Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.
Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.
A semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It attains high serum levels and is excreted quickly via the urine.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.
An infection occurring in PUERPERIUM, the period of 6-8 weeks after giving birth.
Antibiotic analog of CLOXACILLIN.
Broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase. It has been proposed for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, GONORRHEA, and HAEMOPHILUS.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.
Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.
Retrograde flow of urine from the URINARY BLADDER into the URETER. This is often due to incompetence of the vesicoureteral valve leading to ascending bacterial infection into the KIDNEY.
Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the external auditory meatus or through the eustachian tube into the nasopharynx. This is usually associated with CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE involving the TEMPORAL BONE;), NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; or other conditions, but may rarely occur spontaneously. (From Am J Otol 1995 Nov;16(6):765-71)
Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).
A bacterium which causes mastitis in cattle and occasionally in man.
Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.
The prevention of infection or disease following exposure to a pathogen.
Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.
Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
An antibacterial agent that is a semisynthetic analog of LINCOMYCIN.
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.
A semi-synthetic cephalosporin antibiotic.
This drug combination has proved to be an effective therapeutic agent with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. It is effective in the treatment of many infections, including PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA in AIDS.
A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.
Equipment used to prevent contamination of and by patients, especially those with bacterial infections. This includes plastic surgical isolators and isolators used to protect immunocompromised patients.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic that is administered intravenously or intramuscularly. The drug is highly resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactamases and is active against a wide range of both aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.
A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)
Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.
A second-generation cephalosporin administered intravenously or intramuscularly. Its bactericidal action results from inhibition of cell wall synthesis. It is used for urinary tract infections, lower respiratory tract infections, and soft tissue and bone infections.
A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.
The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.
Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (ENDOCARDIUM), the continuous membrane lining the four chambers and HEART VALVES. It is often caused by microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and rickettsiae. Left untreated, endocarditis can damage heart valves and become life-threatening.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the urinary tract or its organs or demonstration of its physiological processes.
Treatment for the prevention of periodontal diseases or other dental diseases by the cleaning of the teeth in the dental office using the procedures of DENTAL SCALING and DENTAL POLISHING. The treatment may include plaque detection, removal of supra- and subgingival plaque and calculus, application of caries-preventing agents, checking of restorations and prostheses and correcting overhanging margins and proximal contours of restorations, and checking for signs of food impaction.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.
Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.
Substances capable of killing agents causing urinary tract infections or of preventing them from spreading.
Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
An acute infection caused by the spore-forming bacteria BACILLUS ANTHRACIS. It commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats. Infection in humans often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the lungs (inhalation anthrax), or the gastrointestinal tract. Anthrax is not contagious and can be treated with antibiotics.
Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)
Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.
A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
A severe form of acute INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS characterized by one or more areas of NECROSIS in the pancreas with varying degree of involvement of the surrounding tissues or organ systems. Massive pancreatic necrosis may lead to DIABETES MELLITUS, and malabsorption.
A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.
Antibacterial obtained from Streptomyces orientalis. It is a glycopeptide related to RISTOCETIN that inhibits bacterial cell wall assembly and is toxic to kidneys and the inner ear.
A group of islands in Melanesia constituting a French overseas territory. The group includes New Caledonia (the main island), Ile des Pins, Loyalty Island, and several other islet groups. The capital is Noumea. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1774 and visited by various navigators, explorers, and traders from 1792 to 1840. Occupied by the French in 1853, it was set up as a penal colony 1864-94. In 1946 it was made a French overseas territory. It was named by Captain Cook with the 5th and 6th century A.D. Latin name for Scotland, Caledonia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p830 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.
A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.
A broad-spectrum semisynthetic antibiotic similar to AMPICILLIN except that its resistance to gastric acid permits higher serum levels with oral administration.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
The L-isomer of Ofloxacin.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Fractures in which the break in bone is not accompanied by an external wound.
The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The destruction of germs causing disease.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.
A synthetic fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent that inhibits the supercoiling activity of bacterial DNA GYRASE, halting DNA REPLICATION.
An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.
Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)
The use of chemical compounds to prevent the development of a specific disease.
A semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic structurally related to ERYTHROMYCIN. It has been used in the treatment of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infections, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis.
A fixed-ratio combination of amoxicillin trihydrate and potassium clavulanate.
Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.
INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.
Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS that is a spherical, non-motile, gram-positive, chemoorganotrophic, facultative anaerobe. Mainly found on the skin and mucous membrane of warm-blooded animals, it can be primary pathogen or secondary invader.
Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).
A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.
A broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with a very long half-life and high penetrability to meninges, eyes and inner ears.
Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.
Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.
Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Chemical substances, produced by microorganisms, inhibiting or preventing the proliferation of neoplasms.
The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent ANTHRAX.
A species of bacteria that causes ANTHRAX in humans and animals.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.
Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.
An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.
A large heterogeneous group of mostly alpha-hemolytic streptococci. They colonize the respiratory tract at birth and generally have a low degree of pathogenicity. This group of species includes STREPTOCOCCUS MITIS; STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS; STREPTOCOCCUS ORALIS; STREPTOCOCCUS SANGUIS; STREPTOCOCCUS SOBRINUS; and the STREPTOCOCCUS MILLERI GROUP. The latter are often beta-hemolytic and commonly produce invasive pyogenic infections including brain and abdominal abscesses.
Partial or total replacement of a joint.
Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
An acute inflammation of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA that is characterized by the presence of pseudomembranes or plaques in the SMALL INTESTINE (pseudomembranous enteritis) and the LARGE INTESTINE (pseudomembranous colitis). It is commonly associated with antibiotic therapy and CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE colonization.
Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.
Removal of all or part of the PROSTATE, often using a cystoscope and/or resectoscope passed through the URETHRA.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.
Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.
The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.
Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.
Obstruction of a vein or VEINS (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Mycoses are a group of diseases caused by fungal pathogens that can infect various tissues and organs, potentially leading to localized or systemic symptoms, depending on the immune status of the host.
Replacement for a knee joint.
A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.
A pulmonary disease in humans occurring in immunodeficient or malnourished patients or infants, characterized by DYSPNEA, tachypnea, and HYPOXEMIA. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a frequently seen opportunistic infection in AIDS. It is caused by the fungus PNEUMOCYSTIS JIROVECII. The disease is also found in other MAMMALS where it is caused by related species of Pneumocystis.
The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.
Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.

Malaria prophylaxis using azithromycin: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Irian Jaya, Indonesia. (1/1047)

New drugs are needed for preventing drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The prophylactic efficacy of azithromycin against P. falciparum in malaria-immune Kenyans was 83%. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the prophylactic efficacy of azithromycin against multidrug-resistant P. falciparum malaria and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax malaria in Indonesian adults with limited immunity. After radical cure therapy, 300 randomized subjects received azithromycin (148 subjects, 750-mg loading dose followed by 250 mg/d), placebo (77), or doxycycline (75, 100 mg/d). The end point was slide-proven parasitemia. There were 58 P. falciparum and 29 P. vivax prophylaxis failures over 20 weeks. Using incidence rates, the protective efficacy of azithromycin relative to placebo was 71.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.3-83.8) against P. falciparum malaria and 98.9% (95% CI, 93.1-99.9) against P. vivax malaria. Corresponding figures for doxycycline were 96.3% (95% CI, 85.4-99.6) and 98% (95% CI, 88.0-99.9), respectively. Daily azithromycin offered excellent protection against P. vivax malaria but modest protection against P. falciparum malaria.  (+info)

Infections associated with dental procedures in total hip arthroplasty. (2/1047)

Dental procedures may lead to a transient bacteraemia lasting for up to 30 minutes. Of the numerous cases of total hip arthroplasty (THA) reported which have been infected from haematogenous sources, dental procedures have been involved only infrequently. We reviewed the records of 2973 patients after THA. Of the late infections identified in 52 patients, three (6%) were strongly associated with a dental procedure. Infection was diagnosed by culture from the affected joint; Streptococcus viridans was identified in two cases and Peptostreptococcus in one. One patient had diabetes mellitus and another rheumatoid arthritis, both conditions predisposing to infection. The dental operations all lasted for more than 45 minutes and no patient received perioperative antibiotics. Infection of a THA after dental procedures is more common than has been previously suspected. Patients with systemic disease, or who are undergoing extensive procedures, should be considered for prophylactic antibiotic treatment.  (+info)

Liposomal amphotericin B for empirical therapy in patients with persistent fever and neutropenia. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group. (3/1047)

BACKGROUND: In patients with persistent fever and neutropenia, amphotericin B is administered empirically for the early treatment and prevention of clinically occult invasive fungal infections. However, breakthrough fungal infections can develop despite treatment, and amphotericin B has substantial toxicity. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial comparing liposomal amphotericin B with conventional amphotericin B as empirical antifungal therapy. RESULTS: The mean duration of therapy was 10.8 days for liposomal amphotericin B (343 patients) and 10.3 days for conventional amphotericin B (344 patients). The composite rates of successful treatment were similar (50 percent for liposomal amphotericin B and 49 percent for conventional amphotericin B) and were independent of the use of antifungal prophylaxis or colony-stimulating factors. The outcomes were similar with liposomal amphotericin B and conventional amphotericin B with respect to survival (93 percent and 90 percent, respectively), resolution of fever (58 percent and 58 percent), and discontinuation of the study drug because of toxic effects or lack of efficacy (14 percent and 19 percent). There were fewer proved breakthrough fungal infections among patients treated with liposomal amphotericin B (11 patients [3.2 percent]) than among those treated with conventional amphotericin B (27 patients [7.8 percent], P=0.009). With the liposomal preparation significantly fewer patients had infusion-related fever (17 percent vs. 44 percent), chills or rigors (18 percent vs. 54 percent), and other reactions, including hypotension, hypertension, and hypoxia. Nephrotoxic effects (defined by a serum creatinine level two times the upper limit of normal) were significantly less frequent among patients treated with liposomal amphotericin B (19 percent) than among those treated with conventional amphotericin B (34 percent, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Liposomal amphotericin B is as effective as conventional amphotericin B for empirical antifungal therapy in patients with fever and neutropenia, and it is associated with fewer breakthrough fungal infections, less infusion-related toxicity, and less nephrotoxicity.  (+info)

