Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Leukemia P388: An experimental lymphocytic leukemia originally induced in DBA/2 mice by painting with methylcholanthrene.Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids: Alkaloids derived from TYRAMINE combined with 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde via a norbelladine pathway, including GALANTAMINE, lycorine and crinine. They are found in the Amaryllidaceae (LILIACEAE) plant family.Narcissus: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain ungiminorine and LECTINS.Ellipticines: Pyrido-CARBAZOLES originally discovered in the bark of OCHROSIA ELLIPTICA. They inhibit DNA and RNA synthesis and have immunosuppressive properties.Bibenzyls: Compounds with 1,2-diphenylethane. They are structurally like reduced STILBENES.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Antibiotics, Antineoplastic: Chemical substances, produced by microorganisms, inhibiting or preventing the proliferation of neoplasms.ThiadiazinesBryostatins: A group of 20-member macrolactones in which there are three remotely substituted pyran rings that are linked by a methylene bridge and an E-disubstituted alkene, and have geminal dimethyls at C8 and C18 carbons. Some interact with PROTEIN KINASE C.Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating: A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)Ancitabine: Congener of CYTARABINE that is metabolized to cytarabine and thereby maintains a more constant antineoplastic action.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Gallium: A rare, metallic element designated by the symbol, Ga, atomic number 31, and atomic weight 69.72.Depsipeptides: Compounds consisting of chains of AMINO ACIDS alternating with CARBOXYLIC ACIDS via ester and amide linkages. They are commonly cyclized.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.6-Mercaptopurine: An antimetabolite antineoplastic agent with immunosuppressant properties. It interferes with nucleic acid synthesis by inhibiting purine metabolism and is used, usually in combination with other drugs, in the treatment of or in remission maintenance programs for leukemia.Drug Synergism: The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Aminoacridines: Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.Epothilones: A group of 16-member MACROLIDES which stabilize MICROTUBULES in a manner similar to PACLITAXEL. They were originally found in the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, now renamed to Polyangium (MYXOCOCCALES).Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Sarcoma 180Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Lactones: Cyclic esters of hydroxy carboxylic acids, containing a 1-oxacycloalkan-2-one structure. Large cyclic lactones of over a dozen atoms are MACROLIDES.Leukemia L1210Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic: Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.Daunorubicin: A very toxic anthracycline aminoglycoside antineoplastic isolated from Streptomyces peucetius and others, used in treatment of LEUKEMIA and other NEOPLASMS.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Prodrugs: A compound that, on administration, must undergo chemical conversion by metabolic processes before becoming the pharmacologically active drug for which it is a prodrug.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Macrolides: A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Camptothecin: An alkaloid isolated from the stem wood of the Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminata. This compound selectively inhibits the nuclear enzyme DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE I. Several semisynthetic analogs of camptothecin have demonstrated antitumor activity.Stilbenes: Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.HL-60 Cells: A promyelocytic cell line derived from a patient with ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA. HL-60 cells lack specific markers for LYMPHOID CELLS but express surface receptors for FC FRAGMENTS and COMPLEMENT SYSTEM PROTEINS. They also exhibit phagocytic activity and responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli. (From Hay et al., American Type Culture Collection, 7th ed, pp127-8)Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Vincristine: An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)Isoquinolines: A group of compounds with the heterocyclic ring structure of benzo(c)pyridine. The ring structure is characteristic of the group of opium alkaloids such as papaverine. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Biotransformation: The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.DNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Caspases: A family of intracellular CYSTEINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that play a role in regulating INFLAMMATION and APOPTOSIS. They specifically cleave peptides at a CYSTEINE amino acid that follows an ASPARTIC ACID residue. Caspases are activated by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor form to yield large and small subunits that form the enzyme. Since the cleavage site within precursors matches the specificity of caspases, sequential activation of precursors by activated caspases can occur.Taxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Phospholipid Ethers: Phospholipids which have an alcohol moiety in ethereal linkage with a saturated or unsaturated aliphatic alcohol. They are usually derivatives of phosphoglycerols or phosphatidates. The other two alcohol groups of the glycerol backbone are usually in ester linkage. These compounds are widely distributed in animal tissues.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Reactive Oxygen Species: Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Gloves, Protective: Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.Aster Plant: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. This plant should not be confused with microtubule asters (MICROTUBULES) nor with aster yellows phytoplasma (mycoplasma-like organisms).Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Olacaceae: A small plant family of the order Santalales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Medical Secretaries: Individuals responsible for various duties pertaining to the medical office routine.Oncology Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with the care provided to cancer patients. It includes aspects of family functioning through education of both patient and family.LaunderingSulindac: A sulfinylindene derivative prodrug whose sulfinyl moiety is converted in vivo to an active NSAID analgesic. Specifically, the prodrug is converted by liver enzymes to a sulfide which is excreted in the bile and then reabsorbed from the intestine. This helps to maintain constant blood levels with reduced gastrointestinal side effects.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Dental Physiological Processes: Functions and activities of DENTITION as a whole.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Equipment Contamination: The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.Amsacrine: An aminoacridine derivative that intercalates into DNA and is used as an antineoplastic agent.Decontamination: The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.Vanadium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain vanadium as an integral part of the molecule.Phlebitis: Inflammation of a vein, often a vein in the leg. Phlebitis associated with a blood clot is called (THROMBOPHLEBITIS).Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Inhibitory Concentration 50: The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.ThiosemicarbazonesCarcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor: A transplantable, poorly differentiated malignant tumor which appeared originally as a spontaneous breast carcinoma in a mouse. It grows in both solid and ascitic forms.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Floxuridine: An antineoplastic antimetabolite that is metabolized to fluorouracil when administered by rapid injection; when administered by slow, continuous, intra-arterial infusion, it is converted to floxuridine monophosphate. It has been used to treat hepatic metastases of gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas and for palliation in malignant neoplasms of the liver and gastrointestinal tract.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)2-Propanol: An isomer of 1-PROPANOL. It is a colorless liquid having disinfectant properties. It is used in the manufacture of acetone and its derivatives and as a solvent. Topically, it is used as an antiseptic.Antineoplastic Protocols: Clinical protocols used to inhibit the growth or spread of NEOPLASMS.Tumor Stem Cell Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of tumor stem cells by assaying their activity. It is used primarily for the in vitro testing of antineoplastic agents.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Carmustine: A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Topoisomerase II Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit the activity of DNA TOPOISOMERASE II. Included in this category are a variety of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS which target the eukaryotic form of topoisomerase II and ANTIBACTERIAL AGENTS which target the prokaryotic form of topoisomerase II.Drug Resistance, Multiple: Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.Farnesyltranstransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate from trans, trans-farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate.Oncology Service, Hospital: The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cancer patient.Comet Assay: A genotoxicological technique for measuring DNA damage in an individual cell using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Cell DNA fragments assume a "comet with tail" formation on electrophoresis and are detected with an image analysis system. Alkaline assay conditions facilitate sensitive detection of single-strand damage.Drugs, Investigational: Drugs which have received FDA approval for human testing but have yet to be approved for commercial marketing. This includes drugs used for treatment while they still are undergoing clinical trials (Treatment IND). The main heading includes drugs under investigation in foreign countries.Isocoumarins: Compounds that differ from COUMARINS in having the positions of the ring and ketone oxygens reversed so the keto oxygen is at the 1-position of the molecule.Nitrogen Mustard Compounds: A group of alkylating agents derived from mustard gas, with the sulfur replaced by nitrogen. They were formerly used as toxicants and vesicants, but now function as antineoplastic agents. These compounds are also powerful mutagens, teratogens, immunosuppressants, and carcinogens.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.DioxolesSuramin: A polyanionic compound with an unknown mechanism of action. It is used parenterally in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis and it has been used clinically with diethylcarbamazine to kill the adult Onchocerca. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1643) It has also been shown to have potent antineoplastic properties.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Alkaloids: Organic nitrogenous bases. Many alkaloids of medical importance occur in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and some have been synthesized. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Topoisomerase I Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit the activity of DNA TOPOISOMERASE I.Azacitidine: A pyrimidine analogue that inhibits DNA methyltransferase, impairing DNA methylation. It is also an antimetabolite of cytidine, incorporated primarily into RNA. Azacytidine has been used as an antineoplastic agent.DNA Adducts: The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.DNA Topoisomerases, Type II: DNA TOPOISOMERASES that catalyze ATP-dependent breakage of both strands of DNA, passage of the unbroken strands through the breaks, and rejoining of the broken strands. These enzymes bring about relaxation of the supercoiled DNA and resolution of a knotted circular DNA duplex.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Nitrosourea CompoundsMice, Inbred BALB CPharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Lethal Dose 50: The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.Pyrones: Keto-pyrans.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Mutagenicity Tests: Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.PyrazinesMetabolic Detoxication, Drug: Reduction of pharmacologic activity or toxicity of a drug or other foreign substance by a living system, usually by enzymatic action. It includes those metabolic transformations that make the substance more soluble for faster renal excretion.HT29 Cells: Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells such as the GOBLET CELLS.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Hydrazones: Compounds of the general formula R:N.NR2, as resulting from the action of hydrazines with aldehydes or ketones. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Sulfonamides: A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Alkylating Agents: Highly reactive chemicals that introduce alkyl radicals into biologically active molecules and thereby prevent their proper functioning. Many are used as antineoplastic agents, but most are very toxic, with carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and immunosuppressant actions. They have also been used as components in poison gases.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Razoxane: An antimitotic agent with immunosuppressive properties.Phosphorylcholine: Calcium and magnesium salts used therapeutically in hepatobiliary dysfunction.Organoplatinum Compounds: Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.Octreotide: A potent, long-acting synthetic SOMATOSTATIN octapeptide analog that inhibits secretion of GROWTH HORMONE and is used to treat hormone-secreting tumors; DIABETES MELLITUS; HYPOTENSION, ORTHOSTATIC; HYPERINSULINISM; hypergastrinemia; and small bowel fistula.Glutathione Transferase: A transferase that catalyzes the addition of aliphatic, aromatic, or heterocyclic FREE RADICALS as well as EPOXIDES and arene oxides to GLUTATHIONE. Addition takes place at the SULFUR. It also catalyzes the reduction of polyol nitrate by glutathione to polyol and nitrite.Lomustine: An alkylating agent of value against both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors.PiperazinesMitomycins: A group of methylazirinopyrroloindolediones obtained from certain Streptomyces strains. They are very toxic antibiotics used as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS in some solid tumors. PORFIROMYCIN and MITOMYCIN are the most useful members of the group.Dehydroascorbic Acid: The reversibly oxidized form of ascorbic acid. It is the lactone of 2,3-DIKETOGULONIC ACID and has antiscorbutic activity in man on oral ingestion.Anthracyclines: Organic compounds that have a tetrahydronaphthacenedione ring structure attached by a glycosidic linkage to the amino sugar daunosamine.Cancer Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of cancer patients.

