Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.
An experimental lymphocytic leukemia originally induced in DBA/2 mice by painting with methylcholanthrene.
Alkaloids derived from TYRAMINE combined with 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde via a norbelladine pathway, including GALANTAMINE, lycorine and crinine. They are found in the Amaryllidaceae (LILIACEAE) plant family.
A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain ungiminorine and LECTINS.
Pyrido-CARBAZOLES originally discovered in the bark of OCHROSIA ELLIPTICA. They inhibit DNA and RNA synthesis and have immunosuppressive properties.
Compounds with 1,2-diphenylethane. They are structurally like reduced STILBENES.
Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.
Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.
Chemical substances, produced by microorganisms, inhibiting or preventing the proliferation of neoplasms.
Thiadiazines are heterocyclic compounds containing a 5-membered ring made up of two nitrogen atoms and three carbon atoms, one of which is bonded to a sulfur atom, and are known for their diverse pharmacological properties, including use as anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, and antipsychotic agents.
A group of 20-member macrolactones in which there are three remotely substituted pyran rings that are linked by a methylene bridge and an E-disubstituted alkene, and have geminal dimethyls at C8 and C18 carbons. Some interact with PROTEIN KINASE C.
A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)
Congener of CYTARABINE that is metabolized to cytarabine and thereby maintains a more constant antineoplastic action.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
A rare, metallic element designated by the symbol, Ga, atomic number 31, and atomic weight 69.72.
Compounds consisting of chains of AMINO ACIDS alternating with CARBOXYLIC ACIDS via ester and amide linkages. They are commonly cyclized.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.
A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.
An antimetabolite antineoplastic agent with immunosuppressant properties. It interferes with nucleic acid synthesis by inhibiting purine metabolism and is used, usually in combination with other drugs, in the treatment of or in remission maintenance programs for leukemia.
The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.
A group of 16-member MACROLIDES which stabilize MICROTUBULES in a manner similar to PACLITAXEL. They were originally found in the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, now renamed to Polyangium (MYXOCOCCALES).
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Sarcoma 180 is an undifferentiated, transplantable mouse tumor model originally induced by methylcholanthrene, widely used in preclinical cancer research for evaluating efficacy of potential therapeutic agents.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
Cyclic esters of hydroxy carboxylic acids, containing a 1-oxacycloalkan-2-one structure. Large cyclic lactones of over a dozen atoms are MACROLIDES.
Leukemia L1210 is a designation for a specific murine (mouse) leukemia cell line that was originally isolated from a female mouse with an induced acute myeloid leukemia, which is widely used as a model in cancer research, particularly for in vivo studies of drug efficacy and resistance.
Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.
A very toxic anthracycline aminoglycoside antineoplastic isolated from Streptomyces peucetius and others, used in treatment of LEUKEMIA and other NEOPLASMS.
A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.
A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.
A compound that, on administration, must undergo chemical conversion by metabolic processes before becoming the pharmacologically active drug for which it is a prodrug.
Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.
Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.
Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.
A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.
An alkaloid isolated from the stem wood of the Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminata. This compound selectively inhibits the nuclear enzyme DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE I. Several semisynthetic analogs of camptothecin have demonstrated antitumor activity.
Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.
A promyelocytic cell line derived from a patient with ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA. HL-60 cells lack specific markers for LYMPHOID CELLS but express surface receptors for FC FRAGMENTS and COMPLEMENT SYSTEM PROTEINS. They also exhibit phagocytic activity and responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli. (From Hay et al., American Type Culture Collection, 7th ed, pp127-8)
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)
A group of compounds with the heterocyclic ring structure of benzo(c)pyridine. The ring structure is characteristic of the group of opium alkaloids such as papaverine. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.
The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
A family of intracellular CYSTEINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that play a role in regulating INFLAMMATION and APOPTOSIS. They specifically cleave peptides at a CYSTEINE amino acid that follows an ASPARTIC ACID residue. Caspases are activated by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor form to yield large and small subunits that form the enzyme. Since the cleavage site within precursors matches the specificity of caspases, sequential activation of precursors by activated caspases can occur.
A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.
Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Phospholipids which have an alcohol moiety in ethereal linkage with a saturated or unsaturated aliphatic alcohol. They are usually derivatives of phosphoglycerols or phosphatidates. The other two alcohol groups of the glycerol backbone are usually in ester linkage. These compounds are widely distributed in animal tissues.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. This plant should not be confused with microtubule asters (MICROTUBULES) nor with aster yellows phytoplasma (mycoplasma-like organisms).
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
A small plant family of the order Santalales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Individuals responsible for various duties pertaining to the medical office routine.
A nursing specialty concerned with the care provided to cancer patients. It includes aspects of family functioning through education of both patient and family.
"Money laundering in the context of healthcare is the process of making illegally-gained proceeds appear legal, often through complex transactions and disguises, which can include various forms of fraudulent billing practices such as overbilling, underbilling, or billing for services not rendered to medical insurance programs or patients."
A sulfinylindene derivative prodrug whose sulfinyl moiety is converted in vivo to an active NSAID analgesic. Specifically, the prodrug is converted by liver enzymes to a sulfide which is excreted in the bile and then reabsorbed from the intestine. This helps to maintain constant blood levels with reduced gastrointestinal side effects.
Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.
Functions and activities of DENTITION as a whole.
Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.
Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.
The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.
An aminoacridine derivative that intercalates into DNA and is used as an antineoplastic agent.
The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.
Inorganic compounds that contain vanadium as an integral part of the molecule.
Inflammation of a vein, often a vein in the leg. Phlebitis associated with a blood clot is called (THROMBOPHLEBITIS).
Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.
Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.
The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.
Thiosemicarbazones are organic compounds resulting from the condensation of thiosemicarbazide with a carbonyl group, characterized by the presence of a -NH-CS-NH-CO- functional structure and widely used in chelation therapy due to their ability to form stable complexes with various metal ions.
A transplantable, poorly differentiated malignant tumor which appeared originally as a spontaneous breast carcinoma in a mouse. It grows in both solid and ascitic forms.
The individuals employed by the hospital.
An antineoplastic antimetabolite that is metabolized to fluorouracil when administered by rapid injection; when administered by slow, continuous, intra-arterial infusion, it is converted to floxuridine monophosphate. It has been used to treat hepatic metastases of gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas and for palliation in malignant neoplasms of the liver and gastrointestinal tract.
The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)
An isomer of 1-PROPANOL. It is a colorless liquid having disinfectant properties. It is used in the manufacture of acetone and its derivatives and as a solvent. Topically, it is used as an antiseptic.
Clinical protocols used to inhibit the growth or spread of NEOPLASMS.
A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of tumor stem cells by assaying their activity. It is used primarily for the in vitro testing of antineoplastic agents.
Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.
A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)
Compounds that inhibit the activity of DNA TOPOISOMERASE II. Included in this category are a variety of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS which target the eukaryotic form of topoisomerase II and ANTIBACTERIAL AGENTS which target the prokaryotic form of topoisomerase II.
Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.
An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate from trans, trans-farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate.
The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cancer patient.
A genotoxicological technique for measuring DNA damage in an individual cell using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Cell DNA fragments assume a "comet with tail" formation on electrophoresis and are detected with an image analysis system. Alkaline assay conditions facilitate sensitive detection of single-strand damage.
Drugs which have received FDA approval for human testing but have yet to be approved for commercial marketing. This includes drugs used for treatment while they still are undergoing clinical trials (Treatment IND). The main heading includes drugs under investigation in foreign countries.
Compounds that differ from COUMARINS in having the positions of the ring and ketone oxygens reversed so the keto oxygen is at the 1-position of the molecule.
A group of alkylating agents derived from mustard gas, with the sulfur replaced by nitrogen. They were formerly used as toxicants and vesicants, but now function as antineoplastic agents. These compounds are also powerful mutagens, teratogens, immunosuppressants, and carcinogens.
Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.
Dioxoles are organic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of two oxygen atoms and two carbon atoms, often found as substructures in various natural and synthetic molecules, including certain pharmaceuticals and toxic dioxin pollutants.
A polyanionic compound with an unknown mechanism of action. It is used parenterally in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis and it has been used clinically with diethylcarbamazine to kill the adult Onchocerca. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1643) It has also been shown to have potent antineoplastic properties.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
Organic nitrogenous bases. Many alkaloids of medical importance occur in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and some have been synthesized. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.
Compounds that inhibit the activity of DNA TOPOISOMERASE I.
A pyrimidine analogue that inhibits DNA methyltransferase, impairing DNA methylation. It is also an antimetabolite of cytidine, incorporated primarily into RNA. Azacytidine has been used as an antineoplastic agent.
The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.
DNA TOPOISOMERASES that catalyze ATP-dependent breakage of both strands of DNA, passage of the unbroken strands through the breaks, and rejoining of the broken strands. These enzymes bring about relaxation of the supercoiled DNA and resolution of a knotted circular DNA duplex.
Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.
Nitrosourea compounds are a class of alkylating agents used in cancer chemotherapy, which contain a nitro group (NO2) and a urea functional group (R-NH-CO-NH2), known for their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and damage DNA, thereby inhibiting tumor growth.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.
The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.
Keto-pyrans.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.
Pyrazines are heterocyclic organic compounds containing a six-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at opposite positions, often responsible for the characteristic flavors and aromas found in various foods, beverages, and some biological systems, but they do not have a direct medical definition as they are not a drug, treatment, or a significant component of human physiology or pathology.
Reduction of pharmacologic activity or toxicity of a drug or other foreign substance by a living system, usually by enzymatic action. It includes those metabolic transformations that make the substance more soluble for faster renal excretion.
Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells such as the GOBLET CELLS.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Compounds of the general formula R:N.NR2, as resulting from the action of hydrazines with aldehydes or ketones. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.
Highly reactive chemicals that introduce alkyl radicals into biologically active molecules and thereby prevent their proper functioning. Many are used as antineoplastic agents, but most are very toxic, with carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and immunosuppressant actions. They have also been used as components in poison gases.
Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.
An antimitotic agent with immunosuppressive properties.
Calcium and magnesium salts used therapeutically in hepatobiliary dysfunction.
Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.
A potent, long-acting synthetic SOMATOSTATIN octapeptide analog that inhibits secretion of GROWTH HORMONE and is used to treat hormone-secreting tumors; DIABETES MELLITUS; HYPOTENSION, ORTHOSTATIC; HYPERINSULINISM; hypergastrinemia; and small bowel fistula.
A transferase that catalyzes the addition of aliphatic, aromatic, or heterocyclic FREE RADICALS as well as EPOXIDES and arene oxides to GLUTATHIONE. Addition takes place at the SULFUR. It also catalyzes the reduction of polyol nitrate by glutathione to polyol and nitrite.
An alkylating agent of value against both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors.
Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4, often used in pharmaceuticals as smooth muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, and antihistamines, but can also be found as recreational drugs with stimulant and entactogen properties.
A group of methylazirinopyrroloindolediones obtained from certain Streptomyces strains. They are very toxic antibiotics used as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS in some solid tumors. PORFIROMYCIN and MITOMYCIN are the most useful members of the group.
The reversibly oxidized form of ascorbic acid. It is the lactone of 2,3-DIKETOGULONIC ACID and has antiscorbutic activity in man on oral ingestion.
Organic compounds that have a tetrahydronaphthacenedione ring structure attached by a glycosidic linkage to the amino sugar daunosamine.
Institutions specializing in the care of cancer patients.

Electronic volume analysis of L1210 chemotherapy. (1/35913)

The rapid analysis of in vivo chemotherapy on the L1210 ascites tumor grown in C57BL/6 X DBA/2F1 mice has been shown by means of an electronic volume analysis. The drugs were injected on the 4th day of tumor growth, and the cells in the peritoneal cavity were studied at 24-hr intervals on the 5th through 7th day. Using the electronic cell volume distributions, combined with labeling indices, cell morphology, and cell counts, it was found that the alkylating agents. 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and cyclophosphamide, at the dosages used, were more effective than the S-phase-specific drugs, palmitoyl ester of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, vincristine, and methotrexate.  (+info)

Various forms of chemically induced liver injury and their detection by diagnostic procedures. (2/35913)

A large number of chemical agents, administered for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes, can produce various types of hepatic injury by several mechanisms. Some agents are intrinsically hepatotoxic, and others produce hepatic injury only in the rare, uniquely susceptible individual. Idiosyncrasy of the host is the mechanism for most types of drug-induced hepatic injury. It may reflect allergy to the drug or a metabolic aberation of the host permitting the accumulation of hepatotoxic metabolites. The syndromes of hepatic disease produced by drugs have been classified hepatocellular, hepatocanalicular, mixed and canalicular. Measurement of serum enzyme activities has provided a powerful tool for studies of hepatotoxicity. Their measurement requires awareness of relative specificity, knowledge of the mechanisms involved, and knowledge of the relationship between known hepatotoxic states and elevated enzyme activities.  (+info)

Differential regulation of p21waf-1/cip-1 and Mdm2 by etoposide: etoposide inhibits the p53-Mdm2 autoregulatory feedback loop. (3/35913)

The Mdm2 protein is frequently overexpressed in human non-seminomatous germ cell tumours and transitional carcinoma of the bladder where it may contribute to tolerance of wtp53. Mdm2 forms an autoregulatory feedback loop with p53; the Mdm2 gene is responsive to transactivation by p53 and once synthesized the Mdm2 protein terminates the p53 response. We show here that the topoisomerase poison etoposide, like ultra violet irradiation, inhibits Mdm2 synthesis. Cytotoxic concentrations of etoposide (IC90 for > 3 h) result in inhibition of Mdm2 induction at both the RNA and protein level. Rapid apoptosis ensues. Global transcription is not inhibited: p21waf-1/cip1 and GADD45 expression increase in a dose dependent manner. Inhibition of Mdm2 synthesis depends on the continuous presence of etoposide, suggesting the DNA damage may prevent transcription. Downregulation of Mdm2 transcript occurs in cells expressing HPV16-E6 suggesting that inhibition of Mdm2 transcription is p53-independent. When cells are -treated with a pulse (1 h) of etoposide and reincubated in drug free medium, Mdm2 synthesis commences immediately after damage is repaired (3 h) and the p53 response is attenuated. Induction of apoptosis and loss of clonogenicity are 3-5-fold lower under pulse treatment conditions. This is the first observation of inhibition of Mdm2 transcription following treatment with topoisomerase (topo II) poisons, a feature that may be useful in tumour types where p53 is tolerated by overexpression of Mdm2.  (+info)

Retinoic acid, but not arsenic trioxide, degrades the PLZF/RARalpha fusion protein, without inducing terminal differentiation or apoptosis, in a RA-therapy resistant t(11;17)(q23;q21) APL patient. (4/35913)

Primary blasts of a t(11;17)(q23;q21) acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) patient were analysed with respect to retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) sensitivity as well as PLZF/RARalpha status. Although RA induced partial monocytic differentiation ex vivo, but not in vivo, As203 failed to induce apoptosis in culture, contrasting with t(15;17) APL and arguing against the clinical use of As203 in t(11;17)(q23;q21) APL. Prior to cell culture, PLZF/RARalpha was found to exactly co-localize with PML onto PML nuclear bodies. However upon cell culture, it quickly shifted towards microspeckles, its localization found in transfection experiments. Arsenic trioxide, known to induce aggregation of PML nuclear bodies, left the microspeckled PLZF/RARalpha localization completely unaffected. RA treatment led to PLZF/RARalpha degradation. However, this complete PLZF/RARalpha degradation was not accompanied by differentiation or apoptosis, which could suggest a contribution of the reciprocal RARalpha/PLZF fusion product in leukaemogenesis or the existence of irreversible changes induced by the chimera.  (+info)

Constitutive activation of Stat3 signaling confers resistance to apoptosis in human U266 myeloma cells. (5/35913)

Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is the major survival factor for myeloma tumor cells and induces signaling through the STAT proteins. We report that one STAT family member, Stat3, is constitutively activated in bone marrow mononuclear cells from patients with multiple myeloma and in the IL-6-dependent human myeloma cell line U266. Moreover, U266 cells are inherently resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis and express high levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Blocking IL-6 receptor signaling from Janus kinases to the Stat3 protein inhibits Bcl-xL expression and induces apoptosis, demonstrating that Stat3 signaling is essential for the survival of myeloma tumor cells. These findings provide evidence that constitutively activated Stat3 signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma by preventing apoptosis.  (+info)

Overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) in human heavy metal-selected tumor cells. (6/35913)

Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the resistance to cytotoxic heavy metals remain largely to be characterized in mammalian cells. To this end, we have analyzed a metal-resistant variant of the human lung cancer GLC4 cell line that we have selected by a step-wise procedure in potassium antimony tartrate. Antimony-selected cells, termed GLC4/Sb30 cells, poorly accumulated antimony through an enhanced cellular efflux of metal, thus suggesting up-regulation of a membrane export system in these cells. Indeed, GLC4/Sb30 cells were found to display a functional overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, a drug export pump, as demonstrated by Western blotting, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and calcein accumulation assays. Moreover, MK571, a potent inhibitor of MRP1 activity, was found to markedly down-modulate resistance of GLC4/Sb30 cells to antimony and to decrease cellular export of the metal. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that overexpression of functional MRP1 likely represents one major mechanism by which human cells can escape the cytotoxic effects of heavy metals.  (+info)

Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with the long-acting somatostatin analogue lanreotide: in vitro and in vivo results. (7/35913)

Fourteen patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with the long-acting somatostatin (SST) analogue lanreotide. No objective response was obtained, and the median survival was 4 months (range 1.8-7 months). Pancreatic cancer could not be visualized by means of SST-receptor (R) scintigraphy in our patients. In vitro data also demonstrated absence of SSTR2 expression, suggesting pancreatic cancer not to be a potential target for treatment with SST analogues.  (+info)

Role of dexamethasone dosage in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists for prophylaxis of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. (8/35913)

Dexamethasone (20 mg) or its equivalent in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists appears to be the gold-standard dose for antiemetic prophylaxis. Additional to concerns about the use of corticosteroids with respect to enhanced tumour growth or impaired killing of the tumour cells, there is evidence that high-dosage dexamethasone impairs the control of delayed nausea and emesis, whereas lower doses appear more beneficial. To come closer to the most adequate dose, we started a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial investigating additional dosage of 8 or 20 mg dexamethasone to tropisetron (Navoban), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in cis-platinum-containing chemotherapy. After an interim analysis of 121 courses of chemotherapy in 69 patients, we have been unable to detect major differences between both treatment alternatives. High-dose dexamethasone (20 mg) had no advantage over medium-dose dexamethasone with respect to objective and subjective parameters of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting. In relation to concerns about the use of corticosteroids in non-haematological cancer chemotherapy, we suggest that 8 mg or its equivalent should be used in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists until further research proves otherwise.  (+info)

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

Antineoplastic agents, phytogenic, also known as plant-derived anticancer drugs, are medications that are derived from plants and used to treat cancer. These agents have natural origins and work by interfering with the growth and multiplication of cancer cells, helping to slow or stop the spread of the disease. Some examples of antineoplastic agents, phytogenic include paclitaxel (Taxol), vincristine, vinblastine, and etoposide. These drugs are often used in combination with other treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and other medications to provide a comprehensive approach to cancer care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Leukemia P388" is not a widely recognized medical term or a specific type of leukemia. The term "P388" is often used to refer to a particular type of mouse leukemia that is commonly used in laboratory research for testing potential anti-cancer drugs.

Leukemia, in general, is a type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow and results in an overproduction of abnormal white blood cells (leukocytes). These abnormal cells crowd out the healthy cells in the bone marrow, leading to a weakened immune system and various complications.

There are many different types of leukemia, classified based on the type of white blood cell affected (myeloid or lymphocytic) and the speed of progression (acute or chronic). If you're looking for information about a specific type of leukemia, I would be happy to help if you could provide more details.

Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are a type of naturally occurring chemical compounds that are found in plants belonging to the Amaryllidaceae family, which includes amaryllis, snowdrop, and daffodil species. These alkaloids have diverse pharmacological activities and have been studied for their potential medicinal properties. Some well-known Amaryllidaceae alkaloids include lycorine, galanthamine, and haemantamine.

Lycorine has been shown to have antiviral, antimalarial, and anti-cancer properties. Galanthamine is a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that has been used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Haemantamine has been studied for its potential as an anti-arrhythmic agent.

It is important to note that while Amaryllidaceae alkaloids have shown promise in preclinical studies, further research is needed to determine their safety and efficacy in humans before they can be approved for medical use. Additionally, some of these alkaloids can be toxic in high concentrations, so it is important to exercise caution when handling or consuming plants that contain them.

In the context of medicine, particularly in psychiatry and psychology, "Narcissus" or "Narcissistic" is not typically used as a standalone medical definition. However, it is associated with Narcissism and Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD).

Narcissism is a personality trait characterized by a grandiose sense of self-importance, a lack of empathy for others, a need for excessive admiration, and feelings of entitlement. It's named after the Greek mythological figure Narcissus, who fell in love with his own reflection.

Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is a mental disorder characterized by these narcissistic traits, but to such an extent that they cause significant impairment in personal relationships and professional life.

Please note that only a qualified healthcare professional can diagnose such conditions.

Ellipticines are a class of naturally occurring alkaloids that have been isolated from various plants, including those in the family Apocynaceae. These compounds have been found to exhibit various biological activities, including anti-cancer and anti-microbial properties.

Ellipticines have a unique chemical structure, characterized by a planar, aromatic core with two side chains that contain nitrogen atoms. This structure allows ellipticines to intercalate into DNA, disrupting its normal function and leading to cell death. As a result, ellipticines have been studied as potential anti-cancer agents, particularly for the treatment of drug-resistant cancers.

In addition to their anti-cancer properties, ellipticines have also been found to exhibit antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic activities. However, further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms behind these effects and to determine the safety and efficacy of ellipticines as therapeutic agents.

Bibenzyls are a type of chemical compound that consist of two benzene rings linked by a two-carbon bridge. They are found in various plants and have been studied for their potential pharmacological properties, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities. Some examples of bibenzyls include chlorogenic acid, which is found in coffee and tea, and orcinol, which is a component of some types of mold.

In the medical context, bibenzyls may be mentioned in relation to research on their potential therapeutic uses or as a component of certain medications or supplements. However, it's important to note that while some bibenzyls have shown promise in preclinical studies, more research is needed to determine their safety and efficacy in humans before they can be widely used as treatments for various conditions.

Doxorubicin is a type of chemotherapy medication known as an anthracycline. It works by interfering with the DNA in cancer cells, which prevents them from growing and multiplying. Doxorubicin is used to treat a wide variety of cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and many others. It may be given alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs.

Doxorubicin is usually administered through a vein (intravenously) and can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, mouth sores, and increased risk of infection. It can also cause damage to the heart muscle, which can lead to heart failure in some cases. For this reason, doctors may monitor patients' heart function closely while they are receiving doxorubicin treatment.

It is important for patients to discuss the potential risks and benefits of doxorubicin therapy with their healthcare provider before starting treatment.

Drug screening assays for antitumor agents are laboratory tests used to identify and evaluate the effectiveness of potential drugs or compounds that can inhibit the growth of tumor cells or induce their death. These assays are typically performed in vitro (in a test tube or petri dish) using cell cultures of various types of cancer cells.

The assays measure different parameters such as cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and cytotoxicity to determine the ability of the drug to kill or inhibit the growth of tumor cells. The results of these assays can help researchers identify promising antitumor agents that can be further developed for clinical use in cancer treatment.

There are different types of drug screening assays for antitumor agents, including high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, which allow for the rapid and automated testing of a large number of compounds against various cancer cell lines. Other types of assays include phenotypic screening assays, target-based screening assays, and functional screening assays, each with its own advantages and limitations.

Overall, drug screening assays for antitumor agents play a critical role in the development of new cancer therapies by providing valuable information on the activity and safety of potential drugs, helping to identify effective treatments and reduce the time and cost associated with bringing new drugs to market.

Antibiotics are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. They work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth.

Antineoplastics, also known as chemotherapeutic agents, are a class of drugs used to treat cancer. These medications target and destroy rapidly dividing cells, such as cancer cells, although they can also affect other quickly dividing cells in the body, such as those in the hair follicles or digestive tract, which can lead to side effects.

Antibiotics and antineoplastics are two different classes of drugs with distinct mechanisms of action and uses. It is important to use them appropriately and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Thiadiazines are a class of heterocyclic compounds containing a five-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms and two sulfur atoms. In the context of pharmaceuticals, thiadiazine derivatives are commonly used as therapeutic agents, particularly in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases.

The most well-known thiadiazine derivative is hydrochlorothiazide, which is a diuretic drug used to treat hypertension and edema associated with heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney disease. Hydrochlorothiazide works by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium and chloride ions in the distal convoluted tubule of the nephron, thereby increasing water excretion and reducing blood volume and pressure.

Other thiadiazine derivatives have been investigated for their potential therapeutic benefits, including anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, and antimicrobial activities. However, many of these compounds have not yet been approved for clinical use due to safety concerns or lack of efficacy.

Bryostatins are a class of naturally occurring marine-derived macrolide lactones that have been isolated from the Bugula neritina, a species of bryozoan. These compounds have attracted significant interest in the medical community due to their potent bioactivities, particularly their ability to modulate various signaling pathways involved in cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

One of the most notable properties of bryostatins is their capacity to act as protein kinase C (PKC) agonists. PKC is a family of enzymes that play critical roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. By activating PKC, bryostatins can induce differentiation and inhibit proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, making them promising candidates for anti-cancer therapy.

In addition to their effects on PKC, bryostatins have also been shown to modulate other signaling pathways, such as the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Akt pathways, which are involved in inflammation and cell survival. These pleiotropic effects make bryostatins interesting targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for a range of diseases.

Despite their promising potential, the clinical application of bryostatins has been limited by their low natural abundance and challenging chemical synthesis. Nevertheless, ongoing research efforts continue to explore new methods for large-scale production and optimization of these compounds, with the ultimate goal of harnessing their unique biological activities for medical benefit.

Antineoplastic agents, alkylating, are a class of chemotherapeutic drugs that work by alkylating (adding alkyl groups) to DNA, which can lead to the death or dysfunction of cancer cells. These agents can form cross-links between strands of DNA, preventing DNA replication and transcription, ultimately leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Examples of alkylating agents include cyclophosphamide, melphalan, and cisplatin. While these drugs are designed to target rapidly dividing cancer cells, they can also affect normal cells that divide quickly, such as those in the bone marrow and digestive tract, leading to side effects like anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and nausea/vomiting.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ancitabine" does not appear to be a valid medical term or medication. It is possible that there may be a spelling error or misunderstanding of the name. If you have more information about the context in which this term was used, I may be able to help provide more clarity or direct you to the correct term.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Gallium is not a medical term, but it's a chemical element with the symbol Ga and atomic number 31. It is a soft, silvery-blue metal that melts at a temperature just above room temperature. In medicine, gallium compounds such as gallium nitrate and gallium citrate are used as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine imaging studies, particularly in the detection of inflammation, infection, and some types of cancer.

For example, Gallium-67 is a radioactive isotope that can be injected into the body to produce images of various diseases such as abscesses, osteomyelitis (bone infection), and tumors using a gamma camera. The way gallium distributes in the body can provide valuable information about the presence and extent of disease.

Therefore, while gallium is not a medical term itself, it has important medical applications as a diagnostic tool in nuclear medicine.

Depsipeptides are a type of naturally occurring or synthetic modified peptides that contain at least one amide bond replaced by an ester bond in their structure. These compounds exhibit diverse biological activities, including antimicrobial, antiviral, and antitumor properties. Some depsipeptides have been developed as pharmaceutical drugs for the treatment of various diseases.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent used to treat various types of cancers, including testicular, ovarian, bladder, head and neck, lung, and cervical cancers. It is an inorganic platinum compound that contains a central platinum atom surrounded by two chloride atoms and two ammonia molecules in a cis configuration.

Cisplatin works by forming crosslinks between DNA strands, which disrupts the structure of DNA and prevents cancer cells from replicating. This ultimately leads to cell death and slows down or stops the growth of tumors. However, cisplatin can also cause damage to normal cells, leading to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hearing loss, and kidney damage. Therefore, it is essential to monitor patients closely during treatment and manage any adverse effects promptly.

Paclitaxel is a chemotherapeutic agent derived from the bark of the Pacific yew tree (Taxus brevifolia). It is an antimicrotubule agent that promotes the assembly and stabilization of microtubules, thereby interfering with the normal dynamic reorganization of the microtubule network that is essential for cell division.

Paclitaxel is used in the treatment of various types of cancer including ovarian, breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. It works by inhibiting the disassembly of microtubules, which prevents the separation of chromosomes during mitosis, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Common side effects of paclitaxel include neutropenia (low white blood cell count), anemia (low red blood cell count), alopecia (hair loss), peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage causing numbness or tingling in the hands and feet), myalgias (muscle pain), arthralgias (joint pain), and hypersensitivity reactions.

6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is a medication used primarily in the treatment of cancer, specifically acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and to prevent rejection in organ transplantation. It is an antimetabolite that works by interfering with the synthesis of DNA and RNA, thereby inhibiting cell division and growth.

6-MP is a prodrug, meaning it requires metabolic activation in the body to exert its therapeutic effects. Once absorbed, 6-MP is converted into several active metabolites, including thioguanine nucleotides (TGN), which are incorporated into DNA and RNA, leading to cytotoxicity and cell death.

Common side effects of 6-MP include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, and increased susceptibility to infections. Long-term use of the medication can also lead to liver toxicity, pancreatitis, and anemia. Regular monitoring of blood counts, liver function tests, and TGN levels is necessary during treatment with 6-MP to minimize potential side effects and ensure safe and effective dosing.

Drug synergism is a pharmacological concept that refers to the interaction between two or more drugs, where the combined effect of the drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects. This means that when these drugs are administered together, they produce an enhanced therapeutic response compared to when they are given separately.

Drug synergism can occur through various mechanisms, such as:

1. Pharmacodynamic synergism - When two or more drugs interact with the same target site in the body and enhance each other's effects.
2. Pharmacokinetic synergism - When one drug affects the metabolism, absorption, distribution, or excretion of another drug, leading to an increased concentration of the second drug in the body and enhanced therapeutic effect.
3. Physiochemical synergism - When two drugs interact physically, such as when one drug enhances the solubility or permeability of another drug, leading to improved absorption and bioavailability.

It is important to note that while drug synergism can result in enhanced therapeutic effects, it can also increase the risk of adverse reactions and toxicity. Therefore, healthcare providers must carefully consider the potential benefits and risks when prescribing combinations of drugs with known or potential synergistic effects.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Aminoacridines are a group of synthetic chemical compounds that contain an acridine nucleus, which is a tricyclic aromatic structure, substituted with one or more amino groups. These compounds have been studied for their potential therapeutic properties, particularly as antiseptics and antibacterial agents. However, their use in medicine has declined due to the development of newer and safer antibiotics. Some aminoacridines also exhibit antimalarial, antifungal, and antiviral activities. They can intercalate into DNA, disrupting its structure and function, which is thought to contribute to their antimicrobial effects. However, this property also makes them potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic, limiting their clinical use.

Epothilones are a type of microtubule stabilizing agent, which are a group of drugs that inhibit the depolymerization of microtubules in cells. Microtubules are important components of the cell's cytoskeleton and play a crucial role in cell division. By stabilizing the microtubules, epothilones prevent the separation of chromosomes during mitosis, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Epothilones are naturally occurring compounds that were originally isolated from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. They have been found to have potent anticancer activity and have been developed as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of various types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, and lung cancer.

There are currently two epothilone drugs that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use: ixabepilone and patupilone. These drugs are administered intravenously and work by binding to tubulin, a protein that makes up microtubules, thereby preventing their disassembly and interfering with cell division.

Like other chemotherapeutic agents, epothilones can have significant side effects, including neutropenia (low white blood cell count), neuropathy (nerve damage), and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting. However, they are often used in combination with other drugs to improve their efficacy and reduce toxicity.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sarcoma 180" is not a recognized medical term or an official classification of sarcomas in humans. It appears to be a term used primarily in research involving mice. Sarcoma 180 is a transplantable tumor that was first isolated from a mouse and has been used as a model for cancer research, particularly in studies involving immunotherapy and cancer treatment.

