psychiatry. 55 (6): 656-8. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2003.09.018. PMC ...
... disorder Bipolar disorder Borderline personality disorder Histrionic personality disorder Narcissistic personality disorder ... "Antisocial personality disorder". NHS. Retrieved 11 May 2016. "Antisocial personality disorder: prevention and management". ... "Antisocial Personality Disorder". Antisocial Personality Disorder: Treatment, Management and Prevention. Leicester (UK): ... additional information DSM-IV-TR Criteria for Antisocial personality disorder Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder: ...
Antisocial personality disorder is a mental condition in which a person has a long-term pattern of manipulating, exploiting, or ... Antisocial personality disorder is a mental condition in which a person has a long-term pattern of manipulating, exploiting, or ... Antisocial personality disorder is one of the hardest personality disorders to treat. People with this condition usually dont ... People with an antisocial personality who have other disorders, such as a mood or substance use disorder, are often treated for ...
Antisocial personality disorder is often characterized by a disregard for others and right or wrong, but theres so much more ... Symptoms of Antisocial Personality Disorder in Children. Antisocial Personality Disorder probably isnt something youve heard ... Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a type of personality disorder often characterized by little or no regard for others ... Narcissistic personality disorder: A cluster B personality disorder defined by exploitativeness and a lack of empathy. But ...
Antisocial personality disorder is more common in men. It is also more common in those with:. * History of conduct disorder as ... This disorder can be difficult to treat. People with antisocial personality disorder are not likely to seek treatment on their ... Personality disorder. BMJ. 2013 Sep 10;347:f5276. Overview of Class B personality disorder (ASPD). EBSCO DynaMed website. ... Antisocial Personality Disorder. (Psychopathy; Sociopathy). by Laurie Rosenblum, MPH. • Definition • Causes • Risk Factors • ...
This quality standard covers assessing and managing borderline and antisocial personality disorders. It describes high-quality ... borderline personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder. Borderline and antisocial personality disorders are 2 ... Antisocial personality disorder. Traits of antisocial personality disorder include impulsivity, high negative emotionality, low ... Care for people with borderline and antisocial personality disorder. Although borderline and antisocial personality disorders ...
Pharmacological Treatment of Antisocial Personality Disorder *Chapter 19. Treatment Issues With Antisocial Personality Disorder ... Chapter 1. Classification and Definition of Antisocial Personality Disorder. *Chapter 2. Antisocial Personality Disorder ... Neurophysiology of Antisocial Personality Disorder *Chapter 12. Central and Peripheral Biomarkers of Antisocial Personality ... Structural MRI Studies of Antisocial Personality Disorder *Chapter 14. Functional MRI Studies of Antisocial Personality ...
Sleep among Habitually Violent Offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder Subject Area: Neurology and Neuroscience , ... Whether this increase in persons with antisocial personality disorder reflects a specific brain pathology, or a delay in the ... in males with antisocial personality disorder. Moreover, in the spectral power analysis, both the delta and the theta power ... Sleep among Habitually Violent Offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder. Neuropsychobiology 1 June 2003; 47 (4): 198-205 ...
24-hour live discussions about Borderline Personality Disorder with other family members ... Some people with antisocial personality disorder will also be diagnosed with other disorders, including borderline personality ... we see a distilled form an essential feature of the DSMs antisocial personality disorder, and the ICDs syssocial personality ... I was reading about antisocial personality disorder and was shocked to see that there are a lot of traits that apply to my ...
Are you up on the latest research into antisocial personality disorder? Find out whats new with a quick quiz. ... This Rapid Review Quiz was excerpted and adapted from the Medscape articles Personality Disorders, Aggression, Choosing Our ... and Optimal Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder Identified? ...
Antisocial Personality Disorder - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the Merck Manuals - Medical ... A personality disorder Overview of Personality Disorders Your personality is your unique way of thinking, understanding, ... Children with conduct disorder should be treated so they dont grow up to have antisocial personality disorder. ... Abuse and neglect can increase the chance of the child having antisocial personality disorder as an adult. ...
Psychopathy is a common term used to describe a grouping of personality traits that includes such things as impulsive behavior ... Antisocial Personality Disorder. The American Psychiatric Association definition for antisocial personality disorder is found ... conduct disorder functions as the childhood equivalent of antisocial personality disorder. In addition, a person diagnosed with ... The closest equivalent to psychopathy in the APA guidebook is a condition called antisocial personality disorder. ...
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Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals ... Borderline personality disorder Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Borderline personality disorder is characterized by a ... Narcissistic personality disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) Narcissistic personality disorder is characterized by ... For a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (1 Diagnosis reference Antisocial personality disorder is characterized by a ...
SANTIAGO, Ivelisse Alvarado; NIEVES, Ilia Rosario y TRABAL, Norma Jean García. The antisocial personality disorder in people ... This article presents the emotional, social, cognitive, and symptom related implications of antisocial personality disorder ( ... Palabras clave : Antisocial personality; risk factors; juvenile delinquency; violence. · resumen en Español · texto en Español ... The findings suggest that the onset of antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence is not only related to the combination ...
