A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain DEFICIENS PROTEIN.
DEFICIENS is a homeotic gene involved in the genetic control of Antirrhinum majus flower development. Its protein is one of the four founder proteins that structurally define the superfamily of MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS.
The reproductive organs of plants.
Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain steroidal glycosides.
A superfamily of proteins that share a highly conserved MADS domain sequence motif. The term MADS refers to the first four members which were MCM1 PROTEIN; AGAMOUS 1 PROTEIN; DEFICIENS PROTEIN; and SERUM RESPONSE FACTOR. Many MADS domain proteins have been found in species from all eukaryotic kingdoms. They play an important role in development, especially in plants where they have an important role in flower development.
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.
A group of plant cells that are capable of dividing infinitely and whose main function is the production of new growth at the growing tip of a root or stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The parts of plants, including SEEDS.
The figwort plant family of the order Lamiales. The family is characterized by bisexual flowers with tubular corollas (fused petals) that are bilaterally symmetrical (two-lips) and have four stamens in most, two of which are usually shorter.
Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS.
A plant genus, of the family ONAGRACEAE, which is the subject of genetic studies. The floral aroma is attributed to benzenoid esters and benzyl acetate.
Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the myb gene (GENES, MYB). They are expressed in a wide variety of cells including thymocytes and lymphocytes, and regulate cell differentiation. Overexpression of myb is associated with autoimmune diseases and malignancies.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.

The mechanics of cell fate determination in petals. (1/76)

The epidermal cells of petals of many species are specialized, having a pronounced conical shape. A transcription factor, MIXTA, is required for the formation of conical cells in Antirrhinum majus; in shoot epidermal cells of several species, expression of this gene is necessary and sufficient to promote conical cell formation. Ectopic expression has also shown MIXTA to be able to promote the formation of multicellular trichomes, indicating that conical cells and multicellular trichomes share elements of a common developmental pathway. Formation of conical cells or trichomes is also mutually exclusive with stomatal formation. In Antirrhinum, MIXTA normally only promotes conical cell formation on the inner epidermal layer of the petals. Its restricted action in cell fate determination results from its specific expression pattern. Expression of MIXTA, in turn, requires the activity of B-function genes, and biochemical evidence suggests that the products of DEFICIENS, GLOBOSA and SEPALLATA-related genes directly activate MIXTA expression late in petal development, after the completion of cell division in the petal epidermis. A MIXTA-like gene, AmMYBML1, is also expressed in petals. AmMYBML1 expression is high early in petal development. This gene may direct the formation of trichomes in petals. In specifying the fates of different cell types in petals, regulatory genes like MIXTA may have been duplicated. Changes in the timing and spatial localization of expression then provides similar regulatory genes which specify different cell fates.  (+info)

Evidence for cytoplasmic inheritance of a developmental organizer affecting growth habit and leaf shape in Antirrhinum majus. (2/76)

A cross between two distinct, true-breeding plants of Antirrhinum majus L. showed an unexpected pattern of inheritance of growth habit in the F2, which was extended to both growth habit and leaf shape in the F3 generation of all the plants traced further. All the F3 families, offspring of individual F2 plants, were very uniform for both growth habit and leaf shape traits but differed distinctly from each other in these respects. The backcrosses of selected F3 and F4 families to the original parents in the cross did not segregate for the distinctive family phenotypes. This led to the postulate that a cytoplasmic factor was involved in the regulation and/or integration of genetic information concerned with growth habit/leaf shape. The similarity of the reciprocal backcrosses of the F3 and F4 families led to the further postulate that the proposed cytoplasmic factor was specified by both the maternal and paternal parents to a similar degree. That the gene component was segregating normally was shown by the inheritance of four marker genes for flower colour, colour pattern and flower shape.  (+info)

Polymorphic microsatellites in Antirrhinum (Scrophulariaceae), a genus with low levels of nuclear sequence variability. (3/76)

In Antirrhinum, reproductive systems range from self-compatible to self-incompatible, but the actual outcrossing rates of self-compatible populations are not known. Thus the extent to which levels of variability and inbreeding differ among Antirrhinum populations is not known. In order to address this issue we isolated nine Antirrhinum nuclear microsatellite loci. In contrast to several nuclear genes that show low levels of sequence variation, six of the microsatellite loci indicate high levels of variability within and between Antirrhinum species. The highly self-compatible Antirrhinum majus ssp. cirrhigerum population has high levels of variability and no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, suggesting substantial rates of outcrossing.  (+info)

Genetic variability in a narrow endemic snapdragon (Antirrhinum subbaeticum, Scrophulariaceae) using RAPD markers. (4/76)

Antirrhinum subbaeticum is an endangered species inhabiting fragmented limestone cliffs. In the last 3 years, a drastic population decline has been observed in three of four known populations and the estimated number of surviving individuals is now close to 400. A RAPD study was conducted to evaluate the levels of genetic variation present in this species to improve conservation guidelines. Thirty-nine polymorphic products identified 66.1% of the samples by unique RAPD multilocus profiles. A cluster analysis grouped the samples into two broad groups corresponding to northern or southern provenances. AMOVA analysis showed that only 17.7% of the genetic diversity was partitioned within populations. These results are in contrast to data available for other Antirrhinum species. This genetic structure could be explained by the predominant selfing behaviour exhibited by A. subbaeticum as opposed to the allogamy of other congeners. Genetic diversity within populations does not seem to be strongly related to population size and historical factors could be responsible for the very low levels of genetic diversity found in one population. Given the low genetic diversity within populations, it is suggested that an extensive sampling of individuals be made for recovering appropriate levels of the gene pool for ex situ preservation. However, translocation of individuals to the genetically weakened Bogarra population from other sources is not recommended.  (+info)

AhSL28, a senescence- and phosphate starvation-induced S-like RNase gene in Antirrhinum. (5/76)

