Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.
A pharmaceutical agent that displays activity as a central nervous system and respiratory stimulant. It is considered a non-competitive GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID antagonist. Pentylenetetrazole has been used experimentally to study seizure phenomenon and to identify pharmaceuticals that may control seizure susceptibility.
An anticonvulsant that is used to treat a wide variety of seizures. It is also an anti-arrhythmic and a muscle relaxant. The mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear, although several cellular actions have been described including effects on ion channels, active transport, and general membrane stabilization. The mechanism of its muscle relaxant effect appears to involve a reduction in the sensitivity of muscle spindles to stretch. Phenytoin has been proposed for several other therapeutic uses, but its use has been limited by its many adverse effects and interactions with other drugs.
Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."
An anticonvulsant used to control grand mal and psychomotor or focal seizures. Its mode of action is not fully understood, but some of its actions resemble those of PHENYTOIN; although there is little chemical resemblance between the two compounds, their three-dimensional structure is similar.
Substances that act in the brain stem or spinal cord to produce tonic or clonic convulsions, often by removing normal inhibitory tone. They were formerly used to stimulate respiration or as antidotes to barbiturate overdose. They are now most commonly used as experimental tools.
Induction of a stress reaction in experimental subjects by means of an electrical shock; applies to either convulsive or non-convulsive states.
An antiepileptic agent related to the barbiturates; it is partly metabolized to PHENOBARBITAL in the body and owes some of its actions to this metabolite. Adverse effects are reported to be more frequent than with PHENOBARBITAL. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p309)
An anticonvulsant especially useful in the treatment of absence seizures unaccompanied by other types of seizures.
A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)
A fatty acid with anticonvulsant properties used in the treatment of epilepsy. The mechanisms of its therapeutic actions are not well understood. It may act by increasing GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID levels in the brain or by altering the properties of voltage dependent sodium channels.
"Semicarbazones are compounds formed when semicarbazide reacts with an aldehyde or ketone, creating a bond that includes a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, which can be useful in the identification and analysis of carbonyl groups in organic chemistry and medicinal research."
An anticonvulsant used for several types of seizures, including myotonic or atonic seizures, photosensitive epilepsy, and absence seizures, although tolerance may develop. It is seldom effective in generalized tonic-clonic or partial seizures. The mechanism of action appears to involve the enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor responses.
A barbituric acid derivative that acts as a nonselective central nervous system depressant. It potentiates GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID action on GABA-A RECEPTORS, and modulates chloride currents through receptor channels. It also inhibits glutamate induced depolarizations.
The repeated weak excitation of brain structures, that progressively increases sensitivity to the same stimulation. Over time, this can lower the threshold required to trigger seizures.
Cyclohexanecarboxylic acids are organic compounds consisting of a cyclohexane ring substituted with a carboxylic acid group, typically represented by the structural formula C6H11COOH.
A benzodiazepine with anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sedative, muscle relaxant, and amnesic properties and a long duration of action. Its actions are mediated by enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID activity.
Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.
A subtype of epilepsy characterized by seizures that are consistently provoked by a certain specific stimulus. Auditory, visual, and somatosensory stimuli as well as the acts of writing, reading, eating, and decision making are examples of events or activities that may induce seizure activity in affected individuals. (From Neurol Clin 1994 Feb;12(1):57-8)
A generalized seizure disorder characterized by recurrent major motor seizures. The initial brief tonic phase is marked by trunk flexion followed by diffuse extension of the trunk and extremities. The clonic phase features rhythmic flexor contractions of the trunk and limbs, pupillary dilation, elevations of blood pressure and pulse, urinary incontinence, and tongue biting. This is followed by a profound state of depressed consciousness (post-ictal state) which gradually improves over minutes to hours. The disorder may be cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (caused by an identified disease process). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p329)
Phenylenediamines are chemical compounds that contain two amino groups (-NH2) linked to a phenyl ring, which have been used in certain pharmaceuticals and industrial applications, but can also pose health risks as potential allergens and carcinogens.
A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A pregnane found in the urine of pregnant women and sows. It has anesthetic, hypnotic, and sedative properties.
An anticonvulsant effective in absence seizures, but generally reserved for refractory cases because of its toxicity. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p378)
An analogue of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID. It is an irreversible inhibitor of 4-AMINOBUTYRATE TRANSAMINASE, the enzyme responsible for the catabolism of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID. (From Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)
Nipecotic acids are a class of compounds, specifically GABAergic drugs, that act as reversible inhibitors of the presynaptic GABA transporter (GAT), increasing the concentration of GABA in the synaptic cleft and enhancing its inhibitory effects on neurotransmission.
The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Phenyl esters of carbamic acid or of N-substituted carbamic acids. Structures are similar to PHENYLUREA COMPOUNDS with a carbamate in place of the urea.
A prolonged seizure or seizures repeated frequently enough to prevent recovery between episodes occurring over a period of 20-30 minutes. The most common subtype is generalized tonic-clonic status epilepticus, a potentially fatal condition associated with neuronal injury and respiratory and metabolic dysfunction. Nonconvulsive forms include petit mal status and complex partial status, which may manifest as behavioral disturbances. Simple partial status epilepticus consists of persistent motor, sensory, or autonomic seizures that do not impair cognition (see also EPILEPSIA PARTIALIS CONTINUA). Subclinical status epilepticus generally refers to seizures occurring in an unresponsive or comatose individual in the absence of overt signs of seizure activity. (From N Engl J Med 1998 Apr 2;338(14):970-6; Neurologia 1997 Dec;12 Suppl 6:25-30)
A slowly hydrolyzed muscarinic agonist with no nicotinic effects. Pilocarpine is used as a miotic and in the treatment of glaucoma.
The most abundant galanin receptor subtype. It displays a high affinity for the full-length form of GALANIN.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
A disorder characterized by recurrent partial seizures marked by impairment of cognition. During the seizure the individual may experience a wide variety of psychic phenomenon including formed hallucinations, illusions, deja vu, intense emotional feelings, confusion, and spatial disorientation. Focal motor activity, sensory alterations and AUTOMATISM may also occur. Complex partial seizures often originate from foci in one or both temporal lobes. The etiology may be idiopathic (cryptogenic partial complex epilepsy) or occur as a secondary manifestation of a focal cortical lesion (symptomatic partial complex epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317-8)
Disorder caused by an interruption of the mineralization of organic bone matrix leading to bone softening, bone pain, and weakness. It is the adult form of rickets resulting from disruption of VITAMIN D; PHOSPHORUS; or CALCIUM homeostasis.
A plant genus of the family Passifloraceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are vines with ornamental flowers and edible fruit.
Recurrent conditions characterized by epileptic seizures which arise diffusely and simultaneously from both hemispheres of the brain. Classification is generally based upon motor manifestations of the seizure (e.g., convulsive, nonconvulsive, akinetic, atonic, etc.) or etiology (e.g., idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic). (From Mayo Clin Proc, 1996 Apr;71(4):405-14)
A course of food intake that is high in FATS and low in CARBOHYDRATES. This diet provides sufficient PROTEINS for growth but insufficient amount of carbohydrates for the energy needs of the body. A ketogenic diet generates 80-90% of caloric requirements from fats and the remainder from proteins.
A class of chemicals derived from barbituric acid or thiobarbituric acid. Many of these are GABA MODULATORS used as HYPNOTICS AND SEDATIVES, as ANESTHETICS, or as ANTICONVULSANTS.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A compound suggested to be both a nootropic and a neuroprotective agent.
Disorders in the processing of calcium in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization.
Cell surface proteins which bind GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and contain an integral membrane chloride channel. Each receptor is assembled as a pentamer from a pool of at least 19 different possible subunits. The receptors belong to a superfamily that share a common CYSTEINE loop.
Neurologic disorders caused by exposure to toxic substances through ingestion, injection, cutaneous application, or other method. This includes conditions caused by biologic, chemical, and pharmaceutical agents.
Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.
A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.
A galanin receptor subtype with broad specificity for full length GALANIN, galanin peptide fragments and GALANIN-LIKE PEPTIDE.
Substances that do not act as agonists or antagonists but do affect the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor-ionophore complex. GABA-A receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA-A) appear to have at least three allosteric sites at which modulators act: a site at which BENZODIAZEPINES act by increasing the opening frequency of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-activated chloride channels; a site at which BARBITURATES act to prolong the duration of channel opening; and a site at which some steroids may act. GENERAL ANESTHETICS probably act at least partly by potentiating GABAergic responses, but they are not included here.
A sedative and anticonvulsant often used in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Chlormethiazole has also been proposed as a neuroprotective agent. The mechanism of its therapeutic activity is not entirely clear, but it does potentiate GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptors response and it may also affect glycine receptors.
A family of tricyclic hydrocarbons whose members include many of the commonly used tricyclic antidepressants (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC).
Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment.
A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.
Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.
Derivatives of carbamic acid, H2NC(=O)OH. Included under this heading are N-substituted and O-substituted carbamic acids. In general carbamate esters are referred to as urethanes, and polymers that include repeating units of carbamate are referred to as POLYURETHANES. Note however that polyurethanes are derived from the polymerization of ISOCYANATES and the singular term URETHANE refers to the ethyl ester of carbamic acid.
A benzodiazepine used in the treatment of anxiety, alcohol withdrawal, and insomnia.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Derivatives of propylene glycol (1,2-propanediol). They are used as humectants and solvents in pharmaceutical preparations.
Benzyl compounds are organic substances that contain a benzyl group, which is a functional structure consisting of a carbon atom attached to a phenyl ring and a methylene group (-CH2-).
An orally active 3-OXO-5-ALPHA-STEROID 4-DEHYDROGENASE inhibitor. It is used as a surgical alternative for treatment of benign PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA.
A subclass of IMIDES with the general structure of pyrrolidinedione. They are prepared by the distillation of ammonium succinate. They are sweet-tasting compounds that are used as chemical intermediates and plant growth stimulants.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
Substances used for their pharmacological actions on GABAergic systems. GABAergic agents include agonists, antagonists, degradation or uptake inhibitors, depleters, precursors, and modulators of receptor function.
A noncompetitive antagonist at GABA-A receptors and thus a convulsant. Picrotoxin blocks the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-activated chloride ionophore. Although it is most often used as a research tool, it has been used as a CNS stimulant and an antidote in poisoning by CNS depressants, especially the barbiturates.
Agents that alleviate ANXIETY, tension, and ANXIETY DISORDERS, promote sedation, and have a calming effect without affecting clarity of consciousness or neurologic conditions. ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS are commonly used in the symptomatic treatment of anxiety but are not included here.
A condition where seizures occur in association with ethanol abuse (ALCOHOLISM) without other identifiable causes. Seizures usually occur within the first 6-48 hours after the cessation of alcohol intake, but may occur during periods of alcohol intoxication. Single generalized tonic-clonic motor seizures are the most common subtype, however, STATUS EPILEPTICUS may occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1174)
A hypnotic and sedative with anticonvulsant effects. However, because of the hazards associated with its administration, its tendency to react with plastic, and the risks associated with its deterioration, it has largely been superseded by other agents. It is still occasionally used to control status epilepticus resistant to conventional treatment. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p608-9)
Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.
Agents that are used to treat bipolar disorders or mania associated with other affective disorders.
A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.
Conditions characterized by recurrent paroxysmal neuronal discharges which arise from a focal region of the brain. Partial seizures are divided into simple and complex, depending on whether consciousness is unaltered (simple partial seizure) or disturbed (complex partial seizure). Both types may feature a wide variety of motor, sensory, and autonomic symptoms. Partial seizures may be classified by associated clinical features or anatomic location of the seizure focus. A secondary generalized seizure refers to a partial seizure that spreads to involve the brain diffusely. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317)
Recurrent seizures causally related to CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Seizure onset may be immediate but is typically delayed for several days after the injury and may not occur for up to two years. The majority of seizures have a focal onset that correlates clinically with the site of brain injury. Cerebral cortex injuries caused by a penetrating foreign object (CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, PENETRATING) are more likely than closed head injuries (HEAD INJURIES, CLOSED) to be associated with epilepsy. Concussive convulsions are nonepileptic phenomena that occur immediately after head injury and are characterized by tonic and clonic movements. (From Rev Neurol 1998 Feb;26(150):256-261; Sports Med 1998 Feb;25(2):131-6)
The formation of CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.
A potent benzodiazepine receptor antagonist. Since it reverses the sedative and other actions of benzodiazepines, it has been suggested as an antidote to benzodiazepine overdoses.
Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.
Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.
Compounds based on imidazolidine dione. Some derivatives are ANTICONVULSANTS.
A group of compounds consisting in part of two rings sharing one atom (usually a carbon) in common.
A childhood seizure disorder characterized by rhythmic electrical brain discharges of generalized onset. Clinical features include a sudden cessation of ongoing activity usually without loss of postural tone. Rhythmic blinking of the eyelids or lip smacking frequently accompanies the SEIZURES. The usual duration is 5-10 seconds, and multiple episodes may occur daily. Juvenile absence epilepsy is characterized by the juvenile onset of absence seizures and an increased incidence of myoclonus and tonic-clonic seizures. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p736)
(2S-(2 alpha,3 beta,4 beta))-2-Carboxy-4-(1-methylethenyl)-3-pyrrolidineacetic acid. Ascaricide obtained from the red alga Digenea simplex. It is a potent excitatory amino acid agonist at some types of excitatory amino acid receptors and has been used to discriminate among receptor types. Like many excitatory amino acid agonists it can cause neurotoxicity and has been used experimentally for that purpose.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Benzodiazepinones are a class of psychoactive drugs that bind to the GABA-A receptor and enhance its inhibitory effects, producing anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties.
An anticonvulsant effective in tonic-clonic epilepsy (EPILEPSY, TONIC-CLONIC). It may cause blood dyscrasias.
Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.
A plant genus of the family ACORACEAE, order Arales, subclass Arecidae most notable for Acorus calamus L. root which contains asarone and has been used in TRADITIONAL MEDICINE.
A plant genus in the family APIACEAE (Umbelliferae) that is used in SPICES and is a source of anethole.
Rare cutaneous eruption characterized by extensive KERATINOCYTE apoptosis resulting in skin detachment with mucosal involvement. It is often provoked by the use of drugs (e.g., antibiotics and anticonvulsants) or associated with PNEUMONIA, MYCOPLASMA. It is considered a continuum of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.
An enzyme that converts brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID) into succinate semialdehyde, which can be converted to succinic acid and enter the citric acid cycle. It also acts on beta-alanine. EC 2.6.1.19.
A very slow opening and closing voltage-gated potassium channel that is expressed in NEURONS and is commonly mutated in BENIGN FAMILIAL NEONATAL CONVULSIONS.
Indazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring fused with a pyrazole ring, and they are used as building blocks in the synthesis of various pharmaceutical drugs.
A very slow opening and closing voltage-gated potassium channel that is expressed in NEURONS and is closely related to KCNQ2 POTASSIUM CHANNEL. It is commonly mutated in BENIGN FAMILIAL NEONATAL CONVULSIONS.
A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)
Progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, resulting from its continued administration. It should be differentiated from DRUG RESISTANCE wherein an organism, disease, or tissue fails to respond to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should also be differentiated from MAXIMUM TOLERATED DOSE and NO-OBSERVED-ADVERSE-EFFECT LEVEL.
An amino acid that, as the D-isomer, is the defining agonist for the NMDA receptor subtype of glutamate receptors (RECEPTORS, NMDA).
A class of drugs that act by inhibition of sodium influx through cell membranes. Blockade of sodium channels slows the rate and amplitude of initial rapid depolarization, reduces cell excitability, and reduces conduction velocity.
A urine test for formiminoglutamic acid, an intermediate metabolite in L-histidine catabolism in the conversion of L-histidine to L-glutamic acid. It may be an indicator of vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency or liver disease.
Various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons; vehicles for medicinal substances intended for external application; there are four classes: hydrocarbon base, absorption base, water-removable base and water-soluble base; several are also emollients.
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
An isoquinoline alkaloid obtained from Dicentra cucullaria and other plants. It is a competitive antagonist for GABA-A receptors.
Cell surface receptors that bind GLYCINE with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Glycine receptors in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM have an intrinsic chloride channel and are usually inhibitory.
Formularies concerned with pharmaceuticals prescribed in hospitals.
A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.
A clinically diverse group of epilepsy syndromes characterized either by myoclonic seizures or by myoclonus in association with other seizure types. Myoclonic epilepsy syndromes are divided into three subtypes based on etiology: familial, cryptogenic, and symptomatic (i.e., occurring secondary to known disease processes such as infections, hypoxic-ischemic injuries, trauma, etc.).
A heterogeneous group of drugs used to produce muscle relaxation, excepting the neuromuscular blocking agents. They have their primary clinical and therapeutic uses in the treatment of muscle spasm and immobility associated with strains, sprains, and injuries of the back and, to a lesser degree, injuries to the neck. They have been used also for the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions that have in common only the presence of skeletal muscle hyperactivity, for example, the muscle spasms that can occur in MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p358)
A dibenzoxepin tricyclic compound. It displays a range of pharmacological actions including maintaining adrenergic innervation. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, but it appears to block reuptake of monoaminergic neurotransmitters into presynaptic terminals. It also possesses anticholinergic activity and modulates antagonism of histamine H(1)- and H(2)-receptors.
Hydroxy analogs of vitamin D 3; (CHOLECALCIFEROL); including CALCIFEDIOL; CALCITRIOL; and 24,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D 3.
A convulsant primarily used in experimental animals. It was formerly used to induce convulsions as a alternative to electroshock therapy.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Devices used to assess the level of consciousness especially during anesthesia. They measure brain activity level based on the EEG.
A benzodiazepine used as an anti-anxiety agent with few side effects. It also has hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and considerable sedative properties and has been proposed as a preanesthetic agent.
A CNS stimulant that is used to induce convulsions in experimental animals. It has also been used as a respiratory stimulant and in the treatment of barbiturate overdose.
Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.
A carbamate with hypnotic, sedative, and some muscle relaxant properties, although in therapeutic doses reduction of anxiety rather than a direct effect may be responsible for muscle relaxation. Meprobamate has been reported to have anticonvulsant actions against petit mal seizures, but not against grand mal seizures (which may be exacerbated). It is used in the treatment of ANXIETY DISORDERS, and also for the short-term management of INSOMNIA but has largely been superseded by the BENZODIAZEPINES. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p603)
Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A potent noncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) used mainly as a research tool. The drug has been considered for the wide variety of neurodegenerative conditions or disorders in which NMDA receptors may play an important role. Its use has been primarily limited to animal and tissue experiments because of its psychotropic effects.
A plant family of the order Polygalales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.
Drugs that inhibit the transport of neurotransmitters into axon terminals or into storage vesicles within terminals. For many transmitters, uptake determines the time course of transmitter action so inhibiting uptake prolongs the activity of the transmitter. Blocking uptake may also deplete available transmitter stores. Many clinically important drugs are uptake inhibitors although the indirect reactions of the brain rather than the acute block of uptake itself is often responsible for the therapeutic effects.
Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members contain ISOFLAVONES, some of which show molluscicidal and schistosomicidal activity. Some species of Pongamia have been reclassified to this genus and some to DERRIS.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.
Derivatives of acetamide that are used as solvents, as mild irritants, and in organic synthesis.
Compounds possessing both a hydroxyl (-OH) and an amino group (-NH2).