The Antisocial Personality Disorder Survey is a tool used to help diagnose antisocial personality disorder. ... on Antisocial Personality Disorder Survey. What is Antisocial Personality Disorder?. Antisocial Personality Disorder is a ... What causes Antisocial Personality Disorder?. The cause of Antisocial Personality Disorder is unknown. It is believed to be a ... How is Antisocial Personality Disorder diagnosed?. Antisocial Personality Disorder is diagnosed by a mental health professional ...
Understanding and managing paranoid personality disorder - Volume 15 Issue 1 ... Antisocial personality disorder. The key characteristic of antisocial personality disorder is recurrent transgression of others ... Avoidant personality disorder. As with paranoid personality disorder, avoidant personality disorder is characterised by a ... Comorbid disorders (e.g. antisocial personality disorder, psychosis, affective disorders) can lower the individuals inhibitory ...
Antisocial Personality Disorder. Antisocial personality disorder is a psychiatric condition in which an individual constantly ... Gedeon, T., Parry, J., & Völlm, B. (2019). The role of oxytocin in antisocial personality disorders: A systematic review of the ... Select one of the personality disorders from the DSM-5 (e.g., paranoid, antisocial, narcissistic). Then, select a therapy ... Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be used in the treatment of Antisocial personality disorder. CBT will involve introducing ...
Anti-Social Personality Disorder. World Mental Health Day: The UKs SILENT Epidemic. 55% of Anti-Social Personality Disorder ( ... sufferer of Anti-Social Personality Disorder and now CEO of the worlds most prominent online coaching businesses. [caption... ...
A personality disorder, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association, Fourth ... Cluster B - Antisocial personality disorder is 3 times more prevalent in men than in women; borderline personality disorder is ... Antisocial personality disorder - Associated with a risk for anxiety disorders, substance abuse, somatization disorder, and ... Antisocial personality disorder. A genetic contribution to antisocial behaviors is strongly supported. Low levels of behavioral ...
A quick recap of personality disorders. There are different methods for naming and classifying personality disorders, but the ... The technical name of sociopathy in this system is an antisocial personality disorder. ... How to find out if you have a personality disorder. With all this information, you might think its easy to detect any ... there is a chance you might qualify for a Cluster C personality disorder. Watch out especially for the dependent personality ...
Goal: Develop a PowerPoint presentation on a personality disorder.. Content Requirements: THE TOPIC IS: ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY ... STU Antisocial Personality Disorder Presentation. November 5, 2023. /in Uncategorized /by Paul. .awasam-promo { background- ... Group PowerPoint Case Presentation: TOPIC: ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY DISORDER ? ... Introduce a fictitious patient with a disease or disorder based on your assigned group topic. Must specifically address the ...
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Antisocial Personality Disorder TopicForum Admin2018-03-25T17:01:37-05:00 Home › Forums › PERSONALITY DISORDERS FORUM › ...
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Abstract Borderline Personality Disorder has many different Characteristics, and Patterns of... ... Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD). 1505 Words , 7 Pages. Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) is a Personality Disorder ... Antisocial Personality Disorder Essay. 1377 Words , 6 Pages. extreme disorder called Antisocial Personality disorder (ASPD). In ... Anti Social Personality Disorder Essay. 523 Words , 3 Pages. The anti-social personality disorder is perhaps one of the most ...
Ted Bundy: Antisocial Personality Disorder. 1375 Words , 6 Pages. *. Informative Speech On Serial Killers. 926 Words , 4 Pages ... Ted Bundy: Antisocial Personality Disorder. 1375 Words , 6 Pages. Ted Bundy was a notorious serial murderer whos reign of ... attachment disorders, doubt and feeling imperfect can manifest from a very young…show more content…. Some killers kill for fame ...
Symptoms of Antisocial Personality Disorder. Some of the signs and symptoms of antisocial personality disorder may include: * ... Antisocial Personality Disorder. Antisocial personality disorder is a kind of chronic mental state in which a persons ability ... Treatment of Antisocial Personality Disorder. Antisocial personality disorder is very difficult to treat. People with this ... Causes of Antisocial Personality Disorder. Personality can be defined as the combination of thoughts, emotions and behaviors ...
... anti-social behaviour. Antisocial personality disorder can only be diagnosed when a pattern of anti-social behaviour began ... Distinguishing from antisocial personality disorder[edit]. When looking at non-ASPD patients (who show anti-social behaviour) ... Not to be confused with Antisocial personality disorder, Asociality, Counterculture, or Social anxiety disorder. ... diagnoses persistent anti-social behaviour as antisocial personality disorder.[7] Genetic factors include abnormalities in the ...