Several species of higher plants have been found to contain S-like ribonucleases (RNases), which are homologous to S-RNases controlling self-incompatibility. No S-like RNase genes have been isolated from self-incompatible Antirrhinum. To investigate the relationship between S- and S-like RNases, we cloned a gene named AhSL28 encoding an S-like RNase in Antirrhinum. Amino acid sequence, genomic structure and phylogenetic analyses indicated that AhSL28 is most similar to RNS2, an S-like RNase from Arabidopsis thaliana and formed a distinct subclass together with several other S-like RNases within the S-RNase superfamily. Unlike S-RNase genes in Antirrhinum, AhSL28 is not only expressed in pistils but also in leaves, petals, sepals and anthers, in particular, showing a strong expression in vascular tissues and transmitting track. Moreover, its RNA transcripts were induced during leaf senescence and phosphate (Pi) starvation but not by wounding, indicating that AhSL28 plays a role in remobilizing Pi and other nutrients, particularly when cells senesce and are under limited Pi conditions in Antirrhinum. Possible evolutionary relations of S- and S-like RNases as well as signal transduction pathways related to S-like RNase action are discussed.  (+info)

Separation of genetic functions controlling organ identity in flowers. (6/76)

Comparative studies on the ABC model of floral development have revealed extensive conservation of B and C class genes, but have failed to identify similar conservation for A class genes. Using a reverse genetic approach, we show that the previous inability to obtain Antirrhinum mutants corresponding to the A class gene AP2 of Arabidopsis reflects greater genetic redundancy in Antirrhinum . Antirrhinum has two genes corresponding to AP2, termed LIP1 and LIP2, both of which need to be inactivated to give a mutant phenotype. Analysis of interactions between LIP and class B/C genes shows that unlike AP2 in Arabidopsis, LIP genes are not required for repression of C in outer whorls of the flower. However, like AP2, LIP genes play a role in sepal, petal and ovule development, although some of their detailed effects are different, reflecting the diverse morphologies of Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis flowers. The dual functions for which AP2 is required in Arabidopsis are therefore separate in Antirrhinum, showing that the genetic basis of some aspects of organ identity have undergone major evolutionary change.  (+info)

Genetic control of surface curvature. (7/76)

Although curvature of biological surfaces has been considered from mathematical and biophysical perspectives, its molecular and developmental basis is unclear. We have studied the cin mutant of Antirrhinum, which has crinkly rather than flat leaves. Leaves of cin display excess growth in marginal regions, resulting in a gradual introduction of negative curvature during development. This reflects a change in the shape and the progression of a cell-cycle arrest front moving from the leaf tip toward the base. CIN encodes a TCP protein and is expressed downstream of the arrest front. We propose that CIN promotes zero curvature (flatness) by making cells more sensitive to an arrest signal, particularly in marginal regions.  (+info)

A linkage map of an F2 hybrid population of Antirrhinum majus and A. molle. (8/76)

To increase the utility of Antirrhinum for genetic and evolutionary studies, we constructed a molecular linkage map for an interspecific hybrid A. majus x A. molle. An F(2) population (n = 92) was genotyped at a minimum of 243 individual loci. Although distorted transmission ratios were observed at marker loci throughout the genome, a mapping strategy based on a fixed framework of codominant markers allowed the loci to be placed into eight robust linkage groups consistent with the haploid chromosome number of Antirrhinum. The mapped loci included 164 protein-coding genes and a similar number of unknown sequences mapped as AFLP, RFLP, ISTR, and ISSR markers. Inclusion of sequences from mutant loci allowed provisional alignment of classical and molecular linkage groups. The total map length was 613 cM with an average interval of 2.5 cM, but most of the loci were aggregated into clusters reducing the effective distance between markers. Potential causes of transmission ratio distortion and its effects on map construction were investigated. This first molecular linkage map for Antirrhinum should facilitate further mapping of mutations, major QTL, and other coding sequences in this model genus.  (+info)

'Antirrhinum' is the genus name for a group of plants commonly known as "snapdragons." The term 'Antirrhinum' comes from the Greek words "anti" meaning like, and "rhin" meaning nose, which describes the shape of their flowers. Snapdragons are popular ornamental plants known for their unique flower structure, with a "mouth" that can be opened and closed by squeezing the sides of the flower.

While 'Antirrhinum' is a botanical name and not a medical term per se, it is important to note that some species of Antirrhinum contain certain chemical compounds that have been studied for their potential medicinal properties. For instance, certain Antirrhinum species have been found to contain iridoid glycosides, which have been investigated for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, it is essential to note that these studies are still in the early stages, and more research is needed before any definitive medical claims can be made about Antirrhinum or its potential therapeutic benefits.

I'm not aware of a medical term called "DEFICIENS protein." It is possible that you may have misspelled the name or it could be a term specific to a certain context, such as a research lab or a specific medical condition.

In general, a deficiency in a particular protein can lead to various medical conditions depending on the function of that protein. Proteins play crucial roles in the body, including acting as enzymes, hormones, structural components, and transporters. A deficiency in a particular protein can result from genetic mutations, poor nutrition, or other factors.

If you meant to ask about a specific protein, please provide more context or check the spelling, so I can give you a more accurate answer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

'Plant development' is not a term typically used in medical definitions, as it is more commonly used in the field of botany to describe the growth and differentiation of plant cells, tissues, and organs over time. However, in a broader context, plant development can be defined as the series of changes and processes that occur from the fertilization of a plant seed to the formation of a mature plant, including germination, emergence, organ formation, growth, and reproduction.

In medicine, terms related to plant development may include "phytotherapy" or "herbal medicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as medicinal treatments for various health conditions. The study of how these plants develop and produce their active compounds is an important area of research in pharmacology and natural products chemistry.

A gene in plants, like in other organisms, is a hereditary unit that carries genetic information from one generation to the next. It is a segment of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) that contains the instructions for the development and function of an organism. Genes in plants determine various traits such as flower color, plant height, resistance to diseases, and many others. They are responsible for encoding proteins and RNA molecules that play crucial roles in the growth, development, and reproduction of plants. Plant genes can be manipulated through traditional breeding methods or genetic engineering techniques to improve crop yield, enhance disease resistance, and increase nutritional value.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

I apologize for any confusion, but "plants" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "plants" refers to a large and diverse group of organisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, which is the process of converting sunlight into chemical energy. Plants are typically characterized by having cells with cell walls containing cellulose, chloroplasts containing the pigment chlorophyll, and the ability to synthesize their own food through photosynthesis.