Various forms of chemically induced liver injury and their detection by diagnostic procedures. (1/3775)

A large number of chemical agents, administered for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes, can produce various types of hepatic injury by several mechanisms. Some agents are intrinsically hepatotoxic, and others produce hepatic injury only in the rare, uniquely susceptible individual. Idiosyncrasy of the host is the mechanism for most types of drug-induced hepatic injury. It may reflect allergy to the drug or a metabolic aberation of the host permitting the accumulation of hepatotoxic metabolites. The syndromes of hepatic disease produced by drugs have been classified hepatocellular, hepatocanalicular, mixed and canalicular. Measurement of serum enzyme activities has provided a powerful tool for studies of hepatotoxicity. Their measurement requires awareness of relative specificity, knowledge of the mechanisms involved, and knowledge of the relationship between known hepatotoxic states and elevated enzyme activities.  (+info)

The urinary elimination profiles of diazepam and its metabolites, nordiazepam, temazepam, and oxazepam, in the equine after a 10-mg intramuscular dose. (2/3775)

A method for the extraction of diazepam and its metabolites (nordiazepam, temazepam, and oxazepam) from equine urine and serum and their quantitation and confirmation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is presented. Valium, a formulation of diazepam, was administered at a dose of 10 mg intramuscularly to four standard-bred mares. Diazepam is extensively metabolized in the horse to nordiazepam, temazepam, and oxazepam. Diazepam urinary concentrations were found to be less than 6 ng/mL. Nordiazepam was found to be mainly in its glucuronide-conjugated form and was measured out to a collection time of 53-55 h. Oxazepam and temazepam were entirely conjugated, and their urinary concentrations were measured out to collection times of 121 h and 77-79 h, respectively. Diazepam and nordiazepam were measured in equine postadministration serum out to collection times of 6 and 54 h, respectively. Oxazepam and temazepam were not detected in postadministration serum.  (+info)

Inhibition of transient and persistent Na+ current fractions by the new anticonvulsant topiramate. (3/3775)

The actions of the antiepileptic drug topiramate (TPM) on Na+ currents were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in dissociated neocortical neurons and intracellular recordings in neocortical slices. Relatively low TPM concentrations (25-30 microM) slightly inhibited the persistent fraction of Na+ current in dissociated neurons and reduced the Na+-dependent long-lasting action potential shoulders, which can be evoked in layer V pyramidal neurons after Ca++ and K+ current blockade. Conversely, the same drug concentrations were ineffective in reducing the amplitude of the fast Na+-dependent action potentials evoked in slices or the peak of transient Na+ (INaf) current evoked in isolated neurons from a physiological holding potential. Consistent INaf inhibition became, however, evident only when the neuronal membrane was kept depolarized to enhance resting Na+ channel inactivation. TPM (100 microM) was ineffective on the voltage dependence of activation but induced a leftward shift of the steady-state INaf inactivation curve. The drug-induced inhibitory effect increased with the duration of membrane depolarization, and the recovery of INaf after long membrane depolarizations was slightly delayed in comparison with that observed under control conditions. The obtained evidence suggests that the anticonvulsant action of TPM may operate by stabilizing channel inactivation, which can be induced by depolarizing events similar to those occurring in chronic epileptic conditions. Concurrently, the slight but significant inhibition of the persistent fraction of the Na+ current, obtained with the application of relatively low TPM concentrations, may contribute toward its anticonvulsant effectiveness by modulating the near-threshold depolarizing events that are sustained by this small current fraction.  (+info)

Inhibition of monoamine oxidase type A, but not type B, is an effective means of inducing anticonvulsant activity in the kindling model of epilepsy. (4/3775)

The anticonvulsant activity of inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO) was reported early after the development of irreversible MAO inhibitors such as tranylcypromine, but was never clinically used because of the adverse effects of these compounds. The more recently developed reversible MAO inhibitors with selectivity for either the MAO-A or MAO-B isoenzyme forms have not been studied extensively in animal models of epilepsy, so it is not known which type of MAO inhibitor is particularly effective in this respect. We compared the following drugs in the kindling model of epilepsy: 1) L-deprenyl (selegiline), i.e., an irreversible inhibitor of MAO-B, which, however, also inhibits MAO-A at higher doses, 2) the novel reversible MAO-B inhibitor LU 53439 (3,4-dimethyl-7-(2-isopropyl-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-5-yl)-methoxy-coumarin), which is much more selective for MAO-B than L-deprenyl, 3) the novel reversible and highly selective MAO-A inhibitor LU 43839 (esuprone; 7-hydroxy-3, 4-dimethylcoumarin ethanesulfonate), and 4) the irreversible nonselective MAO inhibitor tranylcypromine. Esuprone proved to be an effective anticonvulsant in the kindling model with a similar potency as L-deprenyl. In contrast to esuprone and L-deprenyl, the selective MAO-B inhibitor LU 53439 was not effective in the kindling model; this substantiates the previous notion that the anticonvulsant activity of L-deprenyl is not related to MAO-B inhibition, but to other effects of this drug, such as inhibition of MAO-A. Drugs inhibiting both MAO-A and MAO-B to a similar extent (tranylcypromine) or combinations of selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitors (esuprone plus LU 53439) had no advantage over MAO-A inhibition alone, but were less well tolerated. The data thus suggest that selective MAO-A inhibitors such as esuprone may be an interesting new approach for the treatment of epilepsy.  (+info)

Gabapentin suppresses ectopic nerve discharges and reverses allodynia in neuropathic rats. (5/3775)

Repetitive ectopic discharges from injured afferent nerves play an important role in initiation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Gabapentin is effective for treatment of neuropathic pain but the sites and mechanisms of its antinociceptive actions remain uncertain. In the present study, we tested a hypothesis that therapeutic doses of gabapentin suppress ectopic afferent discharge activity generated from injured peripheral nerves. Mechanical allodynia, induced by partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rats, was determined by application of von Frey filaments to the hindpaw. Single-unit afferent nerve activity was recorded proximal to the ligated sciatic nerve site. Intravenous gabapentin, in a range of 30 to 90 mg/kg, significantly attenuated allodynia in nerve-injured rats. Furthermore, gabapentin, in the same therapeutic dose range, dose-dependently inhibited the ectopic discharge activity of 15 injured sciatic afferent nerve fibers through an action on impulse generation. However, the conduction velocity and responses of 12 normal afferent fibers to mechanical stimulation were not affected by gabapentin. Therefore, this study provides electrophysiological evidence that gabapentin is capable of suppressing the ectopic discharge activity from injured peripheral nerves. This action may contribute, at least in part, to the antiallodynic effect of gabapentin on neuropathic pain.  (+info)

Biochemical and electrophysiological studies on the mechanism of action of PNU-151774E, a novel antiepileptic compound. (6/3775)

PNU-151774E [(S)-(+)-2-(4-(3-fluorobenzyloxy)benzylamino)propanamide methanesulfonate], a new anticonvulsant that displays a wide therapeutic window, has a potency comparable or superior to that of most classic anticonvulsants. PNU-151774E is chemically unrelated to current antiepileptics. In animal seizure models it possesses a broad spectrum of action. In the present study, the action mechanism of PNU-151774E has been investigated using electrophysiological and biochemical assays. Binding studies performed with rat brain membranes show that PNU-151774E has high affinity for binding site 2 of the sodium channel receptor, which is greater than that of phenytoin or lamotrigine (IC50, 8 microM versus 47 and 185 microM, respectively). PNU-151774E reduces sustained repetitive firing in a use-dependent manner without modifying the first action potential in hippocampal cultured neurons. In the same preparation PNU-151774E inhibits tetrodotoxin-sensitive fast sodium currents and high voltage-activated calcium currents under voltage-clamp conditions. These electrophysiological activities of PNU-151774E correlate with its ability to inhibit veratrine and KCl-induced glutamate release in rat hippocampal slices (IC50, 56.4 and 185.5 microM, respectively) and calcium inward currents in mouse cortical neurons. On the other hand, PNU-151774E does not affect whole-cell gamma-aminobutryic acid- and glutamate-induced currents in cultured mouse cortical neurons. These results suggest that PNU-151774E exerts its anticonvulsant activity, at least in part, through inhibition of sodium and calcium channels, stabilizing neuronal membrane excitability and inhibiting transmitter release. The possible relevance of these pharmacological properties to its antiepileptic potential is discussed.  (+info)

Effect of riluzole on the neurological and neuropathological changes in an animal model of cardiac arrest-induced movement disorder. (7/3775)

Posthypoxic myoclonus and seizures precipitate as secondary neurological consequences in ischemic/hypoxic insults of the central nervous system. Neuronal hyperexcitation may be due to excessive activation of glutamatergic neurotransmission, an effect that has been shown to follow ischemic/hypoxic events. Therefore, riluzole, an anticonvulsant that inhibits the release of glutamate by stabilizing the inactivated state of activated voltage-sensitive sodium channels, was tested for its antimyoclonic and neuroprotective properties in the cardiac arrest-induced animal model of posthypoxic myoclonus. Riluzole (4-12 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently attenuated the audiogenic seizures and action myoclonus seen in this animal model. Histological examination using Nissl staining and the novel Fluoro-Jade histochemistry in cardiac-arrested animals showed an extensive neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Riluzole treatment almost completely prevented the neuronal degeneration in these brain areas. The neuroprotective effect was more pronounced in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells. These effects were seen at therapeutically relevant doses of riluzole, and the animals tolerated the treatment well. These findings indicate that the pathogenesis of posthypoxic myoclonus and seizure may involve excessive activation of glutamate neurotransmission, and that riluzole may serve as an effective pharmacological agent with neuroprotective potential for the treatment of neurological conditions associated with cardiac arrest in humans.  (+info)

Pharmacological studies on root bark of mulberry tree (Morus alba L.) (8/3775)

Pharmacological studies were done on the root bark of mulberry tree and pharmacological effects were compared with the clinical effects of "Sohakuhi" in Chinese medicine. n-Butanol- and water-soluble fractions of mulberry root had similar effects except for those on the cadiovascular system. Both fractions showed cathartic, analgesic, diuretic, antitussive, antiedema, sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypotensive actions in mice, rats, guinea pigs and dogs. There appears to be a correlation between the experimental pharmacological results and the clinical applications of mulberry root found in the literature on Chinese medicine.  (+info)

Anticonvulsants are a class of drugs used primarily to treat seizure disorders, also known as epilepsy. These medications work by reducing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain that leads to seizures. In addition to their use in treating epilepsy, anticonvulsants are sometimes also prescribed for other conditions, such as neuropathic pain, bipolar disorder, and migraine headaches.

Anticonvulsants can work in different ways to reduce seizure activity. Some medications, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine, work by blocking sodium channels in the brain, which helps to stabilize nerve cell membranes and prevent excessive electrical activity. Other medications, such as valproic acid and gabapentin, increase the levels of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, which has a calming effect on nerve cells and helps to reduce seizure activity.

While anticonvulsants are generally effective at reducing seizure frequency and severity, they can also have side effects, such as dizziness, drowsiness, and gastrointestinal symptoms. In some cases, these side effects may be managed by adjusting the dosage or switching to a different medication. It is important for individuals taking anticonvulsants to work closely with their healthcare provider to monitor their response to the medication and make any necessary adjustments.

Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) is not primarily considered a medical treatment, but rather a research compound used in neuroscience and neurology to study seizure activity and chemically induce seizures in animals for experimental purposes. It is classified as a proconvulsant agent. Medically, it has been used in the past as a medication to treat epilepsy, but its use is now largely historical due to the availability of safer and more effective anticonvulsant drugs.

In a medical or scientific context, Pentylenetetrazole can be defined as:

A chemical compound with the formula C6H5N5O2, which is used in research to investigate seizure activity and induce convulsions in animals. It acts as a non-competitive GABAA receptor antagonist and can lower the seizure threshold. Historically, it has been used as a medication to treat epilepsy, but its use for this purpose is now limited due to the development of safer and more effective anticonvulsant drugs.

Phenytoin is an anticonvulsant drug, primarily used in the treatment of seizures and prevention of seizure recurrence. It works by reducing the spread of seizure activity in the brain and stabilizing the electrical activity of neurons. Phenytoin is also known to have anti-arrhythmic properties and is occasionally used in the management of certain cardiac arrhythmias.

The drug is available in various forms, including immediate-release tablets, extended-release capsules, and a liquid formulation. Common side effects of phenytoin include dizziness, drowsiness, headache, nausea, vomiting, and unsteady gait. Regular monitoring of blood levels is necessary to ensure that the drug remains within the therapeutic range, as both low and high levels can lead to adverse effects.

It's important to note that phenytoin has several potential drug-drug interactions, particularly with other anticonvulsant medications, certain antibiotics, and oral contraceptives. Therefore, it is crucial to inform healthcare providers about all the medications being taken to minimize the risk of interactions and optimize treatment outcomes.

A seizure is an uncontrolled, abnormal firing of neurons (brain cells) that can cause various symptoms such as convulsions, loss of consciousness, altered awareness, or changes in behavior. Seizures can be caused by a variety of factors including epilepsy, brain injury, infection, toxic substances, or genetic disorders. They can also occur without any identifiable cause, known as idiopathic seizures. Seizures are a medical emergency and require immediate attention.

Carbamazepine is an anticonvulsant medication that is primarily used to treat seizure disorders (epilepsy) and neuropathic pain. It works by decreasing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain, which helps to reduce the frequency and severity of seizures. Carbamazepine may also be used off-label for other conditions such as bipolar disorder and trigeminal neuralgia.

The medication is available in various forms, including tablets, extended-release tablets, chewable tablets, and suspension. It is usually taken two to four times a day with food to reduce stomach upset. Common side effects of carbamazepine include dizziness, drowsiness, headache, nausea, vomiting, and unsteady gait.

It is important to note that carbamazepine can interact with other medications, including some antidepressants, antipsychotics, and birth control pills, so it is essential to inform your healthcare provider of all the medications you are taking before starting carbamazepine. Additionally, carbamazepine levels in the blood may need to be monitored regularly to ensure that the medication is working effectively and not causing toxicity.

Convulsants are substances or agents that can cause seizures or convulsions. These can be medications, toxins, or illnesses that lower the seizure threshold and lead to abnormal electrical activity in the brain, resulting in uncontrolled muscle contractions and relaxation. Examples of convulsants include bromides, strychnine, organophosphate pesticides, certain antibiotics (such as penicillin or cephalosporins), and alcohol withdrawal. It is important to note that some medications used to treat seizures can also have convulsant properties at higher doses or in overdose situations.

Electroshock, also known as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), is a medical procedure in which electric currents are passed through the brain to treat certain mental health conditions. It is primarily used to treat severe forms of depression that have not responded to other treatments, and it may also be used to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

During an ECT procedure, electrodes are placed on the patient's head, and a carefully controlled electric current is passed through the brain, intentionally triggering a seizure. The patient is under general anesthesia and given muscle relaxants to prevent physical injury from the seizure.

ECT is typically administered in a series of treatments, usually two or three times a week for several weeks. While the exact mechanism of action is not fully understood, ECT is thought to affect brain chemistry and help regulate mood and other symptoms. It is generally considered a safe and effective treatment option for certain mental health conditions when other treatments have failed. However, it can have side effects, including short-term memory loss and confusion, and it may not be appropriate for everyone.

Primidone is an anticonvulsant medication primarily used in the treatment of seizure disorders. It is a barbiturate derivative that has sedative and muscle relaxant properties. Primidone is metabolized in the body into two other anticonvulsants, phenobarbital and phenylethylmalonamide (PEMA). Together, these active metabolites help to reduce the frequency and severity of seizures.

Primidone is used primarily for generalized tonic-clonic seizures and complex partial seizures. It may also be considered for use in absence seizures, although other medications are typically preferred for this type of seizure. The medication works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in the brain, which helps to prevent or reduce the occurrence of seizures.

Like all anticonvulsant medications, primidone carries a risk of side effects, including dizziness, drowsiness, and unsteady gait. It may also cause rash, nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite in some individuals. In rare cases, primidone can cause more serious side effects such as blood disorders, liver damage, or suicidal thoughts.

It is important for patients taking primidone to be closely monitored by their healthcare provider to ensure that the medication is working effectively and to monitor for any potential side effects. Dosages of primidone may need to be adjusted over time based on the patient's response to treatment and any adverse reactions that occur.

Ethosuximide is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called anticonvulsants or anti-seizure medications. It is primarily used to treat absence seizures, also known as petit mal seizures, which are a type of seizure characterized by brief, sudden lapses in consciousness.

Ethosuximide works by reducing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain that leads to seizures. It does this by inhibiting the formation of sodium channels in the brain, which helps to stabilize the electrical impulses and reduce the likelihood of seizure activity.

