Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.
Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced mutations independently of the mechanism involved.
A low-molecular-weight protein (minimum molecular weight 8000) which has the ability to inhibit trypsin as well as chymotrypsin at independent binding sites. It is characterized by a high cystine content and the absence of glycine.
Organic compounds with the general formula R-NCS.
Mixture of 2- and 3-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenols that is used as an antioxidant in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals.
7,12-Dimethylbenzanthracene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon found in tobacco smoke that is a potent carcinogen.
One of the Liliaceae used as a spice (SPICES) and traditional remedy. It contains alliin lyase and alliin, which is converted by alliin lyase to allicin, the pungent ingredient responsible for the aroma of fresh cut garlic.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
Viscous, nauseating oil obtained from the shrub Croton tiglium (Euphorbaceae). It is a vesicant and skin irritant used as pharmacologic standard for skin inflammation and allergy and causes skin cancer. It was formerly used as an emetic and cathartic with frequent mortality.
A mixture of flavonoids extracted from seeds of the MILK THISTLE, Silybum marianum. It consists primarily of silybin and its isomers, silicristin and silidianin. Silymarin displays antioxidant and membrane stabilizing activity. It protects various tissues and organs against chemical injury, and shows potential as an antihepatoxic agent.
An araliaceous genus of plants that contains a number of pharmacologically active agents used as stimulants, sedatives, and tonics, especially in traditional medicine. Sometimes confused with Siberian ginseng (ELEUTHEROCOCCUS).
A yellow-orange dye obtained from tumeric, the powdered root of CURCUMA longa. It is used in the preparation of curcuma paper and the detection of boron. Curcumin appears to possess a spectrum of pharmacological properties, due primarily to its inhibitory effects on metabolic enzymes.
A di-tert-butyl PHENOL with antioxidant properties.
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
Four fused benzyl rings with three linear and one angular, that can be viewed as a benzyl-phenanthrenes. Compare with NAPHTHACENES which are four linear rings.
A plant species of the family CUCURBITACEAE. It is a source of ribosome-inactivating proteins and triterpene glycosides.
A fused four ring compound occurring free or combined in galls. Isolated from the kino of Eucalyptus maculata Hook and E. Hemipholia F. Muell. Activates Factor XII of the blood clotting system which also causes kinin release; used in research and as a dye.
The infusion of leaves of CAMELLIA SINENSIS (formerly Thea sinensis) as a beverage, the familiar Asian tea, which contains CATECHIN (especially epigallocatechin gallate) and CAFFEINE.
A flavoprotein that reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of NADH or NADPH by various quinones and oxidation-reduction dyes. The enzyme is inhibited by dicoumarol, capsaicin, and caffeine.
Thirteen-carbon butene cyclohexene degradation products formed by the cleavage of CAROTENOIDS. They contribute to the flavor of some FRUIT. Ionone should not be confused with the similarly named ionol.
'Allyl compounds' are organic substances that contain the allyl group (CH2=CH-CH2-) as a functional component, which can be found in various forms such as allyl alcohol, allyl chloride, and allyl esters.
Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.
A group of compounds that are derivatives of methoxybenzene and contain the general formula R-C7H7O.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is an ingredient of Banxia Houpu (DRUGS, CHINESE HERBAL).
A nitrosamine derivative with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.
Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.
A transferase that catalyzes the addition of aliphatic, aromatic, or heterocyclic FREE RADICALS as well as EPOXIDES and arene oxides to GLUTATHIONE. Addition takes place at the SULFUR. It also catalyzes the reduction of polyol nitrate by glutathione to polyol and nitrite.
Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).
A class of phenolic acids related to chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, etc., which are found in plant tissues. It is involved in plant growth regulation.
Substituted thioglucosides. They are found in rapeseed (Brassica campestris) products and related cruciferae. They are metabolized to a variety of toxic products which are most likely the cause of hepatocytic necrosis in animals and humans.
A potent mutagen and carcinogen. It is a public health concern because of its possible effects on industrial workers, as an environmental pollutant, an as a component of tobacco smoke.
The use of chemical compounds to prevent the development of a specific disease.
Serine proteinase inhibitors which inhibit trypsin. They may be endogenous or exogenous compounds.
Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.
An antioxidant flavonoid, occurring especially in woody plants as both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (cis) forms.
A collective term for a group of around nine geometric and positional isomers of LINOLEIC ACID in which the trans/cis double bonds are conjugated, where double bonds alternate with single bonds.
An element with the atomic symbol Se, atomic number 34, and atomic weight 78.96. It is an essential micronutrient for mammals and other animals but is toxic in large amounts. Selenium protects intracellular structures against oxidative damage. It is an essential component of GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
A class of compounds composed of repeating 5-carbon units of HEMITERPENES.
An increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme due to the presence of an inducer which acts to derepress the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.
3-Phenylchromones. Isomeric form of FLAVONOIDS in which the benzene group is attached to the 3 position of the benzopyran ring instead of the 2 position.
Chemical groups containing the covalent sulfur bonds -S-. The sulfur atom can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.
A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.
A class of dibenzylbutane derivatives which occurs in higher plants and in fluids (bile, serum, urine, etc.) in man and other animals. These compounds, which have a potential anti-cancer role, can be synthesized in vitro by human fecal flora. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.
Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.
A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.
Eighteen-carbon essential fatty acids that contain two double bonds.
Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.
Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.
A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.
Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.
Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
An inducibly-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes and INFLAMMATION. It is the target of COX2 INHIBITORS.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.
F344 rats are an inbred strain of albino laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) that have been widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background, which facilitates the study of disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions.
The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
Ubiquitous, inducible, nuclear transcriptional activator that binds to enhancer elements in many different cell types and is activated by pathogenic stimuli. The NF-kappa B complex is a heterodimer composed of two DNA-binding subunits: NF-kappa B1 and relA.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
A tripeptide with many roles in cells. It conjugates to drugs to make them more soluble for excretion, is a cofactor for some enzymes, is involved in protein disulfide bond rearrangement and reduces peroxides.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.

Tomatoes, tomato-based products, lycopene, and cancer: review of the epidemiologic literature. (1/2345)

The epidemiologic literature in the English language regarding intake of tomatoes and tomato-based products and blood lycopene (a compound derived predominantly from tomatoes) level in relation to the risk of various cancers was reviewed. Among 72 studies identified, 57 reported inverse associations between tomato intake or blood lycopene level and the risk of cancer at a defined anatomic site; 35 of these inverse associations were statistically significant. No study indicated that higher tomato consumption or blood lycopene level statistically significantly increased the risk of cancer at any of the investigated sites. About half of the relative risks for comparisons of high with low intakes or levels for tomatoes or lycopene were approximately 0.6 or lower. The evidence for a benefit was strongest for cancers of the prostate, lung, and stomach. Data were also suggestive of a benefit for cancers of the pancreas, colon and rectum, esophagus, oral cavity, breast, and cervix. Because the data are from observational studies, a cause-effect relationship cannot be established definitively. However, the consistency of the results across numerous studies in diverse populations, for case-control and prospective studies, and for dietary-based and blood-based investigations argues against bias or confounding as the explanation for these findings. Lycopene may account for or contribute to these benefits, but this possibility is not yet proven and requires further study. Numerous other potentially beneficial compounds are present in tomatoes, and, conceivably, complex interactions among multiple components may contribute to the anticancer properties of tomatoes. The consistently lower risk of cancer for a variety of anatomic sites that is associated with higher consumption of tomatoes and tomato-based products adds further support for current dietary recommendations to increase fruit and vegetable consumption.  (+info)

Protective alterations in phase 1 and 2 metabolism of aflatoxin B1 by oltipraz in residents of Qidong, People's Republic of China. (2/2345)

BACKGROUND: Residents of Qidong, People's Republic of China, are at high risk for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, in part due to consumption of foods contaminated with aflatoxins, which require metabolic activation to become carcinogenic. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase IIa chemoprevention trial, we tested oltipraz, an antischistosomal drug that has been shown to be a potent and effective inhibitor of aflatoxin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in animal models. METHODS: In 1995, 234 adults from Qidong were enrolled. Healthy eligible individuals were randomly assigned to receive by mouth 125 mg oltipraz daily, 500 mg oltipraz weekly, or a placebo. Sequential immunoaffinity chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry or to fluorescence detection were used to identify and quantify phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites of aflatoxin B1 in the urine of study participants. Reported P values are two-sided. RESULTS: One month of weekly administration of 500 mg oltipraz led to a 51% decrease in median levels of the phase 1 metabolite aflatoxin M1 excreted in urine compared with administration of a placebo (P = .030), but it had no effect on levels of a phase 2 metabolite, aflatoxin-mercapturic acid (P = .871). By contrast, daily intervention with 125 mg oltipraz led to a 2.6-fold increase in median aflatoxin-mercapturic acid excretion (P = .017) but had no effect on excreted aflatoxin M1 levels (P = .682). CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent, high-dose oltipraz inhibited phase 1 activation of aflatoxins, and sustained low-dose oltipraz increased phase 2 conjugation of aflatoxin, yielding higher levels of aflatoxin-mercapturic acid. While both mechanisms can contribute to protection, this study highlights the feasibility of inducing phase 2 enzymes as a chemopreventive strategy in humans.  (+info)