In general, sarcomas are cancers that develop from connective tissues such as bones, muscles, tendons, cartilages, nerves, and blood vessels. They can be further classified into various subtypes based on the specific type of tissue they originate from and their genetic characteristics. If you have any concerns about a specific medical condition or term, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional for accurate information.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Lactones are not a medical term per se, but they are important in the field of pharmaceuticals and medicinal chemistry. Lactones are cyclic esters derived from hydroxy acids. They can be found naturally in various plants, fruits, and some insects. In medicine, lactones have been used in the synthesis of drugs, including certain antibiotics and antifungal agents. For instance, the penicillin family of antibiotics contains a beta-lactone ring in their structure, which is essential for their antibacterial activity.

Leukemia L1210 is not a medical definition itself, but it refers to a specific mouse leukemia cell line that was established in 1948. These cells are a type of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and have been widely used in cancer research as a model for studying the disease, testing new therapies, and understanding the biology of leukemia. The L1210 cell line has contributed significantly to the development of various chemotherapeutic agents and treatment strategies for leukemia and other cancers.

Antimetabolites are a class of antineoplastic (chemotherapy) drugs that interfere with the metabolism of cancer cells and inhibit their growth and proliferation. These agents are structurally similar to naturally occurring metabolites, such as amino acids, nucleotides, and folic acid, which are essential for cellular replication and growth. Antimetabolites act as false analogs and get incorporated into the growing cells' DNA or RNA, causing disruption of the normal synthesis process, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Examples of antimetabolite drugs include:

1. Folate antagonists: Methotrexate, Pemetrexed
2. Purine analogs: Mercaptopurine, Thioguanine, Fludarabine, Cladribine
3. Pyrimidine analogs: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), Capecitabine, Cytarabine, Gemcitabine

These drugs are used to treat various types of cancers, such as leukemias, lymphomas, breast, ovarian, and gastrointestinal cancers. Due to their mechanism of action, antimetabolites can also affect normal, rapidly dividing cells in the body, leading to side effects like myelosuppression (decreased production of blood cells), mucositis (inflammation and ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract), and alopecia (hair loss).

Daunorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and breast cancer. It works by intercalating with DNA and inhibiting topoisomerase II, which results in DNA damage and ultimately cell death.

The drug is administered intravenously and may cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, mouth sores, and damage to the heart muscle (cardiotoxicity) with long-term use. Regular monitoring of cardiac function is recommended during treatment with daunorubicin.

It's important to note that this medication should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, as it can have serious and potentially life-threatening consequences if not used correctly.

Fluorouracil is a antineoplastic medication, which means it is used to treat cancer. It is a type of chemotherapy drug known as an antimetabolite. Fluorouracil works by interfering with the growth of cancer cells and ultimately killing them. It is often used to treat colon, esophageal, stomach, and breast cancers, as well as skin conditions such as actinic keratosis and superficial basal cell carcinoma. Fluorouracil may be given by injection or applied directly to the skin in the form of a cream.

It is important to note that fluorouracil can have serious side effects, including suppression of bone marrow function, mouth sores, stomach and intestinal ulcers, and nerve damage. It should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional.

Bleomycin is a type of chemotherapeutic agent used to treat various types of cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma, testicular cancer, and lymphomas. It works by causing DNA damage in rapidly dividing cells, which can inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells.

Bleomycin is an antibiotic derived from Streptomyces verticillus and is often administered intravenously or intramuscularly. While it can be effective in treating certain types of cancer, it can also have serious side effects, including lung toxicity, which can lead to pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory failure. Therefore, bleomycin should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional who is experienced in administering chemotherapy drugs.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Etoposide is a chemotherapy medication used to treat various types of cancer, including lung cancer, testicular cancer, and certain types of leukemia. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called topoisomerase II, which is involved in DNA replication and transcription. By doing so, etoposide can interfere with the growth and multiplication of cancer cells.

Etoposide is often administered intravenously in a hospital or clinic setting, although it may also be given orally in some cases. The medication can cause a range of side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and an increased risk of infection. It can also have more serious side effects, such as bone marrow suppression, which can lead to anemia, bleeding, and a weakened immune system.

Like all chemotherapy drugs, etoposide is not without risks and should only be used under the close supervision of a qualified healthcare provider. It is important for patients to discuss the potential benefits and risks of this medication with their doctor before starting treatment.

Antineoplastic combined chemotherapy protocols refer to a treatment plan for cancer that involves the use of more than one antineoplastic (chemotherapy) drug given in a specific sequence and schedule. The combination of drugs is used because they may work better together to destroy cancer cells compared to using a single agent alone. This approach can also help to reduce the likelihood of cancer cells becoming resistant to the treatment.

The choice of drugs, dose, duration, and frequency are determined by various factors such as the type and stage of cancer, patient's overall health, and potential side effects. Combination chemotherapy protocols can be used in various settings, including as a primary treatment, adjuvant therapy (given after surgery or radiation to kill any remaining cancer cells), neoadjuvant therapy (given before surgery or radiation to shrink the tumor), or palliative care (to alleviate symptoms and prolong survival).

It is important to note that while combined chemotherapy protocols can be effective in treating certain types of cancer, they can also cause significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, fatigue, and an increased risk of infection. Therefore, patients undergoing such treatment should be closely monitored and managed by a healthcare team experienced in administering chemotherapy.

Drug resistance in neoplasms (also known as cancer drug resistance) refers to the ability of cancer cells to withstand the effects of chemotherapeutic agents or medications designed to kill or inhibit the growth of cancer cells. This can occur due to various mechanisms, including changes in the cancer cell's genetic makeup, alterations in drug targets, increased activity of drug efflux pumps, and activation of survival pathways.

Drug resistance can be intrinsic (present at the beginning of treatment) or acquired (developed during the course of treatment). It is a significant challenge in cancer therapy as it often leads to reduced treatment effectiveness, disease progression, and poor patient outcomes. Strategies to overcome drug resistance include the use of combination therapies, development of new drugs that target different mechanisms, and personalized medicine approaches that consider individual patient and tumor characteristics.

A prodrug is a pharmacologically inactive substance that, once administered, is metabolized into a drug that is active. Prodrugs are designed to improve the bioavailability or delivery of a drug, to minimize adverse effects, or to target the drug to specific sites in the body. The conversion of a prodrug to its active form typically occurs through enzymatic reactions in the liver or other tissues.

Prodrugs can offer several advantages over traditional drugs, including:

* Improved absorption: Some drugs have poor bioavailability due to their chemical properties, which make them difficult to absorb from the gastrointestinal tract. Prodrugs can be designed with improved absorption characteristics, allowing for more efficient delivery of the active drug to the body.
* Reduced toxicity: By masking the active drug's chemical structure, prodrugs can reduce its interactions with sensitive tissues and organs, thereby minimizing adverse effects.
* Targeted delivery: Prodrugs can be designed to selectively release the active drug in specific areas of the body, such as tumors or sites of infection, allowing for more precise and effective therapy.

Examples of prodrugs include:

* Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), which is metabolized to salicylic acid in the liver.
* Enalapril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat hypertension and heart failure, which is metabolized to enalaprilat in the liver.
* Codeine, an opioid analgesic, which is metabolized to morphine in the liver by the enzyme CYP2D6.

It's important to note that not all prodrugs are successful, and some may even have unintended consequences. For example, if a patient has a genetic variation that affects the activity of the enzyme responsible for converting the prodrug to its active form, the drug may not be effective or may produce adverse effects. Therefore, it's essential to consider individual genetic factors when prescribing prodrugs.

Preclinical drug evaluation refers to a series of laboratory tests and studies conducted to determine the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is tested in humans. These studies typically involve experiments on cells and animals to evaluate the pharmacological properties, toxicity, and potential interactions with other substances. The goal of preclinical evaluation is to establish a reasonable level of safety and understanding of how the drug works, which helps inform the design and conduct of subsequent clinical trials in humans. It's important to note that while preclinical studies provide valuable information, they may not always predict how a drug will behave in human subjects.

"Drug evaluation" is a medical term that refers to the systematic process of assessing the pharmacological, therapeutic, and safety profile of a drug or medication. This process typically involves several stages, including preclinical testing in the laboratory, clinical trials in human subjects, and post-marketing surveillance.

The goal of drug evaluation is to determine the efficacy, safety, and optimal dosage range of a drug, as well as any potential interactions with other medications or medical conditions. The evaluation process also includes an assessment of the drug's pharmacokinetics, or how it is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and eliminated by the body.

The findings from drug evaluations are used to inform regulatory decisions about whether a drug should be approved for use in clinical practice, as well as to provide guidance to healthcare providers about how to use the drug safely and effectively.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

A xenograft model antitumor assay is a type of preclinical cancer research study that involves transplanting human tumor cells or tissues into an immunodeficient mouse. This model allows researchers to study the effects of various treatments, such as drugs or immune therapies, on human tumors in a living organism.

In this assay, human tumor cells or tissues are implanted into the mouse, typically under the skin or in another organ, where they grow and form a tumor. Once the tumor has established, the mouse is treated with the experimental therapy, and the tumor's growth is monitored over time. The response of the tumor to the treatment is then assessed by measuring changes in tumor size or weight, as well as other parameters such as survival rate and metastasis.

Xenograft model antitumor assays are useful for evaluating the efficacy and safety of new cancer therapies before they are tested in human clinical trials. They provide valuable information on how the tumors respond to treatment, drug pharmacokinetics, and toxicity, which can help researchers optimize dosing regimens and identify potential side effects. However, it is important to note that xenograft models have limitations, such as differences in tumor biology between mice and humans, and may not always predict how well a therapy will work in human patients.

Drug resistance, also known as antimicrobial resistance, is the ability of a microorganism (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand the effects of a drug that was originally designed to inhibit or kill it. This occurs when the microorganism undergoes genetic changes that allow it to survive in the presence of the drug. As a result, the drug becomes less effective or even completely ineffective at treating infections caused by these resistant organisms.

Drug resistance can develop through various mechanisms, including mutations in the genes responsible for producing the target protein of the drug, alteration of the drug's target site, modification or destruction of the drug by enzymes produced by the microorganism, and active efflux of the drug from the cell.

The emergence and spread of drug-resistant microorganisms pose significant challenges in medical treatment, as they can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. The overuse and misuse of antimicrobial agents, as well as poor infection control practices, contribute to the development and dissemination of drug-resistant strains. To address this issue, it is crucial to promote prudent use of antimicrobials, enhance surveillance and monitoring of resistance patterns, invest in research and development of new antimicrobial agents, and strengthen infection prevention and control measures.

Macrolides are a class of antibiotics derived from natural products obtained from various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They have a large ring structure consisting of 12, 14, or 15 atoms, to which one or more sugar molecules are attached. Macrolides inhibit bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit, thereby preventing peptide bond formation. Common examples of macrolides include erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. They are primarily used to treat respiratory, skin, and soft tissue infections caused by susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Experimental neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that are induced and studied in a controlled laboratory setting, typically in animals or cell cultures. These studies are conducted to understand the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development, progression, and potential treatment strategies. By manipulating various factors such as genetic mutations, environmental exposures, and pharmacological interventions, researchers can gain valuable insights into the complex processes underlying neoplasm formation and identify novel targets for cancer therapy. It is important to note that experimental neoplasms may not always accurately represent human cancers, and further research is needed to translate these findings into clinically relevant applications.

Methotrexate is a medication used in the treatment of certain types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. It is an antimetabolite that inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase, which is necessary for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, essential components of DNA and RNA. By blocking this enzyme, methotrexate interferes with cell division and growth, making it effective in treating rapidly dividing cells such as cancer cells.

In addition to its use in cancer treatment, methotrexate is also used to manage autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In these conditions, methotrexate modulates the immune system and reduces inflammation.

It's important to note that methotrexate can have significant side effects and should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider. Regular monitoring of blood counts, liver function, and kidney function is necessary during treatment with methotrexate.

Camptothecin is a topoisomerase I inhibitor, which is a type of chemotherapeutic agent used in cancer treatment. It works by interfering with the function of an enzyme called topoisomerase I, which helps to uncoil DNA during cell division. By inhibiting this enzyme, camptothecin prevents the cancer cells from dividing and growing, ultimately leading to their death.

Camptothecin is found naturally in the bark and stem of the Camptotheca acuminata tree, also known as the "happy tree," which is native to China. It was first isolated in 1966 and has since been developed into several synthetic derivatives, including irinotecan and topotecan, which are used clinically to treat various types of cancer, such as colon, lung, and ovarian cancers.

Like other chemotherapeutic agents, camptothecin can have significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). It is important for patients receiving camptothecin-based therapies to be closely monitored by their healthcare team to manage these side effects effectively.

Stilbenes are a type of chemical compound that consists of a 1,2-diphenylethylene backbone. They are phenolic compounds and can be found in various plants, where they play a role in the defense against pathogens and stress conditions. Some stilbenes have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. One well-known example of a stilbene is resveratrol, which is found in the skin of grapes and in red wine.

It's important to note that while some stilbenes have been shown to have potential health benefits in laboratory studies, more research is needed to determine their safety and effectiveness in humans. It's always a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

"Nude mice" is a term used in the field of laboratory research to describe a strain of mice that have been genetically engineered to lack a functional immune system. Specifically, nude mice lack a thymus gland and have a mutation in the FOXN1 gene, which results in a failure to develop a mature T-cell population. This means that they are unable to mount an effective immune response against foreign substances or organisms.

The name "nude" refers to the fact that these mice also have a lack of functional hair follicles, resulting in a hairless or partially hairless phenotype. This feature is actually a secondary consequence of the same genetic mutation that causes their immune deficiency.

Nude mice are commonly used in research because their weakened immune system makes them an ideal host for transplanted tumors, tissues, and cells from other species, including humans. This allows researchers to study the behavior of these foreign substances in a living organism without the complication of an immune response. However, it's important to note that because nude mice lack a functional immune system, they must be kept in sterile conditions and are more susceptible to infection than normal mice.

HL-60 cells are a type of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. They are named after the hospital where they were first isolated, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and the 60th culture attempt to grow these cells.

HL-60 cells have the ability to differentiate into various types of blood cells, such as granulocytes, monocytes, and macrophages, when exposed to certain chemical compounds or under specific culturing conditions. This makes them a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms of cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

HL-60 cells are also often used in toxicity studies, drug discovery and development, and research on cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. They can be easily grown in the lab and have a stable genotype, making them ideal for use in standardized experiments and comparisons between different studies.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

A "Drug Administration Schedule" refers to the plan for when and how a medication should be given to a patient. It includes details such as the dose, frequency (how often it should be taken), route (how it should be administered, such as orally, intravenously, etc.), and duration (how long it should be taken) of the medication. This schedule is often created and prescribed by healthcare professionals, such as doctors or pharmacists, to ensure that the medication is taken safely and effectively. It may also include instructions for missed doses or changes in the dosage.

Vincristine is an antineoplastic agent, specifically a vinca alkaloid. It is derived from the Madagascar periwinkle plant (Catharanthus roseus). Vincristine binds to tubulin, a protein found in microtubules, and inhibits their polymerization, which results in disruption of mitotic spindles leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death). It is used in the treatment of various types of cancer including leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. Common side effects include peripheral neuropathy, constipation, and alopecia.

Isoquinolines are not a medical term per se, but a chemical classification. They refer to a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. This structure is similar to that of quinoline, but with the nitrogen atom located at a different position in the ring.

Isoquinolines have various biological activities and can be found in some natural products, including certain alkaloids. Some isoquinoline derivatives have been developed as drugs for the treatment of various conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and cancer. However, specific medical definitions related to isoquinolines typically refer to the use or effects of these specific drugs rather than the broader class of compounds.

Neoplasm transplantation is not a recognized or established medical procedure in the field of oncology. The term "neoplasm" refers to an abnormal growth of cells, which can be benign or malignant (cancerous). "Transplantation" typically refers to the surgical transfer of living cells, tissues, or organs from one part of the body to another or between individuals.

The concept of neoplasm transplantation may imply the transfer of cancerous cells or tissues from a donor to a recipient, which is not a standard practice due to ethical considerations and the potential harm it could cause to the recipient. In some rare instances, researchers might use laboratory animals to study the transmission and growth of human cancer cells, but this is done for scientific research purposes only and under strict regulatory guidelines.

In summary, there is no medical definition for 'Neoplasm Transplantation' as it does not represent a standard or ethical medical practice.

Biotransformation is the metabolic modification of a chemical compound, typically a xenobiotic (a foreign chemical substance found within an living organism), by a biological system. This process often involves enzymatic conversion of the parent compound to one or more metabolites, which may be more or less active, toxic, or mutagenic than the original substance.