Like all medications, ethosuximide can have side effects, including stomach upset, dizziness, headache, and sleepiness. It is important for patients to follow their doctor's instructions carefully when taking this medication and to report any bothersome or persistent side effects promptly. Ethosuximide may also interact with other medications, so it is important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications you are taking before starting ethosuximide therapy.

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These seizures are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain, which can result in a wide range of symptoms, including convulsions, loss of consciousness, and altered sensations or behaviors. Epilepsy can have many different causes, including genetic factors, brain injury, infection, or stroke. In some cases, the cause may be unknown.

There are many different types of seizures that can occur in people with epilepsy, and the specific type of seizure will depend on the location and extent of the abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Some people may experience only one type of seizure, while others may have several different types. Seizures can vary in frequency, from a few per year to dozens or even hundreds per day.

Epilepsy is typically diagnosed based on the patient's history of recurrent seizures and the results of an electroencephalogram (EEG), which measures the electrical activity in the brain. Imaging tests such as MRI or CT scans may also be used to help identify any structural abnormalities in the brain that may be contributing to the seizures.

While there is no cure for epilepsy, it can often be effectively managed with medication. In some cases, surgery may be recommended to remove the area of the brain responsible for the seizures. With proper treatment and management, many people with epilepsy are able to lead normal, productive lives.

Valproic acid is a medication that is primarily used as an anticonvulsant, which means it is used to treat seizure disorders. It works by increasing the amount of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, a neurotransmitter that helps to reduce abnormal electrical activity in the brain. In addition to its use as an anticonvulsant, valproic acid may also be used to treat migraines and bipolar disorder. It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions, and is usually taken by mouth. As with any medication, valproic acid can have side effects, and it is important for patients to be aware of these and to discuss them with their healthcare provider.

Semicarbazones are chemical compounds that result from the reaction between a carbonyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom: C=O) and semicarbazide. Semicarbazide is a compound with the formula NH2-NH-CO-NH2.

In organic chemistry, the formation of semicarbazones is one method used to protect carbonyl groups during chemical synthesis. These compounds are also important in analytical chemistry as they can be used to identify and quantify aldehydes and ketones.

It's worth noting that while semicarbazones have significant uses in chemistry, they don't have a specific medical definition. However, certain semicarbazone derivatives have been explored for their potential medicinal properties, such as antimicrobial, antiviral, and antitumor activities. But these applications are still largely in the research phase and haven't yet resulted in widely used medical treatments or diagnoses.

Clonazepam is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. It is primarily used to treat seizure disorders, panic attacks, and anxiety. Clonazepam works by increasing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter in the brain that has a calming effect on the nervous system.

The medication comes in tablet or orally disintegrating tablet form and is typically taken two to three times per day. Common side effects of clonazepam include dizziness, drowsiness, and coordination problems. It can also cause memory problems, mental confusion, and depression.

Like all benzodiazepines, clonazepam has the potential for abuse and addiction, so it should be used with caution and only under the supervision of a healthcare provider. It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully and not to stop taking the medication suddenly, as this can lead to withdrawal symptoms.

It's important to note that while I strive to provide accurate information, this definition is intended to be a general overview and should not replace professional medical advice. Always consult with a healthcare provider for medical advice.

Phenobarbital is a barbiturate medication that is primarily used for the treatment of seizures and convulsions. It works by suppressing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain that leads to seizures. In addition to its anticonvulsant properties, phenobarbital also has sedative and hypnotic effects, which can be useful for treating anxiety, insomnia, and agitation.

Phenobarbital is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and elixirs, and it is typically taken orally. The medication works by binding to specific receptors in the brain called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which help to regulate nerve impulses in the brain. By increasing the activity of GABA, phenobarbital can help to reduce excessive neural activity and prevent seizures.

While phenobarbital is an effective medication for treating seizures and other conditions, it can also be habit-forming and carries a risk of dependence and addiction. Long-term use of the medication can lead to tolerance, meaning that higher doses may be needed to achieve the same effects. Abruptly stopping the medication can also lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, restlessness, and seizures.

Like all medications, phenobarbital can have side effects, including dizziness, drowsiness, and impaired coordination. It can also interact with other medications, such as certain antidepressants and sedatives, so it is important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications you are taking before starting phenobarbital.

In summary, phenobarbital is a barbiturate medication used primarily for the treatment of seizures and convulsions. It works by binding to GABA receptors in the brain and increasing their activity, which helps to reduce excessive neural activity and prevent seizures. While phenobarbital can be effective, it carries a risk of dependence and addiction and can have side effects and drug interactions.

Kindling, in the context of neurology, refers to a process of neural sensitization where repeated exposure to sub-convulsive stimuli below the threshold for triggering a seizure can eventually lower this threshold, leading to an increased susceptibility to develop seizures. This concept is often applied in the study of epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

The term "kindling" was first introduced by Racine in 1972 to describe the progressive increase in the severity and duration of behavioral responses following repeated electrical stimulation of the brain in animal models. The kindling process can occur in response to various types of stimuli, including electrical, chemical, or even environmental stimuli, leading to changes in neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in certain brain regions, particularly the limbic system.

Over time, repeated stimulation results in a permanent increase in neural hypersensitivity, making it easier to induce seizures with weaker stimuli. This phenomenon has been implicated in the development and progression of some forms of epilepsy, as well as in the underlying mechanisms of certain mood disorders and other neurological conditions.

Cyclohexanecarboxylic acids are a type of organic compound that consists of a cyclohexane ring, which is a six-carbon saturated hydrocarbon, substituted with a carboxylic acid group (-COOH). This group contains a carbon atom double bonded to an oxygen atom and single bonded to a hydroxyl group (-OH).

The cyclohexane ring can be in various forms, including the chair, boat, or twist-boat conformations, depending on the orientation of its constituent atoms. The carboxylic acid group can ionize to form a carboxylate anion, which is negatively charged and has a deprotonated hydroxyl group.

Cyclohexanecarboxylic acids have various applications in industry and research, including as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, solvents, and pharmaceuticals. They can also be found naturally in some plants and microorganisms.

Diazepam is a medication from the benzodiazepine class, which typically has calming, sedative, muscle relaxant, and anticonvulsant properties. Its medical uses include the treatment of anxiety disorders, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, end-of-life sedation, seizures, muscle spasms, and as a premedication for medical procedures. Diazepam is available in various forms, such as tablets, oral solution, rectal gel, and injectable solutions. It works by enhancing the effects of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, which results in the modulation of nerve impulses in the brain, producing a sedative effect.

It is important to note that diazepam can be habit-forming and has several potential side effects, including drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, and impaired coordination. It should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional and according to the prescribed dosage to minimize the risk of adverse effects and dependence.

Triazines are not a medical term, but a class of chemical compounds. They have a six-membered ring containing three nitrogen atoms and three carbon atoms. Some triazine derivatives are used in medicine as herbicides, antimicrobials, and antitumor agents.

Reflex epilepsy is a type of epilepsy in which seizures are consistently triggered by specific, recurring sensory stimuli. These triggers can vary widely and may include visual patterns, flashes of light, touch, sound, or even emotional experiences. When the brain receives input from these triggers, it responds with an abnormal electrical discharge that can lead to a seizure.

Reflex epilepsy is relatively rare, accounting for only about 5-10% of all epilepsy cases. It's important to note that not everyone who experiences seizures in response to these triggers has reflex epilepsy; the defining characteristic of this condition is the consistent and reproducible nature of the seizure response to a specific stimulus.

There are several different types of reflex epilepsy, each characterized by its own unique set of triggers. For example, some people with this condition may experience seizures in response to visual patterns or flashes of light (known as photosensitive epilepsy), while others may have seizures triggered by certain sounds or tactile sensations.

Treatment for reflex epilepsy typically involves identifying and avoiding triggers whenever possible, as well as using medication to control seizures. In some cases, surgery may be recommended to remove the specific area of the brain that is responsible for the abnormal electrical activity. With proper treatment and management, many people with reflex epilepsy are able to lead full and active lives.

Tonic-clonic epilepsy, also known as grand mal epilepsy, is a type of generalized seizure that affects the entire brain. This type of epilepsy is characterized by two distinct phases: the tonic phase and the clonic phase.

During the tonic phase, which usually lasts for about 10-20 seconds, the person loses consciousness and their muscles stiffen, causing them to fall to the ground. This can result in injuries if the person falls unexpectedly or hits an object on the way down.

The clonic phase follows immediately after the tonic phase and is characterized by rhythmic jerking movements of the limbs, face, and neck. These movements are caused by alternating contractions and relaxations of the muscles and can last for several minutes. The person may also lose bladder or bowel control during this phase.

After the seizure, the person may feel tired, confused, and disoriented. They may also have a headache, sore muscles, and difficulty remembering what happened during the seizure.

Tonic-clonic epilepsy can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, brain injury, infection, or stroke. It is typically diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as an electroencephalogram (EEG) or imaging studies. Treatment may include medication, surgery, or dietary changes, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the seizures.

Phenylenediamines are a class of organic compounds that contain a phenylene diamine group, which consists of two amino groups (-NH2) attached to a benzene ring. They are used in various applications, including as intermediates in the synthesis of dyes and pigments, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. Some phenylenediamines also have potential use as antioxidants and reducing agents.

In a medical context, some phenylenediamines are used in the manufacture of certain drugs, such as certain types of local anesthetics and vasodilators. However, it's important to note that not all phenylenediamines have medical applications, and some may even be harmful or toxic in certain contexts.

Exposure to phenylenediamines can occur through various routes, including skin contact, inhalation, or ingestion. Some people may experience allergic reactions or irritation after exposure to certain phenylenediamines, particularly those used in hair dyes and cosmetics. It's important to follow proper safety precautions when handling these compounds, including wearing protective clothing and using appropriate ventilation.

Amines are organic compounds that contain a basic nitrogen atom with a lone pair of electrons. They are derived from ammonia (NH3) by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms with alkyl or aryl groups. The nomenclature of amines follows the substitutive type, where the parent compound is named as an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon, and the functional group "amine" is designated as a suffix or prefix.

Amines are classified into three types based on the number of carbon atoms attached to the nitrogen atom:

1. Primary (1°) amines: One alkyl or aryl group is attached to the nitrogen atom.
2. Secondary (2°) amines: Two alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.
3. Tertiary (3°) amines: Three alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.

Quaternary ammonium salts have four organic groups attached to the nitrogen atom and a positive charge, with anions balancing the charge.

Amines have a wide range of applications in the chemical industry, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, and solvents. They also play a significant role in biological systems as neurotransmitters, hormones, and cell membrane components.

Pregnenolone is defined as a neurosteroid, which is a steroid hormone that is produced in the nervous system. It is synthesized from cholesterol and is the precursor to other steroid hormones, including progesterone, cortisol, and the sex hormones (estrogens and androgens). Pregnenolone has been shown to have a number of important functions in the body, including modulation of neurotransmitter systems, regulation of ion channels, and protection of nerve cells from damage. It is thought to play a role in various physiological processes, such as memory, learning, and mood regulation. However, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Trimethadione is a medication that belongs to a class of anticonvulsants called succinimides. It is primarily used for the treatment of seizure disorders, particularly absence seizures (petit mal seizures) that do not respond to other medications.

The medical definition of Trimethadione is:

A succinimide anticonvulsant with a narrow therapeutic index and significant adverse effects, including nystagmus, ataxia, sedation, and teratogenicity. It is used primarily in the management of absence seizures that are refractory to other treatments. Trimethadione has largely been replaced by ethosuximide due to its superior safety profile and efficacy.

Vigabatrin is an anticonvulsant medication used to treat certain types of seizures in adults and children. It works by reducing the abnormal excitement in the brain. The medical definition of Vigabatrin is: a irreversible inhibitor of GABA transaminase, which results in increased levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system. This medication is used as an adjunctive treatment for complex partial seizures and is available in oral form for administration.

It's important to note that Vigabatrin can cause serious side effects, including permanent vision loss, and its use should be closely monitored by a healthcare professional. It is also classified as a pregnancy category C medication, which means it may harm an unborn baby and should only be used during pregnancy if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nipecotic acids are a class of compounds that function as GABA transaminase inhibitors. GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and its levels are regulated by enzymes such as GABA transaminase.

Nipecotic acids work by inhibiting this enzyme, leading to an increase in GABA levels in the brain. This can have various effects on the nervous system, including sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant actions. Some nipecotic acid derivatives are used in research as tools for studying the role of GABA in the brain, while others have been investigated for their potential therapeutic uses in treating conditions such as anxiety, insomnia, and epilepsy.

It's important to note that nipecotic acids and their derivatives can have significant side effects and toxicity, and they are not approved for use as medications in most countries. Therefore, they should only be used under the close supervision of a trained medical professional for research purposes.

Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. It plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability and preventing excessive neuronal firing, which helps to maintain neural homeostasis and reduce the risk of seizures. GABA functions by binding to specific receptors (GABA-A, GABA-B, and GABA-C) on the postsynaptic membrane, leading to hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane and reduced neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals.

In addition to its role in the central nervous system, GABA has also been identified as a neurotransmitter in the peripheral nervous system, where it is involved in regulating various physiological processes such as muscle relaxation, hormone secretion, and immune function.

GABA can be synthesized in neurons from glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, through the action of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Once synthesized, GABA is stored in synaptic vesicles and released into the synapse upon neuronal activation. After release, GABA can be taken up by surrounding glial cells or degraded by the enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T) into succinic semialdehyde, which is further metabolized to form succinate and enter the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances. Therefore, modulating GABAergic signaling through pharmacological interventions or other therapeutic approaches may offer potential benefits for the treatment of these conditions.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Phenylcarbamates are a group of organic compounds that contain a phenyl group (a functional group consisting of a six-carbon ring, with the formula -C6H5) bonded to a carbamate group (-NHCOO-). Carbamates are compounds that contain a carbonyl (>C=O) group bonded to a nitrogen atom that is also bonded to two organic substituents.

In the medical field, phenylcarbamates have been used as drugs for various purposes. For example, some phenylcarbamates have been used as anticonvulsants, while others have been investigated for their potential as anti-cancer agents. However, it is important to note that many phenylcarbamates also have toxic properties and must be used with caution.

One well-known example of a phenylcarbamate is phenytoin, an anticonvulsant medication used to treat seizures. Phenytoin works by slowing down the transmission of nerve impulses in the brain, which can help prevent or reduce the severity of seizures.

It's worth noting that while phenylcarbamates have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, they are not a widely used class of drugs and further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential side effects.

Status epilepticus is a serious and life-threatening medical condition characterized by an ongoing seizure activity or a series of seizures without full recovery of consciousness between them, lasting for 30 minutes or more. It is a neurological emergency that requires immediate medical attention to prevent potential complications such as brain damage, respiratory failure, or even death.

The condition can occur in people with a history of epilepsy or seizure disorders, as well as those without any prior history of seizures. The underlying causes of status epilepticus can vary and may include infection, trauma, stroke, metabolic imbalances, toxins, or other medical conditions that affect the brain's normal functioning. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent long-term neurological damage and improve outcomes in patients with this condition.

Pilocarpine is a cholinergic agonist, which means it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system by binding to muscarinic receptors. It is primarily used in the treatment of dry mouth (xerostomia) caused by radiation therapy or Sjögren's syndrome, as well as in the management of glaucoma due to its ability to construct the pupils and reduce intraocular pressure. Pilocarpine can also be used to treat certain cardiovascular conditions and chronic bronchitis. It is available in various forms, including tablets, ophthalmic solutions, and topical gels.

A galanin type 1 receptor (GAL1R) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds the neuropeptide galanin. Galanin is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter in the body that plays a role in various physiological functions, including regulation of feeding behavior, anxiety, pain perception, and memory.

The GAL1R is widely expressed throughout the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Once galanin binds to the GAL1R, it activates a signaling cascade that can have either excitatory or inhibitory effects on neuronal activity, depending on the specific cell type and location.

The activation of GAL1R has been implicated in various pathophysiological conditions, such as pain, depression, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, GAL1R is considered a potential therapeutic target for the development of new drugs to treat these conditions.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Complex partial epilepsy, also known as temporal lobe epilepsy or focal impaired awareness epilepsy, is a type of epilepsy characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures that originate in the temporal lobe or other localized areas of the brain. These seizures typically involve alterations in consciousness or awareness, and may include automatisms (involuntary, repetitive movements), such as lip smacking, fidgeting, or picking at clothes. Complex partial seizures can last from a few seconds to several minutes and may be followed by a post-ictal period of confusion or fatigue.

Complex partial epilepsy is often associated with structural abnormalities in the brain, such as hippocampal sclerosis, tumors, or malformations. It can also be caused by infectious or inflammatory processes, vascular disorders, or genetic factors. The diagnosis of complex partial epilepsy typically involves a thorough neurological evaluation, including a detailed history of seizure symptoms, neuroimaging studies (such as MRI or CT scans), and electroencephalography (EEG) to record brain activity during and between seizures.

Treatment for complex partial epilepsy usually involves medication therapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In some cases, surgery may be recommended if medications are not effective in controlling seizures or if there is a structural lesion that can be safely removed. Other treatment options may include dietary modifications, such as the ketogenic diet, or vagus nerve stimulation.

Osteomalacia is a medical condition characterized by the softening of bones due to defective bone mineralization, resulting from inadequate vitamin D, phosphate, or calcium. It mainly affects adults and is different from rickets, which occurs in children. The primary symptom is bone pain, but muscle weakness can also occur. Prolonged osteomalacia may lead to skeletal deformities and an increased risk of fractures. Treatment typically involves supplementation with vitamin D, calcium, and sometimes phosphate.

"Passiflora" is a genus of flowering plants, commonly known as passion flowers or passion vines. While it is not a medical term itself, certain species of Passiflora are used in herbal medicine. The most common medicinal use of Passiflora is Passiflora incarnata, also known as maypop or purple passionflower. This plant is used as a natural sedative and anxiety reliever due to its calming effects on the nervous system. It contains various chemical compounds such as flavonoids, indole alkaloids, and glycosides which contribute to its medicinal properties. It's often used in teas, supplements, and tinctures for promoting relaxation, reducing insomnia, and treating symptoms of anxiety and stress.