Electronic volume analysis of L1210 chemotherapy. (1/35913)

The rapid analysis of in vivo chemotherapy on the L1210 ascites tumor grown in C57BL/6 X DBA/2F1 mice has been shown by means of an electronic volume analysis. The drugs were injected on the 4th day of tumor growth, and the cells in the peritoneal cavity were studied at 24-hr intervals on the 5th through 7th day. Using the electronic cell volume distributions, combined with labeling indices, cell morphology, and cell counts, it was found that the alkylating agents. 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and cyclophosphamide, at the dosages used, were more effective than the S-phase-specific drugs, palmitoyl ester of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, vincristine, and methotrexate.  (+info)

Various forms of chemically induced liver injury and their detection by diagnostic procedures. (2/35913)

A large number of chemical agents, administered for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes, can produce various types of hepatic injury by several mechanisms. Some agents are intrinsically hepatotoxic, and others produce hepatic injury only in the rare, uniquely susceptible individual. Idiosyncrasy of the host is the mechanism for most types of drug-induced hepatic injury. It may reflect allergy to the drug or a metabolic aberation of the host permitting the accumulation of hepatotoxic metabolites. The syndromes of hepatic disease produced by drugs have been classified hepatocellular, hepatocanalicular, mixed and canalicular. Measurement of serum enzyme activities has provided a powerful tool for studies of hepatotoxicity. Their measurement requires awareness of relative specificity, knowledge of the mechanisms involved, and knowledge of the relationship between known hepatotoxic states and elevated enzyme activities.  (+info)

Differential regulation of p21waf-1/cip-1 and Mdm2 by etoposide: etoposide inhibits the p53-Mdm2 autoregulatory feedback loop. (3/35913)