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  • Personality disorders are a class of mental disorders characterized by enduring and inflexible maladaptive patterns of behavior, cognition, and inner experience, exhibited across many contexts and deviating from those accepted by any culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antisocial personality disorder has been associated with higher levels of impulsivity, suicidality, and irresponsible behavior, usually resulting in heightened levels of aggressive behavior, domestic violence, illegal drug use, pervasive anger, and violent crimes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Individuals with ASPD, or who display antisocial behavior, may often experience chronic boredom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alongside other conduct problems, many people with ASPD experienced conduct disorder in their youth, characterized by a pervasive pattern of violent, criminal, defiant, and anti-social behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a deeply ingrained pattern of behavior characterized by a disregard for the welfare of others. (psychcentral.com)
  • Seeking treatment is important to help the person with the disorder, but also to protect other people who may be affected by the behavior. (epnet.com)
  • A group of distinguished international experts, researchers, and clinicians provide their unique perspectives on what has been learned so far about antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and other forms of antisocial behavior, including childhood conduct disorder, adult antisocial behavior, and psychopathy. (appi.org)
  • Conduct Disorder Conduct disorder is: A behavior problem in which a child repeatedly breaks many laws and rules Misbehavior that's bad enough or frequent enough to cause significant problems for the child or. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Psychopathy is a common term used to describe a grouping of personality traits that includes such things as impulsive behavior, lack of regard for others, lack of a normal range of emotional responsiveness and frequent deception or manipulation of others. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The findings suggest that the onset of antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence is not only related to the combination of risk factors but also to psychosocial processes. (bvsalud.org)
  • People with this disorder often have a history of criminal or other antisocial behavior. (blocksurvey.io)
  • A personality disorder, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association, Fifth Edition ( DSM-5 ) is an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that differs markedly from the expectations of the individual's culture, is pervasive and inflexible, has an onset in adolescence or early adulthood, is stable over time, and leads to distress or impairment. (medscape.com)
  • Cluster A personality disorders show strange behavior and ideas, and some of them may develop into some form of psychosis later in life. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • You can watch out for red flags in your behavior, but the only way to know for sure whether or not you have a disorder - and which kind of healing process to start - is through an appointment with a professional. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • People with antisocial personality disorder may disregard the rules of behavior that are considered acceptable in a group or society, lie constantly, as well as placing others at risk for their own benefits, it is sometimes referred to as sociopathic personality disorder, or sociopathy . (hashtagcloset.com)
  • They are advised to be seen by a counselor, to be taught to understand their disorder, learn to control it, and change their behavior. (hashtagcloset.com)
  • However, this disorder is known as a lifelong disorder but some symptoms can be particularly destructive and criminal behavior and the use of alcohol or drugs may decrease over time, but it's not known whether this disorder is a result of aging or an increased awareness of the consequences of antisocial behavior. (lazoi.com)
  • Antisocial personality disorder issue is an inescapable dysfunctional behavior that frequently averts individuals from complying with social standards and confronting negative effects on their everyday lives then. (edubirdie.com)
  • A public health perspective must be applied to this disorder in a manner that acknowledges and addresses the high risk for comorbidity, secondary conditions, and participation in significant health risk behaviors associated with impulsive and inattentive behavior. (cdc.gov)
  • Personality disorders make up a group of mental illnesses in which a person displays long-term rigid patterns of behavior and thoughts that don't adapt to a wide range of settings. (psychguides.com)
  • A new study details the complex pathway connecting impulsivity, alcohol use, and antisocial behavior, supporting the importance of early intervention. (annenbergpublicpolicycenter.org)
  • Another study found that a family history of antisocial behavior , specifically in a parent, was a strong predictor for conduct issues to persist from childhood into adolescence. (betterhelp.com)
  • Those who present with a childhood conduct disorder will often show similar signs to adults experiencing SPD, including threatening behavior, physical aggression, lying, and a disregard for rules or laws. (betterhelp.com)
  • They may believe their antisocial personality or behavior is a reaction to the perceived negative qualities of others rather than an indication of a mental health issue. (betterhelp.com)
  • For example, someone with sociopathic personality disorder may show a repetitive pattern of violence or aggressive behavior, such as consistently engaging in physical altercations with others without cause. (betterhelp.com)
  • But they are also chameleons, able to disguise their ruthlessness and antisocial behavior under the veneer of charm and eloquence. (forbes.com)
  • Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD or APD) is a personality disorder characterized by a limited capacity for empathy and a long-term pattern of disregard or violation of the rights of others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antisocial behaviors often have their onset before the age of 8, and in nearly 80% of ASPD cases, the subject will develop their first symptoms by age 11. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some researchers have drawn distinctions between the concepts of antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy, with many arguing that psychopathy overlaps with but is distinguishable from ASPD. (wikipedia.org)
  • ASPD is the most likely to be associated with addiction among personality disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a type of personality disorder often characterized by little or no regard for others and no consideration for right or wrong. (psychcentral.com)