Generalized epilepsy is a type of epilepsy characterized by seizures that involve both halves of the brain (generalized onset) from the beginning of the seizure. These types of seizures include tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures, absence (petit mal) seizures, and myoclonic seizures. Generalized epilepsy can be caused by genetic factors or brain abnormalities, and it is typically treated with medication. People with generalized epilepsy may experience difficulties with learning, memory, and behavior, and they may have a higher risk of injury during a seizure. It's important for individuals with generalized epilepsy to work closely with their healthcare team to manage their condition and reduce the frequency and severity of seizures.

A ketogenic diet is a type of diet that is characterized by a significant reduction in carbohydrate intake and an increase in fat intake, with the goal of inducing a metabolic state called ketosis. In ketosis, the body shifts from using glucose (carbohydrates) as its primary source of energy to using ketones, which are produced by the liver from fatty acids.

The typical ketogenic diet consists of a daily intake of less than 50 grams of carbohydrates, with protein intake moderated and fat intake increased to make up the majority of calories. This can result in a rapid decrease in blood sugar and insulin levels, which can have various health benefits for some individuals, such as weight loss, improved blood sugar control, and reduced risk factors for heart disease.

However, it is important to note that a ketogenic diet may not be suitable for everyone, particularly those with certain medical conditions or who are taking certain medications. It is always recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new diet plan.

Barbiturates are a class of drugs that act as central nervous system depressants, which means they slow down the activity of the brain and nerves. They were commonly used in the past to treat conditions such as anxiety, insomnia, and seizures, but their use has declined due to the risk of addiction, abuse, and serious side effects. Barbiturates can also be used for surgical anesthesia and as a treatment for barbiturate or pentobarbital overdose.

Barbiturates work by enhancing the activity of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, which results in sedation, hypnosis, and anticonvulsant effects. However, at higher doses, barbiturates can cause respiratory depression, coma, and even death.

Some examples of barbiturates include pentobarbital, phenobarbital, secobarbital, and amobarbital. These drugs are usually available in the form of tablets, capsules, or injectable solutions. It is important to note that barbiturates should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as they carry a high risk of dependence and abuse.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Piracetam is a nootropic drug, which is primarily used in the treatment of cognitive disorders. It is a cyclic derivative of the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid). Piracetam is believed to work by reducing the permeability of cell membranes in the brain, which may enhance communication between neurons and improve memory and learning.

Medically, piracetam is used off-label for a variety of conditions related to cognitive decline or impairment, such as Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and age-related cognitive decline. It has also been studied in the treatment of myoclonus (involuntary muscle jerks), dyslexia, and other neurological disorders.

It is important to note that while piracetam has shown some promise in improving cognitive function in certain populations, its effectiveness is still a subject of ongoing research and debate. Additionally, piracetam is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for any medical use, although it is available as a dietary supplement in the United States.

As with any medication or supplement, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking piracetam to ensure that it is safe and appropriate for your individual needs.

Calcium metabolism disorders refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the body's ability to properly regulate the levels of calcium in the blood and tissues. Calcium is an essential mineral that plays a critical role in many bodily functions, including bone health, muscle contraction, nerve function, and blood clotting.

There are several types of calcium metabolism disorders, including:

1. Hypocalcemia: This is a condition characterized by low levels of calcium in the blood. It can be caused by various factors such as vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and certain medications. Symptoms may include muscle cramps, spasms, and tingling sensations in the fingers and toes.
2. Hypercalcemia: This is a condition characterized by high levels of calcium in the blood. It can be caused by various factors such as hyperparathyroidism, cancer, and certain medications. Symptoms may include fatigue, weakness, confusion, and kidney stones.
3. Osteoporosis: This is a condition characterized by weak and brittle bones due to low calcium levels in the bones. It can be caused by various factors such as aging, menopause, vitamin D deficiency, and certain medications. Symptoms may include bone fractures and loss of height.
4. Paget's disease: This is a condition characterized by abnormal bone growth and deformities due to disordered calcium metabolism. It can be caused by various factors such as genetics, age, and certain medications. Symptoms may include bone pain, fractures, and deformities.

Treatment for calcium metabolism disorders depends on the underlying cause of the condition. It may involve supplements, medication, dietary changes, or surgery. Proper diagnosis and management are essential to prevent complications such as kidney stones, bone fractures, and neurological damage.

GABA-A receptors are ligand-gated ion channels in the membrane of neuronal cells. They are the primary mediators of fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. When the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binds to these receptors, it opens an ion channel that allows chloride ions to flow into the neuron, resulting in hyperpolarization of the membrane and decreased excitability of the neuron. This inhibitory effect helps to regulate neural activity and maintain a balance between excitation and inhibition in the nervous system. GABA-A receptors are composed of multiple subunits, and the specific combination of subunits can determine the receptor's properties, such as its sensitivity to different drugs or neurotransmitters.

Neurotoxicity syndromes refer to a group of conditions caused by exposure to neurotoxins, which are substances that can damage the structure or function of the nervous system. Neurotoxicity syndromes can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems and may cause a wide range of symptoms depending on the type and severity of the exposure.

Symptoms of neurotoxicity syndromes may include:

* Headache
* Dizziness
* Tremors or shaking
* Difficulty with coordination or balance
* Numbness or tingling in the hands and feet
* Vision problems
* Memory loss or difficulty concentrating
* Seizures or convulsions
* Mood changes, such as depression or anxiety

Neurotoxicity syndromes can be caused by exposure to a variety of substances, including heavy metals (such as lead, mercury, and arsenic), pesticides, solvents, and certain medications. In some cases, neurotoxicity syndromes may be reversible with treatment, while in other cases, the damage may be permanent.

Prevention is key in avoiding neurotoxicity syndromes, and it is important to follow safety guidelines when working with or around potential neurotoxins. If exposure does occur, prompt medical attention is necessary to minimize the risk of long-term health effects.

"Intraperitoneal injection" is a medical term that refers to the administration of a substance or medication directly into the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the organs contained within it. This type of injection is typically used in clinical settings for various purposes, such as delivering chemotherapy drugs, anesthetics, or other medications directly to the abdominal organs.

The procedure involves inserting a needle through the abdominal wall and into the peritoneal cavity, taking care to avoid any vital structures such as blood vessels or nerves. Once the needle is properly positioned, the medication can be injected slowly and carefully to ensure even distribution throughout the cavity.

It's important to note that intraperitoneal injections are typically reserved for situations where other routes of administration are not feasible or effective, as they carry a higher risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or injury to surrounding organs. As with any medical procedure, it should only be performed by trained healthcare professionals under appropriate clinical circumstances.

Benzodiazepines are a class of psychoactive drugs that have been widely used for their sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties. They act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia, seizures, and muscle spasms. They can also be used as premedication before medical procedures to produce sedation, amnesia, and anxiolysis. Some examples of benzodiazepines include diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), and temazepam (Restoril).

While benzodiazepines are effective in treating various medical conditions, they can also cause physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms. Long-term use of benzodiazepines can lead to tolerance, meaning that higher doses are needed to achieve the same effect. Abrupt discontinuation of benzodiazepines can result in severe withdrawal symptoms, including seizures, hallucinations, and anxiety. Therefore, it is important to taper off benzodiazepines gradually under medical supervision.

Benzodiazepines are classified as Schedule IV controlled substances in the United States due to their potential for abuse and dependence. It is essential to use them only as directed by a healthcare provider and to be aware of their potential risks and benefits.

A galanin type 2 receptor (GAL2R) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds the neuropeptide galanin. Galanin is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the body, involved in various physiological functions such as regulation of feeding behavior, anxiety, pain perception, and memory.

The gene for the human GAL2R is called GALR2 and is located on chromosome 17. The receptor is widely expressed throughout the central nervous system, including in areas involved in reward processing, emotion regulation, and cognitive function.

Activation of the GAL2R by galanin can lead to a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, depending on the specific cell type and context. These signaling pathways can ultimately result in changes in neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, and gene expression.

Abnormalities in the galanin system have been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and chronic pain. As such, GAL2R has become a target of interest for drug development in these areas.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) modulators are substances that affect the function of GABA, which is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. GABA plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability and reducing the activity of overactive nerve cells.

GABA modulators can either enhance or decrease the activity of GABA receptors, depending on their specific mechanism of action. These substances can be classified into two main categories:

1. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs): These compounds bind to a site on the GABA receptor that is distinct from the neurotransmitter binding site and enhance the activity of GABA at the receptor, leading to increased inhibitory signaling in the brain. Examples of positive allosteric modulators include benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and certain non-benzodiazepine drugs used for anxiolysis, sedation, and muscle relaxation.
2. Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs): These compounds bind to a site on the GABA receptor that reduces the activity of GABA at the receptor, leading to decreased inhibitory signaling in the brain. Examples of negative allosteric modulators include certain antiepileptic drugs and alcohol, which can reduce the effectiveness of GABA-mediated inhibition and contribute to their proconvulsant effects.

It is important to note that while GABA modulators can have therapeutic benefits in treating various neurological and psychiatric conditions, they can also carry risks for abuse, dependence, and adverse side effects, particularly when used at high doses or over extended periods.

Chlormethiazole is a sedative and anticonvulsant drug, which is primarily used in the treatment of symptoms associated with alcohol withdrawal, such as agitation, tremors, and seizures. It belongs to the class of drugs known as thiazoles and exerts its therapeutic effects by acting on the central nervous system (CNS).

The chemical formula for Chlormethiazole is C4H5ClN2S. It has a white to off-white crystalline appearance and is soluble in water, alcohol, and chloroform. In addition to its use as a sedative and anticonvulsant, Chlormethiazole has also been used in the treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and various other neurological disorders.

It's important to note that Chlormethiazole can be habit-forming and should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional. Additionally, it may interact with other medications and medical conditions, so it's essential to discuss any potential risks and benefits with a doctor before using this medication.

Dibenzocycloheptenes are a class of chemical compounds that contain a dibenzocycloheptene moiety, which is a seven-membered ring with two benzene rings fused on either side. This structure gives the molecule a unique set of physical and chemical properties, including its aromaticity and reactivity.

In medical terms, dibenzocycloheptenes are not commonly used as therapeutic agents themselves. However, some derivatives of this class of compounds have been investigated for their potential medicinal properties. For example, certain dibenzocycloheptene derivatives have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects, making them potentially useful as drugs for treating pain and inflammation.

It's important to note that while some dibenzocycloheptene derivatives may have potential therapeutic uses, they can also have side effects and risks, just like any other medication. Therefore, it's essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using any medication containing this or any other active ingredient.

"Drug-induced abnormalities" refer to physical or physiological changes that occur as a result of taking medication or drugs. These abnormalities can affect various organs and systems in the body and can range from minor symptoms, such as nausea or dizziness, to more serious conditions, such as liver damage or heart rhythm disturbances.

Drug-induced abnormalities can occur for several reasons, including:

1. Direct toxicity: Some drugs can directly damage cells and tissues in the body, leading to abnormalities.
2. Altered metabolism: Drugs can interfere with normal metabolic processes in the body, leading to the accumulation of harmful substances or the depletion of essential nutrients.
3. Hormonal imbalances: Some drugs can affect hormone levels in the body, leading to abnormalities.
4. Allergic reactions: Some people may have allergic reactions to certain drugs, which can cause a range of symptoms, including rashes, swelling, and difficulty breathing.
5. Interactions with other drugs: Taking multiple medications or drugs at the same time can increase the risk of drug-induced abnormalities.

It is important for healthcare providers to monitor patients closely for signs of drug-induced abnormalities and to adjust medication dosages or switch to alternative treatments as necessary. Patients should also inform their healthcare providers of any symptoms they experience while taking medication, as these may be related to drug-induced abnormalities.

The hippocampus is a complex, curved formation in the brain that resembles a seahorse (hence its name, from the Greek word "hippos" meaning horse and "kampos" meaning sea monster). It's part of the limbic system and plays crucial roles in the formation of memories, particularly long-term ones.

This region is involved in spatial navigation and cognitive maps, allowing us to recognize locations and remember how to get to them. Additionally, it's one of the first areas affected by Alzheimer's disease, which often results in memory loss as an early symptom.

Anatomically, it consists of two main parts: the Ammon's horn (or cornu ammonis) and the dentate gyrus. These structures are made up of distinct types of neurons that contribute to different aspects of learning and memory.

Electroencephalography (EEG) is a medical procedure that records electrical activity in the brain. It uses small, metal discs called electrodes, which are attached to the scalp with paste or a specialized cap. These electrodes detect tiny electrical charges that result from the activity of brain cells, and the EEG machine then amplifies and records these signals.

EEG is used to diagnose various conditions related to the brain, such as seizures, sleep disorders, head injuries, infections, and degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. It can also be used during surgery to monitor brain activity and ensure that surgical procedures do not interfere with vital functions.

EEG is a safe and non-invasive procedure that typically takes about 30 minutes to an hour to complete, although longer recordings may be necessary in some cases. Patients are usually asked to relax and remain still during the test, as movement can affect the quality of the recording.

Carbamates are a group of organic compounds that contain the carbamate functional group, which is a carbon atom double-bonded to oxygen and single-bonded to a nitrogen atom (> N-C=O). In the context of pharmaceuticals and agriculture, carbamates are a class of drugs and pesticides that have carbamate as their core structure.

Carbamate insecticides work by inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which is responsible for breaking down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the synapses of the nervous system. When this enzyme is inhibited, acetylcholine accumulates in the synaptic cleft, leading to overstimulation of the nervous system and ultimately causing paralysis and death in insects.

Carbamate drugs are used for a variety of medical indications, including as anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, and psychotropic medications. They work by modulating various neurotransmitter systems in the brain, such as GABA, glutamate, and dopamine. Carbamates can also be used as anti- parasitic agents, such as ivermectin, which is effective against a range of parasites including nematodes, arthropods, and some protozoa.

It's important to note that carbamate pesticides can be toxic to non-target organisms, including humans, if not used properly. Therefore, it's essential to follow all safety guidelines when handling or using these products.

Oxazepam is a benzodiazepine medication that is primarily used to treat anxiety disorders and symptoms such as sleeplessness and irritability. It works by enhancing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that inhibits the activity of certain neurons in the brain, producing a calming effect.

In medical terms, oxazepam can be defined as follows:

Oxazepam is a Schedule IV controlled substance, indicating that it has a potential for abuse and dependence. It is available in tablet form and is typically taken two to four times per day. Common side effects of oxazepam include drowsiness, dizziness, and weakness. More serious side effects can include memory problems, confusion, and difficulty breathing.

It's important to note that oxazepam should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have significant risks and interactions with other medications. It is not recommended for use in pregnant women or those with a history of substance abuse.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Propylene glycol is not a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. Medically, it is classified as a humectant, which means it helps retain moisture. It is used in various pharmaceutical and cosmetic products as a solvent, preservative, and moisturizer. In medical settings, it can be found in topical creams, oral and injectable medications, and intravenous (IV) fluids.

The chemical definition of propylene glycol is:

Propylene glycol (IUPAC name: propan-1,2-diol) is a synthetic organic compound with the formula CH3CH(OH)CH2OH. It is a viscous, colorless, and nearly odorless liquid that is miscible with water, acetone, and chloroform. Propylene glycol is used as an antifreeze when mixed with water, as a solvent in the production of polymers, and as a moisturizer in various pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. It has a sweet taste and is considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a food additive.

Benzyl compounds are organic chemical compounds that contain a benzyl group, which is a functional group consisting of a carbon atom attached to a CH3 group (methyl group) and an aromatic ring, usually a phenyl group. The benzyl group can be represented as -CH2-C6H5.

Benzyl compounds have various applications in different fields such as pharmaceuticals, flavors, fragrances, dyes, and polymers. In pharmaceuticals, benzyl compounds are used as active ingredients or intermediates in the synthesis of drugs. For example, benzylpenicillin is a widely used antibiotic that contains a benzyl group.

Benzyl alcohol, benzyl chloride, and benzyl acetate are some common examples of benzyl compounds with various industrial applications. Benzyl alcohol is used as a solvent, preservative, and intermediate in the synthesis of other chemicals. Benzyl chloride is an important chemical used in the production of resins, dyes, and pharmaceuticals. Benzyl acetate is used as a flavoring agent and fragrance in food and cosmetic products.

It's worth noting that benzyl compounds can be toxic or harmful if ingested, inhaled, or come into contact with the skin, depending on their chemical properties and concentrations. Therefore, they should be handled with care and used under appropriate safety measures.

Finasteride is a synthetic 4-azasteroid compound that acts as a specific inhibitor of Type II 5α-reductase, an intracellular enzyme that converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT is a hormonal byproduct thought to be responsible for the development and worsening of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and androgenetic alopecia (AGA), also known as male pattern baldness.

Finasteride is available in two formulations: finasteride 1 mg (Proscar) and finasteride 5 mg (Propecia). Finasteride 1 mg is used to treat BPH, while finasteride 5 mg is used for the treatment of AGA in men. The drug works by reducing the production of DHT, which in turn slows down the progression of BPH and AGA.

It's important to note that finasteride is not approved for use in women or children, and it should be used with caution in men due to potential side effects such as decreased sexual desire, difficulty in achieving an erection, and a decrease in the amount of semen produced.

Succinimides are a group of anticonvulsant medications used to treat various types of seizures. They include drugs such as ethosuximide, methsuximide, and phensuximide. These medications work by reducing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain that leads to seizures.

The name "succinimides" comes from their chemical structure, which contains a five-membered ring containing two nitrogen atoms and a carbonyl group. This structure is similar to that of other anticonvulsant medications, such as barbiturates, but the succinimides have fewer side effects and are less likely to cause sedation or respiratory depression.

Succinimides are primarily used to treat absence seizures, which are characterized by brief periods of staring and lack of responsiveness. They may also be used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and other types of seizures.