In a medical or biological context, you might be thinking of "plant-based" or "phytomedicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as a form of medicine or treatment. Phytomedicines have been used for thousands of years in many traditional systems of medicine, and some plant-derived compounds have been found to have therapeutic benefits in modern medicine as well. However, "plants" itself does not have a medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Petunia" is not a medical term. It's the name of a genus of plants in the family Solanaceae, commonly known as petunias. They are popular ornamental plants due to their vibrant and diverse flowers. If you have any questions about botany or gardening, I'd be happy to try to help with those!

MADS domain proteins are a family of transcription factors that play crucial roles in various developmental processes in plants, including flower development and organ formation. The name "MADS" is an acronym derived from the initial letters of four founding members: MCM1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGAMOUS from Arabidopsis thaliana, DEFICIENS from Antirrhinum majus, and SRF from Homo sapiens.

These proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the MADS-box, which binds to specific sequences in the promoter regions of their target genes. The MADS domain proteins often form higher-order complexes through protein-protein interactions, leading to the regulation of gene expression involved in developmental transitions and cell fate determination. In plants, MADS domain proteins have been implicated in various aspects of reproductive development, such as floral meristem identity, floral organ specification, and ovule development.

Angiosperms, also known as flowering plants, are a group of plants that produce seeds enclosed within an ovary. The term "angiosperm" comes from the Greek words "angeion," meaning "case" or "capsule," and "sperma," meaning "seed." This group includes the majority of plant species, with over 300,000 known species.

Angiosperms are characterized by their reproductive structures, which consist of flowers. The flower contains male and female reproductive organs, including stamens (which produce pollen) and carpels (which contain the ovules). After fertilization, the ovule develops into a seed, while the ovary matures into a fruit, which provides protection and nutrition for the developing embryo.

Angiosperms are further divided into two main groups: monocots and eudicots. Monocots have one cotyledon or embryonic leaf, while eudicots have two. Examples of monocots include grasses, lilies, and orchids, while examples of eudicots include roses, sunflowers, and legumes.

Angiosperms are ecologically and economically important, providing food, shelter, and other resources for many organisms, including humans. They have evolved a wide range of adaptations to different environments, from the desert to the ocean floor, making them one of the most diverse and successful groups of plants on Earth.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic material present in the cells of all living organisms, including plants. In plants, DNA is located in the nucleus of a cell, as well as in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plant DNA contains the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the plant, and is passed down from one generation to the next through the process of reproduction.

The structure of DNA is a double helix, formed by two strands of nucleotides that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. Each nucleotide contains a sugar molecule (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. There are four types of nitrogenous bases in DNA: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, forming the rungs of the ladder that make up the double helix.

The genetic information in DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nitrogenous bases. Large sequences of bases form genes, which provide the instructions for the production of proteins. The process of gene expression involves transcribing the DNA sequence into a complementary RNA molecule, which is then translated into a protein.

Plant DNA is similar to animal DNA in many ways, but there are also some differences. For example, plant DNA contains a higher proportion of repetitive sequences and transposable elements, which are mobile genetic elements that can move around the genome and cause mutations. Additionally, plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, which are not present in animal cells, and these structures contain their own DNA.

Gene expression regulation in plants refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and RNA from the genes present in the plant's DNA. This regulation is crucial for normal growth, development, and response to environmental stimuli in plants. It can occur at various levels, including transcription (the first step in gene expression, where the DNA sequence is copied into RNA), RNA processing (such as alternative splicing, which generates different mRNA molecules from a single gene), translation (where the information in the mRNA is used to produce a protein), and post-translational modification (where proteins are chemically modified after they have been synthesized).

In plants, gene expression regulation can be influenced by various factors such as hormones, light, temperature, and stress. Plants use complex networks of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling complexes, and small RNAs to regulate gene expression in response to these signals. Understanding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation in plants is important for basic research, as well as for developing crops with improved traits such as increased yield, stress tolerance, and disease resistance.

A meristem, in the context of plant biology, refers to a type of tissue found in plants that is responsible for their growth. These tissues are composed of cells that have the ability to divide and differentiate into various specialized cell types. Meristems are typically located at the tips of roots and shoots (apical meristems), as well as within the vascular bundles (cambial meristems) and in the cork layers (phellogen meristems). They contribute to the increase in length and girth of plant organs, allowing plants to grow throughout their life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Structures" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of botany to refer to the different parts of a plant, such as roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Each of these structures has specific functions that contribute to the overall growth, reproduction, and survival of the plant. If you have any questions related to biology or botany, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

Scrophulariaceae is a family of plants commonly known as the Figwort or Snapdragon family. It was once a large and diverse group, but many of its members have been reclassified into different families in recent years based on molecular evidence. The family still includes a number of well-known garden plants such as foxgloves (Digitalis), snapdragons (Antirrhinum), and penstemons (Penstemon).

The plants in Scrophulariaceae are typically herbaceous, although some are shrubs or small trees. They are characterized by their two-lipped flowers, with the upper lip usually forming a hood and the lower lip often having three lobes. The stamens and style are often enclosed within the flower and only emerge when it is fully open.

Scrophulariaceae has been reported to contain various chemical compounds with potential medicinal properties, such as cardiac glycosides in Digitalis species, which have been used to treat heart conditions. However, it's important to note that the use of these plants for medicinal purposes should only be done under the guidance and supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, as they can also contain toxic compounds that may cause harm if not used correctly.

Homeobox genes are a specific class of genes that play a crucial role in the development and regulation of an organism's body plan. They encode transcription factors, which are proteins that regulate the expression of other genes. The homeobox region within these genes contains a highly conserved sequence of about 180 base pairs that encodes a DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain. This domain is responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the transcription of target genes.