  • The latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) classifies ASPD as part of the cluster B personality disorder group, along with borderline, histrionic, and narcissistic personality disorders. (psychcentral.com)
  • Having childhood conduct disorder is also often predictive for ASPD. (psychcentral.com)
  • Overview of Class B personality disorder (ASPD). (epnet.com)
  • Special coverage is included on antisocial women, antisocial children, antisocial sexual offenders, forensic aspects of ASPD, and preventive strategies. (appi.org)
  • This article presents the emotional, social, cognitive, and symptom related implications of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in institutionalized individuals. (bvsalud.org)
  • Likewise, this investigation highlighted the comorbidity of ASPD comorbidity with and other axis I disorders. (bvsalud.org)
  • 55% of Anti-Social Personality Disorder (ASPD) sufferers ignored in the UK, according to the Mental Health Foundation Meet Lewis Raymond Taylor, addict, three times ex-convict, victim of abuse, sufferer of Anti-Social Personality Disorder and now CEO of the world's most prominent online coaching businesses. (citiesabc.com)
  • Famous People with Antisocial Personality Disorder Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), comes in many different forms, and they are all characterised by the way a person thinks and perceives situations that are much different from normal people. (ipl.org)
  • An earlier wave of the same study reported that 3.6% have the condition of Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), an equivalent the common term and definition for sociopath (Grant, B., et al, 2004). (alabamainstitute.com)
  • As the name suggests, a person with antisocial personality disorder engages in behaviors that go against social norms. (psychcentral.com)
  • Cluster B personality disorders are those in which a person has trouble managing their emotions and behaviors. (psychcentral.com)
  • Initially, psychiatrists proposed that all psychopaths have a superficially outgoing personality that hides a fixed pattern of psychotic (i.e., hallucination-based or delusion-based) and antisocial behaviors. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Substance Use Disorders Substance use disorders involve a pathologic pattern of behaviors in which patients continue to use a substance despite experiencing significant problems related to its use. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The Antisocial Personality Disorder Survey is a short, self-report questionnaire that asks questions about your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. (blocksurvey.io)
  • A genetic contribution to antisocial behaviors is strongly supported. (medscape.com)
  • Personality can be defined as the combination of thoughts, emotions and behaviors that makes everyone unique. (lazoi.com)
  • Estimates of comorbidity, secondary conditions, and health risk behaviors among those with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are quite high and range from 30 to 60 percent for highly comorbid conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • What are the most costly, common comorbid disorders and health risk behaviors associated with ADHD (see list)? (cdc.gov)
  • People who have personality disorders can express a wide range of emotions and behaviors that are considered detrimental to relationships, causing friends and family to withdraw from the individual. (psychguides.com)
  • Personality disorders are difficult to cure because people who suffer from the condition often have abnormal thoughts and behaviors that prevent them from thinking and functioning as well as they should. (psychguides.com)
  • According to a major study reported in 2008, 6.2% of the U.S. adult population has Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) (Stinson, F., et al, 2008). (alabamainstitute.com)
  • Children who've suffered from insensitive parenting and verbal abuse during childhood are three times more likely to suffer from narcissistic personality disorder. (psychguides.com)
  • A rendezvényen Sam Vaknin, izraeli író, pszichológiaprofesszor, a nárcisztikus Sam Vaknin, Israeli author, psychology professor and researcher on narcissistic personality disorder, will speak about Cluster B personality disorders. (uni-corvinus.hu)
  • Some doctors believe that psychopathic personality (psychopathy) is the same disorder. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The closest equivalent to psychopathy in the APA guidebook is a condition called antisocial personality disorder . (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Later, the concept of psychopathy widened as mental health professionals realized that affected individuals can have a much wider range of dysfunctional personality traits. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Personality traits associated with psychopathy/sociopathy fall into four main groups, known as antisocial traits, interpersonal traits, affective traits and lifestyle traits. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The U.S. criminal justice system and many mental health researchers measure psychopathy with a standardized test called the Psychopathy Checklist - Revised, or PCL-R. This test ranks 20 psychopathy-related personality traits on a scale of 0 to 2. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • In many respects, the symptoms found in people diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder mirror the symptoms commonly associated with psychopathy. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • However, the definition for antisocial personality disorder also differs from the definition for psychopathy in important ways. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Psychopathy and sociopathy each assumed an expansive job in molding standoffish Antisocial personality disorder into the psychological sickness it is today. (edubirdie.com)
  • They additionally made distinct thoughts with regards to the causes and indications of Antisocial personality disorder issue, sociopathy concentrated on the conduct parts of the turmoil and psychopathy. (edubirdie.com)
  • Based on their 2011 meta-analysis of the correlates of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI), Miller and Lynam (An examination of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory's nomological network: A meta-analytic review, Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 3, 305-326) conclude that its Fearless Dominance (PPI-FD) higher-order dimension exhibits weak construct validity, leading them to question the relevance of boldness to the conceptualization and assessment of psychopathy. (nih.gov)
  • A person must be at least 18 years old to have a diagnosis of personality disorder. (epnet.com)
  • With formal psychiatric assessment and appropriate treatment, symptoms improve sufficiently so that at least 50% of people no longer meet the criteria for borderline personality disorder 5-10 years after diagnosis. (nice.org.uk)