The Mdm2 protein is frequently overexpressed in human non-seminomatous germ cell tumours and transitional carcinoma of the bladder where it may contribute to tolerance of wtp53. Mdm2 forms an autoregulatory feedback loop with p53; the Mdm2 gene is responsive to transactivation by p53 and once synthesized the Mdm2 protein terminates the p53 response. We show here that the topoisomerase poison etoposide, like ultra violet irradiation, inhibits Mdm2 synthesis. Cytotoxic concentrations of etoposide (IC90 for > 3 h) result in inhibition of Mdm2 induction at both the RNA and protein level. Rapid apoptosis ensues. Global transcription is not inhibited: p21waf-1/cip1 and GADD45 expression increase in a dose dependent manner. Inhibition of Mdm2 synthesis depends on the continuous presence of etoposide, suggesting the DNA damage may prevent transcription. Downregulation of Mdm2 transcript occurs in cells expressing HPV16-E6 suggesting that inhibition of Mdm2 transcription is p53-independent. When cells are -treated with a pulse (1 h) of etoposide and reincubated in drug free medium, Mdm2 synthesis commences immediately after damage is repaired (3 h) and the p53 response is attenuated. Induction of apoptosis and loss of clonogenicity are 3-5-fold lower under pulse treatment conditions. This is the first observation of inhibition of Mdm2 transcription following treatment with topoisomerase (topo II) poisons, a feature that may be useful in tumour types where p53 is tolerated by overexpression of Mdm2.  (+info)

Retinoic acid, but not arsenic trioxide, degrades the PLZF/RARalpha fusion protein, without inducing terminal differentiation or apoptosis, in a RA-therapy resistant t(11;17)(q23;q21) APL patient. (4/35913)

Primary blasts of a t(11;17)(q23;q21) acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) patient were analysed with respect to retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) sensitivity as well as PLZF/RARalpha status. Although RA induced partial monocytic differentiation ex vivo, but not in vivo, As203 failed to induce apoptosis in culture, contrasting with t(15;17) APL and arguing against the clinical use of As203 in t(11;17)(q23;q21) APL. Prior to cell culture, PLZF/RARalpha was found to exactly co-localize with PML onto PML nuclear bodies. However upon cell culture, it quickly shifted towards microspeckles, its localization found in transfection experiments. Arsenic trioxide, known to induce aggregation of PML nuclear bodies, left the microspeckled PLZF/RARalpha localization completely unaffected. RA treatment led to PLZF/RARalpha degradation. However, this complete PLZF/RARalpha degradation was not accompanied by differentiation or apoptosis, which could suggest a contribution of the reciprocal RARalpha/PLZF fusion product in leukaemogenesis or the existence of irreversible changes induced by the chimera.  (+info)

Constitutive activation of Stat3 signaling confers resistance to apoptosis in human U266 myeloma cells. (5/35913)

Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is the major survival factor for myeloma tumor cells and induces signaling through the STAT proteins. We report that one STAT family member, Stat3, is constitutively activated in bone marrow mononuclear cells from patients with multiple myeloma and in the IL-6-dependent human myeloma cell line U266. Moreover, U266 cells are inherently resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis and express high levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Blocking IL-6 receptor signaling from Janus kinases to the Stat3 protein inhibits Bcl-xL expression and induces apoptosis, demonstrating that Stat3 signaling is essential for the survival of myeloma tumor cells. These findings provide evidence that constitutively activated Stat3 signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma by preventing apoptosis.  (+info)

Overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) in human heavy metal-selected tumor cells. (6/35913)

Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the resistance to cytotoxic heavy metals remain largely to be characterized in mammalian cells. To this end, we have analyzed a metal-resistant variant of the human lung cancer GLC4 cell line that we have selected by a step-wise procedure in potassium antimony tartrate. Antimony-selected cells, termed GLC4/Sb30 cells, poorly accumulated antimony through an enhanced cellular efflux of metal, thus suggesting up-regulation of a membrane export system in these cells. Indeed, GLC4/Sb30 cells were found to display a functional overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, a drug export pump, as demonstrated by Western blotting, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and calcein accumulation assays. Moreover, MK571, a potent inhibitor of MRP1 activity, was found to markedly down-modulate resistance of GLC4/Sb30 cells to antimony and to decrease cellular export of the metal. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that overexpression of functional MRP1 likely represents one major mechanism by which human cells can escape the cytotoxic effects of heavy metals.  (+info)

Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with the long-acting somatostatin analogue lanreotide: in vitro and in vivo results. (7/35913)

Fourteen patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with the long-acting somatostatin (SST) analogue lanreotide. No objective response was obtained, and the median survival was 4 months (range 1.8-7 months). Pancreatic cancer could not be visualized by means of SST-receptor (R) scintigraphy in our patients. In vitro data also demonstrated absence of SSTR2 expression, suggesting pancreatic cancer not to be a potential target for treatment with SST analogues.  (+info)

Role of dexamethasone dosage in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists for prophylaxis of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. (8/35913)

Dexamethasone (20 mg) or its equivalent in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists appears to be the gold-standard dose for antiemetic prophylaxis. Additional to concerns about the use of corticosteroids with respect to enhanced tumour growth or impaired killing of the tumour cells, there is evidence that high-dosage dexamethasone impairs the control of delayed nausea and emesis, whereas lower doses appear more beneficial. To come closer to the most adequate dose, we started a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial investigating additional dosage of 8 or 20 mg dexamethasone to tropisetron (Navoban), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in cis-platinum-containing chemotherapy. After an interim analysis of 121 courses of chemotherapy in 69 patients, we have been unable to detect major differences between both treatment alternatives. High-dose dexamethasone (20 mg) had no advantage over medium-dose dexamethasone with respect to objective and subjective parameters of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting. In relation to concerns about the use of corticosteroids in non-haematological cancer chemotherapy, we suggest that 8 mg or its equivalent should be used in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists until further research proves otherwise.  (+info)