Infective endocarditis and dentistry: outcome-based research. (4/1047)

Antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of infective endocarditis has long been recommended for patients receiving dental care. Two studies of patients with endocarditis found limited risk associated with dental treatment. It is imperative that guidelines for therapy be based on outcome studies and on evidence of safety, efficacy and cost effectiveness.  (+info)

Review article: antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). (5/1047)

This review examines the evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopan-creatography (ERCP), and provides detailed advice about suitable antibiotic regimens in appropriate high-risk patients. Ascending cholangitis and infective endocarditis are potential complications of endoscopic ERCP. The pathophysiology of these two complications is quite separate and different sub-groups of patients require prophylaxis with appropriate antibiotic regimens. Ascending cholangitis results from bacterial infection of an obstructed biliary system, usually from enteric Gram-negative microorganisms, resulting in bacteraemia. There is incomplete drainage of the biliary system after ERCP in up to 10% of patients who require stenting. Antibiotics started in these patients will probably reduce the frequency of cholangitis by 80%. If antibiotics are restricted to this group, approximately 90% of all patients having an ERCP will avoid antibiotics, but 80% of cholangitic episodes will be prevented. Infective endocarditis may result from the bacteraemia caused at the time of the ERCP in patients with an abnormal heart valve. Antibiotic prophylaxis, in particular covering alpha-haemolytic streptococci, should be started before the procedure in this defined high-risk group.  (+info)

Implementing a policy for pneumococcal prophylaxis in a haematology unit after splenectomy. (6/1047)

People who have had a splenectomy for any reason are 40 times more likely to have an overwhelming infection, especially pneumococcal infection, and 17 times more likely to suffer fatal sepsis. The incidence of such life threatening infections is reduced by prophylactic immunisation with polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine and long term antibiotic prophylaxis or instituting prompt antibiotic treatment in the event of fever. This haematology unit agreed a policy of immunisation and antibiotic prophylaxis in June 1988 for all patients undergoing elective splenectomy. The success of this policy was audited in July 1993 by a retrospective analysis of patients' case notes. Seventy four patients were identified as having had a splenectomy, 54 (73%) before June 1988, of whom only 13 (24%) had received both pneumococcal immunisation and antibiotic prophylaxis before implementation of the agreed policy. At the time of audit, 46/74 (62%) patients were recorded as having received immunisation and 64/74 (86%) as receiving antibiotic prophylaxis or a supply of antibiotics to take in the event of a fever. All but one of the 20 patients who had a splenectomy after June 1988, since implementation of the agreed policy, received immunisation and antibiotic prophylaxis. The authors conclude that establishment of a formal agreed policy for pneumococcal prophylaxis for patients undergoing splenectomy has improved the quality of care.  (+info)

Neutropenic infections in 100 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or Hodgkin's disease treated with high-dose BEAM chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell transplant: out-patient treatment is a viable option. (7/1047)

A retrospective analysis was performed on 100 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n = 75) or Hodgkin's disease (HD, n = 25) who underwent peripheral blood progenitor cell transplant (PBPCT) following high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan (BEAM) between March 1994 and June 1997. Following PBPCT and until engraftment all patients received oral ciprofloxacin and fluconazole, patients with positive Herpes simplex virus serology received acyclovir and 91 patients received filgrastim. The median days of neutropenia and days to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) >500/mm3 were 6 and 9, respectively. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 68 patients. Gram-positive bacteremia occurred in 14 patients. No gram-negative infections, invasive fungal infections, intensive care visits or deaths occurred during the period of neutropenia or in the first 30 days following transplant. In multivariate logistic regression the risk of development of any infection was associated only with the duration of neutropenia (P = 0.02) and the risk of bacteremia was associated only with the number of CD34+ cells infused (P = 0.046). Among 49 patients treated in the outpatient setting, 14 (28%) were never admitted. High-dose chemotherapy with BEAM supported by PBPCT, prophylactic antibiotics and filgrastim resulted in a low incidence of infections and no acute mortality. WBC engraftment occurred rapidly allowing for a predictable course during which lengthy hospital stays and amphotericin therapy could be avoided.  (+info)

Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence, incidence, and indications for antibiotic prophylaxis. (8/1047)

BACKGROUND: The literature on infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is virtually confined to case reports. Consequently, the risk of endocarditis in HCM remains undefined. METHODS AND RESULTS: We assessed the occurrence of endocarditis in 810 HCM patients evaluated between 1970 and 1997. Endocarditis was diagnosed in 10 patients, 2 of whom were excluded from analysis of prevalence and incidence because they were referred for acute endocarditis. At first evaluation, echocardiographic features consistent with prior endocarditis were identified in 3 of 808 patients, a prevalence of 3.7 per 1000 patients (95% CI, 0.8 to 11). Of 681 patients who were followed, 5 developed endocarditis, an incidence of 1.4 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 0.5 to 3.2); outflow obstruction was present in each of these 5 patients and was associated with the risk of endocarditis (P=0.006). In the 224 obstructive patients, incidence of endocarditis was 3.8 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.6 to 8.9) and probability of endocarditis 4. 3% at 10 years. Left atrial size was also associated with the risk of endocarditis (P=0.007). In patients with both obstruction and atrial dilatation (>/=50 mm), incidence of endocarditis increased to 9.2 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 2.5 to 23.5). Analysis of all 10 patients with endocarditis identified outflow obstruction in each and atrial dilatation in 7. CONCLUSIONS: Endocarditis in HCM is virtually confined to patients with outflow obstruction and is more common in those with both obstruction and atrial dilatation. These results indicate that antibiotic prophylaxis is required only in patients with obstructive HCM.  (+info)

Antibiotic prophylaxis refers to the use of antibiotics to prevent infection from occurring in the first place, rather than treating an existing infection. This practice is commonly used before certain medical procedures or surgeries that have a high risk of infection, such as joint replacements, heart valve surgery, or organ transplants. The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis is to reduce the risk of infection by introducing antibiotics into the body before bacteria have a chance to multiply and cause an infection.

The choice of antibiotic for prophylaxis depends on several factors, including the type of procedure being performed, the patient's medical history and allergies, and the most common types of bacteria that can cause infection in that particular situation. The antibiotic is typically given within one hour before the start of the procedure, and may be continued for up to 24 hours afterward, depending on the specific guidelines for that procedure.

It's important to note that antibiotic prophylaxis should only be used when it is truly necessary, as overuse of antibiotics can contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Therefore, the decision to use antibiotic prophylaxis should be made carefully and in consultation with a healthcare provider.

A surgical wound infection, also known as a surgical site infection (SSI), is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an infection that occurs within 30 days after surgery (or within one year if an implant is left in place) and involves either:

1. Purulent drainage from the incision;
2. Organisms isolated from an aseptically obtained culture of fluid or tissue from the incision;
3. At least one of the following signs or symptoms of infection: pain or tenderness, localized swelling, redness, or heat; and
4. Diagnosis of surgical site infection by the surgeon or attending physician.

SSIs can be classified as superficial incisional, deep incisional, or organ/space infections, depending on the depth and extent of tissue involvement. They are a common healthcare-associated infection and can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.

Cefazolin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is necessary for its survival. Without a functional cell wall, the bacteria are not able to grow and multiply, and are eventually destroyed by the body's immune system.

Cefazolin is commonly used to treat infections of the skin, bones, joints, heart, lungs, and urinary tract. It may also be used to prevent infection during surgery. Like all antibiotics, cefazolin is only effective against certain types of bacteria, so it is important to know the specific type of bacteria causing an infection before using this medication.

Cefazolin is usually given as an injection into a vein or muscle, and may be administered in a hospital setting or at home with proper training. The dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the severity and location of the infection, as well as the patient's overall health status.

As with any medication, cefazolin can cause side effects, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, headache, and rash. In rare cases, it may also cause serious side effects such as allergic reactions, kidney damage, or abnormal blood clotting. It is important to report any unusual symptoms to a healthcare provider promptly.

It is essential to complete the full course of treatment with cefazolin, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that the infection is fully treated and to reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Premedication is the administration of medication before a medical procedure or surgery to prevent or manage pain, reduce anxiety, minimize side effects of anesthesia, or treat existing medical conditions. The goal of premedication is to improve the safety and outcomes of the medical procedure by preparing the patient's body in advance. Common examples of premedication include administering antibiotics before surgery to prevent infection, giving sedatives to help patients relax before a procedure, or providing medication to control acid reflux during surgery.

Puerperal infection, also known as childbed fever or postpartum infection, is a healthcare-associated infection that can occur in women following childbirth, miscarriage, or abortion. It's typically caused by bacteria that enter the reproductive system during these processes and can lead to inflammation and infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, or other pelvic organs.

The most common causative agents are Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus), Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Symptoms of puerperal infection can include fever, abdominal pain, foul-smelling vaginal discharge, and painful urination. If left untreated, the infection can lead to serious complications such as sepsis, infertility, or even death.

Prompt diagnosis and treatment with antibiotics are crucial for managing puerperal infections and preventing complications. Good hygiene practices and proper sterilization of medical equipment can also help reduce the risk of developing this infection.

Flucloxacillin is not strictly a medical "definition," but rather it is an antibiotic medication used to treat infections caused by susceptible gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-sensitive strains. It is a semisynthetic penicillin derivative that is resistant to degradation by beta-lactamases produced by many bacteria, making it effective against some bacteria that are resistant to other penicillins.

Flucloxacillin works by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, leading to bacterial death. It is often used to treat skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, and endocarditis caused by susceptible organisms. Like other antibiotics, flucloxacillin should be used judiciously to prevent the development of antimicrobial resistance.

It's important to note that the use of any medication, including flucloxacillin, should be under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional, who can consider the individual patient's medical history, current medications, and other factors to determine the most appropriate treatment.

Cefuroxime is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is necessary for its survival. Without a functional cell wall, the bacteria are unable to grow and multiply, and are eventually destroyed by the body's immune system.

Cefuroxime is effective against many different types of bacteria, including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. It is often used to treat respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and bone and joint infections.