  • The aim of the present study was to characterize the subjective and objective sleep and sleep quality in habitually violent offenders with DSM-IV diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder using a sleep questionnaire, actigraphy, polysomnography and power spectral analysis. (karger.com)
  • First, and perhaps most significantly, an adult who receives a diagnosis for antisocial personality disorder must have an earlier history of another mental health condition called conduct disorder. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • As with all personality disorders, diagnosis is dependent on longitudinal evidence that mal-adaptive features of feeling, thinking and behaving are enduring over time. (cambridge.org)
  • A normal response to unusual circumstances should always be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of a patient with cross-sectional features suggestive of paranoid personality disorder. (cambridge.org)
  • Explain how you would share your diagnosis of this disorder with the client to avoid damaging the therapeutic relationship. (eminencepapers.com)
  • According to Haycock, Dean A., and Emily Jane Willingham, "antisocial personality disorder is a diagnosis applied to persons who routinely behave with little or no regard for the rights, safety, or feelings of others" (109). (ipl.org)
  • Diagnosis of this disorder is very difficult without extensive testing. (ipl.org)
  • This paper focuses on difficulties in the treatment and care of patients with a diagnosis of psychopathic, or anti-social personality disorder as it is usually referred to today. (tavistockandportman.ac.uk)
  • This means that these patients are often thought to be either suffering from paranoid schizophrenia or anti-social personality disorder or a dual diagnosis depending on the phase of their illness. (tavistockandportman.ac.uk)
  • The current diagnostic system does not recognize the underlying personality structures that link the diagnosis and cycles of the illness together. (tavistockandportman.ac.uk)
  • It is important to remember that the diagnosis of conversion disorder is made based on the overall clinical picture and not a single clinical finding. (medscape.com)
  • The technical name of sociopathy in this system is an antisocial personality disorder. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • Before being named an Antisocial personality disorder issue, different terms were utilized as marks, including psychiatry and sociopathy. (edubirdie.com)
  • Antisocial mental disturbance was originally labelled underneath the classes of mental state and sociopathy before earning its current title. (edubirdie.com)
  • mental state and sociopathy do have some similarities however professionals still argue a number of the massive variations that makes cause for 2 fully completely different diagnoses and disorders as critical one. (edubirdie.com)
  • Today, mental state and sociopathy lay inside the realm of delinquent mental disturbance although several push for them to own separate diagnoses once more, or to a minimum of be understood as 2 fully completely different disorders. (edubirdie.com)
  • The anti-social personality disorder is perhaps one of the most frightening personality disorders a person can have, as well as one of the most complex to diagnose. (ipl.org)
  • Borderline personality disorder is often comorbid with depression, anxiety, eating disorders, post‑traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and drug misuse, and bipolar disorder (the symptoms of which can often be confused with borderline personality disorder). (nice.org.uk)
  • Antisocial personality disorder is often comorbid with depression, anxiety, and alcohol and drug misuse. (nice.org.uk)
  • Adolescents diagnosed with a personality disorder are more likely to be diagnosed with another mental disorder, such as anxiety or oppositional defiant disorder. (ipl.org)
  • People with Antisocial Personality Disorder can be very deceitful and clever, and often times are good at faking sadness, remorse, anxiety, and loyalty. (ipl.org)
  • People suffering with antisocial personality disorder may also need treatment for other conditions, like depression, anxiety or substance use disorders. (lazoi.com)
  • Not to be confused with Antisocial personality disorder , Asociality , Counterculture , or Social anxiety disorder . (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms are secondary to other psychiatric etiologies such as depressive disorder or anxiety disorders. (medscape.com)
  • In some studies, some malfunctioning genes might cause certain personality disorders, while another study links anxiety, fear and aggression to genetics. (psychguides.com)
  • The most common were substance abuse/dependence, antisocial personality disorder, hypomanic episodes, generalized anxiety and major depression. (eurekalert.org)
  • Globally, less than 40% of people experiencing a mood, anxiety or substance use disorder seek assistance in the first year of its onset. (who.int)
  • The course of antisocial personality disorder is variable and although recovery is achievable over time, some people continue to experience social and interpersonal difficulties. (nice.org.uk)
  • Solve the mystery of antisocial, narcissist, histrionic, and borderline clients and finally make a breakthrough in clinical treatment. (studenttherapy.com)
  • Rapid Review Quiz: Antisocial Personality Disorder - Medscape - Sep 25, 2023. (medscape.com)
  • See a provider or a mental health professional if you or someone you know has symptoms of antisocial personality disorder. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Antisocial personality disorder exists on a spectrum, meaning that symptoms can range from mild to severe. (psychcentral.com)
  • Conduct disorder causes similar symptoms in those younger than age 15. (epnet.com)
  • Most people with borderline personality disorder show symptoms in late adolescence or early adult life, although some may not come to the attention of mental health services until much later. (nice.org.uk)
  • In addition, a person diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder must experience his or her symptoms outside of the context of the hyper-aroused state called mania or the severe mental disorder called schizophrenia. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Do you currently have any symptoms of antisocial personality disorder? (blocksurvey.io)
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder is diagnosed by a mental health professional based on a review of your symptoms and medical history. (blocksurvey.io)
  • Typically these symptoms make people with antisocial personality disorder unable to fulfill their responsibilities related to family, work or school. (lazoi.com)
  • The symptoms of antisocial personality disorder may initiate in childhood and are fully evident for most people during their 20s and 30s. (lazoi.com)
  • The best treatment of antisocial personality disorder relies on each person's specific situation and severity of symptoms. (lazoi.com)