Like all medications, succinimides can cause side effects, including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headache, and rash. More serious side effects, such as blood dyscrasias, liver toxicity, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome, are rare but have been reported. It is important for patients taking succinimides to be monitored regularly by their healthcare provider to ensure safe and effective use of the medication.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agents are pharmaceutical drugs that act as agonists at the GABA receptors in the brain. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and it plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability.

GABA agents can enhance the activity of GABA by increasing the frequency or duration of GABA-mediated chloride currents at the GABA receptors. These drugs are often used as anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, muscle relaxants, and sedatives due to their ability to reduce neuronal excitability and promote relaxation.

Examples of GABA agents include benzodiazepines, barbiturates, non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, and certain anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentin and pregabalin. It is important to note that while these drugs can be effective in treating various medical conditions, they also carry the risk of dependence, tolerance, and adverse effects, particularly when used at high doses or for prolonged periods.

Picrotoxin is a toxic, white, crystalline compound that is derived from the seeds of the Asian plant Anamirta cocculus (also known as Colchicum luteum or C. autummale). It is composed of two stereoisomers, picrotin and strychnine, in a 1:2 ratio.

Medically, picrotoxin has been used as an antidote for barbiturate overdose and as a stimulant to the respiratory center in cases of respiratory depression caused by various drugs or conditions. However, its use is limited due to its narrow therapeutic index and potential for causing seizures and other adverse effects.

Picrotoxin works as a non-competitive antagonist at GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptors in the central nervous system, blocking the inhibitory effects of GABA and increasing neuronal excitability. This property also makes it a convulsant agent and explains its use as a research tool to study seizure mechanisms and as an insecticide.

It is important to note that picrotoxin should only be used under medical supervision, and its handling requires appropriate precautions due to its high toxicity.

Anti-anxiety agents, also known as anxiolytics, are a class of medications used to manage symptoms of anxiety disorders. These drugs work by reducing the abnormal excitement in the brain and promoting relaxation and calmness. They include several types of medications such as benzodiazepines, azapirone, antihistamines, and beta-blockers.

Benzodiazepines are the most commonly prescribed anti-anxiety agents. They work by enhancing the inhibitory effects of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, which results in sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties. Examples of benzodiazepines include diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), and clonazepam (Klonopin).

Azapirones are a newer class of anti-anxiety agents that act on serotonin receptors in the brain. Buspirone (Buspar) is an example of this type of medication, which has fewer side effects and less potential for abuse compared to benzodiazepines.

Antihistamines are medications that are primarily used to treat allergies but can also have anti-anxiety effects due to their sedative properties. Examples include hydroxyzine (Vistaril, Atarax) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl).

Beta-blockers are mainly used to treat high blood pressure and heart conditions but can also help manage symptoms of anxiety such as rapid heartbeat, tremors, and sweating. Propranolol (Inderal) is an example of a beta-blocker used for this purpose.

It's important to note that anti-anxiety agents should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and potential for dependence or addiction. Additionally, these medications are often used in combination with psychotherapy and lifestyle modifications to manage anxiety disorders effectively.

Alcohol withdrawal seizures are a type of seizure that can occur as a result of alcohol withdrawal in individuals who have developed physical dependence on alcohol. These seizures typically occur within 48 hours after the last drink, but they can sometimes happen up to five days later. They are often accompanied by other symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, such as tremors, anxiety, nausea, and increased heart rate.

Alcohol withdrawal seizures are caused by changes in the brain's chemistry that occur when a person who is dependent on alcohol suddenly stops or significantly reduces their alcohol intake. Alcohol affects the neurotransmitters in the brain, particularly gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. When a person drinks heavily and frequently, the brain adjusts to the presence of alcohol by reducing the number of GABA receptors and increasing the number of glutamate receptors.

When a person suddenly stops drinking, the brain is thrown out of balance, and the reduced number of GABA receptors and increased number of glutamate receptors can lead to seizures. Alcohol withdrawal seizures are a medical emergency and require immediate treatment to prevent complications such as status epilepticus (prolonged seizures) or brain damage. Treatment typically involves administering benzodiazepines, which help to calm the brain and reduce the risk of seizures.

Paraldehyde is not typically defined in the context of modern medical terminology. However, historically, it was used in medicine as a sedative and anticonvulsant. Paraldehyde is a chemical compound consisting of three molecules of acetaldehyde joined together, forming a cyclic structure. It has been used in the past to treat seizures and anxiety, but its use has largely been discontinued due to its adverse effects, such as unpleasant odor, gastric irritation, and potential for causing respiratory depression.

In modern medical terminology, paraldehyde is not commonly used or recognized. Instead, more modern and safer medications are employed to manage similar conditions.

Hypnotics and sedatives are classes of medications that have depressant effects on the central nervous system, leading to sedation (calming or inducing sleep), reduction in anxiety, and in some cases, decreased awareness or memory. These agents work by affecting the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) in the brain, which results in inhibitory effects on neuronal activity.

Hypnotics are primarily used for the treatment of insomnia and other sleep disorders, while sedatives are often prescribed to manage anxiety or to produce a calming effect before medical procedures. Some medications can function as both hypnotics and sedatives, depending on the dosage and specific formulation. Common examples of these medications include benzodiazepines (such as diazepam and lorazepam), non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (such as zolpidem and eszopiclone), barbiturates, and certain antihistamines.

It is essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have potential side effects, such as drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, and impaired coordination. Additionally, long-term use or high doses may lead to tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.

Antimanic agents are a class of medications primarily used to treat mania, a symptom of bipolar disorder. These agents help to control and reduce the severity of manic episodes, which can include symptoms such as elevated or irritable mood, increased energy, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, and impulsive or risky behavior.

The most commonly used antimanic agents are mood stabilizers, such as lithium and valproate (Depakote), and atypical antipsychotics, such as olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel), and aripiprazole (Abilify). These medications work by altering the levels or activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is also considered an effective antimanic treatment for severe mania that has not responded to medication. ECT involves applying electrical currents to the brain while the patient is under anesthesia, which induces a seizure and can help to reduce symptoms of mania.

It's important to note that antimanic agents should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider, as they can have significant side effects and interactions with other medications. Additionally, a comprehensive treatment plan for bipolar disorder typically includes psychotherapy, education, and support to help manage the condition and prevent future episodes.

Fructose is a simple monosaccharide, also known as "fruit sugar." It is a naturally occurring carbohydrate that is found in fruits, vegetables, and honey. Fructose has the chemical formula C6H12O6 and is a hexose, or six-carbon sugar.

Fructose is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion and is metabolized primarily in the liver. It is sweeter than other sugars such as glucose and sucrose (table sugar), which makes it a popular sweetener in many processed foods and beverages. However, consuming large amounts of fructose can have negative health effects, including increasing the risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Epilepsy, partial is a type of epilepsy characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures that originate in a specific, localized area of the brain. These seizures are also known as focal seizures and can vary in severity and symptoms depending on the location of the abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

Partial epilepsies can be further classified into two main categories: simple partial seizures and complex partial seizures. Simple partial seizures do not involve a loss of consciousness, while complex partial seizures are associated with impaired awareness or responsiveness during the seizure.

The causes of partial epilepsies can include brain injury, infection, stroke, tumors, genetic factors, or an unknown cause. Treatment typically involves anti-seizure medications, and in some cases, surgery may be recommended to remove the specific area of the brain responsible for the seizures.

Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a type of epilepsy that is caused by brain injury or trauma. The head injury can be either traumatic (such as from a car accident, fall, or physical assault) or non-traumatic (such as stroke, infection, or brain tumor).

In PTE, the first seizure occurs within one week to one year after the initial injury. The seizures may be immediate (within the first 24 hours of the injury) or delayed (occurring more than one week after the injury).

PTE is characterized by recurrent seizures that are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. These seizures can vary in severity and frequency, and may cause a range of symptoms such as convulsions, loss of consciousness, and altered sensations or emotions.

The diagnosis of PTE is typically made based on the patient's history of head trauma, along with the results of an electroencephalogram (EEG) and neuroimaging studies such as MRI or CT scans. Treatment for PTE may include medication to control seizures, as well as surgery or other interventions in some cases.

Teratogenesis is the formation or production of abnormal physical features and structural malformations in a developing fetus that are caused by the exposure to teratogens. Teratogens are various environmental agents such as alcohol, drugs, medications, chemicals, infectious diseases, radiation, and maternal factors (like diabetes, obesity) that can disrupt normal embryonic or fetal development during pregnancy. The severity and type of birth defects depend on the timing, duration, and dosage of exposure to these teratogens. It is important to note that not all exposures to teratogens will result in birth defects, but increased risks are associated with their exposure during critical periods of development.

Flumazenil is a medication that acts as a competitive antagonist at benzodiazepine receptors. It is primarily used in clinical settings to reverse the effects of benzodiazepines, which are commonly prescribed for their sedative, muscle relaxant, and anxiety-reducing properties. Flumazenil can reverse symptoms such as excessive sedation, respiratory depression, and impaired consciousness caused by benzodiazepine overdose or adverse reactions. It is important to note that flumazenil should be administered with caution, as it can precipitate seizures in individuals who are physically dependent on benzodiazepines.

Drug hypersensitivity is an abnormal immune response to a medication or its metabolites. It is a type of adverse drug reaction that occurs in susceptible individuals, characterized by the activation of the immune system leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction can range from mild symptoms such as skin rashes, hives, and itching to more severe reactions like anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening.

Drug hypersensitivity reactions can be classified into two main types: immediate (or IgE-mediated) and delayed (or non-IgE-mediated). Immediate reactions occur within minutes to a few hours after taking the medication and are mediated by the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators from mast cells and basophils. Delayed reactions, on the other hand, can take several days to develop and are caused by T-cell activation and subsequent cytokine release.

Common drugs that can cause hypersensitivity reactions include antibiotics (such as penicillins and sulfonamides), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), monoclonal antibodies, and chemotherapeutic agents. It is important to note that previous exposure to a medication does not always guarantee the development of hypersensitivity reactions, as they can also occur after the first administration in some cases.

The diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity involves a thorough medical history, physical examination, and sometimes skin or laboratory tests. Treatment typically includes avoiding the offending medication and managing symptoms with antihistamines, corticosteroids, or other medications as needed. In severe cases, emergency medical care may be required to treat anaphylaxis or other life-threatening reactions.

Analgesics are a class of drugs that are used to relieve pain. They work by blocking the transmission of pain signals in the nervous system, allowing individuals to manage their pain levels more effectively. There are many different types of analgesics available, including both prescription and over-the-counter options. Some common examples include acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), and opioids such as morphine or oxycodone.

The choice of analgesic will depend on several factors, including the type and severity of pain being experienced, any underlying medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and individual patient preferences. It is important to use these medications as directed by a healthcare provider, as misuse or overuse can lead to serious side effects and potential addiction.

In addition to their pain-relieving properties, some analgesics may also have additional benefits such as reducing inflammation (like in the case of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs) or causing sedation (as with certain opioids). However, it is essential to weigh these potential benefits against the risks and side effects associated with each medication.

When used appropriately, analgesics can significantly improve a person's quality of life by helping them manage their pain effectively and allowing them to engage in daily activities more comfortably.

Hydantoins are a class of chemical compounds that contain a five-membered ring containing two nitrogen atoms, with one of the nitrogens being part of a urea group. They are important in medicine as a specific group of anticonvulsant drugs used to treat seizures, known as hydantoin derivatives or hydantoins proper. The most well-known example is phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin), which has been widely used for this purpose since the 1930s.

The structure of hydantoins allows them to interact with and stabilize voltage-gated sodium channels in the brain, reducing their excitability and thus the likelihood of seizures. However, long-term use of hydantoin derivatives can lead to several side effects, including dizziness, unsteady gait, tremors, and behavioral changes. Regular monitoring of blood levels is necessary to ensure safe and effective treatment with these medications.

"Spiro compounds" are not specifically classified as medical terms, but they are a concept in organic chemistry. However, I can provide a general definition:

Spiro compounds are a type of organic compound that contains two or more rings, which share a single common atom, known as the "spiro center." The name "spiro" comes from the Greek word for "spiral" or "coiled," reflecting the three-dimensional structure of these molecules.

The unique feature of spiro compounds is that they have at least one spiro atom, typically carbon, which is bonded to four other atoms, two of which belong to each ring. This arrangement creates a specific geometry where the rings are positioned at right angles to each other, giving spiro compounds distinctive structural and chemical properties.

While not directly related to medical terminology, understanding spiro compounds can be essential in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical research since these molecules often exhibit unique biological activities due to their intricate structures.

Absence epilepsy is a type of epilepsy characterized by recurrent brief episodes of "absences," or staring spells, that can last from a few seconds to several minutes. These episodes are often accompanied by subtle body movements such as lip smacking or eyelid flutters. Absence epilepsy is most commonly diagnosed in children and adolescents, and it is more common in girls than boys.

The seizures in absence epilepsy are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain, specifically in a part of the brain called the cortex. These abnormal electrical discharges occur in a pattern that involves both sides of the brain simultaneously. This differs from other types of epilepsy, which may involve only one side of the brain or specific areas within a single hemisphere.

Absence seizures are typically brief and do not cause confusion or disorientation after they end. However, if they occur frequently, they can interfere with learning and social development. In some cases, absence epilepsy may be associated with other types of seizures, such as generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures or myoclonic jerks.

The diagnosis of absence epilepsy is usually made based on the characteristic symptoms and the results of an electroencephalogram (EEG), which can detect the abnormal electrical activity in the brain during a seizure. Treatment typically involves medication to control the seizures, such as ethosuximide or valproic acid. In some cases, a ketogenic diet may also be recommended as an alternative treatment option.

Kainic acid is not a medical term per se, but it is a compound that has been widely used in scientific research, particularly in neuroscience. It is a type of excitatory amino acid that acts as an agonist at certain types of receptors in the brain, specifically the AMPA and kainate receptors.

Kainic acid is often used in research to study the effects of excitotoxicity, which is a process that occurs when nerve cells are exposed to excessive amounts of glutamate or other excitatory neurotransmitters, leading to cell damage or death. Kainic acid can induce seizures and other neurological symptoms in animals, making it a valuable tool for studying epilepsy and related disorders.

While kainic acid itself is not a medical treatment or diagnosis, understanding its effects on the brain has contributed to our knowledge of neurological diseases and potential targets for therapy.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Preclinical drug evaluation refers to a series of laboratory tests and studies conducted to determine the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is tested in humans. These studies typically involve experiments on cells and animals to evaluate the pharmacological properties, toxicity, and potential interactions with other substances. The goal of preclinical evaluation is to establish a reasonable level of safety and understanding of how the drug works, which helps inform the design and conduct of subsequent clinical trials in humans. It's important to note that while preclinical studies provide valuable information, they may not always predict how a drug will behave in human subjects.

"Motor activity" is a general term used in the field of medicine and neuroscience to refer to any kind of physical movement or action that is generated by the body's motor system. The motor system includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles that work together to produce movements such as walking, talking, reaching for an object, or even subtle actions like moving your eyes.

Motor activity can be voluntary, meaning it is initiated intentionally by the individual, or involuntary, meaning it is triggered automatically by the nervous system without conscious control. Examples of voluntary motor activity include deliberately lifting your arm or kicking a ball, while examples of involuntary motor activity include heartbeat, digestion, and reflex actions like jerking your hand away from a hot stove.

Abnormalities in motor activity can be a sign of neurological or muscular disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis. Assessment of motor activity is often used in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Benzodiazepines are a class of psychoactive drugs that possess anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, amnesic, sedative, hypnotic, and muscle relaxant properties. Benzodiazepinones are a subclass of benzodiazepines that share a specific chemical structure, characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine ring with an additional nitrogen-containing ring attached at the 2-position of the benzodiazepine ring.

Examples of benzodiazepinones include clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and flurazepam (Dalmane). These medications are commonly used in the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia, seizures, and muscle spasms. However, they can also cause physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms, so they should be prescribed with caution and under medical supervision.

Mephenytoin is defined as an anticonvulsant drug, specifically a hydantoin derivative, that is used in the treatment of complex partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Mephenytoin has been largely replaced by other anticonvulsants due to its adverse effects such as rash, agranulocytosis, and liver toxicity. It is also known as Mesantoin or Mefenitoin.

Please note that this definition is for informational purposes only and should not be used as a medical advice. Always consult with a healthcare professional for accurate information regarding medications and their effects.

Sodium channels are specialized protein structures that are embedded in the membranes of excitable cells, such as nerve and muscle cells. They play a crucial role in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in these cells. Sodium channels are responsible for the rapid influx of sodium ions into the cell during the initial phase of an action potential, which is the electrical signal that travels along the membrane of a neuron or muscle fiber. This sudden influx of sodium ions causes the membrane potential to rapidly reverse, leading to the depolarization of the cell. After the action potential, the sodium channels close and become inactivated, preventing further entry of sodium ions and helping to restore the resting membrane potential.

Sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and one or two smaller beta subunits. The alpha subunit forms the ion-conducting pore, while the beta subunits play a role in modulating the function and stability of the channel. Mutations in sodium channel genes have been associated with various inherited diseases, including certain forms of epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and muscle disorders.

"Acorus" is a genus of perennial plants in the family Acoraceae. The most common species is Acorus calamus, also known as sweet flag or calamus. This plant has been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, including as a stimulant, carminative, and antiemetic. However, it's important to note that the use of this plant in modern medicine is limited due to concerns about its potential toxicity and lack of rigorous scientific evidence supporting its efficacy. Therefore, it's recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before using any products containing Acorus for medicinal purposes.

"Pimpinella" is a term that refers to a genus of plants in the family Apiaceae, also known as the carrot or parsley family. The most common species in this genus is Pimpinella anisum, which is known as anise or aniseed. This herb is native to the eastern Mediterranean region and Southwest Asia, and its seeds are used as a spice and medicinal plant.

Aniseed has been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, including treating digestive disorders such as bloating, gas, and indigestion. It contains a compound called anethole, which has been found to have antispasmodic, carminative, and analgesic properties. However, it's important to note that while aniseed may have some health benefits, it should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

Therefore, "Pimpinella" is not a medical term per se but rather a botanical name for a genus of plants with potential medicinal uses.