In the context of pharmacology and toxicology, biotransformation is an important aspect of drug metabolism and elimination from the body. The liver is the primary site of biotransformation, but other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract can also play a role.

Biotransformation can occur in two phases: phase I reactions involve functionalization of the parent compound through oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis, while phase II reactions involve conjugation of the metabolite with endogenous molecules such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetate to increase its water solubility and facilitate excretion.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Breast neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the breast tissue that can be benign or malignant. Benign breast neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors or growths, while malignant breast neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Breast neoplasms can arise from different types of cells in the breast, including milk ducts, milk sacs (lobules), or connective tissue. The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which starts in the milk ducts and can spread to other parts of the breast and nearby structures.

Breast neoplasms are usually detected through screening methods such as mammography, ultrasound, or MRI, or through self-examination or clinical examination. Treatment options for breast neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapy.

DNA damage refers to any alteration in the structure or composition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the genetic material present in cells. DNA damage can result from various internal and external factors, including environmental exposures such as ultraviolet radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals, as well as normal cellular processes such as replication and oxidative metabolism.

Examples of DNA damage include base modifications, base deletions or insertions, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA helix. These types of damage can lead to mutations, genomic instability, and chromosomal aberrations, which can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related conditions.

The body has several mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and double-strand break repair. However, if the damage is too extensive or the repair mechanisms are impaired, the cell may undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) to prevent the propagation of potentially harmful mutations.

Cyclophosphamide is an alkylating agent, which is a type of chemotherapy medication. It works by interfering with the DNA of cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and growing. This helps to stop the spread of cancer in the body. Cyclophosphamide is used to treat various types of cancer, including lymphoma, leukemia, multiple myeloma, and breast cancer. It can be given orally as a tablet or intravenously as an injection.

Cyclophosphamide can also have immunosuppressive effects, which means it can suppress the activity of the immune system. This makes it useful in treating certain autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. However, this immunosuppression can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects.

Like all chemotherapy medications, cyclophosphamide can cause a range of side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, fatigue, and increased susceptibility to infections. It is important for patients receiving cyclophosphamide to be closely monitored by their healthcare team to manage these side effects and ensure the medication is working effectively.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human participants and are designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new medical treatments, drugs, devices, or behavioral interventions. The purpose of clinical trials is to determine whether a new intervention is safe, effective, and beneficial for patients, as well as to compare it with currently available treatments. Clinical trials follow a series of phases, each with specific goals and criteria, before a new intervention can be approved by regulatory authorities for widespread use.

Clinical trials are conducted according to a protocol, which is a detailed plan that outlines the study's objectives, design, methodology, statistical analysis, and ethical considerations. The protocol is developed and reviewed by a team of medical experts, statisticians, and ethicists, and it must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB) before the trial can begin.

Participation in clinical trials is voluntary, and participants must provide informed consent before enrolling in the study. Informed consent involves providing potential participants with detailed information about the study's purpose, procedures, risks, benefits, and alternatives, as well as their rights as research subjects. Participants can withdraw from the study at any time without penalty or loss of benefits to which they are entitled.

Clinical trials are essential for advancing medical knowledge and improving patient care. They help researchers identify new treatments, diagnostic tools, and prevention strategies that can benefit patients and improve public health. However, clinical trials also pose potential risks to participants, including adverse effects from experimental interventions, time commitment, and inconvenience. Therefore, it is important for researchers to carefully design and conduct clinical trials to minimize risks and ensure that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that originates from the bone marrow - the soft, inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. It is characterized by an abnormal production of white blood cells, known as leukocytes or blasts. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are several types of leukemia, classified based on the specific type of white blood cell affected and the speed at which the disease progresses:

1. Acute Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress rapidly, with symptoms developing over a few weeks or months. They involve the rapid growth and accumulation of immature, nonfunctional white blood cells (blasts) in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) - Originates from lymphoid progenitor cells, primarily affecting children but can also occur in adults.
- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) - Develops from myeloid progenitor cells and is more common in older adults.

2. Chronic Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress slowly, with symptoms developing over a period of months to years. They involve the production of relatively mature, but still abnormal, white blood cells that can accumulate in large numbers in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) - Affects B-lymphocytes and is more common in older adults.
- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) - Originates from myeloid progenitor cells, characterized by the presence of a specific genetic abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome. It can occur at any age but is more common in middle-aged and older adults.

Treatment options for leukemia depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors. Treatments may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Ovarian neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the ovary, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various cell types within the ovary, including epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian neoplasms are often classified based on their cell type of origin, histological features, and potential for invasive or metastatic behavior.

Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are the most common type and can be further categorized into several subtypes, such as serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and Brenner tumors. Some of these epithelial tumors have a higher risk of becoming malignant and spreading to other parts of the body.

Germ cell ovarian neoplasms arise from the cells that give rise to eggs (oocytes) and can include teratomas, dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumors, and embryonal carcinomas. Stromal ovarian neoplasms develop from the connective tissue cells supporting the ovary and can include granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas.

It is essential to diagnose and treat ovarian neoplasms promptly, as some malignant forms can be aggressive and potentially life-threatening if not managed appropriately. Regular gynecological exams, imaging studies, and tumor marker tests are often used for early detection and monitoring of ovarian neoplasms. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, depending on the type, stage, and patient's overall health condition.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Caspases are a family of protease enzymes that play essential roles in programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. These enzymes are produced as inactive precursors and are activated when cells receive signals to undergo apoptosis. Once activated, caspases cleave specific protein substrates, leading to the characteristic morphological changes and DNA fragmentation associated with apoptotic cell death. Caspases also play roles in other cellular processes, including inflammation and differentiation. There are two types of caspases: initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8, -9, and -10) and effector caspases (caspase-3, -6, and -7). Initiator caspases are activated in response to various apoptotic signals and then activate the effector caspases, which carry out the proteolytic cleavage of cellular proteins. Dysregulation of caspase activity has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic injury, and cancer.

Taxoids are a class of naturally occurring compounds that are derived from the bark of the Pacific yew tree (Taxus brevifolia) and other species of the genus Taxus. They are known for their antineoplastic (cancer-fighting) properties and have been used in chemotherapy to treat various types of cancer, including ovarian, breast, and lung cancer.

The most well-known taxoid is paclitaxel (also known by the brand name Taxol), which was first discovered in the 1960s and has since become a widely used cancer drug. Paclitaxel works by stabilizing microtubules, which are important components of the cell's skeleton, and preventing them from disassembling. This disrupts the normal function of the cell's mitotic spindle, leading to cell cycle arrest and ultimately apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Other taxoids that have been developed for clinical use include docetaxel (Taxotere), which is a semi-synthetic analogue of paclitaxel, and cabazitaxel (Jevtana), which is a second-generation taxoid. These drugs have similar mechanisms of action to paclitaxel but may have different pharmacokinetic properties or be effective against cancer cells that have developed resistance to other taxoids.

While taxoids have been successful in treating certain types of cancer, they can also cause significant side effects, including neutropenia (low white blood cell count), anemia (low red blood cell count), and peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage). As with all chemotherapy drugs, the use of taxoids must be carefully balanced against their potential benefits and risks.

Prostatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the prostate gland, which can be benign or malignant. The term "neoplasm" simply means new or abnormal tissue growth. When it comes to the prostate, neoplasms are often referred to as tumors.

Benign prostatic neoplasms, such as prostate adenomas, are non-cancerous overgrowths of prostate tissue. They usually grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. While they can cause uncomfortable symptoms like difficulty urinating, they are generally not life-threatening.

Malignant prostatic neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous growths. The most common type of prostate cancer is adenocarcinoma, which arises from the glandular cells in the prostate. Prostate cancer often grows slowly and may not cause any symptoms for many years. However, some types of prostate cancer can be aggressive and spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the bones or lymph nodes.

It's important to note that while prostate neoplasms can be concerning, early detection and treatment can significantly improve outcomes for many men. Regular check-ups with a healthcare provider are key to monitoring prostate health and catching any potential issues early on.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Phospholipid ethers are a type of phospholipid in which the traditional fatty acid chains are replaced by alkyl or alkenyl groups linked to the glycerol backbone via an ether bond. They are a significant component of lipoproteins and cell membranes, particularly in archaea, where they contribute to the stability and rigidity of the membrane at extreme temperatures and pressures.

The two main types of phospholipid ethers are plasmalogens and diether lipids. Plasmalogens contain a vinyl ether bond at the sn-1 position, while diether lipids have an ether bond at both the sn-1 and sn-2 positions. These unique structures give phospholipid ethers distinct chemical and biological properties compared to conventional phospholipids with ester-linked fatty acids.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are highly reactive molecules containing oxygen, including peroxides, superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen. They are naturally produced as byproducts of normal cellular metabolism in the mitochondria, and can also be generated by external sources such as ionizing radiation, tobacco smoke, and air pollutants. At low or moderate concentrations, ROS play important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis, but at high concentrations, they can cause significant damage to cell structures, including lipids, proteins, and DNA, leading to oxidative stress and potential cell death.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Protective gloves are a type of personal protective equipment (PPE) used to shield the hands from potential harm or contamination. They can be made from various materials such as latex, nitrile rubber, vinyl, or polyethylene and are designed to provide a barrier against chemicals, biological agents, radiation, or mechanical injuries. Protective gloves come in different types, including examination gloves, surgical gloves, chemical-resistant gloves, and heavy-duty work gloves, depending on the intended use and level of protection required.

I couldn't find a medical definition for "Aster plant" since the term "Aster" is primarily used in botany and horticulture, referring to a large genus of flowering plants in the family Asteraceae. The name "Asters" comes from the Greek word 'astron,' which means 'star,' due to their star-shaped flower heads.

Although Aster plants do not have specific medical relevance, some traditional medicine systems and folklore use certain species for various purposes. For example, in traditional Chinese medicine, Mianto (Aster tataricus) is used as an antitussive and expectorant. However, it's essential to consult scientific research and healthcare professionals before using any plant material for medicinal purposes, as many require further study and may have potential side effects or interactions with other treatments.

Occupational exposure refers to the contact of an individual with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents as a result of their job or occupation. This can include exposure to hazardous substances such as chemicals, heavy metals, or dusts; physical agents such as noise, radiation, or ergonomic stressors; and biological agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Occupational exposure can occur through various routes, including inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, or injection. Prolonged or repeated exposure to these hazards can increase the risk of developing acute or chronic health conditions, such as respiratory diseases, skin disorders, neurological damage, or cancer.

Employers have a legal and ethical responsibility to minimize occupational exposures through the implementation of appropriate control measures, including engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, and training programs. Regular monitoring and surveillance of workers' health can also help identify and prevent potential health hazards in the workplace.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Olacaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in botany, specifically the name of a family of flowering plants that includes around 28 genera and 600 species. These plants are found primarily in tropical regions and have simple, actinomorphic flowers and fleshy fruits. Examples of plants in this family include Olax, Ximenia, and Heisteria.

It is not uncommon for there to be some overlap between medical and botanical terminology, as many medicinal treatments are derived from plants. However, in this case, "Olacaceae" does not have a specific medical definition.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Medical secretaries are administrative professionals who work in healthcare settings, such as hospitals, clinics, or private medical practices. Their primary role is to provide support to medical staff by handling various administrative tasks. Although I couldn't find a specific medical definition for "medical secretary," I can offer you a detailed job description based on common responsibilities and duties associated with this profession:

1. Scheduling appointments and managing patient records: Medical secretaries coordinate schedules for patients and healthcare professionals, maintain accurate and confidential patient records, and ensure that medical information is up-to-date and securely stored.
2. Communication: They serve as a liaison between patients, healthcare providers, and other medical staff, handling inquiries, providing information, and facilitating communication via phone, email, or in-person interactions.
3. Document preparation and management: Medical secretaries prepare and distribute various documents, such as correspondence, reports, referral letters, and medical records. They also manage document filing systems, both physical and electronic, to ensure easy access and organization.
4. Billing and insurance processing: They are responsible for managing financial transactions related to patient care, including generating invoices, submitting insurance claims, and handling billing inquiries and disputes.
5. Organizational skills: Medical secretaries maintain a well-organized workspace and workflow, prioritizing tasks and meeting deadlines to support the efficient operation of the medical practice or department.
6. Meeting and event coordination: They arrange meetings, conferences, and continuing education events for medical staff, handling logistics, registration, and communication with attendees.
7. Ad hoc duties: Medical secretaries may perform various ad hoc tasks as needed, such as ordering supplies, maintaining equipment, or providing general office support.
8. Professionalism and confidentiality: They adhere to strict professional standards, including maintaining patient confidentiality and demonstrating respect, empathy, and discretion in all interactions.

While there may not be a specific medical definition for "medical secretary," the above job description outlines the essential roles and responsibilities associated with this profession within healthcare settings.

Oncology nursing is a specialized area of nursing that focuses on the care of patients with cancer. Oncology nurses are responsible for providing comprehensive nursing care to patients throughout all stages of their illness, from diagnosis and treatment to recovery or palliative care. They work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as oncologists, radiotherapists, and social workers, to provide a coordinated approach to patient care.

Oncology nurses must have a deep understanding of the various types of cancer, their treatments, and the potential side effects of those treatments. They must also be skilled in assessing patients' physical and emotional needs, providing education and support to patients and their families, and managing symptoms such as pain, nausea, and fatigue.

In addition to direct patient care, oncology nurses may also be involved in research, advocacy, and education related to cancer and its treatment. They may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and long-term care facilities.

In the context of medical billing and healthcare, "laundering" is not a term that has a specific or widely accepted definition. It may be used informally to refer to illegal activities such as submitting false claims for reimbursement or engaging in kickback schemes, but it does not have a recognized medical meaning.

In general, the term "money laundering" is used to describe the process of making illegally-gained proceeds appear legal by disguising the true origin of the money. It typically involves three steps: placement, layering, and integration. Placement is the act of introducing the illicit money into the financial system, often by breaking it up into smaller amounts and depositing it into various accounts. Layering is the process of moving the money through a series of transactions to make it difficult to trace back to its original source. Integration is the final step, in which the laundered money is mixed with legitimate funds and used for normal business or personal expenses.

It's important to note that engaging in any form of illegal activity, including money laundering, is a serious crime and can result in severe penalties, including fines and imprisonment.

Sulindac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Sulindac is a prodrug, meaning that it is converted into its active form, sulindac sulfide, in the body. Sulindac sulfide has both analgesic (pain-relieving) and anti-inflammatory effects, making it useful for treating conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Like other NSAIDs, sulindac can cause side effects such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It should be used with caution in people with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) problems, kidney disease, or liver disease.

It is important to note that this information is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. It is always recommended to consult with a doctor or pharmacist for medical advice.

Protective devices, in the context of medical care, refer to equipment or products designed to prevent injury, harm, or infection to patients, healthcare workers, or others. They can include a wide range of items such as:

1. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): Items worn by healthcare professionals to protect themselves from infectious materials or harmful substances, such as gloves, masks, face shields, gowns, and goggles.
2. Medical Devices: Equipment designed to prevent injury during medical procedures, such as tourniquets, safety needles, and bite blocks.
3. Patient Safety Devices: Items used to protect patients from harm, such as bed rails, pressure ulcer prevention devices, and fall prevention equipment.
4. Environmental Protection Devices: Equipment used to prevent the spread of infectious agents in healthcare settings, such as air purifiers, isolation rooms, and waste management systems.
5. Dental Protective Devices: Devices used in dental care to protect patients and dental professionals from injury or infection, such as dental dams, mouth mirrors, and high-speed evacuators.

The specific definition of protective devices may vary depending on the context and field of medicine.

Dental physiological processes refer to the various functions and changes that occur in the teeth and surrounding tissues as part of their normal functioning. These processes include:

1. Tooth development: The formation and growth of teeth from embryonic stages to eruption into the oral cavity. This process involves the differentiation of dental tissues such as enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp.
2. Eruption: The natural movement of teeth from their developmental position within the jawbone to their functional position in the oral cavity.
3. Tooth use: The mechanical forces exerted on teeth during functions such as chewing, biting, and speaking. These forces stimulate the periodontal ligament, which helps maintain the health and stability of the teeth.
4. Salivary flow: The production and secretion of saliva, which plays a crucial role in maintaining oral hygiene by washing away food particles and neutralizing acid produced by bacteria.
5. pH balance: The regulation of acidity and alkalinity in the oral cavity, which affects the health of teeth and surrounding tissues.
6. Mineralization and demineralization: The process of mineral ions being absorbed and released from tooth enamel, which can lead to the formation of dental caries or the reversal of early carious lesions.
7. Immune response: The body's defense mechanisms that protect the teeth and surrounding tissues from infection and inflammation.
8. Cell turnover and regeneration: The natural process of cell death and replacement in the dental pulp, periodontal ligament, and gingival tissues.
9. Aging changes: The normal wear and tear, color changes, and structural modifications that occur in teeth over time due to aging.