Influence of tangeretin on tamoxifen's therapeutic benefit in mammary cancer. (3/2345)

BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen and the citrus flavonoid tangeretin exhibit similar inhibitory effects on the growth and invasive properties of human mammary cancer cells in vitro; furthermore, the two agents have displayed additive effects in vitro. In this study, we examined whether tangeretin would enhance tamoxifen's therapeutic benefit in vivo. METHODS: Female nude mice (n = 80) were inoculated subcutaneously with human MCF-7/6 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Groups of 20 mice were treated orally by adding the following substances to their drinking water: tamoxifen (3 x 10(-5) M), tangeretin (1 x 10(-4) M), tamoxifen plus tangeretin (3 x 10(-5) M plus 1 x 10(-4) M), or solvent. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Oral treatment of mice with tamoxifen resulted in a statistically significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with solvent treatment (two-sided P = .001). Treatment with tangeretin did not inhibit tumor growth, and addition of this compound to drinking water with tamoxifen completely neutralized tamoxifen's inhibitory effect. The median survival time of tumor-bearing mice treated with tamoxifen plus tangeretin was reduced in comparison with that of mice treated with tamoxifen alone (14 versus 56 weeks; two-sided P = .002). Tangeretin (1 x 10(-6) M or higher) inhibited the cytolytic effect of murine natural killer cells on MCF-7/6 cells in vitro, which may explain why tamoxifen-induced inhibition of tumor growth in mice is abolished when tangeretin is present in drinking water. IMPLICATIONS: We describe an in vivo model to study potential interference of dietary compounds, such as flavonoids, with tamoxifen, which could lead to reduced efficacy of adjuvant therapy. In our study, the tumor growth-inhibiting effect of oral tamoxifen was reversed upon addition of tangeretin to the diet. Our data argue against excessive consumption of tangeretin-added products and supplements by patients with mammary cancer during tamoxifen treatment.  (+info)

Cyclin D1 proteolysis: a retinoid chemoprevention signal in normal, immortalized, and transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. (4/2345)

BACKGROUND: Retinoids (derivatives of vitamin A) are reported to reduce the occurrence of some second primary cancers, including aerodigestive tract tumors. In contrast, beta-carotene does not reduce the occurrence of primary aerodigestive tract cancers. Mechanisms explaining these effective retinoid and ineffective carotenoid chemoprevention results are poorly defined. Recently, the all-trans-retinoic acid (RA)-induced proteolysis of cyclin D1 that leads to the arrest of cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle was described in human bronchial epithelial cells and is a promising candidate for such a mechanism. In this study, we have investigated this proteolysis as a common signal used by carotenoids or receptor-selective and receptor-nonselective retinoids. METHODS: We treated cultured normal human bronchial epithelial cells, immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B), and transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2BNNK) with receptor-selective or receptor-nonselective retinoids or with carotenoids and studied the effects on cell proliferation by means of tritiated thymidine incorporation and on cyclin D1 expression by means of immunoblot analysis. We also examined whether calpain inhibitor I, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome degradation pathway, affected the decline (i.e., proteolysis) of cyclin D1. RESULTS: Receptor-nonselective retinoids were superior to the carotenoids studied in mediating the decline in cyclin D1 expression and in suppressing the growth of bronchial epithelial cells. Retinoids that activated retinoic acid receptor beta or retinoid X receptor pathways preferentially led to a decrease in the amount of cyclin D1 protein and a corresponding decline in growth. The retinoid-mediated degradation of cyclin D1 was blocked by cotreatment with calpain inhibitor I. CONCLUSIONS: Retinoid-dependent cyclin D1 proteolysis is a common chemoprevention signal in normal and neoplastic human bronchial epithelial cells. In contrast, carotenoids did not affect cyclin D1 expression. Thus, the degradation of cyclin D1 is a candidate intermediate marker for effective retinoid-mediated cancer chemoprevention in the aerodigestive tract.  (+info)

Hormonal prevention of breast cancer: mimicking the protective effect of pregnancy. (5/2345)

Full term pregnancy early in life is the most effective natural protection against breast cancer in women. Rats treated with chemical carcinogen are similarly protected by a previous pregnancy from mammary carcinogenesis. Proliferation and differentiation of the mammary gland does not explain this phenomenon, as shown by the relative ineffectiveness of perphenazine, a potent mitogenic and differentiating agent. Here, we show that short term treatment of nulliparous rats with pregnancy levels of estradiol 17beta and progesterone has high efficacy in protecting them from chemical carcinogen induced mammary cancers. Because the mammary gland is exposed to the highest physiological concentrations of estradiol and progesterone during full term pregnancy, it is these elevated levels of hormones that likely induce protection from mammary cancer. Thus, it appears possible to mimic the protective effects of pregnancy against breast cancer in nulliparous rats by short term specific hormonal intervention.  (+info)

Inhibition of aberrant proliferation and induction of apoptosis in HER-2/neu oncogene transformed human mammary epithelial cells by N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide. (6/2345)

Epithelial cells from non-cancerous mammary tissue in response to exposure to chemical carcinogens or transfection with oncogenes exhibit hyperproliferation and hyperplasia prior to the development of cancer. Aberrant proliferation may, therefore, represent a modifiable early occurring preneoplastic event that is susceptible to chemoprevention of carcinogenesis. The synthetic retinoid N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (HPR), has exhibited preventive efficacy in several in vitro and in vivo breast cancer models, and represents a promising chemopreventive compound for clinical trials. Clinically relevant biochemical and cellular mechanisms responsible for the chemopreventive effects of HPR, however, are not fully understood. Experiments were performed on preneoplastic human mammary epithelial 184-B5/HER cells derived from reduction mammoplasty and initiated for tumorigenic transformation by overexpression of HER-2/neu oncogene, to examine whether HPR inhibits aberrant proliferation of these cells and to identify the possible mechanism(s) responsible for the inhibitory effects of HPR. Continuous 7-day treatment with HPR produced a dose-dependent, reversible growth inhibition. Long-term (21 day) treatment of 184-B5/HER cells with HPR inhibited anchorage-dependent colony formation by approximately 80% (P < 0.01) relative to that observed in the solvent control. A 24 h treatment with cytostatic 400 nM HPR produced a 25% increase (P = 0.01) in G0/G1 phase, and a 36% decrease (P = 0.01) in S phase of the cell cycle. HPR treatment also induced a 10-fold increase (P = 0.02) in the sub-G0 (apoptotic) peak that was down-regulated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Treatment with HPR resulted in a 30% reduction of cellular immunoreactivity to tyrosine kinase, whereas immunoreactivity to p185HER remained essentially unaltered. HPR exposure resulted in time-dependent increase in cellular metabolism of the retinoid as evidenced by increased formation of the inert metabolite N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-retinamide (MPR) and progressive increase in apoptosis. Thus, HPR-induced inhibition of aberrant proliferation may be caused, in part, by its ability to inhibit HER-2/neu-mediated proliferative signal transduction, retard cell cycle progression and upregulate cellular apoptosis.  (+info)

Resveratrol suppresses cell transformation and induces apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway. (7/2345)

Resveratrol, a plant constituent enriched in the skin of grapes, is one of the most promising agents for the prevention of cancer. However, the mechanism of the anti-carcinogenic activity of resveratrol is not well understood. Here we offer a possible explanation of its anti-cancer effect. Resveratrol suppresses tumor promoter-induced cell transformation and markedly induces apoptosis, transactivation of p53 activity and expression of p53 protein in the same cell line and at the same dosage. Also, resveratrol-induced apoptosis occurs only in cells expressing wild-type p53 (p53+/+), but not in p53-deficient (p53-/-) cells, while there is no difference in apoptosis induction between normal lymphoblasts and sphingomyelinase-deficient cell lines. These results demonstrate for the first time that resveratrol induces apoptosis through activation of p53 activity, suggesting that its anti-tumor activity may occur through the induction of apoptosis.  (+info)

Effect of retinoids on AOM-induced colon cancer in rats: modulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant crypt foci. (8/2345)