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is a rare, serious and potentially life-threatening skin reaction that usually occurs as a reaction to medication but can also be caused by an infection. SJS is characterized by the detachment of the epidermis (top layer of the skin) from the dermis (the layer underneath). It primarily affects the mucous membranes, such as those lining the eyes, mouth, throat, and genitals, causing painful raw areas that are prone to infection.

SJS is considered a severe form of erythema multiforme (EM), another skin condition, but it's much more serious and can be fatal. The symptoms of SJS include flu-like symptoms such as fever, sore throat, and fatigue, followed by a red or purplish rash that spreads and blisters, eventually leading to the detachment of the top layer of skin.

The exact cause of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is not always known, but it's often triggered by medications such as antibiotics, anti-convulsants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and antiretroviral drugs. Infections caused by herpes simplex virus or Mycoplasma pneumoniae can also trigger SJS.

Treatment for Stevens-Johnson Syndrome typically involves hospitalization, supportive care, wound care, and medication to manage pain and prevent infection. Discontinuing the offending medication is crucial in managing this condition. In severe cases, patients may require treatment in a burn unit or intensive care unit.

4-Aminobutyrate transaminase (GABA transaminase or GABA-T) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) to 2-oxoglutarate, forming succinic semialdehyde and glutamate. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the metabolism of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system. Inhibition of GABA transaminase is a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and anxiety, due to its ability to increase GABA levels in the brain.

KCNQ2 potassium channel, also known as Kv7.2 channel, is a type of voltage-gated potassium channel that plays a crucial role in regulating the electrical excitability of neurons. The channel is composed of four KCNQ2 subunits and can form heteromeric complexes with KCNQ3 subunits to form the M-current, which helps to set the resting membrane potential and control the firing frequency of action potentials in neurons.

Mutations in the KCNQ2 gene have been associated with a variety of neurological disorders, including benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS), epileptic encephalopathy, and intellectual disability. These mutations can alter the function or expression of the KCNQ2 channel, leading to abnormal neuronal excitability and seizure activity.

In summary, KCNQ2 potassium channel is a type of voltage-gated potassium channel that helps regulate the electrical excitability of neurons and has been implicated in several neurological disorders when its function is altered due to genetic mutations.

Indazoles are not a medical term, but a chemical classification. They refer to a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a indazole moiety, which is a benzene ring fused with a diazole ring. Indazoles have no specific medical relevance, but certain derivatives of indazoles have been developed and used as drugs in medicine, particularly in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. For example, Tadalafil (Cialis), a medication used to treat erectile dysfunction and benign prostatic hyperplasia, is a selective inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 and has an indazole structure.

KCNQ3 potassium channel, also known as Kv7.3 or KvLQT3, is a type of voltage-gated potassium channel that plays a crucial role in the regulation of electrical excitability in the brain and other tissues. These channels are composed of four α subunits that form a tetrameric complex, with each subunit containing six transmembrane domains and a pore region.

The KCNQ3 channel is widely expressed in the central nervous system, where it contributes to the regulation of neuronal excitability by mediating the slow component of the delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs). This current helps to set the resting membrane potential and control the firing pattern of action potentials in neurons.

Mutations in the KCNQ3 gene have been associated with a variety of neurological disorders, including benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS), epileptic encephalopathy, and intellectual disability. These mutations can alter the electrical properties of the channel, leading to changes in neuronal excitability and network activity that underlie these conditions.

Overall, the KCNQ3 potassium channel is an important regulator of neural function and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in neurological disorders associated with altered neuronal excitability.

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a type of focal (localized) epilepsy that originates from the temporal lobes of the brain. The temporal lobes are located on each side of the brain and are involved in processing sensory information, memory, and emotion. TLE is characterized by recurrent seizures that originate from one or both temporal lobes.

The symptoms of TLE can vary depending on the specific area of the temporal lobe that is affected. However, common symptoms include auras (sensory or emotional experiences that occur before a seizure), strange smells or tastes, lip-smacking or chewing movements, and memory problems. Some people with TLE may also experience automatisms (involuntary movements such as picking at clothes or fumbling with objects) during their seizures.

Treatment for TLE typically involves medication to control seizures, although surgery may be recommended in some cases. The goal of treatment is to reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and improve quality of life.

Drug tolerance is a medical concept that refers to the decreased response to a drug following its repeated use, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effect. This occurs because the body adapts to the presence of the drug, leading to changes in the function or expression of targets that the drug acts upon, such as receptors or enzymes. Tolerance can develop to various types of drugs, including opioids, benzodiazepines, and alcohol, and it is often associated with physical dependence and addiction. It's important to note that tolerance is different from resistance, which refers to the ability of a pathogen to survive or grow in the presence of a drug, such as antibiotics.

N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) is not a medication but a type of receptor, specifically a glutamate receptor, found in the post-synaptic membrane in the central nervous system. Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. NMDA receptors are involved in various functions such as synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. They also play a role in certain neurological disorders like epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic pain.

NMDA receptors are named after N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, a synthetic analog of the amino acid aspartic acid, which is a selective agonist for this type of receptor. An agonist is a substance that binds to a receptor and causes a response similar to that of the natural ligand (in this case, glutamate).

Sodium channel blockers are a class of medications that work by blocking sodium channels in the heart, which prevents the rapid influx of sodium ions into the cells during depolarization. This action slows down the rate of impulse generation and propagation in the heart, which in turn decreases the heart rate and prolongs the refractory period.

Sodium channel blockers are primarily used to treat cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. They may also be used to treat certain types of neuropathic pain. Examples of sodium channel blockers include Class I antiarrhythmics such as flecainide, propafenone, lidocaine, and mexiletine.

It's important to note that sodium channel blockers can have potential side effects, including proarrhythmia (i.e., the development of new arrhythmias or worsening of existing ones), negative inotropy (decreased contractility of the heart muscle), and cardiac conduction abnormalities. Therefore, these medications should be used with caution and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

The FIGLU (Formiminoglutamic acid excretion) test is not a medical definition itself, but it is a test used to help diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU), an inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism.

In PKU, the body cannot break down the amino acid phenylalanine properly due to a deficiency in the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. As a result, phenylalanine and its toxic byproducts accumulate in the body, which can cause brain damage and intellectual disability if left untreated.

The FIGLU test measures the amount of formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) in the urine after a patient is given a load of histidine, another amino acid. In people with PKU, the accumulation of phenylalanine inhibits the conversion of histidine to glutamic acid, leading to an increase in FIGLU excretion in the urine. Therefore, a positive FIGLU test can indicate the presence of PKU. However, it is not a definitive diagnostic test and should be confirmed with other tests such as plasma amino acid analysis and/or genetic testing.

Ointment bases refer to the vehicle or foundation in which active pharmaceutical ingredients are dispersed to form a semi-solid medication. These bases provide the necessary consistency for ointments, allowing easy application to the skin or other body surfaces. They can be composed of various materials such as fats, waxes, oils, and emulsifying agents.

The choice of an ointment base depends on several factors, including:

1. The desired physical properties (e.g., spreadability, absorption rate)
2. The route of administration (e.g., dermal, mucosal)
3. The compatibility with the active ingredient(s)
4. The intended therapeutic effect (e.g., occlusive, non-occlusive)

Some common types of ointment bases include:

1. Hydrocarbon bases: Consist of hydrophobic materials like petrolatum, white soft paraffin, and microcrystalline wax. They are generally inert, odorless, and resistant to oxidation.
2. Absorption bases: Contain a mixture of hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight esters or fatty alcohols. These bases have better penetrating properties than hydrocarbon bases and are suitable for drugs with low oil solubility.
3. Emulsifying bases: Comprise of water-in-oil (W/O) or oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, which allow the dispersion of both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs. Common examples include cetomacrogol and anhydrous lanette.
4. Water-soluble bases: Primarily consist of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) or other water-soluble materials. They are useful for drugs with high water solubility and provide a cooling sensation upon application.

It is essential to select an appropriate ointment base to ensure the optimal delivery, stability, and efficacy of the active ingredient(s).

Infantile spasms, also known as West syndrome, is a rare but serious type of epilepsy that affects infants typically between 4-8 months of age. The spasms are characterized by sudden, brief, and frequent muscle jerks or contractions, often involving the neck, trunk, and arms. These spasms usually occur in clusters and may cause the infant to bend forward or stretch out. Infantile spasms can be a symptom of various underlying neurological conditions and are often associated with developmental delays and regression. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for improving outcomes.

'Animal behavior' refers to the actions or responses of animals to various stimuli, including their interactions with the environment and other individuals. It is the study of the actions of animals, whether they are instinctual, learned, or a combination of both. Animal behavior includes communication, mating, foraging, predator avoidance, and social organization, among other things. The scientific study of animal behavior is called ethology. This field seeks to understand the evolutionary basis for behaviors as well as their physiological and psychological mechanisms.

Bicuculline is a pharmacological agent that acts as a competitive antagonist at GABA-A receptors, which are inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system. By blocking the action of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) at these receptors, bicuculline can increase neuronal excitability and cause convulsions. It is used in research to study the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in various physiological processes and neurological disorders.

Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are ligand-gated ion channel proteins that play a crucial role in mediating inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. They belong to the Cys-loop family of receptors, which also includes GABA(A), nicotinic acetylcholine, and serotonin receptors.

GlyRs are composed of pentameric assemblies of subunits, with four different subunit isoforms (α1, α2, α3, and β) identified in vertebrates. The most common GlyR composition consists of α and β subunits, although homomeric receptors composed solely of α subunits can also be formed.

When glycine binds to the orthosteric site on the extracellular domain of the receptor, it triggers a conformational change that leads to the opening of an ion channel, allowing chloride ions (Cl-) to flow through and hyperpolarize the neuronal membrane. This inhibitory neurotransmission is essential for regulating synaptic excitability, controlling motor function, and modulating sensory processing in the brainstem, spinal cord, and other regions of the central nervous system.

Dysfunction of GlyRs has been implicated in various neurological disorders, including hyperekplexia (startle disease), epilepsy, chronic pain, and neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder.

A hospital formulary is a list of medications that a hospital or healthcare system has approved for use in specific clinical situations. The formulary is developed and maintained by a committee of physicians, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals who evaluate the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of various medications before adding them to the formulary.

The primary goal of a hospital formulary is to promote the safe and effective use of medications while minimizing unnecessary costs. By standardizing the medications used in the hospital, formularies can help reduce medication errors, improve patient outcomes, and ensure that limited resources are used wisely.

Hospital formularies may vary depending on the specific needs and preferences of the hospital or healthcare system. They typically include a wide range of medications, from common pain relievers and antibiotics to specialty drugs used to treat rare conditions. In addition to listing approved medications, hospital formularies may also provide guidelines for their use, including dosages, routes of administration, and monitoring requirements.

Healthcare providers who practice in hospitals with formularies are expected to follow the guidelines set forth in the formulary when prescribing medications. However, they may request exceptions to the formulary if a patient's clinical situation requires a medication that is not on the list. The formulary committee will then review the request and make a determination based on the available evidence and clinical expertise.

Midazolam is a medication from the class of drugs known as benzodiazepines. It works by enhancing the effect of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which has a calming effect on the brain and nervous system. Midazolam is often used for its sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties.

Medically, midazolam is used for various purposes, including:

1. Preoperative medication (sedation before surgery)
2. Procedural sedation (for minor surgical or diagnostic procedures)
3. Treatment of seizures (status epilepticus)
4. Sedation in critically ill patients
5. As an adjunct to anesthesia during surgeries
6. Treatment of alcohol withdrawal symptoms
7. To induce amnesia for certain medical or dental procedures

Midazolam is available in various forms, such as tablets, intravenous (IV) solutions, and intranasal sprays. It has a rapid onset of action and a short duration, making it suitable for brief, intermittent procedures. However, midazolam can cause side effects like drowsiness, confusion, respiratory depression, and memory impairment. Therefore, its use should be carefully monitored by healthcare professionals.

Myoclonic epilepsies are a group of epilepsy syndromes characterized by the presence of myoclonic seizures. A myoclonic seizure is a type of seizure that involves quick, involuntary muscle jerks or twitches. These seizures can affect one part of the body or multiple parts simultaneously and may vary in frequency and severity.

Myoclonic epilepsies can occur at any age but are more common in infancy, childhood, or adolescence. Some myoclonic epilepsy syndromes have a genetic basis, while others may be associated with brain injury, infection, or other medical conditions.

Some examples of myoclonic epilepsy syndromes include:

1. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME): This is the most common type of myoclonic epilepsy and typically begins in adolescence. It is characterized by myoclonic jerks, often occurring upon awakening or after a period of relaxation, as well as generalized tonic-clonic seizures.
2. Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsies (PME): These are rare inherited disorders that typically begin in childhood or adolescence and involve both myoclonic seizures and other types of seizures. PMEs often progress to include cognitive decline, movement disorders, and other neurological symptoms.
3. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS): This is a severe form of epilepsy that typically begins in early childhood and involves multiple types of seizures, including myoclonic seizures. LGS can be difficult to treat and often results in cognitive impairment and developmental delays.
4. Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy (MAE): Also known as Doose syndrome, MAE is a childhood epilepsy syndrome characterized by myoclonic seizures, atonic seizures (brief periods of muscle weakness or loss of tone), and other types of seizures. It often responds well to treatment with antiepileptic drugs.

The management of myoclonic epilepsies typically involves a combination of medication, lifestyle changes, and, in some cases, dietary modifications. The specific treatment plan will depend on the type of myoclonic epilepsy and its underlying cause.

Central muscle relaxants are a class of pharmaceutical agents that act on the central nervous system (CNS) to reduce skeletal muscle tone and spasticity. These medications do not directly act on the muscles themselves but rather work by altering the messages sent between the brain and the muscles, thereby reducing excessive muscle contraction and promoting relaxation.

Central muscle relaxants are often prescribed for the management of various neuromuscular disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, and stroke-induced spasticity. They may also be used to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions like strains, sprains, or other muscle injuries.

Examples of central muscle relaxants include baclofen, tizanidine, cyclobenzaprine, methocarbamol, and diazepam. It is important to note that these medications can have side effects such as drowsiness, dizziness, and impaired cognitive function, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Doxepin is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) medication that is primarily used to treat depression and anxiety disorders. It works by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, in the brain. Doxepin is also used in the treatment of insomnia, as it can help to improve sleep quality and reduce nighttime awakenings.

In addition to its antidepressant and sedative effects, doxepin has anti-inflammatory properties and is sometimes used off-label to treat chronic itching associated with various skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis.

Like other TCAs, doxepin can cause a range of side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, dizziness, and drowsiness. It may also cause weight gain, sexual dysfunction, and orthostatic hypotension (a drop in blood pressure upon standing). In rare cases, doxepin can cause more serious side effects, such as seizures, irregular heart rhythms, and serotonin syndrome (a potentially life-threatening condition caused by excessive levels of serotonin in the body).

Doxepin is available in immediate-release and extended-release forms, and is typically taken orally once or twice a day. The dosage may vary depending on the individual's age, weight, and medical history, as well as the specific condition being treated. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking doxepin, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Hydroxycholecalciferols are metabolites of vitamin D that are formed in the liver and kidneys. They are important for maintaining calcium homeostasis in the body by promoting the absorption of calcium from the gut and reabsorption of calcium from the kidneys.

The two main forms of hydroxycholecalciferols are 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). 25-hydroxyvitamin D is the major circulating form of vitamin D in the body and is used as a clinical measure of vitamin D status. It is converted to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidneys by the enzyme 1α-hydroxylase, which is activated in response to low serum calcium or high phosphate levels.

1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is the biologically active form of vitamin D and plays a critical role in regulating calcium homeostasis by increasing intestinal calcium absorption and promoting bone health. Deficiency in hydroxycholecalciferols can lead to rickets in children and osteomalacia or osteoporosis in adults, characterized by weakened bones and increased risk of fractures.

Flurothyl, also known as Nelson's fluid or induction agent, is a chemical compound with the formula C5H4F6O. It is a colorless liquid that is volatile and has a sweetish odor. In medicine, it was historically used as a rapid-acting inhalational general anesthetic, but its use has been largely discontinued due to safety concerns, including the risk of seizures and cardiac arrest. Flurothyl works by sensitizing the brain to carbon dioxide, leading to a loss of consciousness. It is still used in research settings to study seizure disorders and anesthetic mechanisms.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "consciousness monitors." The term "consciousness" generally refers to an individual's state of being awake and aware of their surroundings and experiences. In a medical context, healthcare professionals may monitor a person's level of consciousness as part of their overall assessment of the patient's neurological status.

There are several tools and scales that healthcare providers use to assess a person's level of consciousness, including:

1. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS): This is a widely used tool for assessing level of consciousness in patients with traumatic brain injury or other conditions that may affect consciousness. The GCS evaluates a patient's ability to open their eyes, speak, and move in response to stimuli.
2. The Alert, Voice, Pain, Unresponsive (AVPU) scale: This is another tool used to assess level of consciousness. It evaluates whether a patient is alert, responds to voice, responds to pain, or is unresponsive.
3. Pupillary response: Healthcare providers may also monitor the size and reactivity of a person's pupils as an indicator of their level of consciousness. Changes in pupil size or reactivity can be a sign of brainstem dysfunction or increased intracranial pressure.

It's important to note that while healthcare professionals may monitor a patient's level of consciousness, there is no single device or tool that can directly measure "consciousness" itself. Instead, these tools and assessments provide valuable information about a person's neurological status and help healthcare providers make informed decisions about their care.

Lorazepam is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as benzodiazepines. Medically, it is defined as a prescription drug used for the treatment of anxiety disorders, short-term relief of symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. It can also be used for the treatment of insomnia, seizure disorders, and alcohol withdrawal. Lorazepam works by affecting chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety or other symptoms.

It is important to note that lorazepam can be habit-forming and should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider. Misuse of this medication can lead to serious risks, including addiction, overdose, or death.

Bemegride is a central nervous system stimulant that was previously used in the treatment of barbiturate overdose and to reduce intracranial pressure in patients with brain injuries. It works by increasing the activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as dopamine and norepinephrine.