Hospital equipment and supplies refer to the physical resources used in a hospital setting to provide patient care and treatment. This includes both reusable and disposable medical devices and items used for diagnostic, therapeutic, monitoring, or supportive purposes. Examples of hospital equipment include but are not limited to:

1. Medical beds and mattresses
2. Wheelchairs and stretchers
3. Infusion pumps and syringe drivers
4. Defibrillators and ECG machines
5. Anesthesia machines and ventilators
6. Operating room tables and lights
7. X-ray machines, CT scanners, and MRI machines
8. Ultrasound machines and other imaging devices
9. Laboratory equipment for testing and analysis

Hospital supplies include items used in the delivery of patient care, such as:

1. Syringes, needles, and IV catheters
2. Bandages, dressings, and wound care products
3. Gloves, gowns, and other personal protective equipment (PPE)
4. Sterile surgical instruments and sutures
5. Incontinence pads and briefs
6. Nutritional supplements and feeding tubes
7. Medications and medication administration supplies
8. Disinfectants, cleaning agents, and sterilization equipment.

Proper management of hospital equipment and supplies is essential for ensuring patient safety, providing high-quality care, and controlling healthcare costs.

Protective clothing refers to specialized garments worn by healthcare professionals, first responders, or workers in various industries to protect themselves from potential hazards that could cause harm to their bodies. These hazards may include biological agents (such as viruses or bacteria), chemicals, radiological particles, physical injuries, or extreme temperatures.

Examples of protective clothing include:

1. Medical/isolation gowns: Fluid-resistant garments worn by healthcare workers during medical procedures to protect against the spread of infectious diseases.
2. Lab coats: Protective garments typically worn in laboratories to shield the wearer's skin and clothing from potential chemical or biological exposure.
3. Coveralls: One-piece garments that cover the entire body, often used in industries with high exposure risks, such as chemical manufacturing or construction.
4. Gloves: Protective hand coverings made of materials like latex, nitrile, or vinyl, which prevent direct contact with hazardous substances.
5. Face masks and respirators: Devices worn over the nose and mouth to filter out airborne particles, protecting the wearer from inhaling harmful substances.
6. Helmets and face shields: Protective headgear used in various industries to prevent physical injuries from falling objects or impact.
7. Fire-resistant clothing: Specialized garments worn by firefighters and those working with high temperatures or open flames to protect against burns and heat exposure.

The choice of protective clothing depends on the specific hazards present in the work environment, as well as the nature and duration of potential exposures. Proper use, maintenance, and training are essential for ensuring the effectiveness of protective clothing in minimizing risks and maintaining worker safety.

Equipment contamination in a medical context refers to the presence of harmful microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi, on the surfaces of medical equipment or devices. This can occur during use, storage, or transportation of the equipment and can lead to the transmission of infections to patients, healthcare workers, or other individuals who come into contact with the contaminated equipment.

Equipment contamination can occur through various routes, including contact with contaminated body fluids, airborne particles, or environmental surfaces. To prevent equipment contamination and the resulting infection transmission, it is essential to follow strict infection control practices, such as regular cleaning and disinfection of equipment, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and proper handling and storage of medical devices.

Amsacrine is a chemotherapeutic agent, which means it is a medication used to treat cancer. It is classified as an antineoplastic drug, and more specifically, as an intercalating agent and a topoisomerase II inhibitor. Amsacrine works by intercalating, or inserting itself, into the DNA of cancer cells, which prevents the DNA from replicating and ultimately leads to the death of the cancer cell. It is primarily used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other hematologic malignancies.

The chemical name for Amsacrine is 5-[3-amino-1-(3-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxybut-1-yloxy]-8-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone. It has a molecular formula of C16H17ClNO5 and a molecular weight of 359.8 g/mol.

Amsacrine is typically administered intravenously, and its use is usually reserved for patients who have not responded to other forms of chemotherapy. It may be used in combination with other anticancer drugs as part of a treatment regimen. As with any chemotherapeutic agent, Amsacrine can have significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, and hair loss. It can also cause damage to the heart and other organs, so it is important for patients to be closely monitored during treatment.

It's worth noting that while Amsacrine can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer, it is not a cure-all, and its use must be carefully considered in the context of each individual patient's medical history and current health status.

Decontamination is the process of removing, inactivating or destroying harmful contaminants from a person, object, environment or substance. In a medical context, decontamination typically refers to the removal of pathogens, toxic chemicals, or radioactive substances from patients, equipment, or surfaces in order to prevent infection or illness.

There are different methods and techniques for decontamination depending on the type and extent of contamination. For example, mechanical cleaning (such as washing with soap and water), chemical disinfection (using antimicrobial agents), radiation sterilization (using ionizing radiation), and heat sterilization (using steam or dry heat) are some common methods used in medical settings to decontaminate surfaces, equipment, and supplies.

Decontamination is an important process in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and clinics, as well as in emergency response situations involving hazardous materials or bioterrorism incidents. Proper decontamination procedures can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases, reduce the risk of chemical or radiation exposure, and protect the health and safety of patients, healthcare workers, and the public.

Vanadium compounds refer to chemical substances that contain the metallic element vanadium (symbol V) combined with one or more other elements. Vanadium is a transition metal that can form various types of compounds, including salts, oxides, and organometallic complexes. These compounds have diverse chemical and physical properties and are used in various industrial applications, such as catalysts, batteries, and ceramics. In medicine, vanadium compounds have been studied for their potential insulin-mimetic effects and have been investigated as a possible treatment for diabetes, although their clinical use is not yet established.

Phlebitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of a vein, usually occurring in the legs. The inflammation can be caused by blood clots (thrombophlebitis) or other conditions that cause irritation and swelling in the vein's lining. Symptoms may include redness, warmth, pain, and swelling in the affected area. In some cases, phlebitis may lead to serious complications such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), so it is essential to seek medical attention if you suspect you have this condition.

'Hospital Nursing Staff' refers to the group of healthcare professionals who are licensed and trained to provide nursing care to patients in a hospital setting. They work under the direction of a nurse manager or director and collaborate with an interdisciplinary team of healthcare providers, including physicians, therapists, social workers, and other support staff.

Hospital nursing staff can include registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or vocational nurses (LVNs), and unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs) such as nursing assistants, orderlies, and patient care technicians. Their responsibilities may vary depending on their role and the needs of the patients, but they typically include:

* Administering medications and treatments prescribed by physicians
* Monitoring patients' vital signs and overall condition
* Providing emotional support and education to patients and their families
* Assisting with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, and grooming
* Documenting patient care and progress in medical records
* Collaborating with other healthcare professionals to develop and implement individualized care plans.

Hospital nursing staff play a critical role in ensuring the safety, comfort, and well-being of hospitalized patients, and they are essential members of the healthcare team.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

Hazardous substances, in a medical context, refer to agents that pose a risk to the health of living organisms. These can include chemicals, biological agents (such as bacteria or viruses), and physical hazards (like radiation). Exposure to these substances can lead to a range of adverse health effects, from acute symptoms like irritation and poisoning to chronic conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, or genetic mutations.

The classification and regulation of hazardous substances are often based on their potential for harm, the severity of the associated health risks, and the conditions under which they become dangerous. These assessments help inform safety measures, exposure limits, and handling procedures to minimize risks in occupational, environmental, and healthcare settings.

Inhibitory Concentration 50 (IC50) is a measure used in pharmacology, toxicology, and virology to describe the potency of a drug or chemical compound. It refers to the concentration needed to reduce the biological or biochemical activity of a given substance by half. Specifically, it is most commonly used in reference to the inhibition of an enzyme or receptor.

In the context of infectious diseases, IC50 values are often used to compare the effectiveness of antiviral drugs against a particular virus. A lower IC50 value indicates that less of the drug is needed to achieve the desired effect, suggesting greater potency and potentially fewer side effects. Conversely, a higher IC50 value suggests that more of the drug is required to achieve the same effect, indicating lower potency.

It's important to note that IC50 values can vary depending on the specific assay or experimental conditions used, so they should be interpreted with caution and in conjunction with other measures of drug efficacy.

Thiosemicarbazones are a class of organic compounds that contain the functional group R-NH-CS-N=CNR', where R and R' are organic radicals. These compounds have been widely studied due to their various biological activities, including antiviral, antibacterial, and anticancer properties. They can form complexes with metal ions, which can also exhibit interesting biological activity. Thiosemicarbazones have the ability to act as chelating agents, forming stable coordination compounds with many metal ions. This property has been exploited in the development of new drugs and diagnostic agents.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor" is not a recognized medical term or a valid medical definition. The term "Ehrlich tumor" is sometimes used to refer to a type of transplantable tumor that was first developed by the German physician Paul Ehrlich in the early 20th century for cancer research purposes. However, it's important to note that this type of tumor is not a naturally occurring cancer and is typically used only in laboratory experiments.

Carcinoma, on the other hand, is a medical term that refers to a type of cancer that starts in cells that line the inner or outer surfaces of organs. Carcinomas can develop in various parts of the body, including the lungs, breasts, colon, and skin.

If you have any specific questions about cancer or a particular medical condition, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

'Hospital Personnel' is a general term that refers to all individuals who are employed by or provide services on behalf of a hospital. This can include, but is not limited to:

1. Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, and technicians.
2. Administrative staff who manage the hospital's operations, including human resources, finance, and management.
3. Support services personnel such as maintenance workers, food service workers, housekeeping staff, and volunteers.
4. Medical students, interns, and trainees who are gaining clinical experience in the hospital setting.

All of these individuals play a critical role in ensuring that the hospital runs smoothly and provides high-quality care to its patients.

Floxuridine is a chemotherapeutic antimetabolite medication that is primarily used in the treatment of colon cancer. It is a fluorinated pyrimidine nucleoside analogue, which means it is similar in structure to the building blocks of DNA and RNA, and can be incorporated into these molecules during cell division, disrupting their normal function and preventing cell replication.

Floxuridine works by inhibiting the enzyme thymidylate synthase, which is necessary for the synthesis of thymidine, a nucleoside that is essential for DNA replication. By blocking this enzyme, floxuridine can prevent the growth and proliferation of cancer cells.

Floxuridine is often used in combination with other chemotherapy drugs as part of a treatment regimen for colon cancer. It may be administered intravenously or via continuous infusion, depending on the specific treatment plan. As with all chemotherapy drugs, floxuridine can have significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function), which can lead to anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia.

Drug compounding is the process of combining, mixing, or altering ingredients to create a customized medication to meet the specific needs of an individual patient. This can be done for a variety of reasons, such as when a patient has an allergy to a certain ingredient in a mass-produced medication, or when a patient requires a different dosage or formulation than what is available commercially.

Compounding requires specialized training and equipment, and compounding pharmacists must follow strict guidelines to ensure the safety and efficacy of the medications they produce. Compounded medications are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but the FDA does regulate the ingredients used in compounding and has oversight over the practices of compounding pharmacies.

It's important to note that while compounding can provide benefits for some patients, it also carries risks, such as the potential for contamination or incorrect dosing. Patients should only receive compounded medications from reputable pharmacies that follow proper compounding standards and procedures.

2-Propanol is a type of alcohol, also known as isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol. It is a colorless, flammable liquid with a characteristic odor. 2-Propanol is miscible with water and most organic solvents.

It is commonly used as a solvent and as an antiseptic or disinfectant, due to its ability to denature proteins and disrupt microbial cell membranes. In medical settings, 2-Propanol is often used as a skin sanitizer or hand rub to reduce the number of microorganisms on the skin.

Ingestion or prolonged exposure to 2-Propanol can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and may lead to central nervous system depression, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. It is important to handle 2-Propanol with care and follow appropriate safety precautions when using it.

Antineoplastic protocols refer to the standardized treatment plans used in cancer therapy that involve the use of antineoplastic agents or drugs. These protocols are developed based on clinical research and evidence-based medicine, and they outline the specific types, dosages, schedules, and routes of administration of antineoplastic drugs for the treatment of various types of cancer.

The main goal of antineoplastic protocols is to optimize the effectiveness of cancer therapy while minimizing toxicity and adverse effects. They may involve single-agent or multi-agent chemotherapy, as well as other forms of cancer treatment such as radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy. Antineoplastic protocols are often individualized based on the patient's age, performance status, tumor type and stage, genetic makeup, and other factors that may affect their response to treatment.

It is important for healthcare providers to follow antineoplastic protocols carefully to ensure that patients receive safe and effective cancer therapy. Regular monitoring and assessment of the patient's response to treatment are also crucial components of antineoplastic protocols, as they allow healthcare providers to adjust the treatment plan as needed to maximize its benefits and minimize its risks.

A Tumor Stem Cell Assay is not a widely accepted or standardized medical definition. However, in the context of cancer research, a tumor stem cell assay generally refers to an experimental procedure used to identify and isolate cancer stem cells (also known as tumor-initiating cells) from a tumor sample.

Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that are believed to be responsible for driving tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. They have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cell types within the tumor, making them a promising target for cancer therapies.

A tumor stem cell assay typically involves isolating cells from a tumor sample and subjecting them to various tests to identify those with stem cell-like properties. These tests may include assessing their ability to form tumors in animal models or their expression of specific surface markers associated with cancer stem cells. The goal of the assay is to provide researchers with a better understanding of the biology of cancer stem cells and to develop new therapies that target them specifically.

A pharmacy is a retail store or a healthcare facility where medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, are sold or dispensed. Pharmacies are staffed by professional pharmacists who provide medication therapy management services, including reviewing the patient's medication history, checking for potential drug interactions, dosage adjustments, and providing education to patients on the safe and effective use of their medications.

Pharmacies may also offer other health-related products such as medical supplies, vitamins, and personal care items. Some pharmacies are part of a larger healthcare system, such as hospitals or clinics, while others are standalone retail stores. In addition to traditional brick-and-mortar locations, there are also online pharmacies that operate over the internet.

It's important for patients to only obtain medications from licensed and reputable pharmacies to ensure their safety and the effectiveness of their treatment.

Carmustine is a chemotherapy drug used to treat various types of cancer, including brain tumors, multiple myeloma, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. It belongs to a class of drugs called alkylating agents, which work by damaging the DNA in cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and growing.

Carmustine is available as an injectable solution that is administered intravenously (into a vein) or as implantable wafers that are placed directly into the brain during surgery. The drug can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and low blood cell counts, among others. It may also increase the risk of certain infections and bleeding complications.

As with all chemotherapy drugs, carmustine can have serious and potentially life-threatening side effects, and it should only be administered under the close supervision of a qualified healthcare professional. Patients receiving carmustine treatment should be closely monitored for signs of toxicity and other adverse reactions.

Cytarabine is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including leukemias and lymphomas. Its chemical name is cytosine arabinoside, and it works by interfering with the DNA synthesis of cancer cells, which ultimately leads to their death.

Cytarabine is often used in combination with other chemotherapy drugs and may be administered through various routes, such as intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous injection, or orally. The specific dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and stage of cancer being treated, as well as the patient's overall health status.

Like all chemotherapy drugs, cytarabine can cause a range of side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, and an increased risk of infection. It may also cause more serious side effects, such as damage to the liver, kidneys, or nervous system, and it is important for patients to be closely monitored during treatment to minimize these risks.

It's important to note that medical treatments should only be administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, and this information should not be used as a substitute for medical advice.

Topoisomerase II inhibitors are a class of anticancer drugs that work by interfering with the enzyme topoisomerase II, which is essential for DNA replication and transcription. These inhibitors bind to the enzyme-DNA complex, preventing the relaxation of supercoiled DNA and causing DNA strand breaks. This results in the accumulation of double-stranded DNA breaks, which can lead to apoptosis (programmed cell death) in rapidly dividing cells, such as cancer cells. Examples of topoisomerase II inhibitors include etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone.

"Multiple drug resistance" (MDR) is a term used in medicine to describe the condition where a patient's infection becomes resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs. This means that the bacteria, virus, fungus or parasite that is causing the infection has developed the ability to survive and multiply despite being exposed to medications that were originally designed to kill or inhibit its growth.