We have previously reported that the retinoids, 4-(hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (RA) prevented azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors and along with 2-(carboxyphenyl)retinamide (2-CPR) prevented aberrant crypt foci (ACF). In this study, we evaluated the effect of 2-CPR on AOM-induced colon tumors and the effect of the three retinoids on apoptosis and cell proliferation. Male F344 rats were administrated 15 mg/kg AOM at weeks 7 and 8 of age. 2-CPR (315 mg/kg) was administered in the diet starting either 1 week before or at week 12 after the first dose of AOM. The rats continued to receive the 2-CPR until killed at week 46. Unlike the demonstrated prevention of colon cancer by the other two retinoids, both dosing schedules of 2-CPR resulted in an approximate doubling of the yield of colon tumors. In adenomas, 2-CPR, 4-HPR and 9-cis-RA were equally effective in reducing mitotic activity, while only 4-HPR and 9-cis-RA but not 2-CPR enhanced apoptosis. When administered for only the 6 days prior to killing 4-HPR but not 2-CPR decreased the Mitotic Index and increased the Apoptotic Index in adenomas. In non-involved crypts, chronic exposure to 4-HPR and 9-cis-RA in contrast to 2-CPR reduced the Mitotic Index and enhanced the Apoptotic Index. In concurrence with our previous study, both 2-CPR and 4-HPR were very potent in preventing ACF when administered in the diet starting 1 week before the first dose of AOM and continuing for the 5 weeks of the study. Hence, unlike the other two retinoids, 2-CPR, although very potent in preventing ACF, enhanced rather than prevented AOM-induced colon cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that the effect of 2-CPR on tumor yield is different from 4-HPR and 9-cis-RA because, unlike them, it does not enhance apoptosis.  (+info)

Anticarcinogenic agents are substances that prevent, inhibit or reduce the development of cancer. They can be natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the process of carcinogenesis at various stages, such as initiation, promotion, and progression. Anticarcinogenic agents may work by preventing DNA damage, promoting DNA repair, reducing inflammation, inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death), or modulating immune responses.

Examples of anticarcinogenic agents include chemopreventive agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and retinoids; phytochemicals found in fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based foods; and medications used to treat cancer, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapies.

It is important to note that while some anticarcinogenic agents have been shown to be effective in preventing or reducing the risk of certain types of cancer, they may also have potential side effects and risks. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using any anticarcinogenic agent for cancer prevention or treatment purposes.

Antimutagenic agents are substances that prevent or reduce the frequency of mutations in DNA, which can be caused by various factors such as radiation, chemicals, and free radicals. These agents work by preventing the formation of mutations or by repairing the damage already done to the DNA. They can be found naturally in foods, such as antioxidants, or they can be synthesized in a laboratory. Antimutagenic agents have potential use in cancer prevention and treatment, as well as in reducing the negative effects of environmental mutagens.

The Trypsin Inhibitor, Bowman-Birk Soybean is a type of protease inhibitor that is found in soybeans. It is named after its discoverer, Henry B. Bowman, and the location where it was first discovered, the Birk farm in Ohio. This protein inhibits the activity of trypsin, an enzyme that helps digest proteins in the body.

The Bowman-Birk Trypsin Inhibitor (BBTI) is a small protein with a molecular weight of approximately 8000 Da and consists of two inhibitory domains, each containing a reactive site for trypsin. This dual inhibitory property allows BBTI to inhibit both trypsin and chymotrypsin, another proteolytic enzyme.

BBTI has been studied extensively due to its potential health benefits. It has been shown to have anti-cancer properties, as it can inhibit the growth of cancer cells and induce apoptosis (programmed cell death). Additionally, BBTI may also have anti-inflammatory effects and has been shown to protect against oxidative stress.

However, it is important to note that excessive consumption of BBTI may interfere with protein digestion and absorption in the body, as it inhibits trypsin activity. Therefore, soybeans and soybean-derived products should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Isothiocyanates are organic compounds that contain a functional group made up of a carbon atom, a nitrogen atom, and a sulfur atom, with the formula RN=C=S (where R can be an alkyl or aryl group). They are commonly found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, and wasabi. Isothiocyanates have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. However, they can also be toxic in high concentrations.

Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic antioxidant that is commonly used as a food additive to prevent or slow down the oxidation of fats, oils, and other lipids. This helps to maintain the quality, stability, and safety of food products by preventing rancidity and off-flavors. BHA is also used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds for similar purposes.

In medical terms, BHA is classified as a chemical preservative and antioxidant. It is a white or creamy white crystalline powder that is soluble in alcohol and ether but insoluble in water. BHA is often used in combination with other antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), to provide a synergistic effect and enhance the overall stability of food products.

While BHA is generally recognized as safe by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), some studies have suggested that high doses of BHA may have potential health risks, including possible carcinogenic effects. However, these findings are not conclusive, and further research is needed to fully understand the potential health impacts of BHA exposure.

9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) is a synthetic, aromatic hydrocarbon that is commonly used in research as a carcinogenic compound. It is a potent tumor initiator and has been widely used to study chemical carcinogenesis in laboratory animals.

DMBA is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with two benzene rings fused together, and two methyl groups attached at the 9 and 10 positions. This structure allows DMBA to intercalate into DNA, causing mutations that can lead to cancer.

Exposure to DMBA has been shown to cause a variety of tumors in different organs, depending on the route of administration and dose. In animal models, DMBA is often applied to the skin or administered orally to induce tumors in the mammary glands, lungs, or digestive tract.

It's important to note that DMBA is not a natural compound found in the environment and is used primarily for research purposes only. It should be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions due to its carcinogenic properties.

Garlic (Allium sativum) is not a medical term, but rather a species of plant that belongs to the onion family. It is a widely used culinary ingredient and traditional medicine. The medicinal properties are believed to come from the sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin, which are formed when garlic is crushed or chopped.

While garlic is not a medical treatment itself, it has been studied for its potential health benefits in various areas, including cardiovascular disease, cancer prevention, and immune function support. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish recommended dosages. It's important to consult with healthcare professionals before starting any new supplement regimen, including garlic.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Croton oil is a highly toxic, irritant, and vesicant liquid that is derived from the seeds of the croton tiglium plant. It is a type of unsaturated fatty acid known as an octadecatrienoic acid, and it contains a mixture of various chemical compounds including crotonic acid, diglycerides, and phorbol esters.

Croton oil is commonly used in laboratory research as a pharmacological tool to study the mechanisms of inflammation, pain, and skin irritation. It can also be used as a veterinary medicine to treat certain types of intestinal parasites in animals. However, due to its high toxicity and potential for causing severe burns and blisters on the skin, it is not used in human medicine.

It's important to note that croton oil should only be handled by trained professionals in a controlled laboratory setting, as improper use or exposure can result in serious injury or death.

Silymarin is not a medical term itself, but it's the active compound found in the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum). Medically, silymarin is often referred to as a standardized extract from the seeds of the milk thistle plant. It is a complex mixture of flavonolignans, mainly consisting of silybin, isosilybin, silychristin, and silydianin.

Silymarin has been reported to have various biological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hepatoprotective effects. It is commonly used in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and toxic liver damage due to alcohol or drug abuse. However, its clinical efficacy remains a subject of ongoing research and debate among medical professionals.

"Panax" is a term used in the field of botany and medicine, particularly in the study of traditional Chinese medicine. It specifically refers to the genus of plants that includes ginseng, which is known scientifically as "Panax ginseng." This plant has been used in traditional medicine for centuries due to its perceived ability to boost energy levels, reduce stress, and improve overall health. The term "Panax" itself comes from the Greek words "pan," meaning all or everything, and "akos," meaning cure or remedy, reflecting the belief in its wide-ranging healing properties. It's important to note that while some studies suggest potential health benefits of Panax ginseng, more research is needed to fully understand its effects and safety.

Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound that is responsible for the yellow color of turmeric, a spice derived from the plant Curcuma longa. It has been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine for centuries due to its potential health benefits.

Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which have been studied for their potential therapeutic effects in various medical conditions such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, and diabetes. It works by inhibiting the activity of several enzymes and proteins that play a role in inflammation and oxidative stress.

However, it is important to note that while curcumin has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies, its effectiveness in humans is still being researched. Moreover, curcumin has low bioavailability, which means that it is poorly absorbed and rapidly eliminated from the body, limiting its potential therapeutic use. To overcome this limitation, researchers are exploring various formulations and delivery systems to improve curcumin's absorption and stability in the body.

Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a synthetic organic compound that is commonly used as a food additive and preservative. Its chemical formula is C15H24O. BHT is an antioxidant, which means it helps to prevent the oxidation of fats and oils, thereby extending the shelf life of foods and cosmetics.

In medical terms, BHT is sometimes used as a preservative in pharmaceuticals and medical devices. It has been shown to have some antimicrobial properties, which can help to prevent the growth of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms. However, its use in medical applications is relatively limited compared to its widespread use in food and cosmetic products.

It's worth noting that while BHT is generally recognized as safe by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), some studies have suggested that it may have potential health risks, including liver toxicity and possible carcinogenic effects. Therefore, its use in food and other products is subject to certain limits and regulations.

Carcinogens are agents (substances or mixtures of substances) that can cause cancer. They may be naturally occurring or man-made. Carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by altering cellular DNA, disrupting cellular function, or promoting cell growth. Examples of carcinogens include certain chemicals found in tobacco smoke, asbestos, UV radiation from the sun, and some viruses.