Homeobox genes are particularly important during embryonic development, where they help establish the anterior-posterior axis and regulate the development of various organs and body segments. They also play a role in maintaining adult tissue homeostasis and have been implicated in certain diseases, including cancer. Mutations in homeobox genes can lead to developmental abnormalities and congenital disorders.

Some examples of homeobox gene families include HOX genes, PAX genes, and NKX genes, among others. These genes are highly conserved across species, indicating their fundamental role in the development and regulation of body plans throughout the animal kingdom.

'Clarkia' is a term that refers to a genus of annual or perennial plants belonging to the family Onagraceae. These plants are native to western North America and are commonly known as "godetias" or "farewell-to-springs." The name 'Clarkia' honors Captain William Clark, who explored the western United States with Meriwether Lewis in the early 19th century.

There is no specific medical definition associated with 'Clarkia.' While some species of 'Clarkia' have been used traditionally by indigenous peoples for medicinal purposes, there is limited scientific evidence to support their effectiveness or safety. Therefore, it is not commonly recognized as a term with a medical definition in the same way that other plant names, such as 'Digitalis' (foxglove) or 'Salix alba' (white willow), might be.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-Myb, also known as MYB proteins, are transcription factors that play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression during normal cell growth, differentiation, and development. They are named after the avian myeloblastosis virus, which contains an oncogenic version of the c-myb gene.

The human c-Myb protein is encoded by the MYB gene located on chromosome 6 (6q22-q23). This protein contains a highly conserved N-terminal DNA-binding domain, followed by a transcription activation domain and a C-terminal negative regulatory domain. The DNA-binding domain recognizes specific DNA sequences in the promoter regions of target genes, allowing c-Myb to regulate their expression.

Inappropriate activation or overexpression of c-Myb can contribute to oncogenesis, leading to the development of various types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma. This occurs due to uncontrolled cell growth and proliferation, impaired differentiation, and increased resistance to apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Regulation of c-Myb activity is tightly controlled in normal cells through various mechanisms, including post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and degradation. Dysregulation of these control mechanisms can result in the aberrant activation of c-Myb, contributing to oncogenesis.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

Genetically modified plants (GMPs) are plants that have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering techniques to exhibit desired traits. These modifications can be made to enhance certain characteristics such as increased resistance to pests, improved tolerance to environmental stresses like drought or salinity, or enhanced nutritional content. The process often involves introducing genes from other organisms, such as bacteria or viruses, into the plant's genome. Examples of GMPs include Bt cotton, which has a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that makes it resistant to certain pests, and golden rice, which is engineered to contain higher levels of beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. It's important to note that genetically modified plants are subject to rigorous testing and regulation to ensure their safety for human consumption and environmental impact before they are approved for commercial use.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Pigmentation, in a medical context, refers to the coloring of the skin, hair, or eyes due to the presence of pigment-producing cells called melanocytes. These cells produce a pigment called melanin, which determines the color of our skin, hair, and eyes.

There are two main types of melanin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Eumelanin is responsible for brown or black coloration, while pheomelanin produces a red or yellow hue. The amount and type of melanin produced by melanocytes can vary from person to person, leading to differences in skin color and hair color.