However, the use of bemegride is not common in modern medical practice due to its potential for causing seizures and other adverse effects. It has largely been replaced by other medications that are safer and more effective for treating these conditions.

It's important to note that the use of bemegride should be under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause serious side effects if not used properly.

Antidepressive agents are a class of medications used to treat various forms of depression and anxiety disorders. They act on neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers in the brain, to restore the balance that has been disrupted by mental illness. The most commonly prescribed types of antidepressants include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). These medications can help alleviate symptoms such as low mood, loss of interest in activities, changes in appetite and sleep patterns, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and thoughts of death or suicide. It is important to note that antidepressants may take several weeks to reach their full effectiveness and may cause side effects, so it is essential to work closely with a healthcare provider to find the right medication and dosage.

Meprobamate is a carbamate derivative and acts as a central nervous system depressant. It is primarily used as an anti-anxiety agent, although it also has muscle relaxant properties. Meprobamate works by enhancing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that inhibits nerve transmission in the brain, thereby producing a calming effect.

It is important to note that meprobamate has a potential for abuse and dependence, and its use is associated with several side effects, including dizziness, drowsiness, and impaired coordination. Therefore, it should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

A craniotomy is a surgical procedure where a bone flap is temporarily removed from the skull to access the brain. This procedure is typically performed to treat various neurological conditions, such as brain tumors, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, or traumatic brain injuries. After the underlying brain condition is addressed, the bone flap is usually replaced and secured back in place with plates and screws. The purpose of a craniotomy is to provide access to the brain for diagnostic or therapeutic interventions while minimizing potential damage to surrounding tissues.

Dizocilpine maleate is a chemical compound that is commonly known as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. It is primarily used in research settings to study the role of NMDA receptors in various physiological processes, including learning and memory.

The chemical formula for dizocilpine maleate is C16H24Cl2N2O4·C4H4O4. The compound is a white crystalline powder that is soluble in water and alcohol. It has potent psychoactive effects and has been investigated as a potential treatment for various neurological and psychiatric disorders, although it has not been approved for clinical use.

Dizocilpine maleate works by blocking the action of glutamate, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in learning and memory, at NMDA receptors in the brain. By doing so, it can alter various cognitive processes and has been shown to have anticonvulsant, analgesic, and neuroprotective effects in animal studies. However, its use is associated with significant side effects, including hallucinations, delusions, and memory impairment, which have limited its development as a therapeutic agent.

Polygalaceae is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in botany. It refers to a family of flowering plants commonly known as the milkwort family. The plants in this family are characterized by their small, typically bilateral flowers and often have a pair of large, leaf-like bracts at the base of the flower cluster. Some members of Polygalaceae have medicinal uses, such as the roots of Polygala senega, which have been used historically to induce vomiting and treat respiratory conditions. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before using any plant-based remedies for medical purposes.

Neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors are a class of drugs that work by blocking the reuptake of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, into the presynaptic neuron after they have been released into the synapse. This results in an increased concentration of these neurotransmitters in the synapse, which can enhance their signal transduction and lead to therapeutic effects.

These drugs are commonly used in the treatment of various psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs).

It's important to note that while neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors can be effective in treating certain conditions, they may also have potential side effects and risks. Therefore, it is essential to use them under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional.

Acetates, in a medical context, most commonly refer to compounds that contain the acetate group, which is an functional group consisting of a carbon atom bonded to two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom (-COO-). An example of an acetate is sodium acetate (CH3COONa), which is a salt formed from acetic acid (CH3COOH) and is often used as a buffering agent in medical solutions.

Acetates can also refer to a group of medications that contain acetate as an active ingredient, such as magnesium acetate, which is used as a laxative, or calcium acetate, which is used to treat high levels of phosphate in the blood.

In addition, acetates can also refer to a process called acetylation, which is the addition of an acetyl group (-COCH3) to a molecule. This process can be important in the metabolism and regulation of various substances within the body.

"Millettia" is a genus of flowering plants in the family Fabaceae, also known as the legume family. These plants are primarily found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world, particularly in Africa, Asia, and Australia. Some species of Millettia have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, such as treating fever, malaria, and skin diseases. However, it's important to note that the medicinal properties and safety of these plants can vary widely depending on the specific species and preparation methods, so they should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare provider.

Excitatory amino acid antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of excitatory neurotransmitters, particularly glutamate and aspartate, in the brain. These drugs work by binding to and blocking the receptors for these neurotransmitters, thereby reducing their ability to stimulate neurons and produce an excitatory response.

Excitatory amino acid antagonists have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits in a variety of neurological conditions, including stroke, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, their use is limited by the fact that blocking excitatory neurotransmission can also have negative effects on cognitive function and memory.

There are several types of excitatory amino acid receptors, including N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), and kainite receptors. Different excitatory amino acid antagonists may target one or more of these receptor subtypes, depending on their specific mechanism of action.

Examples of excitatory amino acid antagonists include ketamine, memantine, and dextromethorphan. These drugs have been used in clinical practice for various indications, such as anesthesia, sedation, and treatment of neurological disorders. However, their use must be carefully monitored due to potential side effects and risks associated with blocking excitatory neurotransmission.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

A "drug eruption" is a general term used to describe an adverse skin reaction that occurs as a result of taking a medication. These reactions can vary in severity and appearance, and may include symptoms such as rash, hives, itching, redness, blistering, or peeling of the skin. In some cases, drug eruptions can also cause systemic symptoms such as fever, fatigue, or joint pain.

The exact mechanism by which drugs cause eruptions is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve an abnormal immune response to the medication. There are many different types of drug eruptions, including morphilliform rashes, urticaria (hives), fixed drug eruptions, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), which is a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction.

If you suspect that you are experiencing a drug eruption, it is important to seek medical attention promptly. Your healthcare provider can help determine the cause of the reaction and recommend appropriate treatment. In some cases, it may be necessary to discontinue the medication causing the reaction and switch to an alternative therapy.

Acetamides are organic compounds that contain an acetamide functional group, which is a combination of an acetyl group (-COCH3) and an amide functional group (-CONH2). The general structure of an acetamide is R-CO-NH-CH3, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Acetamides are found in various medications, including some pain relievers, muscle relaxants, and anticonvulsants. They can also be found in certain industrial chemicals and are used as intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of acetamides can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Chronic exposure has been linked to more serious health effects, including liver and kidney damage. Therefore, handling and use of acetamides should be done with appropriate safety precautions.

Amino alcohols are organic compounds containing both amine and hydroxyl (alcohol) functional groups. They have the general structure R-NH-OH, where R represents a carbon-containing group. Amino alcohols can be primary, secondary, or tertiary, depending on the number of alkyl or aryl groups attached to the nitrogen atom.

These compounds are important in many chemical and biological processes. For example, some amino alcohols serve as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, and polymers. In biochemistry, certain amino alcohols function as neurotransmitters or components of lipids.

Some common examples of amino alcohols include:

* Ethanolamine (monoethanolamine, MEA): a primary amino alcohol used in the production of detergents, emulsifiers, and pharmaceuticals
* Serinol: a primary amino alcohol that occurs naturally in some foods and is used as a flavoring agent
* Choline: a quaternary ammonium compound with a hydroxyl group, essential for human nutrition and found in various foods such as eggs, liver, and peanuts
* Trimethylamine (TMA): a tertiary amino alcohol that occurs naturally in some marine animals and is responsible for the "fishy" odor of their flesh.