It's important to note that not all exposures to carcinogens will result in cancer, and the risk typically depends on factors such as the level and duration of exposure, individual genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle choices. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies carcinogens into different groups based on the strength of evidence linking them to cancer:

Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
Group 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans
Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans

This information is based on medical research and may be subject to change as new studies become available. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

"Momordica charantia" is the scientific name for a plant also known as bitter melon or bitter gourd. It's a tropical and subtropical vine that belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, which includes cucumbers, melons, and squashes. The fruit of the plant is used in various culinary traditions, and it has a distinctively bitter taste. In traditional medicine, different parts of the Momordica charantia plant have been used for their perceived medicinal properties, such as potential antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial effects. However, it's essential to note that while some preliminary research shows promise, more rigorous studies are needed to confirm these benefits and understand the potential risks associated with its use.

Ellagic acid is a type of polyphenol, which is a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of multiple phenol units. It is found in various fruits and vegetables, including raspberries, strawberries, pomegranates, and walnuts. Ellagic acid has been studied for its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish a clear medical definition of ellagic acid. It is not considered a medication or a treatment for any specific medical condition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tea" is not a medical term. It generally refers to a hot beverage made by infusing the leaves of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) in hot water. There are various types of tea including black, green, white, oolong, and herbal teas, but these are not medical terms. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I'd be happy to try to help if I can, but it would be helpful if you could provide more context or clarify what you're asking about.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Norisoprenoids" is not a widely recognized or established term in medicine or medical chemistry. It appears to be a term used primarily in the field of plant metabolism and natural products chemistry, referring to a class of compounds that are derived from the degradation of carotenoids (a type of isoprenoid) and have lost one or more methyl groups.

If you're asking about this term in a different context or if there's specific medical relevance you have in mind, could you please provide more details? I'd be happy to help further if I can.

Allyl compounds are organic compounds that contain the allyl group, which is a functional group with the formula CH2=CH-CH2-. The allyl group consists of a methylene bridge (CH2-) flanked by a carbon-carbon double bond (-CH=). Allyl compounds can be derived from allyl alcohol, allyl chloride, or other allyl halides and can participate in various chemical reactions due to the reactivity of the double bond. They are used in organic synthesis, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals.

Thiocyanates are chemical compounds that contain the thiocyanate ion (SCN-), which consists of a sulfur atom, a carbon atom, and a nitrogen atom. The thiocyanate ion is formed by the removal of a hydrogen ion from thiocyanic acid (HSCN). Thiocyanates are used in various applications, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and industrial chemicals. In medicine, thiocyanates have been studied for their potential effects on the thyroid gland and their use as a treatment for cyanide poisoning. However, excessive exposure to thiocyanates can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, as well as potential impacts on thyroid function.

Anisoles are organic compounds that consist of a phenyl ring (a benzene ring with a hydroxyl group replaced by a hydrogen atom) attached to a methoxy group (-O-CH3). The molecular formula for anisole is C6H5OCH3. Anisoles are aromatic ethers and can be found in various natural sources, including anise plants and some essential oils. They have a wide range of applications, including as solvents, flavoring agents, and intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals.

'Perilla frutescens' is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a plant species also known as the beefsteak plant or Chinese basil. While it doesn't have a specific medical definition, some components of this plant have been studied for their potential medicinal properties. For instance, Perilla frutescens contains rosmarinic acid and luteolin, which have been researched for their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects. However, it is essential to note that further research is required before any definitive medical claims can be made about the plant or its components.

Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) is a potent chemical carcinogen that belongs to the class of nitrosamines. It is known to induce tumors in various organs, including the liver, kidney, and lungs, in different animal species. Diethylnitrosamine requires metabolic activation by enzymes such as cytochrome P450 to exert its carcinogenic effects.

Diethylnitrosamine is not typically used for medical purposes but may be employed in laboratory research to study the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis and cancer development. It is essential to handle this compound with care, following appropriate safety protocols, due to its potential hazards.

Antioxidants are substances that can prevent or slow damage to cells caused by free radicals, which are unstable molecules that the body produces as a reaction to environmental and other pressures. Antioxidants are able to neutralize free radicals by donating an electron to them, thus stabilizing them and preventing them from causing further damage to the cells.

Antioxidants can be found in a variety of foods, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains. Some common antioxidants include vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and selenium. Antioxidants are also available as dietary supplements.

In addition to their role in protecting cells from damage, antioxidants have been studied for their potential to prevent or treat a number of health conditions, including cancer, heart disease, and age-related macular degeneration. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of using antioxidant supplements.

Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a group of enzymes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. They facilitate the conjugation of these compounds with glutathione, a tripeptide consisting of cysteine, glutamic acid, and glycine, which results in more water-soluble products that can be easily excreted from the body.

GSTs play a crucial role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and chemical injury by neutralizing reactive electrophilic species and peroxides. They are found in various tissues, including the liver, kidneys, lungs, and intestines, and are classified into several families based on their structure and function.

Abnormalities in GST activity have been associated with increased susceptibility to certain diseases, such as cancer, neurological disorders, and respiratory diseases. Therefore, GSTs have become a subject of interest in toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical research.

Proanthocyanidins are a type of polyphenolic compound that are found in various plants, including fruits, vegetables, and bark. They are also known as condensed tannins or oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs). These compounds are characterized by their ability to form complex structures through the linkage of flavan-3-ol units.

Proanthocyanidins have been studied for their potential health benefits, which may include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cardiovascular protective effects. They have also been shown to have a positive impact on collagen stability, which may contribute to their potential role in promoting skin and joint health.

Foods that are rich in proanthocyanidins include grapes (and red wine), berries, apples, cocoa, and green tea. These compounds can be difficult for the body to absorb, but supplements containing standardized extracts of proanthocyanidins are also available.

It's important to note that while proanthocyanidins have shown promise in laboratory and animal studies, more research is needed to fully understand their potential health benefits and safety profile in humans. As with any supplement, it's always a good idea to talk to your healthcare provider before starting to take proanthocyanidins.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

'Brassica' is a term used in botanical nomenclature, specifically within the family Brassicaceae. It refers to a genus of plants that includes various vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and mustard greens. These plants are known for their nutritional value and health benefits. They contain glucosinolates, which have been studied for their potential anti-cancer properties. However, it is not a medical term per se, but rather a taxonomic category used in the biological sciences.

Caffeic acids are a type of phenolic compounds that contain a catechol structure and a carboxylic acid group. They are found in various plants, including coffee, tea, fruits, and vegetables. The most common caffeic acid is caffeic acid itself, which is abundant in coffee. Caffeic acids have been studied for their potential health benefits, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. However, more research is needed to fully understand their effects on human health.

Glucosinolates are naturally occurring compounds found in various plants, particularly in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and mustard greens. They are sulfur-containing glucosides that can be hydrolyzed by the enzyme myrosinase when the plant tissue is damaged, leading to the formation of biologically active compounds like isothiocyanates, thiocyanates, and nitriles. These breakdown products have been shown to exhibit various health benefits, such as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. However, excessive intake or exposure may also cause adverse effects in some individuals.

Chemoprevention is a medical term that refers to the use of chemical agents, usually in the form of drugs or dietary supplements, to prevent or delay the development of cancer. These agents are typically designed to interfere with the molecular processes involved in cancer initiation, promotion, or progression.

There are several different approaches to chemoprevention, depending on the specific type of cancer and the individual patient's risk factors. Some chemopreventive agents work by blocking the action of hormones that can promote cancer growth, while others may inhibit the activity of enzymes involved in DNA damage or repair.

Chemoprevention is often used in individuals who are at high risk of developing cancer due to inherited genetic mutations, a history of precancerous lesions, or other factors. However, it is important to note that chemopreventive agents can have side effects and may not be appropriate for everyone. Therefore, they should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Trypsin inhibitors are substances that inhibit the activity of trypsin, an enzyme that helps digest proteins in the small intestine. Trypsin inhibitors can be found in various foods such as soybeans, corn, and raw egg whites. In the case of soybeans, trypsin inhibitors are denatured and inactivated during cooking and processing.

In a medical context, trypsin inhibitors may be used therapeutically to regulate excessive trypsin activity in certain conditions such as pancreatitis, where there is inflammation of the pancreas leading to the release of activated digestive enzymes, including trypsin, into the pancreas and surrounding tissues. By inhibiting trypsin activity, these inhibitors can help reduce tissue damage and inflammation.

Experimental liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the liver that are intentionally created or manipulated in a laboratory setting for the purpose of studying their development, progression, and potential treatment options. These experimental models can be established using various methods such as chemical induction, genetic modification, or transplantation of cancerous cells or tissues. The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of liver cancer biology and develop novel therapies for liver neoplasms in humans. It's important to note that these experiments are conducted under strict ethical guidelines and regulations to minimize harm and ensure the humane treatment of animals involved in such studies.