  • Symptoms are exclusively a function of somatoform disorder, factitious disorder, or malingering. (medscape.com)
  • Learn about the symptoms and signs of personality problems, how get effective treatment, and ultimately how to recover from personality for the short and long-term. (psychguides.com)
  • Personality disorders may cause extreme suspicion of others, lack of interest in social relationships, inappropriate emotional responses, and other concerning symptoms 2 . (psychguides.com)
  • Each disorder has a specific set of symptoms to distinguish it from the others. (psychguides.com)
  • Many different types of personality disorders exist, and the symptoms vary greatly according to each type. (psychguides.com)
  • Four other mental disorders figure in the top 10 causes of disability in the world, namely alcohol abuse, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and obsessive compulsive disorder. (who.int)
  • Many people who are diagnosed with borderline or schizotypal personality disorder experienced sexual trauma or bullying during childhood. (psychguides.com)
  • Traits of antisocial personality disorder include impulsivity, high negative emotionality, low conscientiousness and associated behaviours, including irresponsible and exploitative behaviour, recklessness and deceitfulness. (nice.org.uk)
  • Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD, ADHD) Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a syndrome of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. (msdmanuals.com)
  • According to the Diagnostic and Statistics Manual for Mental Disorders version 5 (DSM-5) NPD does not include characteristics of impulsivity, aggression, and deceit. (alabamainstitute.com)
  • Some personality disorders also cause increased impulsivity or aggression. (psychguides.com)
  • Most of these people often suffer from a co-occurring major mental disorder, such as depression, panic disorder , post-traumatic stress disorder and others. (psychguides.com)
  • DSM-IV personality disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Several drugs, however, have been shown to reduce aggression, a common problem for many antisocial. (hashtagcloset.com)
  • Abstract Borderline Personality Disorder has many different Characteristics, and Patterns of instability.impulsiveness, Interpersonal Relationships, People may have suicidal thoughts and attempts, aggression, emotional dysregulations. (ipl.org)
  • Other environmental influences may include malnutrition, fetal exposure to smoking or alcohol, and having a parent with a substance use disorder. (psychcentral.com)
  • Fast Five Quiz: Substance Use Disorder Test your knowledge and ensure that you are ready to diagnose, manage, and treat various substance abuse disorders with this quick quiz. (medscape.com)
  • Frequently, a history of psychiatric disorders is present. (medscape.com)
  • BOSTON, Mass, March 4, 2013-The first large, population-based study to follow children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) into adulthood shows that ADHD often doesn't "go away," and that children with ADHD are more likely to have other psychiatric disorders as adults. (eurekalert.org)
  • Psychosocial formulations point to the high prevalence of early abuse (sexual, physical, and emotional) in these patients, and the borderline syndrome is often formulated as a variant of posttraumatic stress disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Abuse and neglect can increase the chance of the child having antisocial personality disorder as an adult. (merckmanuals.com)
  • According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), about 9.1 percent of the US adult population experience a personality disorder in a 12-month prevalence period. (psychguides.com)
  • A Man With Hypertension and Recent Personality Changes He has had personality changes for approximately 3 weeks, according to his adult son, and has been confused during recent phone calls and occasionally slurs his speech. (medscape.com)
  • Borderline personality disorder is characterised by significant instability of interpersonal relationships, self‑image and mood, and impulsive behaviour. (nice.org.uk)
  • As a result of antisocial personality disorder, people may experience unstable interpersonal relationships and may disregard the consequences of their behaviour and the feelings of others. (nice.org.uk)
  • Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Borderline personality disorder is characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability and hypersensitivity in interpersonal relationships, instability in self-image, extreme mood fluctuations. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The DSM-IV-TR criteria for paranoid personality disorder ( American Psychiatric Association 2000 ) have been criticised for underrepresenting the typical affective and interpersonal features of the disorder, features that give a richer sense of the typical presentation ( Reference Bernstein, Useda, O'Donohue, Fowler and Lilienfield Bernstein 2007 ) ( Box 1 ). (cambridge.org)
  • For instance, people with the disorder typically do such things as disregard the welfare of others, display superficial charm in social situations, display a lack of guilt or regret, break the law, behave irresponsibly, manipulate or lie to others, act impulsively, seek stimulation through reckless activity, and maintain an inflated sense of self-importance. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Antisocial personality disorder is characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregard for consequences and for the rights of others. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It is used to help diagnose antisocial personality disorder, a mental health condition characterized by a pattern of disregard for and Violation of the rights of others. (blocksurvey.io)
  • People suffering with antisocial personality disorder typically have no regard for right and wrong and often disregard the rights, wishes and feelings of others. (lazoi.com)
  • NICE's quality standard on antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders in children and young people covers antisocial behaviour and conduct disorder in children and young people under 18 years. (nice.org.uk)
  • [4] In children, conduct disorders could result from ineffective parenting. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with antisocial personality disorder are not likely to seek treatment on their own. (epnet.com)
  • Bateman AW, Gunderson J, Mulder R. Treatment of personality disorder. (epnet.com)
  • This quality standard covers treatment and management of borderline and antisocial personality disorders. (nice.org.uk)
  • This session is designed to equip attendees with the knowledge needed to make informed decisions when choosing evidence-based treatment options for their clients, especially Veterans and individuals with co-occurring disorders. (nearcp.org)
  • There is no specific treatment for Antisocial Personality Disorder. (blocksurvey.io)