Changes in pigmentation can occur due to various factors such as genetics, exposure to sunlight, hormonal changes, inflammation, or certain medical conditions. For example, hyperpigmentation refers to an excess production of melanin that results in darkened patches on the skin, while hypopigmentation is a condition where there is a decreased production of melanin leading to lighter or white patches on the skin.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Antirrhinum. The Plant List Antirrhinum in Topwalks The Genus Antirrhinum (Snapdragon): ... Antirrhinum species are widely used as ornamental plants in borders and as cut flowers. The Antirrhinum is morphologically ... Yellow Snapdragon Flower Antirrhinum majus Flower Pink Snapdragon Flower Antirrhinum majus Flower Pink Snapdragon Flower White ... "Plants Profile for Antirrhinum (snapdragon)". plants.usda.gov. Retrieved May 30, 2020. The Plant List: Antirrhinum (retrieved ...
... (syn. Neogaerrhinum filipes) is an annual species of North American snapdragon, usually known by the common ... "Antirrhinum filipes A. Gray". National Park Service. Retrieved March 28, 2017. Emily Bowers, Janice (1999). Flowers and Shrubs ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Antirrhinum filipes. USDA Plants Profile Photo gallery (Articles with short description ...
Licensed under CC0 (license statement/permission). Text taken from Antirrhinum tortuosum​, . Encyclopedia of Life. "Antirrhinum ... Antirrhinum tortuosum is a species of plant in the family Plantaginaceae. This article incorporates text from a free content ... Mifsud, Stephen (2002-08-23). "Antirrhinum tortuosum (Greater Snapdragon) : MaltaWildPlants.com - the online Flora of the ... Antirrhinum, Flora of Malta, All stub articles, Plantaginaceae stubs). ...
"Antirrhinum siculum Mill. - Encyclopedia of Life". eol.org. Retrieved 2022-02-04. Mifsud, Stephen (2002-08-23). "Antirrhinum ... Antirrhinum siculum is a species of herb in the family Plantaginaceae. They have simple, narrow leaves. Individuals can grow to ... Licensed under CC0 (license statement/permission). Text taken from Antirrhinum siculum​, . Encyclopedia of Life. " ... Antirrhinum, Flora of Malta, All stub articles, Plantaginaceae stubs). ...
... (syn. Sairocarpus cornutus) is an uncommon species of New World snapdragon known by the common name ... Antirrhinum, Flora of California, Plants described in 1849, Flora without expected TNC conservation status, All stub articles, ...
... is a species of plant in the family Plantaginaceae. It is endemic to Spain. Its natural habitat is ... Antirrhinum subbaeticum is a beautiful perennial herb found only in the eastern Andalusia mountain ranges of Spain. It is a ... The flowers of Antirrhinum subbaeticum are densely clustered into an attractive inflorescence, borne on a branching stem ... Sánchez Gómez, P.; Carrión Vilches, M.A.; Jiménez Martínez, J.F. (2006). "Antirrhinum subbaeticum". IUCN Red List of Threatened ...
... , the Spanish snapdragon, is a species of flowering plant belonging to the genus Antirrhinum that is ... Data related to Antirrhinum hispanicum at Wikispecies Media related to Antirrhinum hispanicum at Wikimedia Commons (Articles ...
... subsp. litigiosum (Pau) Rothm.: now synonymised with Antirrhinum barrelieri Boreau Antirrhinum majus subsp. ... ex Ficalho) Antirrhinum majus subsp. linkianum (Boiss. & Reut.) Rothm: now classified as Antirrhinum linkianum Boiss. & Reut. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Antirrhinum majus. Wikispecies has information related to Antirrhinum majus. (Articles ... Antirrhinum majus can survive a certain amount of frost, as well as higher temperatures, but does best at 17-25 °C (63-77 °F). ...
... (syn. Neogaerrhinum kelloggii) is a species of New World snapdragon known by the common name Kellogg's ... Antirrhinum, Flora of Baja California, Flora of California, Flora without expected TNC conservation status, All stub articles, ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Antirrhinum kelloggii. v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ...
Antirrhinum siculum Mill. Antirrhinum tortuosum Bosc ex Lam. Antirrhinum valentinum Font Quer "Antirrhinum L. , Plants of the ... Antirrhinum latifolium Mill. Antirrhinum linkianum Boiss. & Reut. Antirrhinum majus L. Antirrhinum martenii (Font Quer) Rothm. ... Antirrhinum controversum Pau Antirrhinum × ferrandopardoi P.P.Ferrer Antirrhinum graniticum Rothm. Antirrhinum grosii Font Quer ... Link Antirrhinum microphyllum Rothm. Antirrhinum molle L. Antirrhinum × montserratii Molero & Romo Antirrhinum pertegasii Rothm ...
Antirrhinum multiflorum) is a species of New World snapdragon known by the common name Sierra snapdragon or multi-flowered ... "Antirrhinum thompsonii". ucjeps.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2023-05-15. USDA Plants Profile Photo gallery v t e (Articles with ...
"Antirrhinum siculum". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Antirrhinum tortuosum". MaltaWildPlants.com ...
"ITIS - Report: Antirrhinum coulterianum". www.itis.gov. Retrieved 2022-12-05. Media related to Antirrhinum coulterianum at ... Antirrhinum coulterianum USDA Plants Profile Antirrhinum coulterianum - U.C. Photo gallery v t e (Articles with short ... Antirrhinum coulterianum) is a species of New World snapdragon known by the common name Coulter's snapdragon. It is native to ...
Antirrhinum vexillocalyculatum) is a species of New World snapdragon found only in California and occasionally Oregon. This ... Antirrhinum vexillocalyculatum ssp. breweri. The Jepson Manual. USDA Plants Profile Jepson Manual Treatment v t e (Articles ...
formerly often in Antirrhinum Misopates Raf. - formerly often in Antirrhinum Mohavea A.Gray - formerly often in Antirrhinum ... formerly often in Antirrhinum Pseudomisopates Güemes Sairocarpus D.A.Sutton - formerly often in Antirrhinum Chaenorhinum clade ... Nanorrhinum Betsche Antirrhinum clade / Mohaveinae (disputed) - most formerly in Linariinae Acanthorrhinum Rothm. Antirrhinum L ... Except for the Antirrhinum-Chaenorhinum and Linaria clades, all main lineages have resolved as basal in one recent study or ...
"Rust resistance in Antirrhinum". Phytopathology 25 (11): 977-991. 1935. ---. "Michigan fungi. I". Papers from the Michigan ...
antirrhini attacks snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus). "Pseudomonas tomato" pv. apii attacks celery (Apium graveolens). " ...