A catechin is a type of plant phenol and antioxidant found in various foods and beverages, such as tea, cocoa, and certain fruits and vegetables. Chemically, catechins are flavan-3-ols, which are a subclass of flavonoids. They have several potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Catechins are known to have anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and antidiabetic properties. They can also help improve oral health by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria in the mouth. The most well-known catechin is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is found in high concentrations in green tea and has been extensively studied for its potential health benefits.

In summary, a catechin is a type of antioxidant compound found in various plant-based foods and beverages that may have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of chronic diseases and improving oral health.

Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are a group of chemicals found in the fatty acid family known as omega-6 fatty acids. They are called "conjugated" because of the particular arrangement of double bonds in their chemical structure. CLAs are primarily found in meat and dairy products from ruminant animals, such as cows, goats, and sheep. They have been studied for their potential health benefits, including weight loss promotion, cancer prevention, and immune system enhancement. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish safe and effective dosages.

Selenium is a trace element that is essential for the proper functioning of the human body. According to the medical definitions provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), selenium is a component of several major metabolic pathways, including thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems, and immune function.

Selenium is found in a variety of foods, including nuts (particularly Brazil nuts), cereals, fish, and meat. It exists in several forms, with selenomethionine being the most common form found in food. Other forms include selenocysteine, which is incorporated into proteins, and selenite and selenate, which are inorganic forms of selenium.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for selenium is 55 micrograms per day for adults. While selenium deficiency is rare, chronic selenium deficiency can lead to conditions such as Keshan disease, a type of cardiomyopathy, and Kaschin-Beck disease, which affects the bones and joints.

It's important to note that while selenium is essential for health, excessive intake can be harmful. High levels of selenium can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and neurological damage. The tolerable upper intake level (UL) for selenium is 400 micrograms per day for adults.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, including cannabis. They are responsible for the distinctive aromas and flavors found in different strains of cannabis. Terpenes have been found to have various therapeutic benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial properties. Some terpenes may also enhance the psychoactive effects of THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It's important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential medical benefits and risks associated with terpenes.

Enzyme induction is a process by which the activity or expression of an enzyme is increased in response to some stimulus, such as a drug, hormone, or other environmental factor. This can occur through several mechanisms, including increasing the transcription of the enzyme's gene, stabilizing the mRNA that encodes the enzyme, or increasing the translation of the mRNA into protein.

In some cases, enzyme induction can be a beneficial process, such as when it helps the body to metabolize and clear drugs more quickly. However, in other cases, enzyme induction can have negative consequences, such as when it leads to the increased metabolism of important endogenous compounds or the activation of harmful procarcinogens.

Enzyme induction is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology, as it can affect the efficacy and safety of drugs and other xenobiotics. It is also relevant to the study of drug interactions, as the induction of one enzyme by a drug can lead to altered metabolism and effects of another drug that is metabolized by the same enzyme.

Flavonoids are a type of plant compounds with antioxidant properties that are beneficial to health. They are found in various fruits, vegetables, grains, and wine. Flavonoids have been studied for their potential to prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer due to their ability to reduce inflammation and oxidative stress.

There are several subclasses of flavonoids, including:

1. Flavanols: Found in tea, chocolate, grapes, and berries. They have been shown to improve blood flow and lower blood pressure.
2. Flavones: Found in parsley, celery, and citrus fruits. They have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
3. Flavanonols: Found in citrus fruits, onions, and tea. They have been shown to improve blood flow and reduce inflammation.
4. Isoflavones: Found in soybeans and legumes. They have estrogen-like effects and may help prevent hormone-related cancers.
5. Anthocyanidins: Found in berries, grapes, and other fruits. They have antioxidant properties and may help improve vision and memory.

It is important to note that while flavonoids have potential health benefits, they should not be used as a substitute for medical treatment or a healthy lifestyle. It is always best to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

Mutagenicity tests are a type of laboratory assays used to identify agents that can cause genetic mutations. These tests detect changes in the DNA of organisms, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, after exposure to potential mutagens. The most commonly used mutagenicity test is the Ames test, which uses a strain of Salmonella bacteria that is sensitive to mutagens. If a chemical causes an increase in the number of revertants (reversion to the wild type) in the bacterial population, it is considered to be a mutagen. Other tests include the mouse lymphoma assay and the chromosomal aberration test. These tests are used to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of chemicals and are an important part of the safety evaluation process for new drugs, chemicals, and other substances.

Isoflavones are a type of plant-derived compounds called phytoestrogens, which have a chemical structure similar to human estrogen. They are found in various plants, particularly in soybeans and soy products. Isoflavones can act as weak estrogens or anti-estrogens in the body, depending on the levels of natural hormones present. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits, including reducing menopausal symptoms, improving cardiovascular health, and preventing certain types of cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand their effects and safety.

In the context of medicine and toxicology, sulfides refer to inorganic or organic compounds containing the sulfide ion (S2-). Sulfides can be found in various forms such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), metal sulfides, and organic sulfides (also known as thioethers).

Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic gas with a characteristic rotten egg smell. It can cause various adverse health effects, including respiratory irritation, headaches, nausea, and, at high concentrations, loss of consciousness or even death. Metal sulfides, such as those found in some minerals, can also be toxic and may release hazardous sulfur dioxide (SO2) when heated or reacted with acidic substances.

Organic sulfides, on the other hand, are a class of organic compounds containing a sulfur atom bonded to two carbon atoms. They can occur naturally in some plants and animals or be synthesized in laboratories. Some organic sulfides have medicinal uses, while others may pose health risks depending on their concentration and route of exposure.

It is important to note that the term "sulfide" has different meanings in various scientific contexts, so it is essential to consider the specific context when interpreting this term.

A papilloma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that grows on a stalk, often appearing as a small cauliflower-like growth. It can develop in various parts of the body, but when it occurs in the mucous membranes lining the respiratory, digestive, or genitourinary tracts, they are called squamous papillomas. The most common type is the skin papilloma, which includes warts. They are usually caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and can be removed through various medical procedures if they become problematic or unsightly.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soybeans" are not a medical term. They are a type of legume that is commonly used in agriculture and food production. The medical community might discuss soybeans in the context of nutrition or allergies, but there isn't a formal medical definition for this term.

Here's some general information: Soybeans, scientifically known as Glycine max, are native to East Asia and are now grown worldwide. They are a significant source of plant-based protein and oil. Soybeans contain various nutrients, including essential amino acids, fiber, B vitamins, and minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc. They are used in various food products such as tofu, soy milk, tempeh, and miso. Additionally, soybeans are also used in the production of industrial products, including biodiesel, plastics, and inks. Some people may have allergic reactions to soybeans or soy products.

Lignans are a type of plant compound that have antioxidant and estrogen properties. They are found in various plants such as seeds, grains, fruits, and vegetables. Once consumed, some lignans can be converted by intestinal bacteria into enterolactone and enterodiol, which can have weak estrogenic or anti-estrogenic effects in the body. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease. However, more research is needed to fully understand their effects and potential health benefits.

'Mammary neoplasms, experimental' is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide definitions for the individual terms:

1. Mammary: Pertaining to the breast or mammary glands in females, which are responsible for milk production.
2. Neoplasms: Abnormal growths of tissue, also known as tumors or masses, that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).
3. Experimental: Relating to a scientific experiment or study, typically conducted in a controlled setting to test hypotheses and gather data.

In the context of medical research, 'experimental mammary neoplasms' may refer to artificially induced breast tumors in laboratory animals (such as rats or mice) for the purpose of studying the development, progression, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer. These studies can help researchers better understand the biology of breast cancer and develop new therapies and strategies for its diagnosis and management.

Stilbenes are a type of chemical compound that consists of a 1,2-diphenylethylene backbone. They are phenolic compounds and can be found in various plants, where they play a role in the defense against pathogens and stress conditions. Some stilbenes have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. One well-known example of a stilbene is resveratrol, which is found in the skin of grapes and in red wine.

It's important to note that while some stilbenes have been shown to have potential health benefits in laboratory studies, more research is needed to determine their safety and effectiveness in humans. It's always a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Quercetin is a type of flavonoid antioxidant that is found in plant foods, including leafy greens, tomatoes, berries, and broccoli. It has been studied for its potential health benefits, such as reducing inflammation, protecting against damage to cells, and helping to reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. Quercetin is also known for its ability to stabilize mast cells and prevent the release of histamine, making it a popular natural remedy for allergies. It is available in supplement form, but it is always recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Linoleic acid is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that is essential for human health. It is one of the two essential fatty acids, meaning that it cannot be produced by the body and must be obtained through diet.

Linoleic acid is a member of the omega-6 fatty acid family and has a chemical structure with two double bonds at the sixth and ninth carbon atoms from the methyl end of the molecule. It is found in various plant sources, such as vegetable oils (e.g., soybean, corn, safflower, and sunflower oils), nuts, seeds, and whole grains.