In particular, MDR occurs when an organism becomes resistant to at least one drug in three or more antimicrobial categories. This can happen due to genetic changes in the microorganism that allow it to survive in the presence of these drugs. The development of MDR is a significant concern for public health because it limits treatment options and can make infections harder, if not impossible, to treat.

MDR can develop through several mechanisms, including mutations in the genes that encode drug targets or enzymes involved in drug metabolism, as well as the acquisition of genetic elements such as plasmids and transposons that carry resistance genes. The overuse and misuse of antimicrobial drugs are major drivers of MDR, as they create selective pressure for the emergence and spread of resistant strains.

MDR infections can occur in various settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, and communities. They can affect people of all ages and backgrounds, although certain populations may be at higher risk, such as those with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. Preventing the spread of MDR requires a multifaceted approach that includes surveillance, infection control, antimicrobial stewardship, and research into new therapies and diagnostics.

Farnesyltranstransferase (FTase) is an enzyme that plays a role in the post-translational modification of proteins, specifically by adding a farnesyl group to certain protein substrates. This process, known as farnesylation, is essential for the proper localization and function of many proteins, including Ras family GTPases, which are involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

FTase catalyzes the transfer of a farnesyl group from farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to a cysteine residue near the C-terminus of its protein substrates. This modification allows the protein to interact with membranes and other cellular structures, which is critical for their function. Inhibitors of FTase have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for cancer and other diseases associated with aberrant Ras signaling.

An Oncology Service in a hospital refers to the specialized department or unit that provides comprehensive cancer care and treatment. It is typically staffed with various healthcare professionals such as medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, oncology nurses, radiologists, pathologists, social workers, and psychologists who work together to provide a multidisciplinary approach to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care.

The oncology service may offer various treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, hormone therapy, and surgery, depending on the type and stage of cancer. They also provide supportive care services like pain management, nutritional support, and rehabilitation to help patients manage symptoms and improve their quality of life during and after treatment.

Overall, an Oncology Service in a hospital is dedicated to providing compassionate and evidence-based cancer care to patients and their families throughout the entire cancer journey.

The Comet Assay, also known as single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), is a sensitive method used to detect and measure DNA damage at the level of individual cells. The assay gets its name from the comet-like shape that formed DNA fragments migrate towards the anode during electrophoresis, creating a "tail" that represents the damaged DNA.

In this assay, cells are embedded in low melting point agarose on a microscope slide and then lysed to remove the cell membranes and histones, leaving the DNA intact. The slides are then subjected to electrophoresis under neutral or alkaline conditions, which causes the negatively charged DNA fragments to migrate out of the nucleus towards the anode. After staining with a DNA-binding dye, the slides are visualized under a fluorescence microscope and the degree of DNA damage is quantified by measuring the length and intensity of the comet "tail."

The Comet Assay is widely used in genetic toxicology to assess the genotoxic potential of chemicals, drugs, and environmental pollutants. It can also be used to measure DNA repair capacity and oxidative DNA damage.

Investigational drugs, also known as experimental or trial drugs, refer to medications that are currently being tested in clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy for the treatment of various medical conditions. These drugs have not yet been approved by regulatory agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for general use.

Before entering clinical trials, investigational drugs must undergo extensive preclinical testing in the lab and on animals to assess their safety and potential therapeutic benefits. Clinical trials are conducted in phases, starting with small groups of healthy volunteers to assess safety, followed by larger groups of patients to evaluate efficacy and side effects.

Participation in clinical trials is voluntary, and participants must meet certain eligibility criteria to ensure their safety and the validity of the trial results. Investigational drugs may ultimately be approved for general use if they are found to be safe and effective in clinical trials.

Isocoumarins are a type of chemical compound that contains a benzene ring fused to a five-membered lactone ring, which is made up of one oxygen atom and four carbon atoms. This particular structure gives isocoumarins their unique chemical and biological properties. They can be found naturally in various plants and microorganisms, and have been shown to exhibit a range of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. Some isocoumarins are also used as starting materials for the synthesis of other chemical compounds.

Nitrogen mustard compounds are a group of chemical agents that have been used historically as chemotherapy drugs and also have potential as military chemical warfare agents. They are alkylating agents, which means they work by modifying DNA in such a way that it can no longer replicate properly, leading to cell death.

In the medical context, nitrogen mustard compounds are used to treat certain types of cancer, including Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. They may also be used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other cancers.

The most common nitrogen mustard compounds used in medicine are mechlorethamine, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and melphalan. These drugs are typically administered intravenously or orally, and their use is carefully monitored to minimize side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and suppression of the immune system.

It's worth noting that nitrogen mustard compounds can also be highly toxic and dangerous if used as chemical warfare agents. They can cause severe respiratory, skin, and eye damage, as well as potentially fatal systemic effects.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Nurses" is not a medical term per se, but rather a job title or professional role within the healthcare field. Here's a brief description of what nurses do:

Nurses are healthcare professionals who work closely with patients to provide and coordinate care, education, and support. They play a critical role in promoting health, preventing illness, and helping patients cope with various medical conditions. Nurses can be found in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, long-term care facilities, community health centers, and patient homes.

There are different nursing specialties and levels of education, including:

1. Registered Nurse (RN): Typically holds an associate's or bachelor's degree in nursing and has passed a licensing exam. RNs provide direct patient care, administer medications, and coordinate treatment plans.
2. Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN): Has completed additional education and training beyond the RN level, often earning a master's or doctoral degree. APRNs can specialize in areas such as nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified registered nurse anesthetist, or certified nurse-midwife.
3. Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN): Holds a diploma or certificate from a practical nursing program and has passed a licensing exam. LPNs/LVNs provide basic patient care under the supervision of RNs and physicians.

These definitions are not exhaustive, but they should give you an idea of what nurses do and their roles within the healthcare system.

I apologize for any confusion, but "dioxoles" is not a medical term or concept. It is a chemical term that refers to a specific type of organic compound containing a dioxole ring, which is a six-membered ring consisting of two oxygen atoms and two carbon atoms. Dioxoles can be found in various natural and synthetic substances, but they are not typically relevant to medical definitions or concepts.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help answer them for you.

Suramin is a medication that has been used for the treatment of African sleeping sickness, which is caused by trypanosomes. It works as a reverse-specific protein kinase CK inhibitor and also blocks the attachment of the parasite to the host cells. Suramin is not absorbed well from the gastrointestinal tract and is administered intravenously.

It should be noted that Suramin is an experimental treatment for other conditions such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, viral infections and autoimmune diseases, but it's still under investigation and has not been approved by FDA for those uses.

A hospital is a healthcare facility where patients receive medical treatment, diagnosis, and care for various health conditions, injuries, or diseases. It is typically staffed with medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers who provide round-the-clock medical services. Hospitals may offer inpatient (overnight) stays or outpatient (same-day) services, depending on the nature of the treatment required. They are equipped with various medical facilities like operating rooms, diagnostic equipment, intensive care units (ICUs), and emergency departments to handle a wide range of medical situations. Hospitals may specialize in specific areas of medicine, such as pediatrics, geriatrics, oncology, or trauma care.

Alkaloids are a type of naturally occurring organic compounds that contain mostly basic nitrogen atoms. They are often found in plants, and are known for their complex ring structures and diverse pharmacological activities. Many alkaloids have been used in medicine for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and therapeutic properties. Examples of alkaloids include morphine, quinine, nicotine, and caffeine.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Mitomycin is an antineoplastic antibiotic derived from Streptomyces caespitosus. It is primarily used in cancer chemotherapy, particularly in the treatment of various carcinomas including gastrointestinal tract malignancies and breast cancer. Mitomycin works by forming cross-links in DNA, thereby inhibiting its replication and transcription, which ultimately leads to cell death.

In addition to its systemic use, mitomycin is also used topically in ophthalmology for the treatment of certain eye conditions such as glaucoma and various ocular surface disorders. The topical application of mitomycin can help reduce scarring and fibrosis by inhibiting the proliferation of fibroblasts.

It's important to note that mitomycin has a narrow therapeutic index, meaning there is only a small range between an effective dose and a toxic one. Therefore, its use should be closely monitored to minimize side effects, which can include myelosuppression, mucositis, alopecia, and potential secondary malignancies.

Topoisomerase I inhibitors are a class of anticancer drugs that work by inhibiting the function of topoisomerase I, an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the relaxation and replication of DNA. By inhibiting this enzyme's activity, these drugs interfere with the normal unwinding and separation of DNA strands, leading to DNA damage and ultimately cell death. Topoisomerase I inhibitors are used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including colon, small cell lung, ovarian, and cervical cancers. Examples of topoisomerase I inhibitors include camptothecin, irinotecan, and topotecan.

Azacitidine is a medication that is primarily used to treat myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a type of cancer where the bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. It is also used to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in some cases.

Azacitidine is a type of drug known as a hypomethylating agent, which means that it works by modifying the way that genes are expressed in cancer cells. Specifically, azacitidine inhibits the activity of an enzyme called DNA methyltransferase, which adds methyl groups to the DNA molecule and can silence the expression of certain genes. By inhibiting this enzyme, azacitidine can help to restore the normal function of genes that have been silenced in cancer cells.

Azacitidine is typically given as a series of subcutaneous (under the skin) or intravenous (into a vein) injections over a period of several days, followed by a rest period of several weeks before the next cycle of treatment. The specific dosage and schedule may vary depending on the individual patient's needs and response to treatment.

Like all medications, azacitidine can have side effects, which may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, fever, and decreased appetite. More serious side effects are possible, but relatively rare, and may include bone marrow suppression, infections, and liver damage. Patients receiving azacitidine should be closely monitored by their healthcare provider to manage any side effects that may occur.

DNA adducts are chemical modifications or alterations that occur when DNA molecules become attached to or bound with certain harmful substances, such as toxic chemicals or carcinogens. These attachments can disrupt the normal structure and function of the DNA, potentially leading to mutations, genetic damage, and an increased risk of cancer and other diseases.

DNA adducts are formed when a reactive molecule from a chemical agent binds covalently to a base in the DNA molecule. This process can occur either spontaneously or as a result of exposure to environmental toxins, such as those found in tobacco smoke, certain industrial chemicals, and some medications.

The formation of DNA adducts is often used as a biomarker for exposure to harmful substances, as well as an indicator of potential health risks associated with that exposure. Researchers can measure the levels of specific DNA adducts in biological samples, such as blood or urine, to assess the extent and duration of exposure to certain chemicals or toxins.

It's important to note that not all DNA adducts are necessarily harmful, and some may even play a role in normal cellular processes. However, high levels of certain DNA adducts have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and other diseases, making them a focus of ongoing research and investigation.

DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that regulate the topological state of DNA during various cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and repair. They do this by introducing temporary breaks in the DNA strands and allowing the strands to rotate around each other, thereby relieving torsional stress and supercoiling. Topoisomerases are classified into two types: type I and type II.

Type II topoisomerases are further divided into two subtypes: type IIA and type IIB. These enzymes function by forming a covalent bond with the DNA strands, cleaving them, and then passing another segment of DNA through the break before resealing the original strands. This process allows for the removal of both positive and negative supercoils from DNA as well as the separation of interlinked circular DNA molecules (catenanes) or knotted DNA structures.

Type II topoisomerases are essential for cell viability, and their dysfunction has been linked to various human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. They have also emerged as important targets for the development of anticancer drugs that inhibit their activity and induce DNA damage leading to cell death. Examples of type II topoisomerase inhibitors include etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Nitrosoureas are a class of chemical compounds that contain a nitroso (--NO) and urea (-NH-CO-NH-) functional group. In the field of medicine, nitrosoureas are primarily used as antineoplastic agents, or drugs designed to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

These compounds work by alkylating and crosslinking DNA, which ultimately leads to the disruption of DNA replication and transcription processes in cancer cells, causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Nitrosoureas can also inhibit the activity of certain enzymes involved in DNA repair, further enhancing their cytotoxic effects.

Some common nitrosourea compounds used in clinical settings include:

1. Carmustine (BCNU)
2. Lomustine (CCNU)
3. Semustine (MeCCNU)
4. Fotemustine
5. Streptozocin

These drugs have been used to treat various types of cancer, such as brain tumors, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. However, their use is often limited by significant side effects, including myelosuppression (decreased production of blood cells), nausea, vomiting, and liver toxicity.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

A Pharmacist is a healthcare professional who practices in the field of pharmacy, focusing on the safe and effective use of medications. They are responsible for dispensing medications prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as providing information and counseling to patients about their medications. This includes explaining how to take the medication, potential side effects, and any drug interactions. Pharmacists may also be involved in medication therapy management, monitoring patient health and adjusting medication plans as needed. They must have a deep understanding of the properties and actions of drugs, including how they are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their potential interactions with other substances and treatments. In addition to a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, pharmacists must also be licensed in the state where they practice.

Medical Definition:

Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) is a standard measurement in toxicology that refers to the estimated amount or dose of a substance, which if ingested, injected, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin by either human or animal, would cause death in 50% of the test population. It is expressed as the mass of a substance per unit of body weight (mg/kg, μg/kg, etc.). LD50 values are often used to compare the toxicity of different substances and help determine safe dosage levels.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Pyrones" is not a medical term, but rather a chemical term used to describe a class of organic compounds known as lactones with a characteristic eight-membered ring. These compounds are found in various natural sources such as plants and fungi, and some have been studied for their potential biological activities.

However, if you meant "pyrexia" instead of "pyrones," then I can provide the medical definition:

Pyrexia is a term used to describe an abnormally elevated body temperature, also known as fever. In adults, a core body temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) or higher is generally considered indicative of pyrexia. Fever is often a response to an infection or inflammation in the body and can be part of the immune system's effort to combat pathogens.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and other molecules from genes in neoplastic cells, or cells that are part of a tumor or cancer. In a normal cell, gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that the right genes are turned on or off at the right time. However, in cancer cells, this regulation can be disrupted, leading to the overexpression or underexpression of certain genes.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation can be affected by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and signals from the tumor microenvironment. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes (genes that promote cancer growth and development) or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (genes that prevent cancer).

Understanding neoplastic gene expression regulation is important for developing new therapies for cancer, as targeting specific genes or pathways involved in this process can help to inhibit cancer growth and progression.

Mutagenicity tests are a type of laboratory assays used to identify agents that can cause genetic mutations. These tests detect changes in the DNA of organisms, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, after exposure to potential mutagens. The most commonly used mutagenicity test is the Ames test, which uses a strain of Salmonella bacteria that is sensitive to mutagens. If a chemical causes an increase in the number of revertants (reversion to the wild type) in the bacterial population, it is considered to be a mutagen. Other tests include the mouse lymphoma assay and the chromosomal aberration test. These tests are used to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of chemicals and are an important part of the safety evaluation process for new drugs, chemicals, and other substances.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pyrazines" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. Pyrazines are actually a class of organic compounds that contain a ring made up of two nitrogen atoms and three carbon atoms. They are found in various foods and contribute to their flavors. If you have any questions about organic chemistry or food science, I'd be happy to try to help!

Metabolic detoxification, in the context of drugs, refers to the series of biochemical processes that the body undergoes to transform drugs or other xenobiotics into water-soluble compounds so they can be excreted. This process typically involves two phases:

1. Phase I Detoxification: In this phase, enzymes such as cytochrome P450 oxidases introduce functional groups into the drug molecule, making it more polar and reactive. This can result in the formation of metabolites that are less active than the parent compound or, in some cases, more toxic.

2. Phase II Detoxification: In this phase, enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, and sulfotransferases conjugate these polar and reactive metabolites with endogenous molecules like glutathione, glucuronic acid, or sulfate. This further increases the water solubility of the compound, allowing it to be excreted by the kidneys or bile.

It's important to note that while these processes are essential for eliminating drugs and other harmful substances from the body, they can also produce reactive metabolites that may cause damage to cells and tissues if not properly regulated. Therefore, maintaining a balance in the activity of these detoxification enzymes is crucial for overall health and well-being.

HT-29 is a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line that is commonly used in research. These cells are derived from a colorectal cancer tumor and have the ability to differentiate into various cell types found in the intestinal mucosa, such as absorptive enterocytes and mucus-secreting goblet cells. HT-29 cells are often used to study the biology of colon cancer, including the effects of drugs on cancer cell growth and survival, as well as the role of various genes and signaling pathways in colorectal tumorigenesis.