... is a British plant geneticist known for her work on members of the genus Antirrhinum, commonly known as a ... Antirrhinum Stock Collection, archived images of snapdragon variants CA 2230511A1 "Flowering genes" - for the CENTRORADIALIS ( ... Working with Brian Harrison in the 1970s, she defined genetic instabilities in Antirrhinum and the role of temperature in ... Carpenter, R; Coen, E S (1 September 1990). "Floral homeotic mutations produced by transposon-mutagenesis in Antirrhinum majus ...
The larvae feed on Antirrhinum asarina. Fauna Europaea Bidzilya, O., 2005: A review of the genus Athrips (Lepidoptera: ...
It can be found in Antirrhinum majus (common snapdragon). It can be found in blackcurrant, açaí, black raspberry, litchi ... Gilbert, R.I. (1971). "An unusual anthocyanin in Antirrhinum majus". Phytochemistry. 10 (11): 2848-2849. doi:10.1016/S0031-9422 ... Scott-Moncrieff, R (1930). "Natural anthocyanin pigments: The magenta flower pigment of Antirrhinum majus". Biochemical Journal ...
Antirrhinum cyathiferum), a New World snapdragon known by the common names dog's-mouth and Deep Canyon snapdragon. It is native ... Previously considered to belong among the New World Antirrhinum species, it is now considered the sole member of the related ... Oyama, Ryan K.; Baum, David A. (2004). "Phylogenetic relationships of North American Antirrhinum (Veronicaceae)". American ...
This genus is often included in the closely related snapdragon genus Antirrhinum. Formerly included in the family ... Oyama, R. K.; Baum, D. A. (2004). "Phylogenetic relationships of North American Antirrhinum (Veronicaceae)". American Journal ...
Larvae have been recorded on Antirrhinum species. Fauna Europaea "Tentative Checklist of the Turkish Lepidoptera". Archived ...
... , the antirrhinum brocade, is a moth of the family Noctuidae. The species was first described by Eugenius ... The larvae feed on the flowers and leaves of Antirrhinum and Linaria species. Imago larva pupa Warren. W. in Seitz, A. Ed., ... "73.060 BF2224 Antirrhinum Brocade Calophasia platyptera (Esper, 1788)". UKMoths. Retrieved 24 January 2021. Fauna Europaea ...
Snapdragon or Antirrhinum is a genus of plants. Snapdragon or Snap-dragon may also refer to: Qualcomm Snapdragon, a hardware ...
She studied the inheritance of flower colour in the common snapdragon Antirrhinum and the biochemistry of anthocyanin pigment ... Wheldale, Muriel (1907). "The Inheritance of Flower Colour in Antirrhinum Majus". Proc. R. Soc. B. 79 (532): 288-304. Bibcode: ... Bateson's genetics group at Cambridge where she began her study focusing on the inheritance of petal colour in Antirrhinum ( ... her with expertise in biochemical genetics for investigating the inheritance and biosynthesis of petal colour in Antirrhinum. ...
The larval hosts are Antirrhinum, Linaria, and Nuttallanthus. "Connecticut's Endangered, Threatened and Special Concern Species ...
Box 3: The control of floral determinacy in Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis from Zsuzsanna Schwarz-Sommer, Brendan Davies & Andrew ... Hudson (August 2003). "An everlasting pioneer: the story of Antirrhinum research". Nature Reviews Genetics. 4 (8): 655-664. doi ...
graniticum, Antirrhinum rupestris, Arrhenatherum fernandesii, Biscutella bilbilitana, Centaurea monticola subsp. citricolor, ... In this habitat it occurs together with these following characteristic species: Antirrhinum graniticum subsp. ...
The bright yellow flowers resemble those of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus). They are bilaterally symmetrical and composed of ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Antirrhinum. The Plant List Antirrhinum in Topwalks The Genus Antirrhinum (Snapdragon): ... Antirrhinum species are widely used as ornamental plants in borders and as cut flowers. The Antirrhinum is morphologically ... Yellow Snapdragon Flower Antirrhinum majus Flower Pink Snapdragon Flower Antirrhinum majus Flower Pink Snapdragon Flower White ... "Plants Profile for Antirrhinum (snapdragon)". plants.usda.gov. Retrieved May 30, 2020. The Plant List: Antirrhinum (retrieved ...
Photo of Antirrhinum orontium L.. Antirrhinum orontium L., Misopates orontium (L.) Rafin - (Lesser Snapdragon). Annual herb of ...
Antirrhinum majus Black Prince. SNAPDRAGON. Family: Scrophulariaceae. Pronounced: an-tih-RI-num MAY-jus ...
View all photos in CalPhotos of Antirrhinum nuttallianum ssp. nuttallianum *Check Google Images for Antirrhinum nuttallianum ... Antirrhinum nuttallianum ssp. nuttallianum. Wild Snapdragon Photographer: Joseph Dougherty. ID: 0000 0000 1105 1569 (2005-11-29 ... The photographers identification Antirrhinum nuttallianum ssp. nuttallianum has not been reviewed. Click here to review or ... View Calflora record for Antirrhinum nuttallianum ssp. nuttallianum* ...
Specializing in rare and unusual annual and perennial plants, including cottage garden heirlooms and hard to find California native wildflowers.
scotsgrans entry Antirrhinum in their garden on Grows on You. ... Species: Antirrhinum.. Many years ago I sowed a packet of these ... antirrhinums and they have self sown their seeds ever since. If possible I leave them where they land. ...
Unwins Natures Haven Antirrhinum Potomac Cherry Rose Seeds, aka Snapdragons, produces tall, sturdy, striking pink flower ... Natures Haven Antirrhinum Potomac Cherry Rose Seeds. Snapdragon - Antirrhinum majus Unwins Natures Haven Antirrhinum Potomac ... Home > Natures Haven Antirrhinum Potomac Cherry Rose Seeds ...
Photo of Antirrhinum majus Twinny Yellow Shades - Semi-double azalea flowered dwarf gorgeous pink blooms. (12 in/ 30 cm) Family ... Photo of Antirrhinum Twinny Yellow Shades (Snapdragon) Antirrhinum majus Twinny Yellow Shades - Semi-double azalea flowered ...
Antirrhinum nanum Dwarf Bedding Mixed seeds from Thompson & Morgan - experts in the garden since 1855 ... Antirrhinum nanum Dwarf Bedding Mixed - SeedsSnapdragon. Half-hardy Annual. What is Half-Hardy Annual?. A plant that ...
New season item arrive from September.Antirrhinum Madame Butterfly is a selected form of the traditional snapdragon. It ... Antirrhinum Madame Butterfly is a selected form of the traditional snapdragon. It produces tall, elegant spikes of semi-double ...
div id=full-description, ,p class=description, The flowers of Antirrhinum majus F1 Twinny introduce a brand-new colour ... The genus name Antirrhinum, pronounced an-ti-RYE-num, comes from the Greek. anti meaning like, and rhinos meaning nose, ... The flowers of Antirrhinum majus F1 Twinny introduce a brand-new colour palette for snapdragons, not to mention an exciting ... Worldwide, Antirrhinum is one of the most important summer cut-flowers grown from seed. They are grown year-round in ...