Like all antibiotics, cefuroxime should be used only under the direction of a healthcare provider, and it is important to take the full course of treatment as prescribed, even if symptoms improve before the medication is finished. Misuse of antibiotics can lead to the development of drug-resistant bacteria, which are more difficult to treat and can pose a serious threat to public health.

Bacterial infections are caused by the invasion and multiplication of bacteria in or on tissues of the body. These infections can range from mild, like a common cold, to severe, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. The symptoms of a bacterial infection depend on the type of bacteria invading the body and the area of the body that is affected.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that can live in many different environments, including in the human body. While some bacteria are beneficial to humans and help with digestion or protect against harmful pathogens, others can cause illness and disease. When bacteria invade the body, they can release toxins and other harmful substances that damage tissues and trigger an immune response.

Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics, which work by killing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. However, it is important to note that misuse or overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, making treatment more difficult. It is also essential to complete the full course of antibiotics as prescribed, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that all bacteria are eliminated and reduce the risk of recurrence or development of antibiotic resistance.

Streptococcal infections are a type of infection caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes). These bacteria can cause a variety of illnesses, ranging from mild skin infections to serious and potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, pneumonia, and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease).

Some common types of streptococcal infections include:

* Streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) - an infection of the throat and tonsils that can cause sore throat, fever, and swollen lymph nodes.
* Impetigo - a highly contagious skin infection that causes sores or blisters on the skin.
* Cellulitis - a bacterial infection of the deeper layers of the skin and underlying tissue that can cause redness, swelling, pain, and warmth in the affected area.
* Scarlet fever - a streptococcal infection that causes a bright red rash on the body, high fever, and sore throat.
* Necrotizing fasciitis - a rare but serious bacterial infection that can cause tissue death and destruction of the muscles and fascia (the tissue that covers the muscles).

Treatment for streptococcal infections typically involves antibiotics to kill the bacteria causing the infection. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect a streptococcal infection, as prompt treatment can help prevent serious complications.

Oral surgical procedures refer to various types of surgeries performed in the oral cavity and maxillofacial region, which includes the mouth, jaws, face, and skull. These procedures are typically performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, who are dental specialists with extensive training in surgical procedures involving the mouth, jaws, and face.

Some common examples of oral surgical procedures include:

1. Tooth extractions: This involves removing a tooth that is damaged beyond repair or causing problems for the surrounding teeth. Wisdom tooth removal is a common type of tooth extraction.
2. Dental implant placement: This procedure involves placing a small titanium post in the jawbone to serve as a replacement root for a missing tooth. A dental crown is then attached to the implant, creating a natural-looking and functional replacement tooth.
3. Jaw surgery: Also known as orthognathic surgery, this procedure involves repositioning the jaws to correct bite problems or facial asymmetry.
4. Biopsy: This procedure involves removing a small sample of tissue from the oral cavity for laboratory analysis, often to diagnose suspicious lesions or growths.
5. Lesion removal: This procedure involves removing benign or malignant growths from the oral cavity, such as tumors or cysts.
6. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery: This procedure involves treating disorders of the TMJ, which connects the jawbone to the skull and allows for movement when eating, speaking, and yawning.
7. Facial reconstruction: This procedure involves rebuilding or reshaping the facial bones after trauma, cancer surgery, or other conditions that affect the face.

Overall, oral surgical procedures are an important part of dental and medical care, helping to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the mouth, jaws, and face.

Vesico-Ureteral Reflux (VUR) is a medical condition that affects the urinary system, specifically the junction where the ureters (tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder) connect with the bladder. In normal physiology, once the bladder fills up with urine and contracts during micturition (urination), the pressure within the bladder should prevent the backflow of urine into the ureters.

However, in VUR, the valve-like mechanism that prevents this backflow does not function properly, allowing urine to flow backward from the bladder into the ureters and potentially even into the kidneys. This reflux can lead to recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney damage, and other complications if left untreated. VUR is more commonly diagnosed in children but can also occur in adults.

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea is a condition characterized by the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid from the inner ear into the external auditory canal of the ear. CSF is a clear, colorless fluid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord. It is normally contained within the subarachnoid space, which is a space between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater that surrounds the brain and spinal cord.

CSF otorrhea can occur as a result of a head injury, skull base fracture, or surgical procedure involving the ear or surrounding structures. It can also be caused by congenital defects or tumors in the area. CSF otorrhea is a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention, as it can lead to meningitis or other complications if left untreated.

Diagnosis of CSF otorrhea typically involves a physical examination and testing of any fluid draining from the ear for beta-2 transferrin, a protein that is present in CSF but not in other bodily fluids. Imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans may also be used to help identify the underlying cause of the CSF leak. Treatment may involve bed rest, hydration, and antibiotics to prevent infection. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the site of the CSF leak.

Prosthesis-related infections, also known as prosthetic joint infections (PJIs), are infections that occur around or within a prosthetic device, such as an artificial joint. These infections can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or other microorganisms and can lead to serious complications if not treated promptly and effectively.

Prosthesis-related infections can occur soon after the implantation of the prosthetic device (early infection) or months or even years later (late infection). Early infections are often caused by bacteria that enter the surgical site during the procedure, while late infections may be caused by hematogenous seeding (i.e., when bacteria from another source spread through the bloodstream and settle in the prosthetic device) or by contamination during a subsequent medical procedure.

Symptoms of prosthesis-related infections can include pain, swelling, redness, warmth, and drainage around the affected area. In some cases, patients may also experience fever, chills, or fatigue. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, laboratory tests (such as blood cultures, joint fluid analysis, and tissue biopsy), and imaging studies (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI).

Treatment of prosthesis-related infections usually involves a combination of antibiotics and surgical intervention. The specific treatment approach will depend on the type and severity of the infection, as well as the patient's overall health status. In some cases, it may be necessary to remove or replace the affected prosthetic device.

Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is a type of bacteria that commonly colonizes the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of humans. It is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and forms chains when viewed under the microscope.

While S. agalactiae can be carried asymptomatically by many adults, it can cause serious infections in newborns, pregnant women, elderly individuals, and people with weakened immune systems. In newborns, GBS can lead to sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis, which can result in long-term health complications or even be fatal if left untreated.

Pregnant women are often screened for GBS colonization during the third trimester of pregnancy, and those who test positive may receive intrapartum antibiotics to reduce the risk of transmission to their newborns during delivery.

Bacterial endocarditis is a medical condition characterized by the inflammation and infection of the inner layer of the heart, known as the endocardium. This infection typically occurs when bacteria enter the bloodstream and attach themselves to damaged or abnormal heart valves or other parts of the endocardium. The bacteria can then multiply and cause the formation of vegetations, which are clusters of infected tissue that can further damage the heart valves and lead to serious complications such as heart failure, stroke, or even death if left untreated.

Bacterial endocarditis is a relatively uncommon but potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt medical attention. Risk factors for developing bacterial endocarditis include pre-existing heart conditions such as congenital heart defects, artificial heart valves, previous history of endocarditis, or other conditions that damage the heart valves. Intravenous drug use is also a significant risk factor for this condition.

Symptoms of bacterial endocarditis may include fever, chills, fatigue, muscle and joint pain, shortness of breath, chest pain, and a new or changing heart murmur. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, blood cultures, and imaging tests such as echocardiography. Treatment usually involves several weeks of intravenous antibiotics to eradicate the infection, and in some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to repair or replace damaged heart valves.

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is the medical practice of using antiviral medications to prevent the development of a disease after an exposure to that disease. It is most commonly used in the context of preventing HIV infection, where it involves taking a combination of antiretroviral drugs for 28 days following potential exposure to the virus, such as through sexual assault or accidental needlestick injuries.

The goal of PEP is to reduce the risk of HIV infection by stopping the virus from replicating and establishing itself in the body. However, it is not 100% effective and should be used in conjunction with other preventative measures such as safe sex practices and proper use of personal protective equipment.

It's important to note that PEP must be started as soon as possible after exposure, ideally within 72 hours, but preferably within 24 hours, for it to be most effective. The decision to initiate PEP should be made in consultation with a medical professional and will depend on various factors such as the type of exposure, the risk of transmission, and the individual's medical history.

Gastrostomy is a surgical procedure that creates an opening through the abdominal wall into the stomach. This opening, called a stoma or gastrostomy tract, allows for the passage of a tube (gastrostomy tube) that can be used to provide enteral nutrition and hydration directly into the stomach when a person is unable to consume food or fluids by mouth due to various medical conditions such as dysphagia, neurological disorders, or head and neck cancers.

Gastrostomy tubes come in different types and sizes, including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes, laparoscopic gastrostomy tubes, and open surgical gastrostomy tubes. The choice of the procedure depends on various factors such as the patient's medical condition, anatomy, and overall health status.

The primary purpose of a gastrostomy is to ensure adequate nutrition and hydration for individuals who have difficulty swallowing or are unable to consume enough food or fluids by mouth to meet their nutritional needs. It can also help prevent complications associated with prolonged fasting, such as malnutrition, dehydration, and weight loss.

Dental care for chronically ill refers to the oral health management and treatment provided to individuals who have chronic medical conditions. These patients often require specialized dental care due to their increased risk of developing oral health problems as a result of their underlying medical condition or its treatment. The goal of dental care for the chronically ill is to prevent and manage dental diseases, such as tooth decay and gum disease, in order to maintain overall health and quality of life. This may involve close collaboration between dental professionals, physicians, and other healthcare providers to ensure that the patient's oral health needs are being met in a comprehensive and coordinated manner.

Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are derived from the fungus Acremonium, originally isolated from seawater and cow dung. They have a similar chemical structure to penicillin and share a common four-membered beta-lactam ring in their molecular structure.

Cephalosporins work by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, which ultimately leads to bacterial death. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, meaning they are effective against a wide range of bacteria, including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

There are several generations of cephalosporins, each with different spectra of activity and pharmacokinetic properties. The first generation cephalosporins have a narrow spectrum of activity and are primarily used to treat infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Second-generation cephalosporins have an expanded spectrum of activity that includes some Gram-negative organisms, such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Third-generation cephalosporins have even broader spectra of activity and are effective against many resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Fourth-generation cephalosporins have activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. They are often reserved for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Cephalosporins are generally well tolerated, but like penicillin, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. Cross-reactivity between cephalosporins and penicillin is estimated to occur in 5-10% of patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Other potential adverse effects include gastrointestinal symptoms (such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea), neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity.