  • Principles of safe handling of antineoplastic agents. (edcan.org.au)
  • This page includes guideline for the safe handling of antineoplastic agents from professional organizations, government agencies and international groups. (unt.edu)
  • This page lists reviews of the literature published on the topic of safe handling of antineoplastic agents which provide background information on the topic. (unt.edu)
  • On the other hand, alkylating agents such as cisplatin, cis- [PtCl2 (NH3) have been widely used as antineoplastic agents for a wide variety of cancers including testicular, ovarian, neck and head cancers, amongst others. (uwc.ac.za)
  • However, the use of cisplatin as an anticancer agent is limited due to toxicity and resistance problems. (uwc.ac.za)
  • On the other hand the newly synthesized palladium complexes also need further evaluation to see if they can be used as anticancer agents that can overcome the problems associated with cisplatin. (uwc.ac.za)
  • Current chemotherapy and infectious disease : proceedings of the 11th International Congress of Chemotherapy and the 19th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, Massachusetts, 1-5 October 1979 / editors, John D. Nelson, Carlo Grassi. (who.int)
  • With the average cost of a new oral antineoplastic drug in 2012 approximating $10,000, paying for medications can be a significant out-of-pocket expense and burden for patients. (hindawi.com)
  • Hypersensitivity to a chemotherapeutic agent is defined as an unforeseen reaction whose signs and symptoms cannot be explained by the known toxicity of the drug [ 29 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Which medications in the drug class Antineoplastic agents are used in the treatment of Pancreatic Cancer? (medscape.com)
  • The selective cytotoxicity displayed by these conjugates towards tested cancer cells with non-toxicity against normal human VERO cells indicated their potential for further antineoplastic drug development. (eurekaselect.com)
  • In this study had clarify the possibility of the drug-drug interaction with the concomitant administration among the commonly ad antineoplastic agents in routine chemotherapy. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Drug repurposing against COVID-19: focus on anticancer agents. (coviki.org)
  • Presently, there are about 50 antineoplastic agents that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States. (workoutforfatloss.com)
  • For a general outline of antineoplastic drug interactions. (pocketdrugguide.com)
  • Clinical trials were identified with the search terms "drug therapy", "antineoplastic agents" and "double blind method" and limited to English language, human, and randomized controlled trial. (docphin.com)
  • A total of 116 trials evaluating antineoplastic drug therapy were identified. (docphin.com)
  • 2 While the individual toxicities and drug interactions associated with both the antiretroviral and cytotoxic or molecularly targeted antineoplastic drug classes have been extensively studied, there is a clear paucity of literature on their overlapping toxicity profiles and pharmacokinetic inter-actions, not to mention the lack of national guidelines regarding the optimal therapeutic regimens for concurrent treatment of HIV and cancer. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The purpose of this brochure is to make you aware of the adverse health effects of antineoplastic agents, describe how you can be exposed to these agents, and provide and identify control methods and work practices to prevent or reduce your exposure to antineoplastic agents. (cdc.gov)
  • However, for the health care workers who are exposed to antineoplastic agents as part of their work practice, precautions should be taken to eliminate or reduce exposure as much as possible. (cdc.gov)
  • A number of studies have documented environmental and worker exposure to the antineoplastic agents. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthcare workers and oncology nurses should be fully aware of the hazards associated with not following these guidelines and the precautionary measures that can be used to minimize exposure to antineoplastic agents. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • These agents are considered cytotoxins, mutagens, and carcinogens, and hence, their proper handling is important to reduce occupational exposure. (workoutforfatloss.com)
  • This page contains articles published within the past three years on all topics related to occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents. (unt.edu)
  • The acute effects associated with exposure to antineoplastic agents, such as skin rashes, allergic-type reactions, hair loss and others, are included in the publications listed in this page. (unt.edu)
  • These data identify a novel mechanism of action of some commonly used antineoplastic agents which by decreasing the stability of CYP24 mRNA would prolong the bioavailability of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 for anticancer actions. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Calcitriol or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] and analogues have received much interest as anticancer agents because the secosteroid hormone has shown antitumor activity ( 1 - 3 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Feasibility of a Text Messaging Intervention to Promote Self-Management for Patients Prescribed Oral Anticancer Agents. (mhealthevidence.org)
  • PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine proof of concept of a mobile health (mHealth) intervention delivering text messages (texts) to self-manage among patients prescribed oral anticancer agents (OAs) and to examine preliminary efficacy on symptoms and medication adherence. (mhealthevidence.org)
  • The heterogeneous adverse effects induced by antineoplastic agents (cytotoxic and novel anticancer agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene- and iodine-based cancer therapies, and radioimmunotherapies) will be highlighted. (springer.com)
  • Anticancer agents based on natural product models / edited by John M. Cassady, John D. Douros. (who.int)
  • This study provides Anti - Neoplastic Agents sales, revenue, and market share for each player covered in this report for a period between 2016 and 2020. (openpr.com)