Anticonvulsants suppress the excessive rapid firing of neurons during seizures. Anticonvulsants also prevent the spread of the ... or on the newer anticonvulsants gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine or topiramate. The choice of anticonvulsants depends on ... The first anticonvulsant was bromide, suggested in 1857 by the British gynecologist Charles Locock who used it to treat women ... Anticonvulsants (also known as antiepileptic drugs or antiseizure drugs) are a diverse group of pharmacological agents used in ...
As this syndrome can present secondary to multiple anticonvulsants, the general term "anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome ... Anticonvulsant/sulfonamide hypersensitivity syndrome is a potentially serious hypersensitivity reaction that can be seen with ... 2015). "Late-onset Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome Mimicking Lymphoma". Internal Medicine. 54 (24): 3201-3204. doi: ... medications with an aromatic amine chemical structure, such as aromatic anticonvulsants (e.g. diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbital ...
Anticonvulsants, Imides, Ureas, All stub articles, Anticonvulsant stubs). ... Pheneturide has a similar profile of anticonvulsant activity and toxicity relative to phenacemide. As such, it is only used in ... 335-. ISBN 978-94-011-6223-4. Vida J (19 July 2013). Anticonvulsants. Elsevier. pp. 4, 42. ISBN 978-0-323-14395-0. deStevens G ... Pheneturide inhibits the metabolism and thus increases the levels of other anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin. Phenacemide ...
Anticonvulsants. Possibly reduce the anticonvulsant effect of antiepileptics by lowering the seizure threshold. Antihistamines ...
It has mainly anticonvulsant action with less sedative effects than the closely related compound phenobarbital. It saw ... Smith DB, Goldstein SG, Roomet A (1986). "A comparison of the toxicity effects of the anticonvulsant eterobarb (antilon, DMMP) ... Gallagher BB, Baumel IP, Woodbury SG, Dimicco JA (May 1975). "Clinical evaluation of eterobarb, a new anticonvulsant drug". ... Vida JA, Wilber WR, Reinhard JF (March 1971). "Anticonvulsants. 2. Acyloxymethyl and halomethyl derivatives of barbituric acid ...
Vida J (19 July 2013). Anticonvulsants. Elsevier. pp. 578-. ISBN 978-0-323-14395-0. Haddad LM, Winchester JF (1983). Clinical ... is a drug described as a tranquilizer or sedative which has anxiolytic and anticonvulsant properties. It is related ... Anticonvulsants, Anxiolytics, Sedatives, All stub articles, Sedative stubs). ...
"Hydantoin anticonvulsants". drugs.com. Drauz, Karlheinz; Grayson, Ian; Kleemann, Axel; Krimmer, Hans-Peter; Leuchtenberger, ... In pharmaceuticals, hydantoin derivatives form a class of anticonvulsants; phenytoin and fosphenytoin both contain hydantoin ... moieties and are both used as anticonvulsants in the treatment of seizure disorders. The hydantoin derivative dantrolene is ...
McLamore WM, P'an SY, Bavley A (1955). "Hypnotics and Anticonvulsants. II. Halogenated Tertiary Acetylenic Carbinols". Journal ...
Tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects of clonazepam occurs in both animals and humans. In humans, tolerance to the ... The anticonvulsant properties of benzodiazepines are due to the enhancement of synaptic GABA responses, and the inhibition of ... It possesses anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, sedative, hypnotic, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties. It is typically taken by ... Battistin L, Varotto M, Berlese G, Roman G (February 1984). "Effects of some anticonvulsant drugs on brain GABA level and GAD ...
It is unclear if anticonvulsants are useful for treating tinnitus. Steroid injections into the middle ear also do not seem to ... Hoekstra, Carlijn EL; Rynja, Sybren P; van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Rovers, Maroeska M (6 July 2011). "Anticonvulsants for tinnitus ...
The drug was quickly adopted as the first widely effective anti-convulsant, though World War I delayed its introduction in the ... Among anti-convulsant drugs, behavioural disturbances occur most frequently with clonazepam and phenobarbital. Acute ... Direct blockade of excitatory glutamate signaling is also believed to contribute to the hypnotic/anticonvulsant effect that is ... The treatment of simple febrile seizures with anticonvulsant prophylaxis is no longer recommended. Phenobarbital is the INN and ...
Anticonvulsants are not needed. And those affected do not develop epilepsy when they grow up. Jerome Engel; Timothy A. Pedley; ...
... anticonvulsants) and trimethoprim. Combining lamotrigine with sodium valproate increases the risk of SJS. Nonsteroidal anti- ... "Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis due to anticonvulsants share certain clinical and laboratory features ...
Anticonvulsants, such as carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, and topiramate, do not appear to be effective as treatment. ... Minozzi, S; Cinquini, M; Amato, L; Davoli, M; Farrell, MF; Pani, PP; Vecchi, S (April 2015). "Anticonvulsants for cocaine ...
Hammond CJ, Niciu MJ, Drew S, Arias AJ (April 2015). "Anticonvulsants for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and ... At the current stage of research, evidence supporting the clinical use of anticonvulsants to treat alcohol dependence is ... Results are conditioned by heterogeneity and by the low number and quality of studies comparing anticonvulsants versus other ... Pani PP, Trogu E, Pacini M, Maremmani I (February 2014). "Anticonvulsants for alcohol dependence". The Cochrane Database of ...
Hrib NJ, Martin LL (1989). Chapter 2. Antianxiety Agents and Anticonvulsants. Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry. Vol. 24. ... Studies have shown tolufazepam to have anticonvulsant and anxiolytic activity in animal subjects, including convulsions ...
Long term anticonvulsant medications are not usually recommended in those who have had prior seizures due to withdrawal. There ... A 2010 Cochrane review similarly reported that the evidence to support the role of anticonvulsants over benzodiazepines in the ... Hammond CJ, Niciu MJ, Drew S, Arias AJ (April 2015). "Anticonvulsants for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and ... Minozzi S, Amato L, Vecchi S, Davoli M (March 2010). Minozzi S (ed.). "Anticonvulsants for alcohol withdrawal". The Cochrane ...
Tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects tends to correlate more with tolerance to physiological effects, however, meaning that ... Nau H; Kuhnz W; Egger HJ; Rating D; Helge H (November 1982). "Anticonvulsants during pregnancy and lactation. Transplacental, ... However, barbiturates are still used as anticonvulsants (e.g., phenobarbital and primidone) and general anesthetics (e.g., ... They are effective when used medically as anxiolytics, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants, but have physical and psychological ...
Namely antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics. As of 2008 the treatments prescribed to children with ASD were ... More than half of U.S. children diagnosed with ASD are prescribed psychoactive drugs or anticonvulsants, with the most common ...
Tuen C. "Anticonvulsants before 1993". Neuroland. Archived from the original on 4 August 2019. "Cerebyx Approval History". ... In 2003, it was reported that even though anticonvulsants are often very effective in mania, and acute mania requires rapid ... when the number of anticonvulsants available was much more limited. One solution was to develop a prodrug that did not have ... Anticonvulsants, CYP3A4 inducers, Hydantoins, Prodrugs, Pfizer brands). ...
... anticonvulsant, anesthesia) Procymate (Equipax) (sedative, anxiolytic) Styramate (Sinaxamol) (muscle relaxant, anticonvulsant) ... Among these is Felbamate, an anticonvulsant that was approved in 1993 and is commonly used today. It is a GABAA positive ... Like most anticonvulsants, pregabalin and gabapentin have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Gabapentinoids ... Most anticonvulsants like Lamotrigine and Phenytoin are depressants. Carbamates are depressants that are similar to ...
Seizures are treated with anticonvulsants. Hydrocephalus (obstructed flow of CSF) may require insertion of a temporary or long- ...
Gray LA (2020-03-01). "Anticonvulsant toxicity". Medicine. 48 (3): 192-193. doi:10.1016/j.mpmed.2019.12.011. ISSN 1357-3039. ... Ivermectin and some anticonvulsants such as vigabatrin. The first brain image of an individual with psychosis was completed as ...
... anticonvulsant drugs; nitrate compounds; organic solvents; parental exposure to lead; alcohol; cigarette use; and a number of ...
Like many anticonvulsants, primidone interacts with other anticonvulsants. Clobazam decreases clearance of primidone,Mesuximide ... Primidone is one of the anticonvulsants associated with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome, with the others being ... Primidone is an anticonvulsant of the barbiturate class; however, its long-term effect in raising the seizure threshold is ... A low-dose therapy (250 mg/day) is just as good as a high-dose therapy (750 mg/day). Primidone is not the only anticonvulsant ...
Anticonvulsants are used to prevent seizures. If brain function is severely affected, interventions like physical therapy and ...
Seizures may be treated with anticonvulsants. However, gelastic seizures are often intractable and may not benefit from such ...
... anticonvulsants such as valproate and phenytoin; cholesterol-lowering statins; steroids such as oral contraceptives and ...
Anticonvulsants are used to control epilepsy. With fewer than 100 cases having been reported worldwide, the exact prevalence is ...
Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group) (2002-04-22). "Routine anticonvulsants for treating cerebral malaria". The Cochrane ...
Anticonvulsants suppress the excessive rapid firing of neurons during seizures. Anticonvulsants also prevent the spread of the ... or on the newer anticonvulsants gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine or topiramate. The choice of anticonvulsants depends on ... The first anticonvulsant was bromide, suggested in 1857 by the British gynecologist Charles Locock who used it to treat women ... Anticonvulsants (also known as antiepileptic drugs or antiseizure drugs) are a diverse group of pharmacological agents used in ...
Anticonvulsants. Class Summary. These agents prevent seizure recurrence and terminate clinical and electrical seizure activity. ... Prophylactic Anticonvulsants After Neurosurgery. Epilepsy Curr. 2002 Jul. 2(4):105-107. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
JME is relatively common and responds well to treatment with appropriate anticonvulsants. ... Anticonvulsants. Class Summary. Anticonvulsants are the mainstay of therapy for JME. These agents are given to prevent ... Lamotrigine is a well-tolerated anticonvulsant; it requires slow up-titration because of the risk of rash. It probably has ... The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any anticonvulsant solely for the treatment of juvenile myoclonic ...
... a widely prescribed anticonvulsant used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain, is showing promise in the treatment of alcohol ... The anticonvulsant gabapentin, a widely prescribed anticonvulsant used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain, is showing ...
Anticonvulsants. Class Summary. Anticonvulsants are employed in management of seizures presenting as complication of disease ...
UPDATES:ANTICONVULSANT IMPLICATED IN GUM DISEASE. What Doctors Dont Tell You1 min read ... Tagged asanticonvulsantsgingival hyperplasiagum damagephenytoinWhat Doctors Dont Tell You ...
Calcium Channel Blockers and Anticonvulsants An Important Interaction. Topics in Pain Management 7(1):p 3-4, August 1991. ... Calcium Channel Blockers and Anticonvulsants An Important Interaction : Topics in Pain Management. ...
... the anticonvulsant drugs levetiracetam, fosphenytoin, and valproate each led to seizure cessation and improved alertness by 60 ... Randomized Trial of Three Anticonvulsant Medications for Status Epilepticus N Engl J Med. 2019 Nov 28;381(22):2103-2113. doi: ... Conclusions: In the context of benzodiazepine-refractory convulsive status epilepticus, the anticonvulsant drugs levetiracetam ... without additional anticonvulsant medication. The posterior probabilities that each drug was the most or least effective were ...
A Case of Lamotrigine-Associated Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome. Nicholas A. Blondin; Sohrab Zahedi, M.D.; Mahlon S. ...
Failure to discontinue anticonvulsant before commencing ECT Date: 12 Mar 2002 A woman complained that her husband should not ... Tegretol is an anti-convulsant medication that prevents this seizure activity. Dr C was aware that Mr B was taking Tegretol ... The course of ECT was unusual in that he was left on a significant dose of a psychotropic anticonvulsant for the first six ... His current medications include Tegretol, an anticonvulsant. The patient did not have the effects expected on ECT. The patient ...
Clarified ,i,Euterpe oleracea,/i, (EO) juice showed anticonvulsant properties similar to diazepam in an ,i,in vivo,/i, model ... This study investigated the effects of EO on the main GABAergic targets for anticonvulsant drugs, analyzing the effect on the ... Recently, the potent anticonvulsant properties of açaí (Euterpe oleracea Martius, family Arecaceae) were demonstrated in an in ... The latter hypothesis is in agreement with the notable potency of the anticonvulsant effect of EO observed in vivo [2]. In a ...
The Effect of Anticonvulsant Therapy upon the Absorption of Folates C. Fehling; C. Fehling ... C. Fehling, Margaretha Jägerstad, K. Lindstrand, Anna-Kerstin Westesson; The Effect of Anticonvulsant Therapy upon the ... 3. The findings indicate that the folate deficiency, caused by anticonvulsant drugs is not due to interference with the ... was examined in normal volunteers and in epileptic patients on anticonvulsant drugs. ...
Anticonvulsants for the Treatment of Low Back Pain and Lumbar Radicular Pain Do not reduce pain or disability; increase the ... Anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain: a systematic review and metaanalysis. CMAJ. 2018; ... Anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain: a systematic review and metaanalysis. CMAJ. 2018; ... While this meta-analysis found that anticonvulsants did not improve pain or disability, there are several limitations that must ...
... an anticonvulsant which is used to treat epilepsy, PTSD, and mood disorders, helped adult volunteers learn to identify pitch ... Anticonvulsant Helps Adults Acquire Perfect Pitch, Learn New Language: Is This Just Another Story Of Popping Pills To Learn?. ... In a new study, researchers found that valproate, an anticonvulsant which is used to treat epilepsy, PTSD, and mood disorders, ...
We conclude that there is no tolerance to the anticonvulsant activity of ganaxolone nor is there cross-tolerance to ganaxolone ... On the day after the chronic treatment periods, the anticonvulsant potencies of ganaxolone and diazepam were determined. The ED ... Chronic Treatment with the Neuroactive Steroid Ganaxolone in the Rat Induces Anticonvulsant Tolerance to Diazepam but Not to ... Chronic Treatment with the Neuroactive Steroid Ganaxolone in the Rat Induces Anticonvulsant Tolerance to Diazepam but Not to ...
Anticonvulsant Fatalities Reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers 2000 - 2019 Abstract found on PubMed ... Background: Anticonvulsants are frequently prescribed, and exposures are commonly reported to American Association of Poison ... Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of cases coded with oral anticonvulsants as a single substance and associated with a ... The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of fatalities associated with oral anticonvulsant use, including ...
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. No warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, is made as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, or correctness of any translations made by a third-party service of the information provided herein into any other language. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited ...
Anticonvulsant activity in pentylenetetrazole-induced Mus musculus albino (mouse) seizure model assessed as survival at 220 mg/ ...
Anticonvulsant activity in Mus musculus (mouse) assessed as protection against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at 0.5 ...
REQUIREMENTS. You must ensure that your Disclosures have been updated within the previous six months. Please go to our Submission Site to add or update your Disclosure information.. Your co-authors must send a completed Publishing Agreement Form to Neurology Staff (not necessary for the lead/corresponding author as the form below will suffice) before you upload your comment.. If you are responding to a comment that was written about an article you originally authored: ...
Antiepileptics and Anticonvulsants (65) *Adenosine Receptors - Antiepileptics and Anticonvulsants (2). *Adrenergic Receptors - ...
N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-5-methyl-3-isoxazolecarboxamide (D2624) belongs to a new series of experimental anticonvulsants related ... Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of the Novel Anticonvulsant AgentN-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-5-methyl-3-isoxazolecarboxamide (D2624 ... Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of the Novel Anticonvulsant AgentN-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-5-methyl-3-isoxazolecarboxamide (D2624 ... Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of the Novel Anticonvulsant AgentN-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-5-methyl-3-isoxazolecarboxamide (D2624 ...
Anticonvulsant medications are usually prescribed by neurologists for patients who have epilepsy or for those who suffer from ... Anticonvulsant medications work by destroying the overactive neurons in the brain.. Convulsions that are caused by having ... For example, back pain can be the cause of this; however, anticonvulsants can calm the brain receptors, and this will result in ... For patients who are prescribed anticonvulsants for pain, they usually take them once a day to prevent pain or seizures from ...
Gut-Brain-axis: effect of basil oil on the gut microbiota and its contribution to the anticonvulsant properties - PubMed ... This study seeks to determine the role of the gut microbiota in the anticonvulsant effect of basil oil (BO) using antibiotic- ... Gut-Brain-axis: effect of basil oil on the gut microbiota and its contribution to the anticonvulsant properties. ... Depletion of the microbiota significantly reversed the anticonvulsant actions of BO. The concentrations of short chain fatty ...
"Anticonvulsants" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Anticonvulsants" by people in this website by year, and ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Anticonvulsants" by people in Profiles. ... whether "Anticonvulsants" was a major or minor topic of these publications. To see the data from this visualization as text, ...
Anticonvulsants. Class Summary. These agents prevent seizure recurrence and terminate clinical and electrical seizure activity. ... Prophylactic Anticonvulsants After Neurosurgery. Epilepsy Curr. 2002 Jul. 2(4):105-107. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
Anticonvulsants. Acetazolamide should not be given to patients taking the anticonvulsant topiramate because concurrent use is ... Anticonvulsants. Mefloquine can lower plasma levels of several anticonvulsant medications, including carbamazepine, ... Anticonvulsants. Barbiturates, carbamazepine, and phenytoin can decrease the half-life of doxycycline. ... Mefloquine can interact with several categories of drugs, including anticonvulsants, other antimalarial drugs, and drugs that ...
Phenobarbital, the longest-acting barbiturate, is used for its anticonvulsant and sedative-hypnotic properties in the ...
Tag: anticonvulsants. How Long Does it Take Gabapentin to Work?. It can take several weeks for gabapentin to reach its full ... Categories GabapentinTags anticonvulsants, Gabapentin, Restless Legs Syndrome Free Priority Mail shipping. We provide Free ... Gabapentin is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It is not completely known how this drug works. When used to ...
At our detox center in Port St. Lucie, FL, we are devoted to showing compassion and unconditional love to everyone, no matter their situation.. ...
  • Phenobarbital was the main anticonvulsant from 1912 until the development of phenytoin in 1938. (wikipedia.org)
  • Animal studies have shown that prenatal exposure to the anticonvulsant drugs phenobarbital and phenytoin alters steroid hormone levels which consequently leads to disturbed sexual differentiation. (amsterdamumc.org)
  • Phenytoin is an anticonvulsant that is used for the treatment of epilepsy. (biesterfeld.com)
  • Neuropsychological effects in children exposed to anticonvulsant monotherapy during gestation: Phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and phenytoin. (bvsalud.org)
  • Some anticonvulsants have shown antiepileptogenic effects in animal models of epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anticonvulsants are more accurately called antiepileptic drugs (abbreviated "AEDs"), and are often referred to as antiseizure drugs because they provide symptomatic treatment only and have not been demonstrated to alter the course of epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any anticonvulsant solely for the treatment of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). (medscape.com)
  • The anticonvulsant gabapentin, a widely prescribed anticonvulsant used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain, is showing promise in the treatment of alcohol dependence, new research suggests. (medscape.com)
  • Anticonvulsant medications are usually prescribed by neurologists for patients who have epilepsy or for those who suffer from any kind of convulsions. (backpaincenters.com)
  • Anti-seizure medications (Anticonvulsants) were originally designed to treat people with epilepsy. (allgenericmedicine.com)
  • 3 While clinical guidelines generally recommend nonpharmacologic interventions and nonopioid analgesics, 4 one large study found that the prescription of anticonvulsant medications has nearly doubled from 2000 to 2010. (thennt.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of fatalities associated with oral anticonvulsant use, including patient demographics, specific medications, and the circumstances surrounding the deaths. (cureepilepsy.org)
  • Anticonvulsant medications work by destroying the overactive neurons in the brain. (backpaincenters.com)
  • All medications have side effects and anticonvulsants are no different. (backpaincenters.com)
  • Gabapentin is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. (trochetadalafil.com)
  • Anticonvulsant medications are FDA approved to treat seizures and many other medical conditions unrelated to seizure disorders. (allgenericmedicine.com)
  • Anticonvulsants also prevent the spread of the seizure within the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the context of benzodiazepine-refractory convulsive status epilepticus, the anticonvulsant drugs levetiracetam, fosphenytoin, and valproate each led to seizure cessation and improved alertness by 60 minutes in approximately half the patients, and the three drugs were associated with similar incidences of adverse events. (nih.gov)
  • We sought to determine whether tolerance occurs to the anticonvulsant activity of ganaxolone in the pentylenetetrazol seizure test and whether there is cross-tolerance with diazepam. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Phenobarbital, the longest-acting barbiturate, is used for its anticonvulsant and sedative-hypnotic properties in the management of all seizure disorders except absence (petit mal). (pharmacycode.com)
  • The patient, suffering from an epileptic attack must take an anticonvulsant to ease the seizure that he has plus calming the body. (medicinesmexico.com.mx)
  • Anticonvulsants (also known as antiepileptic drugs or antiseizure drugs) are a diverse group of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of epileptic seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anticonvulsants suppress the excessive rapid firing of neurons during seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary outcome was absence of clinically evident seizures and improvement in the level of consciousness by 60 minutes after the start of drug infusion, without additional anticonvulsant medication. (nih.gov)
  • For patients who are prescribed anticonvulsants for pain, they usually take them once a day to prevent pain or seizures from occurring. (backpaincenters.com)
  • Anticonvulsants (antiepileptic or AEDs) help to normalize the way nerve impulses travel along the nerve cells which helps prevent or treat seizures. (allgenericmedicine.com)
  • Seizures and belongs to the drug class dibenzazepine anticonvulsants . (drugs.com)
  • Long-term use can be problematic due to the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects and dependency. (wikipedia.org)
  • We conclude that there is no tolerance to the anticonvulsant activity of ganaxolone nor is there cross-tolerance to ganaxolone when tolerance develops to diazepam. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Lexatin produces mild sedative-hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and central muscle relaxant effects. (mexicanrxpharm.com)
  • Sudden discontinuation of anticonvulsant medication can produce status epilepticus. (drjohnson.com)
  • The following are classified as anticonvulsants: Phenobarbital (1912). (wikipedia.org)
  • Essential oils and the constituents in them exhibit different pharmacological activities, such as antinociceptive, anxiolytic-like, and anticonvulsant effects. (mdpi.com)
  • Ganaxolone (3α-hydroxy-3β-methyl-5α-pregnane-20-one), an orally active synthetic analog of the neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone, is a positive allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors with anticonvulsant properties. (aspetjournals.org)
  • however, anticonvulsants can calm the brain receptors, and this will result in less pain. (backpaincenters.com)
  • Substantia nigra GABA receptors can mediate anticonvulsant or proconvulsant effects. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Anticonvulsants are also increasingly being used in the treatment of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder, since many seem to act as mood stabilizers, and for the treatment of neuropathic pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • 10,575 women were exposed to monotherapy with an anticonvulsant or lithium, and 917 were exposed to polytherapy with two or more mood stabilizers. (healthclue.eu)
  • This study investigated the effects of EO on the main GABAergic targets for anticonvulsant drugs, analyzing the effect on the GABA receptor's benzodiazepine and picrotoxinin binding sites and the GABA uptake. (hindawi.com)
  • 1. The absorption of orally administered pteroylmonoglutamate and pteroyltetraglutamate, measured as peak rise in serum folate levels, was examined in normal volunteers and in epileptic patients on anticonvulsant drugs. (portlandpress.com)
  • 3. The findings indicate that the folate deficiency, caused by anticonvulsant drugs is not due to interference with the intestinal conjugase or the mechanism of absorption in itself. (portlandpress.com)
  • This study aimed to review the literature regarding the use of anticonvulsants in the treatment of chronic pain, the most used drugs, the efficacy of each one of them, the pros and cons of their use and the pathologies associated with chronic pain. (bvsalud.org)
  • Therefore, in order to improve the quality of life of patients suffering with chronic pain, the anticonvulsant drugs were introduced to the pharmaceutical market. (bvsalud.org)
  • In fact, a lot of doctors nowadays prescribe anticonvulsant drugs to their patients once they are found to be experiencing hyperactivity in the brain. (medicinesmexico.com.mx)
  • Hence, it is advised for patients who have these convulsion attacks to have anticonvulsant drugs always ready in their bags. (medicinesmexico.com.mx)
  • By just surfing the net, people can easily find Medicines Mexico as their first option in buying their anticonvulsant drugs. (medicinesmexico.com.mx)
  • Anticonvulsants can also be used for the treatment of nerve pain and bipolar disorder. (allgenericmedicine.com)
  • However, the prescribing doctor or psychiatrist may also prescribe an antidepressant to use along with the anticonvulsant and may even use together with behavioral therapy or psychotherapy. (backpaincenters.com)
  • In the previous studies, NUPh scientists proved that the search of potential anticonvulsants among derivatives of 1,3,4-thiadiazole is very perspective [1-3]. (uran.ua)
  • Anticonvulsants are the mainstay of therapy for JME. (medscape.com)
  • The reference group did not fill a prescription for an anticonvulsant or lithium during the 3 months prior to conception or the first half of pregnancy. (healthclue.eu)
  • Anticonvulsants are frequently prescribed, and exposures are commonly reported to American Association of Poison Control Centers sites. (cureepilepsy.org)
  • Anticonvulsants are medicines which are used to commonly treat epileptic episodes. (medicinesmexico.com.mx)
  • On the day after the chronic treatment periods, the anticonvulsant potencies of ganaxolone and diazepam were determined. (aspetjournals.org)
  • If you are currently suffering from chronic back pain, you should consult with your doctor to see if anticonvulsants may be ideal for you. (backpaincenters.com)
  • Anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain: a systematic review and metaanalysis. (thennt.com)
  • The systematic review discussed here included 9 randomized parallel and crossover controlled trials (859 subjects in aggregate) investigating the efficacy of anticonvulsants compared with placebo in adults with nonspecific low back pain with or without radiation to the leg, sciatica, or neurogenic claudication of any duration. (thennt.com)
  • A cross sectional study was conducted for ultrasonographic evaluation of brain of newborn with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with anticonvulsant drug. (pediatricsjournal.net)
  • This was a retrospective analysis of cases coded with oral anticonvulsants as a single substance and associated with a fatal outcome reported to the AAPCC National Poison Data System from 2000 to 2019. (cureepilepsy.org)
  • Anticonvulsants" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (childrensmercy.org)
  • Some anticonvulsants can interfere with your periods or disrupt your hormones. (webmd.com)
  • However, as time passes, anticonvulsants are found to have effective result to control mood swings of people suffering from mental disorders. (medicinesmexico.com.mx)
  • RESUME Afin d'examiner l'expérience d'une clinique de pédopsychiatrie en ce qui concerne la comorbidité et les caractéristiques du traitement des enfants souffrant d'hyperactivité avec déficit de l'attention (HADA), une étude rétrospective a été réalisée auprès des patients de moins de 19 ans qui consultaient à la clinique et chez lesquels un diagnostic de HADA avait été posé. (who.int)
  • While this meta-analysis found that anticonvulsants did not improve pain or disability, there are several limitations that must be considered. (thennt.com)
  • Many people are able to cope with their medical disorders because of using anticonvulsants. (backpaincenters.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Anticonvulsants" by people in this website by year, and whether "Anticonvulsants" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Anticonvulsants" by people in Profiles. (childrensmercy.org)
  • N -(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-5-methyl-3-isoxazolecarboxamide (D2624) belongs to a new series of experimental anticonvulsants related to lidocaine. (aspetjournals.org)
  • In clinical practice, it is often a first-line anticonvulsant in JME. (medscape.com)
  • Those who suffer with any sort of psychological disorders may benefit from the use of anticonvulsants. (backpaincenters.com)
  • Clarified Euterpe oleracea (EO) juice showed anticonvulsant properties similar to diazepam in an in vivo model with pentylenetetrazol, a GABA A receptor blocker. (hindawi.com)
  • Recently, the potent anticonvulsant properties of açaí ( Euterpe oleracea Martius, family Arecaceae) were demonstrated in an in vivo pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) mouse model [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Other barbiturates only have an anticonvulsant effect at anaesthetic doses. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this study, possible sequelae of prenatal exposure to these anticonvulsants on gender development in humans were investigated. (amsterdamumc.org)
  • We identified 126 cases that were classified as fatalities associated with single anticonvulsant use. (cureepilepsy.org)
  • In contrast, in animals that were treated chronically with ganaxolone for 7 days, there was a significant reduction in the anticonvulsant potency of diazepam (ED 50 = 4.0 versus 1.9 mg/kg for naive controls). (aspetjournals.org)