Clindamycin is a antibiotic medication used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It is a type of antibiotic known as a lincosamide, which works by binding to the bacterial ribosome and inhibiting protein synthesis. This leads to the death of the bacteria and helps to clear the infection.

Clindamycin is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and some anaerobic bacteria, making it a useful antibiotic for treating many different types of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, respiratory infections, and dental infections. It is also sometimes used to treat certain types of bacterial vaginal infections.

Like all antibiotics, clindamycin should be used only under the direction of a healthcare provider, as misuse can lead to antibiotic resistance. Additionally, clindamycin can cause side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, and it may increase the risk of developing a serious intestinal infection called Clostridioides difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking this medication.

Guideline adherence, in the context of medicine, refers to the extent to which healthcare professionals follow established clinical practice guidelines or recommendations in their daily practice. These guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines can help improve the quality of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote optimal patient outcomes. Factors that may influence guideline adherence include clinician awareness, familiarity, agreement, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the complexity of the recommendation.

Perioperative care is a multidisciplinary approach to the management of patients before, during, and after surgery with the goal of optimizing outcomes and minimizing complications. It encompasses various aspects such as preoperative evaluation and preparation, intraoperative monitoring and management, and postoperative recovery and rehabilitation. The perioperative period begins when a decision is made to pursue surgical intervention and ends when the patient has fully recovered from the procedure. This care is typically provided by a team of healthcare professionals including anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, physical therapists, and other specialists as needed.

Cephradine is a type of antibiotic known as a first-generation cephalosporin. It is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, and genitourinary tract infections. Cephradine works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which leads to the death of the bacteria.

Cephradine is available in oral (by mouth) and intravenous (into a vein) forms. Common side effects of cephradine include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. More serious side effects can occur, such as allergic reactions, seizures, and severe skin reactions. It is important to take cephradine exactly as directed by a healthcare professional and to inform them of any medical conditions or medications being taken that could interact with the antibiotic.

Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination is an antibiotic medication used to treat various bacterial infections. It contains two active ingredients: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, which work together to inhibit the growth of bacteria by interfering with their ability to synthesize folic acid, a vital component for their survival.

Trimethoprim is a bacteriostatic agent that inhibits dihydrofolate reductase, an enzyme needed for bacterial growth, while sulfamethoxazole is a bacteriostatic sulfonamide that inhibits the synthesis of tetrahydrofolate by blocking the action of the enzyme bacterial dihydropteroate synthase. The combination of these two agents produces a synergistic effect, increasing the overall antibacterial activity of the medication.

Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is commonly used to treat urinary tract infections, middle ear infections, bronchitis, traveler's diarrhea, and pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), a severe lung infection that can occur in people with weakened immune systems. It is also used as a prophylactic treatment to prevent PCP in individuals with HIV/AIDS or other conditions that compromise the immune system.

As with any medication, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination can have side effects and potential risks, including allergic reactions, skin rashes, gastrointestinal symptoms, and blood disorders. It is essential to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and report any adverse reactions promptly.

Gentamicin is an antibiotic that belongs to the class of aminoglycosides. It is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including:

* Gram-negative bacterial infections, such as those caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis
* Certain Gram-positive bacterial infections, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes

Gentamicin works by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, which inhibits protein synthesis and ultimately leads to bacterial cell death. It is typically given via injection (intramuscularly or intravenously) and is often used in combination with other antibiotics to treat serious infections.

Like all aminoglycosides, gentamicin can cause kidney damage and hearing loss, especially when used for long periods of time or at high doses. Therefore, monitoring of drug levels and renal function is recommended during treatment.

Patient isolators are specialized, controlled environments used in healthcare settings to prevent the spread of infectious agents or diseases from patients to healthcare workers and other patients. These isolators can be in the form of negative pressure rooms, glove boxes, or portable units that create a physical barrier between the patient and the environment. They are equipped with HEPA filters and airflow systems to ensure unidirectional airflow and prevent cross-contamination. Patient isolators are used for the care of patients with highly infectious diseases such as Ebola, tuberculosis, and other airborne infections.

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Cefotetan is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to the death of the bacteria. Cefotetan has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many different types of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Cefotetan is often used to treat intra-abdominal infections, gynecological infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and bone and joint infections. It is administered intravenously or intramuscularly, and the dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

Like all antibiotics, cefotetan can cause side effects, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and allergic reactions. It may also increase the risk of bleeding, particularly in patients with impaired kidney function or those taking blood thinners. Therefore, it is important to be closely monitored by a healthcare provider while taking this medication.

Penicillins are a group of antibiotics derived from the Penicillium fungus. They are widely used to treat various bacterial infections due to their bactericidal activity, which means they kill bacteria by interfering with the synthesis of their cell walls. The first penicillin, benzylpenicillin (also known as penicillin G), was discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming. Since then, numerous semi-synthetic penicillins have been developed to expand the spectrum of activity and stability against bacterial enzymes that can inactivate these drugs.

Penicillins are classified into several groups based on their chemical structure and spectrum of activity:

1. Natural Penicillins (e.g., benzylpenicillin, phenoxymethylpenicillin): These have a narrow spectrum of activity, mainly targeting Gram-positive bacteria such as streptococci and staphylococci. However, they are susceptible to degradation by beta-lactamase enzymes produced by some bacteria.
2. Penicillinase-resistant Penicillins (e.g., methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin): These penicillins resist degradation by certain bacterial beta-lactamases and are primarily used to treat infections caused by staphylococci, including methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).
3. Aminopenicillins (e.g., ampicillin, amoxicillin): These penicillins have an extended spectrum of activity compared to natural penicillins, including some Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. However, they are still susceptible to degradation by many beta-lactamases.
4. Antipseudomonal Penicillins (e.g., carbenicillin, ticarcillin): These penicillins have activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other Gram-negative bacteria with increased resistance to other antibiotics. They are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanate or tazobactam to protect them from degradation.
5. Extended-spectrum Penicillins (e.g., piperacillin): These penicillins have a broad spectrum of activity, including many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. They are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors to protect them from degradation.

Penicillins are generally well-tolerated antibiotics; however, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, ranging from mild skin rashes to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Cross-reactivity between different penicillin classes and other beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g., cephalosporins) is possible but varies depending on the specific drugs involved.

Endometritis is a medical condition that refers to the inflammation of the endometrium, which is the innermost layer of the uterus. It is often caused by infections, such as bacterial or fungal infections, that enter the uterus through various routes, including childbirth, miscarriage, or surgical procedures.

The symptoms of endometritis may include abnormal vaginal discharge, pelvic pain, fever, and abdominal cramping. In severe cases, it can lead to complications such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, or sepsis. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics to clear the infection, as well as supportive care to manage symptoms and promote healing.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any symptoms of endometritis, as prompt treatment can help prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Cefonicid is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to the death of the bacteria. Cefonicid is administered intravenously and is typically used to treat serious infections such as sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis.

Here is the medical definition of 'Cefonicid':

Cefonicid is a semisynthetic, broad-spectrum, bactericidal antibiotic of the cephalosporin class. It is administered intravenously and has a long half-life, allowing for once- or twice-daily dosing. Cefonicid is stable in the presence of beta-lactamases, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), making it useful for treating infections caused by bacteria that produce these enzymes. It is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis.

Common side effects of cefonicid include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and local reactions at the injection site. More serious side effects can include allergic reactions, kidney damage, and seizures. Cefonicid should be used with caution in patients with a history of allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics, impaired renal function, or a history of seizure disorders.

Thoracic surgery, also known as cardiothoracic surgery, is a branch of medicine that specializes in the surgical treatment of diseases affecting the organs inside the thorax (chest), specifically the heart, lungs, esophagus, and major blood vessels. This can include procedures such as lung biopsies, lobectomies, pneumonectomies, esophagectomies, heart valve repairs or replacements, coronary artery bypass grafting, and treatment of chest injuries. Thoracic surgeons are medical doctors who have completed extensive training in this field, including a general surgery residency followed by a fellowship in thoracic surgery.

Bioterrorism is the intentional use of microorganisms or toxins derived from living organisms to cause disease, death, or disruption in noncombatant populations. Biological agents can be spread through the air, water, or food and may take hours to days to cause illness, depending on the agent and route of exposure. Examples of biological agents that could be used as weapons include anthrax, smallpox, plague, botulism toxin, and viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola. Bioterrorism is a form of terrorism and is considered a public health emergency because it has the potential to cause widespread illness and death, as well as social disruption and economic loss.

The medical definition of bioterrorism focuses on the use of biological agents as weapons and the public health response to such attacks. It is important to note that the majority of incidents involving the intentional release of biological agents have been limited in scope and have not resulted in widespread illness or death. However, the potential for large-scale harm makes bioterrorism a significant concern for public health officials and emergency responders.

Preparation and response to bioterrorism involve a multidisciplinary approach that includes medical professionals, public health officials, law enforcement agencies, and government organizations at the local, state, and federal levels. Preparedness efforts include developing plans and procedures for responding to a bioterrorism event, training healthcare providers and first responders in the recognition and management of biological agents, and stockpiling vaccines, medications, and other resources that may be needed during a response.

In summary, bioterrorism is the intentional use of biological agents as weapons to cause illness, death, or disruption in noncombatant populations. It is considered a public health emergency due to its potential for widespread harm and requires a multidisciplinary approach to preparedness and response.

Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are defined as the presence of pathogenic microorganisms, typically bacteria, in any part of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, resulting in infection and inflammation. The majority of UTIs are caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, but other organisms such as Klebsiella, Proteus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Enterococcus can also cause UTIs.

UTIs can be classified into two types based on the location of the infection:

1. Lower UTI or bladder infection (cystitis): This type of UTI affects the bladder and urethra. Symptoms may include a frequent and urgent need to urinate, pain or burning during urination, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, and discomfort in the lower abdomen or back.