  • In this report, the global Anti-Neoplastic Agents market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • 2016 Global Antineoplastic and Immunomodulating Agents Industry Report is a professional and in-depth research report on the world's major regional market conditions of the Antineoplastic and Immunomodulating Agents industry, focusing on the main regions (North America, Europe and Asia) and the main countries (United States, Germany, Japan and China). (bigmarketresearch.com)
  • Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (viictr.org)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal" by people in this website by year, and whether "Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (viictr.org)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal" by people in Profiles. (viictr.org)
  • Publications] Hua Li, Norimitsu Kurata, Yuki Nishimura, Mariko Iwase, Eiji Uchida and Hajime Yasuhara: 'The effect of antineoplastic agent vinblastine and vincristine on CYP3A4, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 activity in human liver microsomes'Xenobiotica. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Cell-cycle nonspecific antineoplastic agents (CCNS) refer to a class of pharmaceuticals that act as antitumor agents at all or any phases of the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • A taxoid chemotherapeutic agent used as first-line and subsequent therapy for the treatment of advanced carcinoma of the ovary, and other various cancers including breast and lung cancer. (drugbank.ca)
  • Sometimes, one can experience an allergic reaction following the antineoplastic therapy. (workoutforfatloss.com)
  • As well, adherence to antineoplastic therapy is affected by the patient's understanding of the treatment and ability to remember information provided by the physician, treatment length and psychological distress. (univ-lorraine.fr)
  • The current paucity of literature detailing the overlapping toxicity profiles and pharmacokinetic interactions between HAART and antineoplastic agents as well as the lack of guidelines regarding the optimal pharmacologic regimens for concurrent treatment of HIV and malignancies further complicate therapy. (uspharmacist.com)
  • For cancer patients with a life-threatening disease, there is certainly a great benefit to treatment with these agents. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to acute or short-term effects related to treatment with antineoplastic agents, there are a number of long-term or chronic effects that have been identified in patients. (cdc.gov)
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer external icon (IARC) in Lyon, France has identified a number of antineoplastic agents and two combination therapies as having an association with cancer in patients who are treated with them. (cdc.gov)
  • With the increasing use of oral agents, patients now have more responsibility for monitoring and reporting side effects to their health care providers [ 3 , 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A human epidermal growth factor receptor type 1/epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-1/EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in combination with the antineoplastic agent gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer in patients who have not yet received chemotherapy. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Of 2,100 oncology nurses and other healthcare personnel, 80% do not wear two pairs of chemotherapy gloves and 15% do not even wear a single pair during the administration of antineoplastic agents to patients. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon, France has identified a number of antineoplastic agents and two combination therapies as having an association with cancer in patients who are treated with them. (unt.edu)
  • Many acute or short-term effects have been observed in patients treated with antineoplastic agents. (unt.edu)
  • As 33% of all HIV-related deaths are attributable to cancer, concomitantly treating such patients with HAART and antineoplastic agents is becoming increasingly common-place. (uspharmacist.com)
  • A new research study has been presented by UpMarketResearch.com offering a comprehensive analysis on the Global Anti - Neoplastic Agents Market where user can benefit from the complete market research report with all the required useful information about this market. (openpr.com)
  • This segmentation sheds light on the sales of the Anti - Neoplastic Agents on regional- and country-level. (openpr.com)
  • The competitive landscape chapter of the global market report provides key information about market players such as company overview, total revenue (financials), market potential, global presence, Anti - Neoplastic Agents sales and revenue generated, market share, prices, production sites and facilities, products offered, and strategies adopted. (openpr.com)
  • Our report helps readers decipher the current and future constraints in the Anti - Neoplastic Agents Market, and help them formulate optimum business strategies to maximize growth in the market. (openpr.com)
  • In the recent times, the global market for Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 has surfaced as one of the most promising markets in the pharmaceutical industry, thanks to the significant rise in research and development activities by leading vendors of Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 across the world. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • Manufacturers have turned to technological innovations and data-driven customization to satisfy the augmenting consumer demand for efficiency and more accuracy in results, leading to an increased usage of technology in the Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 production processes, which is also reflecting positively on the growth of this market. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • The research report on the Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 is an analytical study which comprehensively analyzes the competitive framework of this market. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • Using a number of effective assessment tools, such as porter's five forces and value chain analysis, it performs in-depth analyses of the production and supply as well as the demand and sales of Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 and provides deep insights into the future prospects of this market. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • The study begins with a detailed overview of the market for Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017, including the definition, classification, and industry chain structure of Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017, and move forward to cover every aspect of this market, counting several criteria based on which the market is classified. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • With chemical industry undergoing a phase of technological disruption, innovations in products are likely to shape the future of the Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • Further, it offers an estimation of the market size in terms of value (US$) and in volume (kilo tons) and talks about the key segments and the geographical subdivisions of the market for Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 in details. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • It provides in-depth information on the development trends and the policies and regulations, concerning Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017, implemented in each of the geographical segments. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • The predominant applications of the Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 have also been discussed at length in this research study. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • With all these analyses and information, this report can act as a valuable guide to readers looking to gain a clear understanding of all the factors that are influencing the market for Global anti neoplastic agents market research report 2017 at present and are projected to remain doing so over the forecast period. (qyresearchreports.com)
  • However, the high manufacturing costs of anti-neoplastic agents is the major factor hampering the Anti-neoplastic Agents Market growth. (marketdataforecast.com)
  • This research report on the Global Anti-neoplastic Agents Market segmented and sub-segmented into the following categories and analyzed market size and forecast for each segment until 2024. (marketdataforecast.com)
  • The Global Anti-neoplastic Agents market was dominated by North America closely followed Europe. (marketdataforecast.com)
  • s Closed System for Antineoplastic Agent Administration," was conducted by a team of nurses at the Abramson Cancer Center of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with more than 55,000 doses of chemotherapy delivered per year. (thefreedictionary.com)
Antineoplastic Agents: Hazardous Drug Exposures in Healthcare | NIOSH | CDC
Antineoplastic Agents: Hazardous Drug Exposures in Healthcare | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Verelan PM (Verapamil Hydrochloride): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Verelan PM (Verapamil Hydrochloride): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Drugs and Other Substances Interfering with Thyroid Function | SpringerLink
Drugs and Other Substances Interfering with Thyroid Function | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Ototoxicity: Overview, Aminoglycosides, Other Antibiotics
Ototoxicity: Overview, Aminoglycosides, Other Antibiotics (emedicine.medscape.com)
Ambisome (Amphotericin B): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Ambisome (Amphotericin B): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Hypopharyngeal Cancer: Overview, Clinical Presentation, Etiology and Risk Factors
Hypopharyngeal Cancer: Overview, Clinical Presentation, Etiology and Risk Factors (emedicine.medscape.com)
Antineoplastic Agents - Occupational Hazards in Hospitals | NIOSH | CDC
Antineoplastic Agents - Occupational Hazards in Hospitals | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Drug-Induced Hyperpigmentation: Review and Case Series | American Board of Family Medicine
Drug-Induced Hyperpigmentation: Review and Case Series | American Board of Family Medicine (jabfm.org)
Antineoplastic Agents | GreenMedInfo | Keyword | Natural Medicine
Antineoplastic Agents | GreenMedInfo | Keyword | Natural Medicine (greenmedinfo.com)
Anti - Neoplastic Agents Market Emerging Trends || Leading
Anti - Neoplastic Agents Market Emerging Trends || Leading (openpr.com)
Workplace Injuries Caused by Improper Placement...
Workplace Injuries Caused by Improper Placement... (scoop.it)
NIOSHTIC-2  Publications Search - 20034453 - Prevención de la exposición ocupacional a los antineoplásticos y otras medicinas...
NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20034453 - Prevención de la exposición ocupacional a los antineoplásticos y otras medicinas... (cdc.gov)
Evaluation of uttroside B, a saponin from Solanum nigrum Linn, as a promising chemotherapeutic agent against hepatocellular...
Evaluation of uttroside B, a saponin from Solanum nigrum Linn, as a promising chemotherapeutic agent against hepatocellular... (nature.com)
NIOSHTIC-2  Publications Search - 20028685 - Hazardous anticancer drugs in healthcare: environmental exposure assessment.
NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20028685 - Hazardous anticancer drugs in healthcare: environmental exposure assessment. (cdc.gov)
CDC - Publicaciones de NIOSH - Lista de NIOSH de antineoplásicos y otros fármacos tóxicos en entornos de atención médica, 2010 ...
CDC - Publicaciones de NIOSH - Lista de NIOSH de antineoplásicos y otros fármacos tóxicos en entornos de atención médica, 2010 ... (cdc.gov)
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - DrugBank
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - DrugBank (drugbank.ca)
Altretamine  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe
Altretamine - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe (medicineshoppe.com)
Venclexta  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe
Venclexta - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe (medicineshoppe.com)
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health - List of articles
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health - List of articles (sjweh.fi)
Delphinidin (CHEBI:28436)
Delphinidin (CHEBI:28436) (ebi.ac.uk)
Butein (CHEBI:3237)
Butein (CHEBI:3237) (ebi.ac.uk)
Anastrozole (CHEBI:2704)
Anastrozole (CHEBI:2704) (ebi.ac.uk)
Streptozocin (CHEBI:9288)
Streptozocin (CHEBI:9288) (ebi.ac.uk)
R)-amygdalin (CHEBI:17019)
R)-amygdalin (CHEBI:17019) (ebi.ac.uk)
Ponatinib (CHEBI:78543)
Ponatinib (CHEBI:78543) (ebi.ac.uk)
Quercetin 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (CHEBI:75839)
Quercetin 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (CHEBI:75839) (ebi.ac.uk)
Ferruginol (CHEBI:78274)
Ferruginol (CHEBI:78274) (ebi.ac.uk)
Disulfiram (CHEBI:4659)
Disulfiram (CHEBI:4659) (ebi.ac.uk)
Gefitinib (CHEBI:49668)
Gefitinib (CHEBI:49668) (ebi.ac.uk)
Celastrol (CHEBI:63959)
Celastrol (CHEBI:63959) (ebi.ac.uk)