Linoleic acid plays a crucial role in maintaining the fluidity and function of cell membranes, producing eicosanoids (hormone-like substances that regulate various bodily functions), and supporting skin health. However, excessive intake of linoleic acid can lead to an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, which may contribute to inflammation and chronic diseases. Therefore, it is recommended to maintain a balanced diet with appropriate amounts of both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a process in which a normal cell undergoes genetic alterations that cause it to become cancerous or malignant. This process involves changes in the cell's DNA that result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, loss of contact inhibition, and the ability to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.

Neoplastic transformation can occur as a result of various factors, including genetic mutations, exposure to carcinogens, viral infections, chronic inflammation, and aging. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, which regulate cell growth and division.

The transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells is a complex and multi-step process that involves multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. It is characterized by several hallmarks, including sustained proliferative signaling, evasion of growth suppressors, resistance to cell death, enabling replicative immortality, induction of angiogenesis, activation of invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a fundamental concept in cancer biology and is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. It also has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, as identifying the specific genetic alterations that underlie neoplastic transformation can help guide targeted therapies and personalized medicine approaches.

Antineoplastic agents, phytogenic, also known as plant-derived anticancer drugs, are medications that are derived from plants and used to treat cancer. These agents have natural origins and work by interfering with the growth and multiplication of cancer cells, helping to slow or stop the spread of the disease. Some examples of antineoplastic agents, phytogenic include paclitaxel (Taxol), vincristine, vinblastine, and etoposide. These drugs are often used in combination with other treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and other medications to provide a comprehensive approach to cancer care.

Polyphenols are a type of phytochemical, which are naturally occurring compounds found in plant-based foods. They contain multiple phenol units and can be classified into several subgroups, including flavonoids, stilbenes, tannins, and lignans. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immune-modulating properties. They are found in a wide variety of foods such as fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, chocolate, and cereals.

Phenols, also known as phenolic acids or phenol derivatives, are a class of chemical compounds consisting of a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to an aromatic hydrocarbon ring. In the context of medicine and biology, phenols are often referred to as a type of antioxidant that can be found in various foods and plants.

Phenols have the ability to neutralize free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Some common examples of phenolic compounds include gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and ellagic acid, among many others.

Phenols can also have various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and analgesic effects. However, some phenolic compounds can also be toxic or irritating to the body in high concentrations, so their use as therapeutic agents must be carefully monitored and controlled.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "vegetables" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a dietary category that includes various plant-based foods, typically referring to the edible parts of herbaceous plants excluding fruit (but including seeds), such as leaves, stems, roots, tubers, and bulbs.

However, in a nutritional or clinical context, vegetables are often defined by their nutrient content. For example, they may be classified as foods that are high in certain vitamins, minerals, and fiber, and low in calories and fat. Different healthcare professionals or organizations might have slightly different definitions or classifications of what constitutes a vegetable, but there is no single medical definition for this term.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever. COX-2 is primarily expressed in response to stimuli such as cytokines and growth factors, and its expression is associated with the development of inflammation.

COX-2 inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that selectively block the activity of COX-2, reducing the production of prostaglandins and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects. These medications are often used to treat pain and inflammation associated with conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, and headaches.

It's important to note that while COX-2 inhibitors can be effective in managing pain and inflammation, they may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, particularly when used at high doses or for extended periods. Therefore, it's essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Experimental neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that are induced and studied in a controlled laboratory setting, typically in animals or cell cultures. These studies are conducted to understand the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development, progression, and potential treatment strategies. By manipulating various factors such as genetic mutations, environmental exposures, and pharmacological interventions, researchers can gain valuable insights into the complex processes underlying neoplasm formation and identify novel targets for cancer therapy. It is important to note that experimental neoplasms may not always accurately represent human cancers, and further research is needed to translate these findings into clinically relevant applications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "fruit" is not a medical term per se. It is a common term used to describe the part of a plant that develops from the ovary after flowering and contains seeds. However, in a nutritional or dietary context, "fruits" are often referred to as foods that are typically sweet and juicy, and come from plants' flowers. They are rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making them an essential part of a healthy diet. But in a strict medical sense, there isn't a specific definition for "fruit."

F344 is a strain code used to designate an outbred stock of rats that has been inbreeded for over 100 generations. The F344 rats, also known as Fischer 344 rats, were originally developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and are now widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background.

Inbred strains, like the F344, are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or parents and offspring) for many generations until a state of complete homozygosity is reached, meaning that all members of the strain have identical genomes. This genetic uniformity makes inbred strains ideal for use in studies where consistent and reproducible results are important.

F344 rats are known for their longevity, with a median lifespan of around 27-31 months, making them useful for aging research. They also have a relatively low incidence of spontaneous tumors compared to other rat strains. However, they may be more susceptible to certain types of cancer and other diseases due to their inbred status.

It's important to note that while F344 rats are often used as a standard laboratory rat strain, there can still be some genetic variation between individual animals within the same strain, particularly if they come from different suppliers or breeding colonies. Therefore, it's always important to consider the source and history of any animal model when designing experiments and interpreting results.

Carotenoids are a class of pigments that are naturally occurring in various plants and fruits. They are responsible for the vibrant colors of many vegetables and fruits, such as carrots, pumpkins, tomatoes, and leafy greens. There are over 600 different types of carotenoids, with beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin being some of the most well-known.

Carotenoids have antioxidant properties, which means they can help protect the body's cells from damage caused by free radicals. Some carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, can be converted into vitamin A in the body, which is important for maintaining healthy vision, skin, and immune function. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and lutein, have been studied for their potential role in preventing chronic diseases, including cancer and heart disease.

In addition to being found in plant-based foods, carotenoids can also be taken as dietary supplements. However, it is generally recommended to obtain nutrients from whole foods rather than supplements whenever possible, as food provides a variety of other beneficial compounds that work together to support health.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

DNA damage refers to any alteration in the structure or composition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the genetic material present in cells. DNA damage can result from various internal and external factors, including environmental exposures such as ultraviolet radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals, as well as normal cellular processes such as replication and oxidative metabolism.

Examples of DNA damage include base modifications, base deletions or insertions, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA helix. These types of damage can lead to mutations, genomic instability, and chromosomal aberrations, which can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related conditions.

The body has several mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and double-strand break repair. However, if the damage is too extensive or the repair mechanisms are impaired, the cell may undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) to prevent the propagation of potentially harmful mutations.

Breast neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the breast tissue that can be benign or malignant. Benign breast neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors or growths, while malignant breast neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Breast neoplasms can arise from different types of cells in the breast, including milk ducts, milk sacs (lobules), or connective tissue. The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which starts in the milk ducts and can spread to other parts of the breast and nearby structures.

Breast neoplasms are usually detected through screening methods such as mammography, ultrasound, or MRI, or through self-examination or clinical examination. Treatment options for breast neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapy.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

Colorectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from the inner lining (mucosa) of the colon or rectum and can take various forms such as polyps, adenomas, or carcinomas.

Benign neoplasms, such as hyperplastic polyps and inflammatory polyps, are not cancerous but may need to be removed to prevent the development of malignant tumors. Adenomas, on the other hand, are precancerous lesions that can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated.

Colorectal cancer is a malignant neoplasm that arises from the uncontrolled growth and division of cells in the colon or rectum. It is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

Regular screening for colorectal neoplasms is recommended for individuals over the age of 50, as early detection and removal of precancerous lesions can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

NF-κB (Nuclear Factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) is a protein complex that plays a crucial role in regulating the immune response to infection and inflammation, as well as in cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation. It is composed of several subunits, including p50, p52, p65 (RelA), c-Rel, and RelB, which can form homodimers or heterodimers that bind to specific DNA sequences called κB sites in the promoter regions of target genes.

Under normal conditions, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by inhibitory proteins known as IκBs (inhibitors of κB). However, upon stimulation by various signals such as cytokines, bacterial or viral products, and stress, IκBs are phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and degraded, leading to the release and activation of NF-κB. Activated NF-κB then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to κB sites and regulates the expression of target genes involved in inflammation, immunity, cell survival, and proliferation.

Dysregulation of NF-κB signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as cancer, chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, targeting NF-κB signaling has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these diseases.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

Glutathione is a tripeptide composed of three amino acids: cysteine, glutamic acid, and glycine. It is a vital antioxidant that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular health and function. Glutathione helps protect cells from oxidative stress by neutralizing free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can damage cells and contribute to aging and diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and dementia. It also supports the immune system, detoxifies harmful substances, and regulates various cellular processes, including DNA synthesis and repair.