  • The evidence relating to paranoid personality disorder and risk of violence is summarised and clinically useful guidance for the safe treatment of people with the disorder is outlined. (cambridge.org)
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be used in the treatment of Antisocial personality disorder. (eminencepapers.com)
  • Cognitive-behavioral theory and treatment of antisocial personality disorder. (eminencepapers.com)
  • People with this disorder may not even want treatment or think they need it. (lazoi.com)
  • But people suffering with antisocial personality disorder need treatment and close follow-up over the long term. (lazoi.com)
  • The psychiatric assessment can differentiate conversion disorder from other somatoform disorders, factitious disorder, and malingering, and can elucidate the psychodynamics that are important in treatment. (medscape.com)
  • In the treatment of persistent depressive disorder (PDD), disorder-specific Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) has been shown to be superior to Supportive Psychotherapy (SP) in outpatients. (frontiersin.org)
  • Most people who have these disorders don't seek treatment immediately, even if personality disorder treatment program options are available for them. (psychguides.com)
  • however, these disorders don't go away without proper treatment. (psychguides.com)
  • According to the NIMH, 42.4 percent of people diagnosed with personality disorder are receiving treatment. (psychguides.com)
  • The treatment depends on a person's particular personality disorder. (psychguides.com)
  • Call us at to get more information about various treatment and program options for specific types of personality disorder. (psychguides.com)
  • As with many types of personality disorders, SPD can be difficult to diagnose-in part because an individual who has it is likely to deny it and resist evaluation or treatment. (betterhelp.com)
  • People with antisocial personality disorder who do seek treatment often do so because of another issue, such as substance use problems, depression, or relationship conflict. (betterhelp.com)
  • Treatment depends on the cause of the problem, but in any case, talking to someone and asking · personality disorder: people with borderline for help is the first step. (who.int)
  • What Is Sociopathic Personality Disorder? (betterhelp.com)
  • Sometimes referred to as antisocial personality disorder, sociopathic personality disorder (SPD) is a mental illness that's categorized as a cluster B disorder. (betterhelp.com)
  • While the specific cause of sociopathic personality disorder remains unknown, many experts believe it develops during childhood and can be traced back to a combination of internal and external factors. (betterhelp.com)
  • There can be a link present between an early lack of empathy understanding the perspectives and problems of others, including other children and later onset of antisocial personality disorder. (lazoi.com)
  • The rise will be particularly sharp in developing countries primarily owing to the projected increase in the number of individuals entering the age of risk for the onset of these disorders. (who.int)
  • The prevalence of antisocial personality disorder in the general population is 3% in men and 1% in women. (nice.org.uk)
  • It is not an uncommon disorder, with a prevalence in community samples of around 1.3% ( Reference Torgersen, Oldham, Skodol and Bender Torgersen 2005 ), rising to up to 10% in psychiatric out-patient samples ( Reference Bernstein, Useda and Siever Bernstein 1993 ). (cambridge.org)
  • Our books on eating disorders cover a wide array of topics, such as the nature of eating disorders, their prevalence, what they mean for those suffering from the disorders, and how they can be approached and treated. (routledge.com)
  • Among all the mental and neurological disorders, depression accounts for the largest proportion of the burden. (who.int)
  • Paranoid personality disorder is a neglected topic in clinical psychiatry, and is often the subject of diagnostic confusion and therapeutic pessimism. (cambridge.org)
  • This article presents a summary of the key diagnostic issues relating to paranoid personality disorder and describes various psychological and social processes mooted to be central to the genesis of paranoid thinking and behaviours. (cambridge.org)
  • The focus of this article is paranoid personality disorder, a condition in which mistrust of other people is the cardinal feature. (cambridge.org)
  • Select one of the personality disorders from the DSM-5 (e.g., paranoid, antisocial, narcissistic). (eminencepapers.com)
  • A genetic contribution to paranoid traits and a possible genetic link between this personality disorder and schizophrenia exist. (medscape.com)
  • Although the most common etiologies for personality disorders are multifactorial, these conditions may also be secondary to biologic, developmental, or genetic abnormalities. (medscape.com)
  • Family and twin studies of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have found familial aggregation and genetic propensity for BPD, but estimates vary widely. (nature.com)
  • Overview of Personality Disorders Your personality is your unique way of thinking, understanding, reacting, and relating to people. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Overview of Personality Disorders Personality disorders in general are pervasive, enduring patterns of thinking, perceiving, reacting, and relating that cause significant distress or functional impairment. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Criteria for diagnosing personality disorders are listed in the fifth chapter of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). (wikipedia.org)
  • Antisocial personality disorder is a mental condition in which a person has a long-term pattern of manipulating, exploiting, or violating the rights of others without any remorse. (medlineplus.gov)
  • For borderline personality disorder, statements within this quality standard apply to young people post puberty as well as adults recognising that young people would be supported by age‑appropriate services (child and adolescent mental health services). (nice.org.uk)
  • The American Psychiatric Association definition for antisocial personality disorder is found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), which the vast majority of U.S. mental health professionals use when diagnosing mental health-related conditions. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Antisocial personality disorder is a kind of chronic mental state in which a person's ability of thinking, understanding situations and relating to others is not functional and destructive. (lazoi.com)
  • The American Psychiatric Association , in its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , diagnoses persistent anti-social behaviour as antisocial personality disorder . (wikipedia.org)
  • However DSM-V, which is coming out next year, will take a more dimensional approach, and as such will be more compatible with a psychoanalytic understanding of mental disorder. (tavistockandportman.ac.uk)