2. Upper UTI or kidney infection (pyelonephritis): This type of UTI affects the kidneys and can be more severe than a bladder infection. Symptoms may include fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, and pain in the flanks or back.

UTIs are more common in women than men due to their shorter urethra, which makes it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder. Other risk factors for UTIs include sexual activity, use of diaphragms or spermicides, urinary catheterization, diabetes, and weakened immune systems.

UTIs are typically diagnosed through a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the causative organism and determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. In some cases, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan may be necessary to evaluate for any underlying abnormalities in the urinary tract.

Bacteremia is the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream. It is a medical condition that occurs when bacteria from another source, such as an infection in another part of the body, enter the bloodstream. Bacteremia can cause symptoms such as fever, chills, and rapid heart rate, and it can lead to serious complications such as sepsis if not treated promptly with antibiotics.

Bacteremia is often a result of an infection elsewhere in the body that allows bacteria to enter the bloodstream. This can happen through various routes, such as during medical procedures, intravenous (IV) drug use, or from infected wounds or devices that come into contact with the bloodstream. In some cases, bacteremia may also occur without any obvious source of infection.

It is important to note that not all bacteria in the bloodstream cause harm, and some people may have bacteria in their blood without showing any symptoms. However, if bacteria in the bloodstream multiply and cause an immune response, it can lead to bacteremia and potentially serious complications.

Endocarditis is an inflammation of the inner layer of the heart chambers and heart valves, called the endocardium. This inflammation typically results from a bacterial or, less commonly, fungal infection that travels through the bloodstream and attaches to damaged areas of the heart.

There are two main types of endocarditis:

1. Acute Endocarditis: Develops quickly and can be severe, causing fever, chills, shortness of breath, fatigue, and heart murmurs. It may lead to serious complications like heart failure, embolism (blood clots that travel to other parts of the body), and damage to heart valves.

2. Subacute Endocarditis: Develops more slowly, often causing milder symptoms that can be mistaken for a cold or flu. Symptoms may include fatigue, weakness, fever, night sweats, weight loss, joint pain, and heart murmurs. Subacute endocarditis is more likely to affect people with previously damaged heart valves or congenital heart conditions.

Treatment usually involves several weeks of intravenous antibiotics or antifungal medications, depending on the cause of the infection. In some cases, surgery may be required to repair or replace damaged heart valves. Preventive measures include good oral hygiene and prompt treatment of infections, especially in individuals at a higher risk for endocarditis, such as those with congenital heart defects, artificial heart valves, or previous history of endocarditis.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Diagnostic techniques in urology are methods used to identify and diagnose various urological conditions affecting the urinary tract and male reproductive system. These techniques include:

1. Urinalysis: A laboratory examination of a urine sample to detect abnormalities such as infection, kidney stones, or other underlying medical conditions.
2. Urine Culture: A test used to identify and grow bacteria from the urine to determine the type of bacterial infection present in the urinary tract.
3. Imaging Studies: Various imaging techniques such as X-rays, ultrasound, CT scans, and MRI scans are used to visualize the internal structures of the urinary tract and identify any abnormalities.
4. Cystoscopy: A procedure that involves inserting a thin tube with a camera into the bladder through the urethra to examine the bladder and urethra for signs of disease or abnormality.
5. Urodynamics: A series of tests used to evaluate bladder function, including measuring bladder pressure and urine flow rate.
6. Biopsy: The removal and examination of tissue from the urinary tract or male reproductive system to diagnose conditions such as cancer.
7. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test: A blood test used to screen for prostate cancer by measuring the level of PSA, a protein produced by the prostate gland.
8. Voiding Diary: A record of urinary habits, including the frequency and volume of urination, that can help diagnose conditions such as overactive bladder or urinary incontinence.

Dental prophylaxis is a dental procedure aimed at the prevention and treatment of dental diseases. It is commonly known as a "teeth cleaning" and is performed by a dentist or dental hygienist. The procedure involves removing plaque, tartar, and stains from the teeth to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Dental prophylaxis may also include polishing the teeth, applying fluoride, and providing oral hygiene instructions to promote good oral health. It is recommended that individuals receive a dental prophylaxis every six months or as directed by their dentist.

Bacterial drug resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance that occurs when bacteria evolve the ability to survive and reproduce in the presence of drugs (such as antibiotics) that would normally kill them or inhibit their growth. This can happen due to various mechanisms, including genetic mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes from other bacteria.

As a result, bacterial infections may become more difficult to treat, requiring higher doses of medication, alternative drugs, or longer treatment courses. In some cases, drug-resistant infections can lead to serious health complications, increased healthcare costs, and higher mortality rates.

Examples of bacterial drug resistance include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Preventing the spread of bacterial drug resistance is crucial for maintaining effective treatments for infectious diseases.

Staphylococcal infections are a type of infection caused by Staphylococcus bacteria, which are commonly found on the skin and nose of healthy people. However, if they enter the body through a cut, scratch, or other wound, they can cause an infection.

There are several types of Staphylococcus bacteria, but the most common one that causes infections is Staphylococcus aureus. These infections can range from minor skin infections such as pimples, boils, and impetigo to serious conditions such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and toxic shock syndrome.

Symptoms of staphylococcal infections depend on the type and severity of the infection. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, either topical or oral, depending on the severity and location of the infection. In some cases, hospitalization may be necessary for more severe infections. It is important to note that some strains of Staphylococcus aureus have developed resistance to certain antibiotics, making them more difficult to treat.

A wound infection is defined as the invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in a part of the body tissue, which has been damaged by a cut, blow, or other trauma, leading to inflammation, purulent discharge, and sometimes systemic toxicity. The symptoms may include redness, swelling, pain, warmth, and fever. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics and proper wound care. It's important to note that not all wounds will become infected, but those that are contaminated with bacteria, dirt, or other foreign substances, or those in which the skin's natural barrier has been significantly compromised, are at a higher risk for infection.

Anti-infective agents for the urinary tract are medications used to prevent or treat infections caused by microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses) in the urinary system. These agents can be administered locally (for example, via catheter instillation) or systemically (orally or intravenously).

Common classes of anti-infective agents used for urinary tract infections include:

1. Antibiotics: These are the most commonly prescribed class of anti-infectives for urinary tract infections. They target and kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria responsible for the infection. Common antibiotics used for this purpose include trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, and fosfomycin.
2. Antifungals: These medications are used to treat fungal urinary tract infections (UTIs). Common antifungal agents include fluconazole, amphotericin B, and nystatin.
3. Antivirals: Although rare, viral UTIs can occur, and antiviral medications may be prescribed to treat them. Examples of antiviral agents used for urinary tract infections include acyclovir and valacyclovir.

It is essential to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment for any suspected urinary tract infection. Improper use or misuse of anti-infective agents can lead to antibiotic resistance, making future treatments more challenging.

A joint prosthesis, also known as an artificial joint or a replacement joint, is a surgical implant used to replace all or part of a damaged or diseased joint. The most common types of joint prostheses are total hip replacements and total knee replacements. These prostheses typically consist of a combination of metal, plastic, and ceramic components that are designed to replicate the movement and function of a natural joint.

Joint prostheses are usually recommended for patients who have severe joint pain or mobility issues that cannot be adequately managed with other treatments such as physical therapy, medication, or lifestyle changes. The goal of joint replacement surgery is to relieve pain, improve joint function, and enhance the patient's quality of life.

Joint prostheses are typically made from materials such as titanium, cobalt-chrome alloys, stainless steel, polyethylene plastic, and ceramics. The choice of material depends on a variety of factors, including the patient's age, activity level, weight, and overall health.

While joint replacement surgery is generally safe and effective, there are risks associated with any surgical procedure, including infection, blood clots, implant loosening or failure, and nerve damage. Patients who undergo joint replacement surgery typically require several weeks of rehabilitation and physical therapy to regain strength and mobility in the affected joint.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Infectious pregnancy complications refer to infections that occur during pregnancy and can affect the mother, fetus, or both. These infections can lead to serious consequences such as preterm labor, low birth weight, birth defects, stillbirth, or even death. Some common infectious agents that can cause pregnancy complications include:

1. Bacteria: Examples include group B streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause sepsis, meningitis, or pneumonia in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.
2. Viruses: Examples include cytomegalovirus, rubella, varicella-zoster, and HIV, which can cause congenital anomalies, developmental delays, or transmission of the virus to the fetus.
3. Parasites: Examples include Toxoplasma gondii, which can cause severe neurological damage in the fetus if transmitted during pregnancy.
4. Fungi: Examples include Candida albicans, which can cause fungal infections in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.

Preventive measures such as vaccination, good hygiene practices, and avoiding high-risk behaviors can help reduce the risk of infectious pregnancy complications. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of infections during pregnancy are also crucial to prevent adverse outcomes.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Metronidazole is an antibiotic and antiprotozoal medication. It is primarily used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria and certain parasites. Metronidazole works by interfering with the DNA of these organisms, which inhibits their ability to grow and multiply.

It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, creams, and gels, and is often used to treat conditions such as bacterial vaginosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, amebiasis, giardiasis, and pseudomembranous colitis.

Like all antibiotics, metronidazole should be taken only under the direction of a healthcare provider, as misuse can lead to antibiotic resistance and other complications.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

A Cesarean section, often referred to as a C-section, is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. It involves making an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus to remove the baby. This procedure may be necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the mother or the baby at risk.

There are several reasons why a C-section might be recommended, including:

* The baby is in a breech position (feet first) or a transverse position (sideways) and cannot be turned to a normal head-down position.
* The baby is too large to safely pass through the mother's birth canal.
* The mother has a medical condition, such as heart disease or high blood pressure, that could make vaginal delivery risky.
* The mother has an infection, such as HIV or herpes, that could be passed to the baby during a vaginal delivery.
* The labor is not progressing and there are concerns about the health of the mother or the baby.

C-sections are generally safe for both the mother and the baby, but like any surgery, they do carry some risks. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, and injury to nearby organs. In addition, women who have a C-section are more likely to experience complications in future pregnancies, such as placenta previa or uterine rupture.

If you have questions about whether a C-section is necessary for your delivery, it's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider.