Glutathione is found in every cell of the body, with particularly high concentrations in the liver, lungs, and eyes. The body can produce its own glutathione, but levels may decline with age, illness, or exposure to toxins. As such, maintaining optimal glutathione levels through diet, supplementation, or other means is essential for overall health and well-being.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

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Posner's recent research has been focused on applying organic synthesis to the preparation of novel medicinal agents including ... correlation between structure and potency as inducers of anticarcinogenic detoxication enzymes". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry ...
... anticarcinogenic agents MeSH D27.505.954.248.144 - antimetabolites, antineoplastic MeSH D27.505.954.248.147 - antimitotic ... antiviral agents MeSH D27.505.954.122.388.077 - anti-retroviral agents MeSH D27.505.954.122.388.077.088 - anti-hiv agents MeSH ... tocolytic agents MeSH D27.505.954.016 - anti-allergic agents MeSH D27.505.954.122 - anti-infective agents MeSH D27.505.954.122. ... tranquilizing agents MeSH D27.505.696.277.950.015 - anti-anxiety agents MeSH D27.505.696.277.950.025 - antimanic agents MeSH ...
In food manufacturing, it is used as a flavoring agent. In humans, butyric acid is one of two primary endogenous agonists of ... it has pronounced antimicrobial and anticarcinogenic effects) in humans. These effects occur through its metabolism by ... Agents Chemother. 55 (6): 2897-904. doi:10.1128/AAC.00016-11. PMC 3101455. PMID 21464244. Zimmerman MA, Singh N, Martin PM, ...
Laboratory experiments have suggested that cannabis and cannabinoids have anticarcinogenic and antitumor effects, including a ... "Current Status and Prospects for Cannabidiol Preparations as New Therapeutic Agents". Pharmacotherapy. 36 (7): 781-96. doi: ... and anticarcinogenic effects of cannabinoids. Additional work is needed to rule out various sources of bias, confounds and ...
This effect may be responsible for both anticarcinogenic and carcinogenic potential of the substance. It was found to ... Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 50 (11): 3770-8. doi:10.1128/AAC.00578-06. PMC 1635224. PMID 16954323. Si, Hongwei; Liu ... of Combination Effects for the Induction of Micronuclei in Mouse Lymphoma Cells by Binary Mixtures of the Genotoxic Agents MMS ...
The anti-carcinogenic activity of [6]-gingerol and [6]-paradol was analysed in a study observing the cellular mechanisms ... June 2019). "Phytochemicals in Prostate Cancer: From Bioactive Molecules to Upcoming Therapeutic Agents". Nutrients. 11 (7): ...
Implications for the anticarcinogenic activity of L-selenomethionine and L-Se-methylselenocysteine". Nutrition and Cancer. 40 ( ... that methaneseleninic acid shows promise as a sensitizing agent for apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2-family inhibitor ABT-737 in ...
The University of Colorado currently holds patents for the use of etomoxir as an anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic agent. ... Etomoxir and a 2-deoxy-D-glucose Compound; Antiinflammatory, Antiproliferative, Anticarcinogenic and Wound Healing Agents; Drug ...
6. Anti-Carcinogenic Agent. It has been proven that argan oil helps to cure different types of cancer like prostate, bladder, ...
Previous reports have demonstrated the anticarcinogenic effects of EA at levels 10- to 250-fold greater than those applied in ... These observations suggest important implications on human health should EA be prescribed as a chemotherapeutic agent or a ... these levels would not be unreasonable if EA were used as a dietary supplement or as a chemotherapeutic agent. ...
Anticarcinogenic Agents MeSH Secondary Prevention MeSH DeCS ID:. 32808 Unique ID:. D018890 ... IM general or unspecified only; prefer specific chemotherapeutic agent /ther use and disease /prev. ...
Vasodilator Agents. 2. 3. Anti-Anxiety Agents. 1. 2. Anticarcinogenic Agents. 1. 2. ... Crocetin was an effective agent in attenuating the adjuvant-induced arthritis rats in a concentration-dependent manner.Dec 31, ... Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Antioxidants, Cardioprotective, Heme oxygenase-1 up-regulation, Nrf2 ... Crocetin is a potential anticancer agent that can be used for cancer prevention and treatment.Nov 30, 2019. ...
Anticarcinogenic Agents. *Antigens, Bacterial. *Antigens, CD. *Antihypertensive Agents. *Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non- ...
Anticarcinogenic Agents D27.505.696.706.18. D27.720.799.18. Antigens, CD45 D8.811.277.352.650.625.700.150 D8.811.277.352. ... Chemical Warfare Agents J1.637.870.200. J1.637.870.900.200. Chemokine CCL2 D12.644.276.374.200.110.500.600 D12.644.276.374. ...
A Major Inducer of Anti-carcinogenic Protective Enzymes from Broccoli: Isolation and Elucidation of Structure. Proc. Natl. Acad ...
It might provide novel antioxidant and anticarcinogenic agents.. Assuntos. Antocianinas/farmacologia , Antioxidantes/ ... To replace biohazardous nematicides, there is an ever-increasing need to identify natural product-based agents to contain root- ...
Multiple molecular targets of resveratrol: Anti-carcinogenic mechanisms.. Athar M, Back JH, Kopelovich L, Bickers DR, Kim AL.. ... Resveratrol as an antioxidant and pro-oxidant agent: mechanisms and clinical implications.. de la Lastra CA, Villegas I.. ... implicating the potential of resveratrol as an anti-aging agent in treating age-related human diseases. Nevertheless, depending ... have been identified as potent anti-cancer agents. Extensive in vitro studies revealed multiple intracellular targets of ...
Has strong antioxidant & anti carcinogenic qualities and has been shown to reduce the harmful effects of ultra violet rays. ... Argan Oil - Natural healing agent from Northern Africa. High source of vitamin E, essential fatty acids & phytosterols. ... White Tea - Strong antioxidant with natural anti-carcinogenic qualities that works to eliminate free radicals, boost immunity ... Vitamin E - Contains powerful anti aging & anti carcinogenic properties. Reduces fine lines & wrinkles while it heals and ...
Anticarcinogenic Agents. *Antineoplastic Agents. *Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic. *NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone) ...
Sodium fluoride has been used for decades in dental practice as an effective anti-carcinogenic agent12. This inorganic salt ...
Aspirin is sometimes used as a preventive agent for certain diseases. For example, daily intake of low-dose aspirin (75-300 mg ... It has been shown in animal trials that vitamin C has some anticarcinogenic activity. ... First isolated in 1928, vitamin C was identified as the curative agent for scurvy in 1932. ...
Makes sense then that the good bowl of oatmeal is a solid agent in the fight against certain cancers, specifically colon cancer ... Well, they style themselves as anti-carcinogenic compounds, springing into action like superheroes against menacing cancer- ... Need another reason to slather on some oatmeal goodness? Oatmeal boasts a natural cleaning agent called saponins. ...
Over the past several decades, scientific studies have shown that turmeric or curcumin is a potent anti-cancer agent (9, 10). ... Scientists are continuing this promising exploration into turmerics anti-carcinogenic effects.. 4. It Can Ease Cystic Fibrosis ... It has been found to be just as effective an anti-inflammatory agent as ibuprofen, but without ibuprofens gastrointestinal ...
He is a principal investigator of research projects on acupuncture and botanical agents funded by the National Institutes of ... 2004) Anticarcinogenic properties of garlic: a review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr.44(6):479-488. ... This shocking fact is the introduction to a chapter focussing on the many household materials, cleaning agents and personal ... 2005) Antiangiogenic agents: studies on fumagillin and curcumin analogs. Curr Pharm Des. 11(3):357-373. ...
Anti-infective agent... * Anticarcinogenic age... * Antineoplastic agent... * Carcinogenicity test... * Carcinogens * ... Anticancer agents based on natural product models / edited by John M. Cassady, John D. Douros. by Cassady, John M , Douros, ... Anticancer and interferon agents : synthesis and properties / edited by Raphael M. Ottenbrite, George B. Butler. by Ottenbrite ... by IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Cancer Preventive Agents (1997: Lyon, France) , International Agency for Research on ...
Anti-carcinogenic Effects:. An anti-carcinogen is defined as a substance that counteracts the effects of a carcinogen or ... With the rise of smoke and other environmental cancer causing agents, the frequent use of turmeric appears warranted 11. ... Turmeric has demonstrated that it is capable of having an anti-carcinogenic effect on all steps of cancer development. Some ... agent in their urine 11. The results of the study are quite significant. ...
Papayas can be great revitalizing agents, which is why they are used in many cosmetics. Also, papayas are used in homemade face ... A papaya leaf extract obtained from dried leaves produced anti-carcinogenic effects against tumor cells that were grown in the ...
It acts as a cleansing agent and a blood purifier.. Lemon peel. Rich in flavonoids, antioxidants and vitamins C, B6, A, E, and ... Numerous studies have demonstrated anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant properties. Green tea is used as a neuroprotective, both ... It acts as a cleansing agent and a blood purifier.. Lemon juice. Lemon juice stimulates the release of bile and digestive ... Our service providers: We use other companies, agents and contractors to perform services on our behalf or to assist us with ...
Agents Actions 1993;38 Spec No:C25-C27. View abstract.. * Knight, T. E. and Hayashi, T. Solar (brachioradial) pruritus-- ... A comprehensive review of the carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic potential of capsaicin. Toxicol.Pathol. 2012;40:847-873. View ... Olajos, E. J. and Salem, H. Riot control agents: pharmacology, toxicology, biochemistry and chemistry. J.Appl.Toxicol. 2001;21: ...