  • Studies performed before 1968 showed the involuntary functioning in folks with mental state were completely different than that in those who weren't diagnosed with the disorder, still as distinctive physiological changes once folks with mental state were introduced to concern mental imagery (Pemment, 2013). (edubirdie.com)
  • Somewhere between 11% and 22% of adolescents seeking mental health care in outpatient clinics-and between 33% and 49% of those in inpatient units-meet the diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). (appi.org)
  • This book, written by experts in the field, sheds light on a mental disorder that is common in clinics but is often misdiagnosed, misunderstood, and mistreated. (appi.org)
  • The symptom or deficit is not better explained by another medical or mental disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Joanne acquires for the Routledge Mental Health list and actively commissions in the areas of Counselling, Psychotherapy, Clinical Psychology, Psychiatry, Eating Disorders, and Arts Therapies. (routledge.com)
  • Personality disorders are a type of mental disorder that can damage lives and relationships if left undiagnosed and untreated. (psychguides.com)
  • The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) lists 10 separate personality disorders. (psychguides.com)
  • Psychotherapy is the main way of dealing with and treating mental conditions like personality disorders. (psychguides.com)
  • The number of people with mental and neurological disorders will grow - with the burden rising to 15% of DALYs lost by the year 2020. (who.int)
  • Groups at higher risk of developing mental disorders include people with serious or chronic physical illnesses, children and adolescents, whose upbringing has been disrupted, people living in poverty or in difficult conditions, the unemployed, female victims of violence and abuse, and neglected elderly persons. (who.int)
  • The economic impact of mental disorders is wide-ranging, long-lasting and large. (who.int)
  • Studies from countries with established economies have shown that mental disorders consume more than 20% of all health service costs. (who.int)
  • The aggregate yearly cost of mental disorders in 1990 for the United States of America was estimated at US$ 148 000 million. (who.int)
  • Yet, less than half those patients whose condition meets diagnostic criteria for mental and neurological disorders are identified by doctors. (who.int)
  • Recent advances in neurosciences, genetics, psychosocial therapy, pharmacotherapy, and sociocultural disciplines have led to the elaboration of effective interventions for a wide range of mental health problems, offering an opportunity for people with mental and behavioural disorders and their families to lead full and productive lives. (who.int)
  • The model has been used to describe the different accepted types of personality disorders. (medscape.com)
  • The DSM doesn't allow doctors to diagnose any personality disorder in children, and in many ways, conduct disorder functions as the childhood equivalent of antisocial personality disorder. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The neurologist and psychiatrist are thus prepared to diagnose conversion disorder best when working in concert. (medscape.com)
  • Antisocial personality disorder is diagnosed based on a psychological evaluation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • ADHD is a very prevalent childhood disorder with a number of commonly comorbid conditions that present or develop in time with significant additional social, learning, and psychological impairment. (cdc.gov)
  • Psychotherapy are used with antisocial personality disorder. (epnet.com)
  • Rapid Review Quiz: Antisocial Personality Disorder Are you up on the latest research into antisocial personality disorder? (medscape.com)
  • Rapid Review Quiz: ADHD Treatments Have you seen the most recent research on novel treatments for attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder? (medscape.com)
  • Many psychologists narrow down the probable root of the disorder in order to design a therapy that can help treat a person's specific disorder. (psychguides.com)
  • In patients with personality disorder, abnormalities may be seen in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. (medscape.com)
  • In this paper the author draws upon literature in this area and suggests that this dichotomy between the psychotic and the anti-social may be too simple and argues that if we can understand that psychotic processes may well also underlie the personality disorders, we may reach a better understanding of what takes place in these settings and how staff are affected by the patients. (tavistockandportman.ac.uk)
  • A history of sexual or physical abuse is not uncommon and can be seen in as many as one third to one half of patients with dissociative disorder, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • Watch out especially for the dependent personality disorder, which is the most prone to falling into the trappings of sociopaths. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • Strong bonds or relationships with family, relatives or friends might cause dependent personality disorder. (psychguides.com)
  • Review this week's Learning Resources and reflect on the insights they provide about treating clients with personality disorders. (eminencepapers.com)
  • Imagine your sessions with clients with personality disorders. (psychotherapynetworker.org)
  • The DSM classifies personality disorders in three big groups, called clusters, and named cluster A, B and C. The DSM offers a list of criteria that a person should meet to be officially diagnosed as having a personality disorder. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • Cluster B personality disorders are more familiar to us because here is where sociopaths and malignant narcissists are found. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • Now, Cluster C is an interesting one, because it is defined as a group of personality disorders characterized by pathological fear. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • People with Cluster C personality disorders often feel insecure, needy and have low self-esteem, making them easy prey for sociopaths and manipulators. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • If you have a history of falling victim to these kinds of people, there is a chance you might qualify for a Cluster C personality disorder. (sociopathicstyle.com)
  • This disorder is genetically linked with schizophrenia. (medscape.com)
  • Antisocial traits associated with the condition include childhood behavioral disturbances, teen or preteen delinquency, and involvement in criminal conduct. (elementsbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Ask for a diagnostic appointment, which should include both an in-depth interview and a series of personality tests. (sociopathicstyle.com)