It is important to note that when working with cell lines like HT-29, it is essential to use proper laboratory techniques and follow established protocols to ensure the integrity and reproducibility of experimental results. Additionally, researchers should regularly authenticate their cell lines to confirm their identity and verify that they are free from contamination with other cell types.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

A hydrazone is not a medical term per se, but rather a chemical compound. However, it's important for medical professionals to understand the properties and reactions of various chemical compounds, including hydrazones, in the context of pharmacology, toxicology, and medicinal chemistry. Here's a general definition:

Hydrazones are organic compounds that contain a functional group with the structure R1R2C=NNR3, where R1, R2, and R3 are hydrogen atoms or organic groups. They are formed by the condensation reaction of a carbonyl compound (aldehyde or ketone) with hydrazine or its derivatives. Hydrazones can exhibit various biological activities, such as antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties. Some hydrazones are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds.

Sulfonamides are a group of synthetic antibacterial drugs that contain the sulfonamide group (SO2NH2) in their chemical structure. They are bacteriostatic agents, meaning they inhibit bacterial growth rather than killing them outright. Sulfonamides work by preventing the bacteria from synthesizing folic acid, which is essential for their survival.

The first sulfonamide drug was introduced in the 1930s and since then, many different sulfonamides have been developed with varying chemical structures and pharmacological properties. They are used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and ear infections.

Some common sulfonamide drugs include sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (a combination of a sulfonamide and another antibiotic called trimethoprim). While sulfonamides are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can cause side effects such as rash, nausea, and allergic reactions. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

The term "DNA, neoplasm" is not a standard medical term or concept. DNA refers to deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the genetic material present in the cells of living organisms. A neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor or growth of abnormal tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

In some contexts, "DNA, neoplasm" may refer to genetic alterations found in cancer cells. These genetic changes can include mutations, amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements of DNA sequences that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Identifying these genetic abnormalities can help doctors diagnose and treat certain types of cancer more effectively.

However, it's important to note that "DNA, neoplasm" is not a term that would typically be used in medical reports or research papers without further clarification. If you have any specific questions about DNA changes in cancer cells or neoplasms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or conducting further research on the topic.

Lymphoma is a type of cancer that originates from the white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the immune system. These cells are found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and other organs. Lymphoma can be classified into two main types: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

HL is characterized by the presence of a specific type of abnormal lymphocyte called Reed-Sternberg cells, while NHL includes a diverse group of lymphomas that lack these cells. The symptoms of lymphoma may include swollen lymph nodes, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue.

The exact cause of lymphoma is not known, but it is believed to result from genetic mutations in the lymphocytes that lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Exposure to certain viruses, chemicals, and radiation may increase the risk of developing lymphoma. Treatment options for lymphoma depend on various factors such as the type and stage of the disease, age, and overall health of the patient. Common treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Alkylating agents are a class of chemotherapy drugs that work by alkylating, or adding an alkyl group to, DNA molecules. This process can damage the DNA and prevent cancer cells from dividing and growing. Alkylating agents are often used to treat various types of cancer, including Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and solid tumors. Examples of alkylating agents include cyclophosphamide, melphalan, and chlorambucil. These drugs can have significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and an increased risk of infection. They can also cause long-term damage to the heart, lungs, and reproductive system.

'Mammary neoplasms, experimental' is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide definitions for the individual terms:

1. Mammary: Pertaining to the breast or mammary glands in females, which are responsible for milk production.
2. Neoplasms: Abnormal growths of tissue, also known as tumors or masses, that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).
3. Experimental: Relating to a scientific experiment or study, typically conducted in a controlled setting to test hypotheses and gather data.

In the context of medical research, 'experimental mammary neoplasms' may refer to artificially induced breast tumors in laboratory animals (such as rats or mice) for the purpose of studying the development, progression, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer. These studies can help researchers better understand the biology of breast cancer and develop new therapies and strategies for its diagnosis and management.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Razoxane" is not a medical term that has a widely accepted or specific definition in the field of medicine. It is possible that you may be referring to "razoxane," which is a medication used in the treatment of certain types of cancer. Razoxane is an antineoplastic agent, which means it is a drug that is used to treat cancer. It works by interfering with the formation of blood vessels that supply tumors, which can help to slow or stop the growth of the tumor.

It is important to note that the use of razoxane is not widely accepted and it is not a commonly used cancer treatment. It is typically used only in certain specific circumstances and when other treatments have not been effective. As with any medication, razoxane should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional, and it is important to be aware of the potential risks and benefits.

Phosphorylcholine is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a chemical compound. It is the choline ester of phosphoric acid, and it plays an important role in the structure and function of cell membranes. Phosphorylcholine is also found in certain types of lipoproteins, including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol.

In the context of medical research and therapy, phosphorylcholine has been studied for its potential role in various diseases, such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and other inflammatory conditions. Some studies have suggested that phosphorylcholine may contribute to the development of these diseases by promoting inflammation and immune responses. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of phosphorylcholine in human health and disease.

Organoplatinum compounds are a group of chemical substances that contain at least one carbon-platinum bond. These compounds have been widely studied and used in the field of medicine, particularly in cancer chemotherapy. The most well-known organoplatinum compound is cisplatin, which is a platinum-based drug used to treat various types of cancers such as testicular, ovarian, bladder, and lung cancers. Cisplatin works by forming crosslinks with the DNA of cancer cells, disrupting their ability to replicate and ultimately leading to cell death. Other examples of organoplatinum compounds used in cancer treatment include carboplatin and oxaliplatin.

Octreotide is a synthetic analogue of the natural hormone somatostatin, which is used in medical treatment. It is a octapeptide with similar effects to somatostatin, but with a longer duration of action. Octreotide is primarily used in the management of acromegaly, gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), and diarrhea and flushing associated with carcinoid syndrome.

It works by inhibiting the release of several hormones, including growth hormone, insulin, glucagon, and gastrin. This results in a decrease in symptoms caused by excessive hormone secretion, such as reduced growth hormone levels in acromegaly, decreased tumor size in some GEP-NETs, and improved diarrhea and flushing in carcinoid syndrome.

Octreotide is available in several forms, including short-acting subcutaneous injections (Sandostatin®), long-acting depot intramuscular injections (Sandostatin LAR®), and a slow-release formulation for the treatment of diarrhea associated with AIDS (Mycapssa™).

The medical definition of Octreotide is:

A synthetic octapeptide analogue of somatostatin, used in the management of acromegaly, gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), and diarrhea and flushing associated with carcinoid syndrome. Octreotide inhibits the release of several hormones, including growth hormone, insulin, glucagon, and gastrin, leading to symptomatic improvement in these conditions. It is available as short-acting subcutaneous injections, long-acting depot intramuscular injections, and a slow-release formulation for diarrhea associated with AIDS.

Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a group of enzymes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. They facilitate the conjugation of these compounds with glutathione, a tripeptide consisting of cysteine, glutamic acid, and glycine, which results in more water-soluble products that can be easily excreted from the body.

GSTs play a crucial role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and chemical injury by neutralizing reactive electrophilic species and peroxides. They are found in various tissues, including the liver, kidneys, lungs, and intestines, and are classified into several families based on their structure and function.

Abnormalities in GST activity have been associated with increased susceptibility to certain diseases, such as cancer, neurological disorders, and respiratory diseases. Therefore, GSTs have become a subject of interest in toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical research.

Lomustine is a medical term for a specific antineoplastic agent, which is a type of medication used to treat cancer. It's a nitrosourea compound that is classified as an alkylating agent, meaning it works by preventing the reproduction of cancer cells. Lomustine is used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including brain tumors, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It's usually administered orally in the form of a capsule. As with any medication, it can have side effects, which can include nausea, vomiting, and lowered blood cell counts.

Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4. They have the molecular formula N-NRR' where R and R' can be alkyl or aryl groups. Piperazines have a wide range of uses in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and as building blocks in organic synthesis.

In a medical context, piperazines are used in the manufacture of various drugs, including some antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, and anti-worm medications. For example, the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine and the antidepressant drug nefazodone both contain a piperazine ring in their chemical structure.

However, it's important to note that some piperazines are also used as recreational drugs due to their stimulant and euphoric effects. These include compounds such as BZP (benzylpiperazine) and TFMPP (trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), which have been linked to serious health risks, including addiction, seizures, and death. Therefore, the use of these substances should be avoided.

Mitomycin is an antineoplastic antibiotic derived from Streptomyces caespitosus. It is used in cancer chemotherapy, particularly for the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors, head and neck cancers, and sensitive skin cancers like squamous cell carcinoma. Mitomycin works by forming cross-links in DNA, which prevents DNA replication and transcription, ultimately leading to cell death. It is often administered through intravenous injection or topically during surgery for local treatment of certain cancers. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and potential myelosuppression (decrease in blood cells).

Dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) is the oxidized form of ascorbic acid, which is more commonly known as vitamin C. It is the oxidation product of ascorbic acid that is formed when the vitamin C molecule loses two electrons and two protons. This conversion can occur naturally in the body or during the processing and storage of food.

DHAA still retains some vitamin C activity, but it is not as biologically active as ascorbic acid. However, DHAA can be reduced back to ascorbic acid in the body by certain enzymes, which allows it to still contribute to maintaining proper levels of this essential nutrient.

DHAA plays a role in various physiological processes, including collagen synthesis, immune function, and antioxidant defense. It is also involved in the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. A deficiency in vitamin C can lead to scurvy, a condition characterized by fatigue, joint pain, anemia, and skin changes.

Anthracyclines are a class of chemotherapeutic agents that are derived from the bacterium Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius. These drugs include daunorubicin, doxorubicin, epirubicin, and idarubicin. They work by intercalating into DNA and inhibiting the enzyme topoisomerase II, which leads to DNA damage and ultimately cell death. Anthracyclines are used in the treatment of a variety of cancers, including leukemias, lymphomas, breast cancer, and sarcomas. However, they can also cause cardiotoxicity, which limits their long-term use.

Cancer care facilities are healthcare institutions that provide medical and supportive services to patients diagnosed with cancer. These facilities offer a range of treatments, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and hormone therapy. They also provide diagnostic services, pain management, rehabilitation, palliative care, and psychosocial support to help patients cope with the physical and emotional challenges of cancer and its treatment.

Cancer care facilities can vary in size and scope, from large academic medical centers that offer cutting-edge clinical trials and specialized treatments, to community hospitals and outpatient clinics that provide more routine cancer care. Some cancer care facilities specialize in specific types of cancer or treatments, while others offer a comprehensive range of services for all types of cancer.

In addition to medical treatment, cancer care facilities may also provide complementary therapies such as acupuncture, massage, and yoga to help patients manage symptoms and improve their quality of life during and after treatment. They may also offer support groups, counseling, and other resources to help patients and their families cope with the challenges of cancer.

Overall, cancer care facilities play a critical role in diagnosing, treating, and supporting patients with cancer, helping them to achieve the best possible outcomes and quality of life.