Anthrax is a serious infectious disease caused by gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria called Bacillus anthracis. This bacterium produces spores that can survive in the environment for many years. Anthrax can be found naturally in soil and commonly affects animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats. Humans can get infected with anthrax by handling contaminated animal products or by inhaling or coming into contact with contaminated soil, water, or vegetation.

There are three main forms of anthrax infection:

1. Cutaneous anthrax: This is the most common form and occurs when the spores enter the body through a cut or abrasion on the skin. It starts as a painless bump that eventually develops into a ulcer with a black center.
2. Inhalation anthrax (also known as wool-sorter's disease): This occurs when a person inhales anthrax spores, which can lead to severe respiratory symptoms and potentially fatal illness.
3. Gastrointestinal anthrax: This form is rare and results from consuming contaminated meat. It causes nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, which may be bloody.

Anthrax can be treated with antibiotics, but early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for a successful outcome. Preventive measures include vaccination and avoiding contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products. Anthrax is also considered a potential bioterrorism agent due to its ease of dissemination and high mortality rate if left untreated.

A basilar skull fracture is a type of skull fracture that involves the base of the skull. It is a serious and potentially life-threatening injury, as it can cause damage to the brainstem and cranial nerves. A basilar skull fracture may occur as a result of a severe head trauma, such as from a fall, car accident, or violent assault.

In a basilar skull fracture, the bones that form the base of the skull (the occipital bone, sphenoid bone, and temporal bones) are broken. This type of fracture can be difficult to diagnose on a routine skull X-ray, and may require further imaging studies such as a CT scan or MRI to confirm the diagnosis.

Symptoms of a basilar skull fracture may include:

* Battle's sign: a bruise behind the ear
* Raccoon eyes: bruising around the eyes
* Clear fluid leaking from the nose or ears (cerebrospinal fluid)
* Hearing loss
* Facial paralysis
* Difficulty swallowing
* Changes in level of consciousness

If you suspect that someone has a basilar skull fracture, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. This type of injury requires prompt treatment and close monitoring to prevent complications such as infection or brain swelling.

Anti-infective agents are a class of medications that are used to treat infections caused by various microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. These agents work by either killing the microorganism or inhibiting its growth, thereby helping to control the infection and alleviate symptoms.

There are several types of anti-infective agents, including:

1. Antibiotics: These are medications that are used to treat bacterial infections. They work by either killing bacteria (bactericidal) or inhibiting their growth (bacteriostatic).
2. Antivirals: These are medications that are used to treat viral infections. They work by interfering with the replication of the virus, preventing it from spreading and causing further damage.
3. Antifungals: These are medications that are used to treat fungal infections. They work by disrupting the cell membrane of the fungus, killing it or inhibiting its growth.
4. Antiparasitics: These are medications that are used to treat parasitic infections. They work by either killing the parasite or inhibiting its growth and reproduction.

It is important to note that anti-infective agents are not effective against all types of infections, and it is essential to use them appropriately to avoid the development of drug-resistant strains of microorganisms.

Oral surgery is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis and surgical treatment of various conditions related to the mouth, teeth, jaws, and facial structures. Some of the common procedures performed by oral surgeons include:

1. Tooth extractions: Removal of severely decayed, damaged, or impacted teeth, such as wisdom teeth.
2. Dental implant placement: Surgical insertion of titanium posts that serve as artificial tooth roots to support dental restorations like crowns, bridges, or dentures.
3. Jaw surgery (orthognathic surgery): Corrective procedures for misaligned jaws, uneven bite, or sleep apnea caused by structural jaw abnormalities.
4. Oral pathology: Diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant growths or lesions in the oral cavity, including biopsies and removal of tumors.
5. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders: Surgical intervention for issues related to the joint that connects the jawbone to the skull, such as arthroscopy, open joint surgery, or total joint replacement.
6. Facial trauma reconstruction: Repair of fractured facial bones, soft tissue injuries, and lacerations resulting from accidents, sports injuries, or interpersonal violence.
7. Cleft lip and palate repair: Surgical correction of congenital deformities affecting the upper lip and hard/soft palate.
8. Sleep apnea treatment: Surgical reduction or removal of excess tissue in the throat to alleviate airway obstruction and improve breathing during sleep.
9. Cosmetic procedures: Enhancement of facial aesthetics through various techniques, such as chin or cheekbone augmentation, lip reshaping, or scar revision.

Oral surgeons typically complete a four-year dental school program followed by an additional four to six years of specialized surgical training in a hospital-based residency program. They are qualified to administer general anesthesia and often perform procedures in a hospital setting or outpatient surgical center.

Physician's practice patterns refer to the individual habits and preferences of healthcare providers when it comes to making clinical decisions and managing patient care. These patterns can encompass various aspects, such as:

1. Diagnostic testing: The types and frequency of diagnostic tests ordered for patients with similar conditions.
2. Treatment modalities: The choice of treatment options, including medications, procedures, or referrals to specialists.
3. Patient communication: The way physicians communicate with their patients, including the amount and type of information shared, as well as the level of patient involvement in decision-making.
4. Follow-up care: The frequency and duration of follow-up appointments, as well as the monitoring of treatment effectiveness and potential side effects.
5. Resource utilization: The use of healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations, imaging studies, or specialist consultations, and the associated costs.

Physician practice patterns can be influenced by various factors, including medical training, clinical experience, personal beliefs, guidelines, and local availability of resources. Understanding these patterns is essential for evaluating the quality of care, identifying potential variations in care, and implementing strategies to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

Ampicillin is a penicillin-type antibiotic used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the ability of bacteria to form cell walls, which are essential for their survival. This causes the bacterial cells to become unstable and eventually die.

The medical definition of Ampicillin is:

"A semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic, derived from the Penicillium mold. It is used to treat a variety of infections caused by susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Ampicillin is effective against both aerobic and anaerobic organisms. It is commonly used to treat respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, meningitis, and endocarditis."

It's important to note that Ampicillin is not effective against infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or other bacteria that have developed resistance to penicillins. Additionally, overuse of antibiotics like Ampicillin can lead to the development of antibiotic resistance, which is a significant public health concern.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a severe and potentially life-threatening form of acute pancreatitis, which is an inflammatory condition of the pancreas. In acute necrotizing pancreatitis, there is widespread death (necrosis) of pancreatic tissue due to autodigestion caused by the activation and release of digestive enzymes within the pancreas. This condition can lead to systemic inflammation, organ failure, and infection of the necrotic areas in the pancreas. It typically has a more complicated clinical course and worse prognosis compared to acute interstitial pancreatitis, which is another form of acute pancreatitis without significant necrosis.

Ciprofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic that is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including respiratory, urinary, and skin infections. It works by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase, which is an enzyme necessary for bacterial replication and transcription. This leads to bacterial cell death. Ciprofloxacin is available in oral and injectable forms and is usually prescribed to be taken twice a day. Common side effects include nausea, diarrhea, and headache. It may also cause serious adverse reactions such as tendinitis, tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy, and central nervous system effects. It is important to note that ciprofloxacin should not be used in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones and should be used with caution in patients with a history of seizures, brain injury, or other neurological conditions.

Vancomycin is an antibiotic that belongs to the glycopeptide class. It is primarily used to treat severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). Vancomycin works by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls. It is usually administered intravenously in a hospital setting due to its potential nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. The medical definition of 'Vancomycin' can be summarized as:

"A glycopeptide antibiotic used to treat severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, particularly those that are resistant to other antibiotics. It inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is administered intravenously due to its potential nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity."

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New Caledonia" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually the name of a group of islands located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, east of Australia. The main island, Grande Terre, is known for its beautiful landscapes, which include mountains, beaches, and lagoons. New Caledonia is a special collectivity of France, and French is one of the official languages spoken there. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those instead!

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to an infection injures its own tissues and organs. It is characterized by a whole-body inflammatory state (systemic inflammation) that can lead to blood clotting issues, tissue damage, and multiple organ failure.

Sepsis happens when an infection you already have triggers a chain reaction throughout your body. Infections that lead to sepsis most often start in the lungs, urinary tract, skin, or gastrointestinal tract.

Sepsis is a medical emergency. If you suspect sepsis, seek immediate medical attention. Early recognition and treatment of sepsis are crucial to improve outcomes. Treatment usually involves antibiotics, intravenous fluids, and may require oxygen, medication to raise blood pressure, and corticosteroids. In severe cases, surgery may be required to clear the infection.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

'Infection Control' is a set of practices, procedures, and protocols designed to prevent the spread of infectious agents in healthcare settings. It includes measures to minimize the risk of transmission of pathogens from both recognized and unrecognized sources, such as patients, healthcare workers, visitors, and the environment.

Infection control strategies may include:

* Hand hygiene (handwashing and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers)
* Use of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, masks, gowns, and eye protection
* Respiratory etiquette, including covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
* Environmental cleaning and disinfection
* Isolation precautions for patients with known or suspected infectious diseases
* Immunization of healthcare workers
* Safe injection practices
* Surveillance and reporting of infections and outbreaks

The goal of infection control is to protect patients, healthcare workers, and visitors from acquiring and transmitting infections.

Erythromycin is a type of antibiotic known as a macrolide, which is used to treat various types of bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the bacteria's ability to produce proteins, which are necessary for the bacteria to survive and multiply. Erythromycin is often used to treat respiratory tract infections, skin infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It may also be used to prevent endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart) in people at risk of this condition.

Erythromycin is generally considered safe for most people, but it can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to tell your doctor about all the drugs you are taking before starting erythromycin.

Like all antibiotics, erythromycin should only be used to treat bacterial infections, as it is not effective against viral infections such as the common cold or flu. Overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which makes it harder to treat infections in the future.

Amoxicillin is a type of antibiotic known as a penicillin. It works by interfering with the ability of bacteria to form cell walls, which is necessary for their growth and survival. By disrupting this process, amoxicillin can kill bacteria and help to clear up infections.

Amoxicillin is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, ear infections, skin infections, and urinary tract infections. It is available as a tablet, capsule, chewable tablet, or liquid suspension, and is typically taken two to three times a day.