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DOWNLOADTrademarks of Ball Horticultural Company contained on this site or in connection with loaned images are the property of Ball Horticultural Company and are authorized for use only in connection with Ball Horticultural Company products. Trademarks must be used in the form as contained on this site or in connection with loaned images. Any unauthorized use is prohibited. Copyright images from Ball Horticultural Company may be reproduced only in connection with the marketing of Ball Horticultural company products. The correct variety name as listed on images provided must be used in connection with any reproductions ...
Ficha original de Antirrhinum onubense (Fern. Casas) Fern. Casas, con propiedad y copyright de la web www.hoseito.com. ... Antirrhinum onubense (Fern. Casas) Fern. Casas in Fontqueria 15: 39 (1987) ... Antirrhinum onubense (Fern. Casas) Fern. Casas * Descripción Descripción. Antirrhinum onubense (Fern. Casas) Fern. Casas in ... Etimología del Género: Antirrhinum=del griego anti-; en lugar de. Y del griego rhis, rhinos; nariz. Por el parecido de la ...
Antirrhinum is also called snapdragon, because the colourful flowers look just like the face of a dragon. These tiny dragon- ... Antirrhinum is flowering plant that is a nutrient dense herb that acts as an excellent anti-inflammatory. ... Antirrhinum is flowering plant that is a nutrient dense herb that acts as an excellent anti-inflammatory. Antirrhinum is also ...
Spacing: 12 - 14" (30 - 36cm) Height: 6 - 8" (15 - 20cm) Width: 10 - 16" (25 - 41cm) Exposure: Sun ...
Antirrhinum. From the Greek anti, "like," and rhinon, "nose," because the flowers do seem to have a snout. ... Snapdragons (Antirrhinum) · 8/27/2007 · Shore Acres State Park, Cape Arago, Ore-gon. ≈ 10 × 7" (26 × 17 cm) Species not yet ... Snapdragons (Antirrhinum) · 8/15/1996 · Connies Garden, Falmouth, Maine Species not yet identified ...
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Perennial, blooming the first year, 4-8 dm, glandular-hairy above; lvs lanceolate, to 15 mm wide; fls in terminal racemes; cor variously colored, 2.5-4 cm; cal-lobes broadly ovate, obtuse, 3-5 mm; fr glandular, 1.5 cm; 2n=16, 32. Native of the Mediterranean region, occasionally escaped from cult. in our range. Summer ...
Perennial, blooming the first year, 4-8 dm, glandular-hairy above; lvs lanceolate, to 15 mm wide; fls in terminal racemes; cor variously colored, 2.5-4 cm; cal-lobes broadly ovate, obtuse, 3-5 mm; fr glandular, 1.5 cm; 2n=16, 32. Native of the Mediterranean region, occasionally escaped from cult. in our range. Summer ...
lindawildtbotan2021-02-08T12:33:13+00:00februari 8, 2021, ...
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Antirrhinum nanum Dwarf Bedding Mixed, Antirrhinum Mini Cherry Cola ... Antirrhinum majus pumilum Magic Carpet - Kew Collection Seeds. Antirrhinum majus pumilum Magic Carpet - Kew Collection ... Antirrhinum Mini Cherry Cola This compact Antirrhinum comes to you direct from T&M?s own breeding programme. Dwarf, well- ... Antirrhinum Aromas Mixed Antirrhinum Aromas Mixed is a new strain that offers an enticing array of fruity shades plus the ...
Plant Antirrhinum, Snapdragon, Flowering plants - in @AlisaJ garden plant collection ...
Genus: Antirrhinum. Species: majus. Variety: Orange Wonder Snapdragon. Native to: Baleares, France, Portugal, Spain. Introduced ...
Antirrhinum majus Papuľka vyššia 20. júla 2020. 2. mája 2023. Dvojročné, Letničky ...
SKU: 1013 SKU: field_630df5a7c02c4 Antirrhinum majus SNAPTINI, Profesionālās puķu sēklas, Viengadīgās puķes ...
  • The species in this section, including the section type species Antirrhinum orontium (lesser snapdragon) are often treated in the genus Misopates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antirrhinum Madame Butterfly is a selected form of the traditional snapdragon. (palmers.co.nz)
  • Antirrhinum is also called snapdragon, because the colourful flowers look just like the face of a dragon. (ugaoo.com)
  • ANTIRRHINUM majus 'Tetra Mix' (Snapdragon, Mixed) is a popular annual flowering plant that is native to the Mediterranean region. (myseeds.co)
  • The annual snapdragon (Antirrhinum. (plantdelights.com)
  • Antirrhinum is a genus of plants commonly known as dragon flowers or snapdragons because of the flowers' fancied resemblance to the face of a dragon that opens and closes its mouth when laterally squeezed. (wikipedia.org)
  • antirrhiniflora means having flowers like those of Antirrhinum, the genus of common garden-variety snapdragons. (neonscience.org)
  • The genus Antirrhinum is ubiquitous in American gardens. (plantdelights.com)
  • Antirrhinum is an Old World genus of up to 25 perennial taxa, mainly located in the western Mediterranean basin. (floraprotegida.es)
  • Many years ago I sowed a packet of these antirrhinums and they have self sown their seeds ever since. (growsonyou.com)
  • Unwins Nature's Haven Antirrhinum Potomac Cherry Rose Seeds, also known as Snapdragons, produce tall, sturdy, striking candy pink flower spikes with contrasting dark foliage. (unwins.co.uk)
  • Antirrhinum used to be treated within the family Scrophulariaceae, but studies of DNA sequences have led to its inclusion in a vastly enlarged family Plantaginaceae, within the tribe Antirrhineae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antirrhinum species are widely used as ornamental plants in borders and as cut flowers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The situation is further complicated by the variety of terms in use for infrageneric ranks, especially of the Old World species, that is Antirrhinum, sensu stricto (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both Misopates and Sairocarpus are accepted names in The Plant List, and many of the New World species now have Sairocarpus as their accepted name, rather than Antirrhinum. (wikipedia.org)
  • For a comparison of earlier schemes see Mateu-Andrés and de Paco, Table 1 (2005) If the broad circumscription is accepted, its three sections as described by Thompson are as follows (two Old World, one New): Section Antirrhinum: 19 Old World species of relatively large flowered perennial plants, including the type species Antirrhinum majus, mostly native to the western Mediterranean region with a focus on the Iberian Peninsula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species: Antirrhinum. (growsonyou.com)