An alkylating antineoplastic agent is an alkylating agent used in cancer treatment that attaches an alkyl group (CnH2n+1) to ... The platinum agents are also sometimes described as nonclassical. Alkylating antineoplastic agents have limitations. Their ... List of hormonal cytostatic antineoplastic agents "Alkylating Agents". US National Library of Medicine. Archived from the ... Many of the agents are known as "classical alkylating agents". These include true alkyl groups, and have been known for a ...
This is a list of antineoplastic agents used to treat cancer. Rossi, S, ed. (2013). Australian Medicines Handbook (2013 ed.). ...
... (CCNS) refer to a class of pharmaceuticals that act as antitumor agents at all or ... Alkylating antineoplastic agent and anthracyclins are two examples. "Chemotherapy: The Basics". OncoLink. Archived from the ... "Cell killing action of cell cycle phase-non-specific antitumor agents is dependent on concentration--time product". Cancer ...
This is a list of dual hormonal and cytostatic antineoplastic agents. Estramustine phosphate (Emcyt, Estracyt; Leo 299, NSC- ... Antineoplastic drugs, Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, Nitrogen mustards). ...
"Antineoplastic agents. 47. Structure of an antineoplastic agent from Streptomyces griseoluteus". Journal of the American ...
"Antineoplastic agents. 219. Isolation and structure of the cell growth inhibitory constituents from the western Pacific marine ... "Antineoplastic agents. 257. Isolation and structure of spongistatin 1". Journal of Organic Chemistry. 58 (6): 1302-1304. doi: ...
The bulbs of N. poeticus contain the antineoplastic agent narciclasine. This usage is also found in later Arabian, North ... Pettit, GR; Cragg, GM; Singh, SB; Duke, JA; Doubek, DL (1990). "Antineoplastic agents, 162. Zephyranthes candida". Journal of ... "Antineoplastic Agents. 587. Isolation and Structure of 3-Epipancratistatin from Narcissus cv. Ice Follies". Journal of Natural ... as Potential Anticancer Agents". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 52 (4): 1100-1114. doi:10.1021/jm8013585. PMID 19199649. ...
Pettit GR, Xu JP, Chapuis JC, Pettit RK, Tackett LP, Doubek DL, Hooper JN, Schmidt JM (2004). "Antineoplastic agents. 520. ...
Certain antineoplastic agents, bryostatins 4 and 5, have been extracted from Aplidium californicum and are being evaluated. ... Pettit GR, Leet JE, Herald CL, Kamano Y, Doubek DL (1986). "Antineoplastic agents, 116. An evaluation of the marine ascidian ...
Pettit GR, Cragg GM, Singh SB (May-June 1987). "Antineoplastic agents, 122. Constituents of Combretum caffrum". Journal of ...
"Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal". Medical Subject Headings. U.S. National Library of Medicine. 2009. Retrieved 11 November 2010 ...
ISBN 978-3-642-99941-3. Alan C. Sartorelli; David G. Johns (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. ... Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Halogenated ... Carpenter JT (1988). "Progestational agents in the treatment of breast cancer". Cancer Treat. Res. Cancer Treatment and ... Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, Organobromides, Pregnanes, Progestogens, Triketones). ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Nathanson ... 549-. ISBN 978-3-642-30725-6. The first sex steroid used as pharmacological agent was Progynon, first sold by Schering AG in ...
Sartorelli AC, Johns DG (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. Springer Science & Business Media. pp ...
31-. ISBN 978-1-4613-2157-6. Sartorelli AC, Johns DG (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. Springer ...
83-. ISBN 978-1-4832-7299-3. Alan C. Sartorelli; David G. Johns (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents ...
Sartorelli, Alan C.; Johns, David G. (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. Springer Science & ... Anthramycin is an active anti-tumor agent and antibiotic. It works by inhibiting the synthesis of RNA and DNA of carcinoma ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Archived ... Geller J, Fruchtman B, Newman H, Roberts T, Silva R (February 1967). "Effect of progestational agents on carcinoma of the ... Hall NR (June 2011). "What agent should be used to prevent recurrent preterm birth: 17-P or natural progesterone?". Obstetrics ... In the group of new parenteral progestational agents, three substances developed by Karl Junkmann1,2 are the most outstanding ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. ... Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, Human drug metabolites, Organofluorides, All stub articles, Steroid stubs, Genito-urinary system ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Oxylone ... ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. Morton IK, Hall JM (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and ... Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, Progestogens, All stub articles, Steroid stubs, Genito-urinary system drug stubs). ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Council on ... However, androstanolone is nonetheless described as a very poor anabolic agent. This is attributed to its high affinity as a ... von Deutsch DA, Abukhalaf IK, Lapu-Bula R (15 October 2003). "Anabolic Doping Agents". In Mozayani A, Raymon L (eds.). Handbook ... 63-. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. Morton IK, Hall JM (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and ...
ISBN 978-0-323-13916-8. Alan C. Sartorelli; David G. Johns (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Li JJ (3 ... 219-. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. Morton IK, Hall JM (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties ... Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, Organochlorides, Phenol ethers, Prodrugs, Progonadotropins, Selective estrogen receptor ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. pp. 170-192. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-65806-8_11. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. v t e v t e ... Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, All stub articles, Steroid stubs, Genito-urinary system drug stubs). ...
31-. ISBN 978-1-4613-2157-6. Sartorelli AC, Johns DG (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. Springer ... Morton IK, Hall JM (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and Synonyms. Springer Science ...
It has the role of antineoplastic agent, which means it can inhibit or prevent the neoplasms' proliferation. It is also the ... "antineoplastic agent (CHEBI:35610)". www.ebi.ac.uk. Retrieved 2019-10-26. "1-deoxysphinganine". Avanti Polar Lipids. Retrieved ...
Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 181-. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8. Heinrich Kahr ...
It is an antineoplastic agent. It exerts its effect by acting as a suicide inhibitor of the enzyme O6-alkylguanine-DNA ... O6-BG was used clinically in combination with the alkylating agent temozolomide for glioblastoma, however the combination was ... Antineoplastic drugs, Experimental cancer drugs, Benzyl compounds). ...
Milne GW (1 July 2000). Ashgate Handbook of Antineoplastic Agents. Wiley. p. 5. ISBN 978-0-566-08382-2. Tripathi KD (30 ... List of hormonal cytostatic antineoplastic agents List of estrogen esters § Estradiol esters NCI Thesaurus. "Alestramustine". ... is a cytostatic antineoplastic agent which was never marketed. It is the L-alanine ester of estramustine, which is a ... Antineoplastic drugs, Chloroethyl compounds, Estradiol esters, Estranes, Hormonal antineoplastic drugs, Nitrogen mustards, ...
... an alkylating antineoplastic agent; Hydroxydaunorubicin, also known as doxorubicin: an anthracycline antibiotic that is able to ...
An alkylating antineoplastic agent is an alkylating agent used in cancer treatment that attaches an alkyl group (CnH2n+1) to ... The platinum agents are also sometimes described as nonclassical. Alkylating antineoplastic agents have limitations. Their ... List of hormonal cytostatic antineoplastic agents "Alkylating Agents". US National Library of Medicine. Archived from the ... Many of the agents are known as "classical alkylating agents". These include true alkyl groups, and have been known for a ...
In spite of the increasing sophistication in the diagnostic workup for malignancies, detailed investigations fail to reveal a primary site of origin for a subset of patients with metastatic cancer. This is often referred to as carcinoma of unknown primary origin (CUP) or occult primary malignancy.
Nov 6, 2022 , Posted by mrzezo in Implantology , Comments Off on Antineoplastic Agents (Chemotherapy) ...
Doxorubicin is an antineoplastic in the anthracycline class. General properties of drugs in this class include: interaction ...
Antineoplastic agent used in other gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic islet cell and carcinoid tumors ... Streptozocin, 5-FU, and doxorubicin are the agents most commonly used in the treatment of somatostatin-secreting pancreatic ...
Some antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agents / this publication represents the views and expert opinions of an IARC Working ... Laboratory decontamination and destruction of carcinogens in laboratory wastes : some antineoplastic agents / editors, M. ... some Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents (1980: Lyon, France) , International Agency for Research on Cancer. ... Anticancer agents based on natural product models / edited by John M. Cassady, John D. Douros. by Cassady, John M , Douros, ...
Our market research reports on Anticancer Agent provide valuable insights into market size, growth, and key players. Order ... Global Antineoplastic Agents Market by Type (Alkylating & Alkylating-like Agents, Antimetabolites, Antitumor Antibiotics), ... Structure (Cell Cycle Phase Nonspecific Agents, Cell Cycle Phase Specific Agents), Indication, Application, End-User - Forecast ... These agents are designed to target and destroy cancer cells while minimizing the damage to healthy cells. They can be ...
Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects * Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use* * B7-H1 Antigen / antagonists & inhibitors ...
OTHER ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS. Side Effects of Refissa. Back to Top. Common side effects of Refissa include peeling, dry skin, ...
... antineoplastic agents, antibiotics, antimalarials, anticonvulsants, and other drugs. (7.5). •. Potent Inhalation Anesthetics: ... Concurrent use of these agents should generally be avoided. (5.6, 7.2). •. Ergot-Type Oxytocic Drugs: Concurrent administration ... Concurrent use of these agents should generally be avoided. (5.6, 7.4). •. Drugs Associated with Methemoglobinemia: Patients ... patients with a known hypersensitivity to bupivacaine or to any local anesthetic agent of the amide-type or to other components ...
In a study of nurses and pharmacists with occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents, maternal exposure to antineoplastic ... Agents that interfere with the menstrual cycle and ovulation, such as hormonally active agents, may affect fertility [Windham ... Antineoplastic drugs. Miscarriage, low birth weight, birth defects. Certain ethylene glycol ethers such as 2-ethoxyethanol (2EE ... Agents that interfere with male hormones or with hormonal feedback (e.g., testosterone, luteinizing hormone [LH]) may also ...
Pharmacological Actions : Anti-metastatic, Antineoplastic Agents, Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) inhibitor, NF-kappaB ... Pharmacological Actions : Anti-metastatic, Antineoplastic Agents, Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) inhibitor ... Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Anti-metastatic, Antioxidants, Antiproliferative , Apoptotic. Additional ... Pharmacological Actions : Anticarcinogenic Agents, Antiproliferative , Cell cycle arrest. Additional Keywords : Dietary ...
Cobb E. Antineoplastic agent from Cnicus benedictus. Patent Brit 1973;335:181. ... Hirano, T., Gotoh, M., and Oka, K. Natural flavonoids and lignans are potent cytostatic agents against human leukemic HL-60 ...
Antineoplastic Agent Vidaza Adult Azacitidine - Dosage and How to Use. How should Azacitidine be used?. ​It can be given either ...
Antineoplastic Agents. Li J, Tang M, Ke R-X, Li P-L, Sheng Z-G, Zhu B-Z. 2024. The anti-cancer drug candidate CBL0137 induced ...
Antineoplastic agents such as cisplatin (Li et al., 2016a), methotrexate (Erboga et al., 2015), doxorubicin (Heeba and Mahmoud ... Quercetin, together with dasatinib, acts as the novel pharmacological senolytic agent for a number of kidney diseases (Kirkland ... Quercetin acts as an anti-hyperglycemic agent by regulating glucose-related signaling pathways. Quercetin also targets fibrotic ... The combination of quercetin and dasatinib could serve as new therapeutic agents to hinder renal senescence. ...
Hu, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Dong, A.; Jing, Y.; Iwasaki, S.; Yao, X. Antineoplastic agents. III: Steroidal glycosides from Solanum ... Yasukawa, K. Cancer chemopreventive agents: natural pentacyclic triterpenoids; Pentacyclic Triterpenes as Promising Agents in ... Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry From Amino Acids to Proteins as Targets for Metal-based Drugs. Current Drug ... Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry Emerging Role of Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signalling Pathways in Cancer Progression and Role ...
Antineoplastic Agents. Strength : 15MG. Pack Size (Form) : 21 CAPSULE (BOTTLE). Dosage Form : ...
The aim of our work was to vectorize hop extract valorized from coproducts as a therapeutic agent to alleviate inflammation in ... Nuclear Receptor and Stress Response Pathways Associated with Antineoplastic Agent-Induced Diarrhea ... The aim of our work was to formulate a batch of hop extract valorized from leaves as a therapeutic agent to alleviate ... The aim of our work was to vectorize hop extract valorized from coproducts as a therapeutic agent to alleviate inflammation in ...
An effective antineoplastic agent and is used for a variety of cancers. FDA approved uses on breast cancer, ovarian carcinoma, ... Phase III CLL, Phase IV NHL A purine analogue antineoplastic. FDA approved use on hairy cell leukemia. Parke-Davis. Transition ... Immunotherapy agent. Effective with diagnosis date January 1, 2013 forward, code Rituximab as BRM/Immunotherapy. For cases ...
Antineoplastic agents; Biological monitoring; Author Keywords: Antineoplastic drugs; HPLC-MS/MS; occupational exposure; ...
Antineoplastic agents. *Surgical smoke. *Disinfectants. *Physical agents like radiation. Photo © Getty Images. Healthcare ... New infectious agents will continue to emerge. These and other changes mean that occupational safety and health challenges ... Everyday healthcare workers face hazardous work conditions due to exposures to infectious agents and hazardous drugs and ...
Module B: Antineoplastic Agents (Pharmacists, Pharmacy Technicians) - 3/1/08pdf icon [PDF - 2,090 KB] ... Module C: Antineoplastic Agents (Oncology Nurses) - 3/1/08pdf icon [PDF - 1,650 KB] ... and cleaning and disinfection agents. The goal of the management survey is to collect information describing facility-based ...
LR: 20151119; JID: 101091810; 0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Biomarkers, Pharmacological); 0 (Biomarkers, Tumor); 9HW64Q8G6G ( ... CI: (c) 2013; JID: 101168070; 0 (Cariostatic Agents); 0 (Mouthwashes); Q80VPU408O (Fluorides); OTO: NOTNLM; 2012/11/09 [ ...
Pharmacotherapeutic group: antineoplastic agents, protein kinase inhibitors, ATC code: L01EX08. Lenvatinib is a multikinase ... Antihypertensive agents should be started as soon as elevated BP is confirmed. BP should be monitored after 1 week of treatment ... Chemotherapeutic agents Concomitant administration of lenvatinib, carboplatin, and paclitaxel has no significant impact on the ... In the single-agent dose-finding cohort of Study 207, the most frequently (≥ 40%) reported adverse drug reactions were ...
Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Autophagy, Benzamides, Calcium, Cell Death, Cell Line, Tumor, Chloroquine, Dasatinib, ... Antineoplastic Agents; Autophagy; Benzamides; Calcium; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Chloroquine; Dasatinib; Endoplasmic ...
Categories: Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, ...
Antineoplastic Agents. p. 386. Nutritional Supplements and Alternative Medicines. p. 406. Medications Related to Body Systems. ...
  • Before their use in chemotherapy, alkylating agents were better known for their use as sulfur mustard, ("mustard gas") and related chemical weapons in World War I. The nitrogen mustards were the first alkylating agents used medically, as well as the first modern cancer chemotherapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • These publications spurred rapid advancement in the previously non-existent field of cancer chemotherapy, and a wealth of new alkylating agents with therapeutic effect were discovered over the following two decades. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of the healthcare worker survey is to collect information describing exposures, safety and health practices, and use of exposure controls for several targeted hazards including chemotherapeutic drugs, chemical sterilants, high level disinfectants, anesthetic gases, surgical smoke, aerosolized medications, and cleaning and disinfection agents. (cdc.gov)
  • for instance let's reflect on the safety of the new and old antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents in real practice. (univalle.edu.co)
  • Gastrointestinal toxicities were the most frequent (97.1%) and all patients received antineoplastic/chemotherapeutic and antiemetic treatment. (bvsalud.org)
  • An alkylating antineoplastic agent is an alkylating agent used in cancer treatment that attaches an alkyl group (CnH2n+1) to DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alkylating agents are used to treat several cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the alkylating agents are also carcinogenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System, alkylating agents are classified under L01A. (wikipedia.org)
  • These include true alkyl groups, and have been known for a longer time than some of the other alkylating agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen mustards Cyclophosphamide - the most widely used alkylating agent of modern times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chlormethine also known as mechlorethamine or mustine (HN2) - the first alkylating agent to receive regulatory approval. (wikipedia.org)
  • Streptozocin, 5-FU, and doxorubicin are the agents most commonly used in the treatment of somatostatin-secreting pancreatic neoplasms. (medscape.com)
  • Doxorubicin is an antineoplastic in the anthracycline class. (pharmacycode.com)
  • These agents inhibit cell growth and differentiation. (medscape.com)
  • Several bisimidazoacridones (BIA) are potent, selective antineoplastic agents, whereas others have potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity. (bioone.org)
  • Ellipticine is a potent antineoplastic agent exhibiting multiple mechanisms of its action. (nel.edu)
  • The only truth is that new therapeutic agents are more expensive compared to well-known alternatives with more experience of usage. (univalle.edu.co)
  • Agents that interfere with the menstrual cycle and ovulation, such as hormonally active agents, may affect fertility [Windham and Osorio 2004]. (cdc.gov)
  • Agents that interfere with male hormones or with hormonal feedback (e.g., testosterone, luteinizing hormone [LH]) may also affect production of healthy sperm, thus affecting fertility [Osorio and Windham 2004]. (cdc.gov)
  • Goodman, Gilman, and others began studying nitrogen mustards at Yale in 1942, and, following the sometimes dramatic but highly variable responses of experimental tumors in mice to treatment, these agents were first tested in humans late that year. (wikipedia.org)
  • An effective antineoplastic agent and is used for a variety of cancer s. (cancer.gov)
  • la prise en charge du cancer col métastatique s'est enrichie depuis 2017 par la disponibilité des thérapies ciblées dans notre pays. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cette étude avait pour objectifs de déterminer les caractéristiques épidémiologiques, cliniques et thérapeutiques des patientes prises en charge pour cancer du col métastatique dans notre structure. (bvsalud.org)
  • Everyday healthcare workers face hazardous work conditions due to exposures to infectious agents and hazardous drugs and chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • The antineoplastic agents or anticancer drugs represent a large and diverse class of medications. (nih.gov)
  • Selected anticancer agents have also been linked to immunoallergic hepatitis or to autoimmune hepatitis-like injury. (nih.gov)
  • There has been a steady increase in development of innovative antineoplastic agents in recent years and between 5 and 10 new anticancer agents are approved yearly. (nih.gov)
  • Anticancer agents based on natural product models / edited by John M. Cassady, John D. Douros. (who.int)
  • DM4 is is an antitubulin agent that inhibit cell division. (adooq.com)
  • The toxic agent to which the antibody was conjugated, a calicheamicin cytotoxic agent, worked by binding to DNA [10]. (cdc.gov)
  • Antineoplastic agents that are well known to cause significant direct hepatotoxicity when given in moderate to high doses (particularly when used in myeloablation before hematopoietic cell transplantation) include busulfan, melphalan, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, cytarabine, fluorouracil, carboplatin and L-asparaginase. (nih.gov)
  • Cyclophosphamide, a phosphoramide mustard and DNA alkylator used in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. (medscape.com)
  • A monoclonal antibody conjugated with antineoplastic properties. (e-lactancia.org)
  • Monoclonal antibodies are a novel class of agents that often lack information concerning hazards for healthcare workers. (cdc.gov)
  • For example, the American Hospital Formulary Service [8] currently lists monoclonal antibodies, including conjugated forms, as one of eight categories of antineoplastic drugs, see Table 2. (cdc.gov)
  • However, monoclonal antibodies may be conjugated to other carcinogenic or genotoxic agents in order to target those toxic agents to specific cell types. (cdc.gov)
  • Oxaliplatin is an antineoplastic agent that is often administered with FLUOROURACIL and FOLINIC ACID in the treatment of metastatic COLORECTAL NEOPLASMS . (bvsalud.org)
  • C. Drugs, chemical agents, and toxins g. (nih.gov)
  • Everyday healthcare workers face hazardous work conditions due to exposures to infectious agents and hazardous drugs and chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • Because embryonic tissues grow rapidly and have a high DNA turnover rate, they resemble cancer tissues and are thus very vulnerable to antineoplastic drugs. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Almost all antineoplastic agents have some degree of hepatotoxicity, and the liver injury is usually due to direct, intrinsic toxicity. (nih.gov)
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are first-line antihypertensive and potential cancer preventive agents. (nih.gov)
  • These agents cause DNA damage and disrupt DNA replication. (medscape.com)
  • Acts similarly to alkylating agents by crosslinking DNA and inhibiting DNA replication. (medscape.com)
  • Monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) is an antimitotic agent which inhibits cell division by blocking the polymerisation of tubulin, and also shows inhibition of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) activity. (adooq.com)
  • Antineoplastic agent used in other gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic islet cell and carcinoid tumors). (medscape.com)
  • or infusion of biological response modifier (BMR) as an antineoplastic agent? (aapc.com)
  • Antineoplastic agents are used for induction or consolidation therapy. (medscape.com)
  • However, standardized techniques for susceptibility testing for antifungal agents have not been established, and results of susceptibility studies do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome. (nih.gov)
  • L-asparaginase is a candidate enzyme for anti-neoplastic agent againstacute lymphoblastic leukemia and also extensively use in the food industry for prevention of acrylamide formation. (ac.ir)
  • The purpose of this brochure is to make you aware of the adverse health effects of antineoplastic agents, describe how you can be exposed to these agents, and provide and identify control methods and work practices to prevent or reduce your exposure to antineoplastic agents. (cdc.gov)
  • In recent years, however, the miscellaneous group has come to include some of the most important agents. (nih.gov)
  • Agents that interfere with the menstrual cycle and ovulation, such as hormonally active agents, may affect fertility [Windham and Osorio 2004]. (cdc.gov)