Dwivedi, A.K., M. Chaudhry and J.P.S. Sarin (1990) Standardization of a new spermicidal agent Sapindus saponin and its ... Tadi, P.P., R.W. Teel and H.H.S. Lau (1990) Anticandidal and anticarcinogenic potentials of garlic. [Publication] ... Ekeke, G.I. and F.O. Shode (1990) Phenylalanine is the predominant antisickling agent in Cajanus cajan seed extract. [ ... Ekeke, G.I. and F.O. Shode (1990) Phenylalanine is the predominant antisickling agent in Cajanus cajan seed extract. [ ...
Yasukawa, K. Cancer chemopreventive agents: natural pentacyclic triterpenoids; Pentacyclic Triterpenes as Promising Agents in ... Sugano, N.; Choji, Y.; Hibino, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Maeda, H. Anticarcinogenic action of an alcohol-insoluble fraction (LAP1) from ... Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry From Amino Acids to Proteins as Targets for Metal-based Drugs. Current Drug ... Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry Emerging Role of Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signalling Pathways in Cancer Progression and Role ...
NAMs efficacy as a therapeutic agent may not be as acute or as strong as that of drugs targeting a particular enzyme. The ... Meanwhile, NAM is being clinically tested for possible anti-carcinogenic effects against lung cancer [NCT02416739]. ... A reason for this is likely the marginal efficacy of NAM as a therapeutic agent or medicine as compared to drugs targeting ... Murray, M.F. Nicotinamide: An oral antimicrobial agent with activity against both mycobacterium tuberculosis and human ...
Aneuploidy is regarded as a hallmark of cancer, however, its role is complex with both pro- and anti-carcinogenic effects ... There is a need for further mechanistic studies on agents that induce aneuploidy, particularly by mechanisms other than tubulin ... Aneuploidy is regarded as a hallmark of cancer, however, its role is complex with both pro- and anti-carcinogenic effects ... There is a need for further mechanistic studies on agents that induce aneuploidy, particularly by mechanisms other than tubulin ...
Isoquercitrin could be a potential therapeutic agent against neurodegeneration in Parkinsons disease. ... Hertog MGL, Hollman PCH, van de Putte B: Content of potentially anticarcinogenic flavonoids of 28 vegetables and 9 fruits ... García-Lafuente A, Guillamón E, Villares A, Rostagno MA, Martínez JA: Flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents: implications in ... Isoquercitrin could be a potential therapeutic agent against neurodegeneration in Parkinsons disease. ...
Multiple studies have shown dandelion to be a potent detoxifying agent. A 2015 study from Spains University of San Pablo has ... anti-carcinogenic, analgesic, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-coagulatory and prebiotic. ...
  • Although this range of exposure is above the estimated human daily intake (is approximately equal to 940 µg/day for 70 kg person or 13.4 µg/kg/day), these levels would not be unreasonable if EA were used as a dietary supplement or as a chemotherapeutic agent. (cdc.gov)
  • These observations suggest important implications on human health should EA be prescribed as a chemotherapeutic agent or a preventative dietary supplement for cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • Moreover, sesame seeds specifically contain the lignans, sesamin and sesamolin, which studies have shown to also contain pharmacological benefits such as antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties [9]. (scienceandfood.org)
  • Plant-derived polyphenolic compounds, such as the stilbene resveratrol (trans-3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene), have been identified as potent anti-cancer agents. (resveratrolnews.com)
  • Over the past several decades, scientific studies have shown that turmeric or curcumin is a potent anti-cancer agent ( 9 , 10 ). (wellnessjubilation.com)
  • Gordon, W.C. Enhanced response to chemoimmunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis with the use of tumor-associated antigens with a lipophilic agent. (benthamscience.com)
  • Resveratrol as an antioxidant and pro-oxidant agent: mechanisms and clinical implications. (resveratrolnews.com)
  • In this article we submit the results of clinical tests of a new generation anticancer agent RL-175 in 32 volunteers with fatal disseminated breast cancer of T 3-4 N 1 M 0 and T 3-4 N 1 M 1-3 stages. (world-science.ru)
  • Anticancer agents based on natural product models / edited by John M. Cassady, John D. Douros. (who.int)
  • There is a need for further mechanistic studies on agents that induce aneuploidy, particularly by mechanisms other than tubulin disruption and to determine the role of aneuploidy in pre-neoplastic events and in early and late stage neoplasia. (enea.it)
  • Free radical scavengers such as antioxidant agents may be helpful in prolonging the survival of dopaminergic neurons. (biomedcentral.com)
  • At the end of a 30 day trail period, the smokers who had received the turmeric each day had a reduction of a mutagenic (radiation or a chemical substance) agent in their urine 11 . (ollinathletics.com)
  • With the rise of smoke and other environmental cancer causing agents, the frequent use of turmeric appears warranted 11 . (ollinathletics.com)
  • Current protective measures against dietary exposure to heavy metals involve chelating agents , which are compounds that can bind to metal ions. (scienceandfood.org)
  • While other chelating agents, such as thiamine and becozinc, risk deficiencies in essential metals [8], the preference of black sesame seeds to bind to toxic heavy metals make it a favorable dietary supplement for heavy metal detoxification. (scienceandfood.org)
  • The phytochemicals in this diet have key anticarcinogenic and anti-cardiovascular disease properties, promote important antioxidants (eg, polyphenols, flavonoids), and are high in oleic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids and low in monounsaturated fatty acids, which promote the anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic prostaglandin pathway. (medscape.com)
  • To replace biohazardous nematicides, there is an ever-increasing need to identify natural product-based agents to contain root-knot nematodes (RKNs) in agriculture. (bvsalud.org)
  • Argan Oil - Natural healing agent from Northern Africa. (peachtreehealthfoods.com)
  • Sodium fluoride has been used for decades in dental practice as an effective anti-carcinogenic agent 12 . (bvsalud.org)
  • It has been found to be just as effective an anti-inflammatory agent as ibuprofen, but without ibuprofen's gastrointestinal side effects ( 6 ). (wellnessjubilation.com)
  • Unlike other chelating agents used for heavy metal detoxification, which cannot differentiate between essential metal ions and toxic heavy metal ions (cadmium (Cd 2+ ), lead (Pb 2+ ), and mercury (Hg 2+ )), black sesame seeds exhibited selectivity towards the heavy metals. (scienceandfood.org)
  • The enzyme was found to be inactivated by the metal chelating agent, ethylene diamine tetracetate (EDTA) at 5 X 10-3 and 5 X 10-4 M concentrations. (who.int)
  • Isoquercitrin could be a potential therapeutic agent against neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The shortness of the enterocyte life span diminishes the potential of metabolic enzyme-inducing agents in the small intestine to produce increased metabolic rates in the enterocytes for an extended length of time. (aspetjournals.org)
  • 7] During the later stages the effect of the mentioned cytostatic agents falls to zero level of the objective response. (world-science.ru)
  • Anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties have also been documented. (medscape.com)
  • Most, if not all, tumor-promoting agents and conditions, reversibly, inhibit cell-cell communication, whereas antipromoters, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory agents have been shown to ameliorate the effects of tumor promoters on cell-cell communication. (nih.gov)
  • The present study examines the effects of quercitrin on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. (cdc.gov)
  • Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Understanding the mechanism(s) of anticarcinogenic and procarcinogenic effects of beta-carotene is important due to continuing interest in the potential use of carotenoids as chemopreventive agents -- and the conflicting results of observational studies vs. intervention trials. (nih.gov)
  • Clinical trials have shown that silymarin exerts hepatoprotective effects in acute viral hepatitis, poisoning by A phalloides , toxic hepatitis produced by psychotropic agents and alcohol-related liver disease, including cirrhosis, at daily doses ranging from 280 to 800mg, equivalent to 400 to 1140mg of standardised extract. (medscape.com)
  • Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved. (bvsalud.org)
  • 5. Transferrin-decorated thymoquinone-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles exhibit anticarcinogenic effect in non-small cell lung carcinoma via the modulation of miR-34a and miR-16. (nih.gov)
  • The tumor-promotion process requires sustained exposure to agents that stimulate the growth and inhibition of apoptosis of initiated cells in the absence of antipromoters. (nih.gov)
  • Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, 22. (cdc.gov)
  • Selenium (Se), an essential trace element, has also been identified as an anticarcinogenic agent, with supporting evidence from epidemiological studies, clinical intervention trials, preclinical intervention studies (animal cancer models) and cell culture studies. (edu.au)
  • Some research suggest that it may even be an aphrodisiac, all in all, this humble food is considered to be a general nourishing agent and acts as a potent nutritional medicine that can be used in treating many disorders. (herbs2000.com)