  • The flowers of Antirrhinum majus 'F1 Twinny' introduce a brand-new colour palette for snapdragons, not to mention an exciting double-flowered form and award-winning garden performance. (seedaholic.com)
  • Antirrhinum majus Twinny Yellow Shades - Semi-double azalea flowered dwarf gorgeous pink blooms. (millettephotomedia.com)
  • Antirrhinum 'Mini Butterflies' is a dwarf variety that will create a bright and beautiful display in your garden throughout the summer months. (gardeningdirect.co.uk)
  • 410048 Antirrhinum 'Mini Butterflies' Mix https://www.gardeningdirect.co.uk/item-p-410048/antirrhinum-mini-butterflies-mix https://s3.amazonaws.com/YouGarden/Web/500x500/410048.jpg OutOfStock 14.99 GBP Antirrhinum 'Mini Butterflies' is a dwarf variety that will create a bright and beautiful display in your garden throughout the summer months. (gardeningdirect.co.uk)
  • The rich carnival of colour produced by this stunning Antirrhinum is perfectly foiled by the unusual, frosted foliage, making the plants a real talking point. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • Antirrhinum Orleans Red IV biedt lange, volle bloemaren met een rijke, dieprode kleur. (evanthia.nl)
  • Antirrhinum Orleans is de serie bij uitstek voor teelt onder hogere temperaturen en een hoge lichtintensiteit. (evanthia.nl)
  • The stand-out colour of Antirrhinum 'Komodo Orange' comes in a fruity cocktail of deep juicy orange which matures into tangerine and gold overlaid with a coral pink blush. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • Worldwide, Antirrhinum is one of the most important 'summer cut-flowers' grown from seed. (seedaholic.com)
  • Antirrhinum majus 'Circus Clowns' makes a vibrant display in patio containers or planted en masse for a big impact in beds and borders. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • Antirrhinum majus 'Reminiscent Mixed' has a particularly long flowering period making this an ideal choice for wildlife borders, beds and containers. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • DEFICIENS is a homeotic gene involved in the genetic control of Antirrhinum majus flower development. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Antirrhinum is morphologically diverse, particularly the New World group (Saerorhinum). (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been proposed that many of the New World Antirrhinum be now considered under Sairocarpus, in the forthcoming Flora of North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • This compact Antirrhinum comes to you direct from T&M?s own breeding programme. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • Antirrhinum is flowering plant that is a nutrient dense herb that acts as an excellent anti-inflammatory. (ugaoo.com)
  • The species in this section, including the section type species Antirrhinum orontium (lesser snapdragon) are often treated in the genus Misopates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antirrhinum vexillocalyculatum) is a species of New World snapdragon found only in California and occasionally Oregon. (calflora.org)
  • Unwins Antirrhinum Snappy Mix Seeds or Snapdragon are a half-hardy annual in an eye-catching colour mix of pinks, purples, yellows and blushes. (unwins.co.uk)
  • Antirrhinum majus, a perennial 'Snapdragon', bearing masses of flowers. (wardsfarmflowers.com)
  • Product Name: Antirrhinum Rocket Rose Shades Flower Seeds Qty: 1000 Seeds Scientific Name : Antirrhinum majus Common Name: Garden Snapdragon Bloom. (chhajedgarden.com)
  • The Snapdragon flower (Antirrhinum majus) is a beautiful and vibrant flower that thrives in well-draining soil. (cucurbitbreeding.com)
  • Sow Antirrhinum seeds indoors or under glass from January to March on the surface of a good quality seed compost and gently firm down. (thompson-morgan.com)
  • Product Name: Antirrhinum Floral Showers Rose Flower Seeds Brand: Sakata Qty: 1000 Seeds Description : Floral Showers is a day-length neutral sn. (chhajedgarden.com)
  • Product Name : Antirrhinum Potomac Cherry Rose Flower Seeds Qty : 1000 Seeds Brand: PanAmerican Description : Scientific Name : Antirrhinum maju. (chhajedgarden.com)
  • Product Name: Antirrhinum Floral Showers Rose Pink Flower seeds Brand: Sakata Qty: 1000 Seeds Description : Floral Showers is a day-length neut. (chhajedgarden.com)
  • Product Name : Antirrhinum Snapshot Rose Flower Seeds Qty : 1000 Seeds Brand : PanAmerican Scientific Name : Antirrhinum majus Common Name : Dwar. (chhajedgarden.com)
  • Both Misopates and Sairocarpus are accepted names in The Plant List, and many of the New World species now have Sairocarpus as their accepted name, rather than Antirrhinum. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been proposed that many of the New World Antirrhinum be now considered under Sairocarpus, in the forthcoming Flora of North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antirrhinum is a genus of plants commonly known as dragon flowers or snapdragons because of the flowers' fancied resemblance to the face of a dragon that opens and closes its mouth when laterally squeezed. (wikipedia.org)
  • As with most snapdragons, the blooms of Antirrhinum 'Purple Twist' attract bees and other pollinating insects, and make striking cut flowers for a vase indoors. (thompson-morgan.com)
  • Antirrhinum Cannes Light Bronze III brengt een bijzondere brons tot oranje/gele kleur. (evanthia.nl)
  • Antirrhinum Cannes is, als typische groep 3 serie, de stabiele oplossing voor moeilijk planbare seizoenovergangen met minder ideale weersomstandigheden. (evanthia.nl)
  • Cannes plant je tegen het einde van de winter tot begin van de zomer, voor een uitbundige bloei en een zware kwaliteit bloemstelen in de overgang van het voorjaar naar de zomer en van de zomer naar de herfst. (evanthia.nl)
  • Combineer Cannes leeuwenbekken met series als Antibes en Animation (groep I), Costa (groep I-II), Avignon (groep II) en Orleans (groep IV) voor een solide jaarrond programma. (evanthia.nl)
  • The systems in general use utilize certain varieties of Tradescantia, Glycine max, Nicotiana tabacum, Antirrhinum majus, Petunia hybrida , and Arabidopsis thaliana . (nih.gov)
  • Antirrhinum majus 'Circus Clowns' makes a vibrant display in patio containers or planted en masse for a big impact in beds and borders. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • Antirrhinum majus 'Reminiscent Mixed' has a particularly long flowering period making this an ideal choice for wildlife borders, beds and containers. (vanmeuwen.com)
  • This compact Antirrhinum comes to you direct from T&M?s own breeding programme. (vanmeuwen.com)