Like all antibiotics, amoxicillin should be used only under the direction of a healthcare provider, and it is important to take the full course of treatment as prescribed, even if symptoms improve before the medication is finished. Misuse of antibiotics can lead to the development of drug-resistant bacteria, which can make infections more difficult to treat in the future.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Indwelling catheters, also known as Foley catheters, are medical devices that are inserted into the bladder to drain urine. They have a small balloon at the tip that is inflated with water once the catheter is in the correct position in the bladder, allowing it to remain in place and continuously drain urine. Indwelling catheters are typically used for patients who are unable to empty their bladders on their own, such as those who are bedridden or have nerve damage that affects bladder function. They are also used during and after certain surgical procedures. Prolonged use of indwelling catheters can increase the risk of urinary tract infections and other complications.

Levofloxacin is an antibiotic medication that belongs to the fluoroquinolone class. It works by interfering with the bacterial DNA replication, transcription, and repair processes, leading to bacterial cell death. Levofloxacin is used to treat a variety of infections caused by susceptible bacteria, including respiratory, skin, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal infections. It is available in various forms, such as tablets, oral solution, and injection, for different routes of administration.

The medical definition of Levofloxacin can be stated as:

Levofloxacin is a synthetic antibacterial drug with the chemical name (-)-(S)-9-fluoro-2,3-dihydro-3-methoxy-10-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-9-oxoanthracene-1-carboxylic acid l-alanyl-l-proline methylester monohydrate. It is the levo isomer of ofloxacin and is used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections by inhibiting bacterial DNA gyrase, thereby preventing DNA replication and transcription. Levofloxacin is available as tablets, oral solution, and injection for oral and parenteral administration.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

A closed fracture, also known as a simple fracture, is a type of bone break where the skin remains intact and there is no open wound. The bone may be broken in such a way that it does not pierce the skin, but still requires medical attention for proper diagnosis, treatment, and healing. Closed fractures can range from hairline cracks to complete breaks and can occur due to various reasons, including trauma, overuse, or weakened bones. It is important to seek immediate medical care if a closed fracture is suspected, as improper healing can lead to long-term complications such as decreased mobility, chronic pain, or deformity.

Dental care refers to the practice of maintaining and improving the oral health of the teeth and gums. It involves regular check-ups, cleanings, and treatments by dental professionals such as dentists, hygienists, and dental assistants. Dental care also includes personal habits and practices, such as brushing and flossing, that help prevent tooth decay and gum disease.

Regular dental care is important for preventing common dental problems like cavities, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. It can also help detect early signs of more serious health issues, such as oral cancer or diabetes, which can have symptoms that appear in the mouth.

Dental care may involve a range of treatments, from routine cleanings and fillings to more complex procedures like root canals, crowns, bridges, and implants. Dental professionals use various tools and techniques to diagnose and treat dental problems, including X-rays, dental impressions, and local anesthesia.

Overall, dental care is a critical component of overall health and wellness, as poor oral health has been linked to a range of systemic health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and respiratory infections.

Microbial drug resistance is a significant medical issue that refers to the ability of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand or survive exposure to drugs or medications designed to kill them or limit their growth. This phenomenon has become a major global health concern, particularly in the context of bacterial infections, where it is also known as antibiotic resistance.

Drug resistance arises due to genetic changes in microorganisms that enable them to modify or bypass the effects of antimicrobial agents. These genetic alterations can be caused by mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer. The resistant microbes then replicate and multiply, forming populations that are increasingly difficult to eradicate with conventional treatments.

The consequences of drug-resistant infections include increased morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and the potential for widespread outbreaks. Factors contributing to the emergence and spread of microbial drug resistance include the overuse or misuse of antimicrobials, poor infection control practices, and inadequate surveillance systems.

To address this challenge, it is crucial to promote prudent antibiotic use, strengthen infection prevention and control measures, develop new antimicrobial agents, and invest in research to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Antisepsis is the process of preventing or limiting the growth and reproduction of microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses) that can cause infection or disease. This is typically achieved through the use of antiseptic agents, which are substances that inhibit the growth of microorganisms when applied to living tissue or non-living material like surfaces.

Antiseptics work by either killing the microorganisms outright (bactericidal) or preventing them from reproducing and growing (bacteriostatic). They can be applied topically, in the form of creams, ointments, gels, sprays, or washes, to prevent infection in wounds, cuts, burns, or other types of skin damage. Antiseptics are also used in medical devices and equipment to maintain sterility and prevent cross-contamination during procedures.

Examples of antiseptic agents include alcohol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, iodine, and povidone-iodine. The choice of antiseptic depends on the type of microorganism being targeted, the location and severity of the infection, and any potential adverse effects or interactions with other medications or medical conditions.

It's important to note that antisepsis is different from sterilization, which involves the complete destruction of all living organisms, including spores, using methods such as heat, radiation, or chemicals. Sterilization is typically used for surgical instruments and other medical equipment that come into direct contact with sterile tissues or bodily fluids during procedures.

Cross infection, also known as cross-contamination, is the transmission of infectious agents or diseases between patients in a healthcare setting. This can occur through various means such as contaminated equipment, surfaces, hands of healthcare workers, or the air. It is an important concern in medical settings and measures are taken to prevent its occurrence, including proper hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), environmental cleaning and disinfection, and safe injection practices.

Vertical transmission of infectious diseases refers to the spread of an infection from an infected mother to her offspring during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. This mode of transmission can occur through several pathways:

1. Transplacental transmission: The infection crosses the placenta and reaches the fetus while it is still in the womb. Examples include HIV, syphilis, and toxoplasmosis.
2. Intrauterine infection: The mother's infection causes direct damage to the developing fetus or its surrounding tissues, leading to complications such as congenital defects. Examples include rubella and cytomegalovirus (CMV).
3. Perinatal transmission: This occurs during childbirth when the infant comes into contact with the mother's infected genital tract or bodily fluids. Examples include group B streptococcus, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and hepatitis B.
4. Postnatal transmission: This occurs after birth, often through breastfeeding, when the infant ingests infected milk or comes into contact with the mother's contaminated bodily fluids. Examples include HIV and HTLV-I (human T-lymphotropic virus type I).

Vertical transmission is a significant concern in public health, as it can lead to severe complications, congenital disabilities, or even death in newborns. Preventive measures, such as prenatal screening, vaccination, and antimicrobial treatment, are crucial for reducing the risk of vertical transmission and ensuring better outcomes for both mothers and their offspring.

Ofloxacin is an antibacterial drug, specifically a fluoroquinolone. It works by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase, which is essential for the bacteria to replicate. This results in the death of the bacteria and helps to stop the infection. Ofloxacin is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It is available in various forms, such as tablets, capsules, and eye drops. As with any medication, it should be used only under the direction of a healthcare professional, and its use may be associated with certain risks and side effects.

Inguinal hernia, also known as an inguinal rupture or groin hernia, is a protrusion of abdominal-cavity contents through the inguinal canal. The inguinal canal is a passage in the lower abdominal wall that carries the spermatic cord in males and a round ligament in females. Inguinal hernias are more common in men than women.

There are two types of inguinal hernias: direct and indirect. Direct inguinal hernias occur when the abdominal lining and/or fat push through a weakened area in the lower abdominal wall, while indirect inguinal hernias result from a congenital condition where the abdominal lining and/or fat protrude through the internal inguinal ring, a normal opening in the abdominal wall.

Inguinal hernias can cause discomfort or pain, especially during physical activities, coughing, sneezing, or straining. In some cases, incarceration or strangulation of the hernia may occur, leading to serious complications such as bowel obstruction or tissue necrosis, which require immediate medical attention.

Surgical repair is the standard treatment for inguinal hernias, and it can be performed through open or laparoscopic techniques. The goal of surgery is to return the protruding tissues to their proper position and strengthen the weakened abdominal wall with sutures or mesh reinforcement.

Operative surgical procedures refer to medical interventions that involve manual manipulation of tissues, structures, or organs in the body, typically performed in an operating room setting under sterile conditions. These procedures are carried out with the use of specialized instruments, such as scalpels, forceps, and scissors, and may require regional or general anesthesia to ensure patient comfort and safety.

Operative surgical procedures can range from relatively minor interventions, such as a biopsy or the removal of a small lesion, to more complex and extensive surgeries, such as open heart surgery or total joint replacement. The specific goals of operative surgical procedures may include the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions, the repair or reconstruction of damaged tissues or organs, or the prevention of further disease progression.

Regardless of the type or complexity of the procedure, all operative surgical procedures require careful planning, execution, and postoperative management to ensure the best possible outcomes for patients.

Chemoprevention is a medical term that refers to the use of chemical agents, usually in the form of drugs or dietary supplements, to prevent or delay the development of cancer. These agents are typically designed to interfere with the molecular processes involved in cancer initiation, promotion, or progression.

There are several different approaches to chemoprevention, depending on the specific type of cancer and the individual patient's risk factors. Some chemopreventive agents work by blocking the action of hormones that can promote cancer growth, while others may inhibit the activity of enzymes involved in DNA damage or repair.

Chemoprevention is often used in individuals who are at high risk of developing cancer due to inherited genetic mutations, a history of precancerous lesions, or other factors. However, it is important to note that chemopreventive agents can have side effects and may not be appropriate for everyone. Therefore, they should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Azithromycin is a widely used antibiotic drug that belongs to the class of macrolides. It works by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, which leads to the death of susceptible bacteria. This medication is active against a broad range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, atypical bacteria, and some parasites.

Azithromycin is commonly prescribed to treat various bacterial infections, such as:

1. Respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinusitis
2. Skin and soft tissue infections
3. Sexually transmitted diseases, like chlamydia
4. Otitis media (middle ear infection)
5. Traveler's diarrhea

The drug is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, suspension, and intravenous solutions. The typical dosage for adults ranges from 250 mg to 500 mg per day, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

Like other antibiotics, azithromycin should be used judiciously to prevent antibiotic resistance. It is essential to complete the full course of treatment as prescribed by a healthcare professional, even if symptoms improve before finishing the medication.

The Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination is an antibiotic medication used to treat various infections caused by bacteria. This combination therapy combines the antibiotic amoxicillin with potassium clavulanate, which is a beta-lactamase inhibitor. The addition of potassium clavulanate helps protect amoxicillin from being broken down by certain types of bacteria that produce beta-lactamases, thus increasing the effectiveness of the antibiotic against a broader range of bacterial infections.

Amoxicillin is a type of penicillin antibiotic that works by inhibiting the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall, ultimately leading to bacterial death. However, some bacteria have developed enzymes called beta-lactamases, which can break down and inactivate certain antibiotics like amoxicillin. Potassium clavulanate is added to the combination to inhibit these beta-lactamase enzymes, allowing amoxicillin to maintain its effectiveness against a wider range of bacteria.

This combination medication is used to treat various infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and dental infections. It's essential to follow the prescribed dosage and duration as directed by a healthcare professional to ensure effective treatment and prevent antibiotic resistance.

Common brand names for this combination include Augmentin and Amoxiclav.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyethylene Terephthalates" is not a medical term. It is a type of polymer used in the manufacturing of various products, such as plastic bottles and textile fibers. Medically, you might encounter the abbreviation "PET" or "PET scan," which stands for "Positron Emission Tomography." A PET scan is a type of medical imaging that provides detailed pictures of the body's interior. If you have any medical terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Peritonitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the peritoneum, which is the serous membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The peritoneum has an important role in protecting the abdominal organs and providing a smooth surface for them to move against each other.

Peritonitis can occur as a result of bacterial or fungal infection, chemical irritation, or trauma to the abdomen. The most common cause of peritonitis is a rupture or perforation of an organ in the abdominal cavity, such as the appendix, stomach, or intestines, which allows bacteria from the gut to enter the peritoneal cavity.

Symptoms of peritonitis may include abdominal pain and tenderness, fever, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, and decreased bowel movements. In severe cases, peritonitis can lead to sepsis, a life-threatening condition characterized by widespread inflammation throughout the body.

Treatment for peritonitis typically involves antibiotics to treat the infection, as well as surgical intervention to repair any damage to the abdominal organs and remove any infected fluid or tissue from the peritoneal cavity. In some cases, a temporary or permanent drain may be placed in the abdomen to help remove excess fluid and promote healing.

Staphylococcus aureus is a type of gram-positive, round (coccal) bacterium that is commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals and humans. It is a facultative anaerobe, which means it can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause a wide range of infections, from mild skin infections such as pimples, impetigo, and furuncles (boils) to more severe and potentially life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and sepsis. It can also cause food poisoning and toxic shock syndrome.

The bacterium is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, including methicillin, which has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains that are difficult to treat. Proper hand hygiene and infection control practices are critical in preventing the spread of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA.

The American Heart Association (AHA) is a non-profit organization in the United States that aims to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke, including heart disease and stroke. The AHA was founded in 1924 and is one of the oldest and largest voluntary organizations dedicated to fighting cardiovascular disease.

The AHA provides a range of services, including:

* Funding research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of heart disease and stroke
* Providing educational resources for healthcare professionals, patients, and the general public
* Advocating for policies that promote heart health and prevent heart disease and stroke
* Developing guidelines and standards for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases

The AHA is funded through donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations. It operates with a volunteer board of directors and a professional staff. The organization has more than 3,400 volunteers and 70 local offices across the United States.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Staphylococcus epidermidis is a type of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacterium that is commonly found on the human skin and mucous membranes. It is a part of the normal flora and usually does not cause infection in healthy individuals. However, it can cause serious infections in people with weakened immune systems or when it enters the body through medical devices such as catheters or artificial joints. Infections caused by S. epidermidis are often difficult to treat due to its ability to form biofilms.

Medical Definition: Staphylococcus epidermidis is a gram-positive, catalase-positive, coagulase-negative coccus that commonly inhabits the skin and mucous membranes. It is a leading cause of nosocomial infections associated with indwelling medical devices and is known for its ability to form biofilms. S. epidermidis infections can cause a range of clinical manifestations, including bacteremia, endocarditis, urinary tract infections, and device-related infections.

A skull fracture is a break in one or more of the bones that form the skull. It can occur from a direct blow to the head, penetrating injuries like gunshot wounds, or from strong rotational forces during an accident. There are several types of skull fractures, including:

1. Linear Skull Fracture: This is the most common type, where there's a simple break in the bone without any splintering, depression, or displacement. It often doesn't require treatment unless it's near a sensitive area like an eye or ear.

2. Depressed Skull Fracture: In this type, a piece of the skull is pushed inward toward the brain. Surgery may be needed to relieve pressure on the brain and repair the fracture.

3. Diastatic Skull Fracture: This occurs along the suture lines (the fibrous joints between the skull bones) that haven't fused yet, often seen in infants and young children.

4. Basilar Skull Fracture: This involves fractures at the base of the skull. It can be serious due to potential injury to the cranial nerves and blood vessels located in this area.

5. Comminuted Skull Fracture: In this severe type, the bone is shattered into many pieces. These fractures usually require extensive surgical repair.

Symptoms of a skull fracture can include pain, swelling, bruising, bleeding (if there's an open wound), and in some cases, clear fluid draining from the ears or nose (cerebrospinal fluid leak). Severe fractures may cause brain injury, leading to symptoms like confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or neurological deficits. Immediate medical attention is necessary for any suspected skull fracture.

Streptomyces is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic, saprophytic bacteria that are widely distributed in soil, water, and decaying organic matter. They are known for their complex morphology, forming branching filaments called hyphae that can differentiate into long chains of spores.

Streptomyces species are particularly notable for their ability to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, antifungals, and other therapeutic compounds. In fact, many important antibiotics such as streptomycin, neomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin are derived from Streptomyces species.

Because of their industrial importance in the production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds, Streptomyces have been extensively studied and are considered model organisms for the study of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, and ecology.

Ceftriaxone is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which is used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall. Ceftriaxone has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics.

Ceftriaxone is available in injectable form and is commonly used to treat serious infections such as meningitis, pneumonia, and sepsis. It is also used to prevent infections after surgery or trauma. The drug is generally well-tolerated, but it can cause side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and rash. In rare cases, it may cause serious side effects such as anaphylaxis, kidney damage, and seizures.

It's important to note that Ceftriaxone should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare professional, and that it is not recommended for use in individuals with a history of allergic reactions to cephalosporins or penicillins. Additionally, as with all antibiotics, it should be taken as directed and for the full duration of the prescribed course of treatment, even if symptoms improve before the treatment is finished.

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure in which the spleen is removed from the body. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, near the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays several important roles in the body, including fighting certain types of infections, removing old or damaged red blood cells from the circulation, and storing platelets and white blood cells.

There are several reasons why a splenectomy may be necessary, including:

* Trauma to the spleen that cannot be repaired
* Certain types of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Sickle cell disease, which can cause the spleen to enlarge and become damaged
* A ruptured spleen, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly
* Certain blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or hemolytic anemia

A splenectomy is typically performed under general anesthesia and may be done using open surgery or laparoscopically. After the spleen is removed, the incision(s) are closed with sutures or staples. Recovery time varies depending on the individual and the type of surgery performed, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within a few weeks.

It's important to note that following a splenectomy, individuals may be at increased risk for certain types of infections, so it's recommended that they receive vaccinations to help protect against these infections. They should also seek medical attention promptly if they develop fever, chills, or other signs of infection.

Dentist's practice patterns refer to the typical habits, behaviors, and procedures followed by dental professionals when providing oral health care to patients. These patterns can encompass a wide range of factors, including:

1. Clinical Procedures: The types of dental treatments and services that a dentist routinely performs, such as fillings, crowns, root canals, extractions, cleanings, or orthodontic care.
2. Diagnostic Approaches: The methods used by the dentist to identify oral health issues, such as visual examinations, X-rays, or diagnostic tests.
3. Treatment Planning: How a dentist develops and communicates treatment plans to patients, including discussing various treatment options, potential risks and benefits, and costs.
4. Preventive Care: The emphasis placed on preventive dental care, such as regular cleanings, fluoride treatments, and patient education about oral hygiene practices.
5. Use of Technology: The adoption and integration of new technologies in dental practice, such as digital radiography, CAD/CAM systems for restorations, or 3D printing.
6. Referral Patterns: How often a dentist refers patients to specialists for more complex treatments, and which specialists they typically refer to.
7. Patient Communication: The manner in which a dentist communicates with patients, including explaining procedures, discussing treatment plans, and addressing concerns or questions.
8. Record Keeping: The systems used by the dentist to maintain patient records, including electronic health records (EHRs), treatment notes, and communication with other healthcare providers.
9. Infection Control: The practices and protocols in place to prevent the spread of infectious diseases within the dental practice.
10. Practice Management: The business aspects of running a dental practice, such as scheduling, billing, insurance management, and staffing.

Understanding dentist's practice patterns can provide valuable insights into the quality and consistency of dental care provided by different practitioners, as well as help identify areas for improvement in dental education, policy, and research.

A "newborn infant" refers to a baby in the first 28 days of life outside of the womb. This period is crucial for growth and development, but also poses unique challenges as the infant's immune system is not fully developed, making them more susceptible to various diseases.

"Newborn diseases" are health conditions that specifically affect newborn infants. These can be categorized into three main types:

1. Congenital disorders: These are conditions that are present at birth and may be inherited or caused by factors such as infection, exposure to harmful substances during pregnancy, or chromosomal abnormalities. Examples include Down syndrome, congenital heart defects, and spina bifida.

2. Infectious diseases: Newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to infections due to their immature immune systems. Common infectious diseases in newborns include sepsis (bloodstream infection), pneumonia, and meningitis. These can be acquired from the mother during pregnancy or childbirth, or from the environment after birth.

3. Developmental disorders: These are conditions that affect the normal growth and development of the newborn infant. Examples include cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and vision or hearing impairments.

It is important to note that many newborn diseases can be prevented or treated with appropriate medical care, including prenatal care, proper hygiene practices, and timely vaccinations. Regular check-ups and monitoring of the newborn's health by a healthcare provider are essential for early detection and management of any potential health issues.

Aminoglycosides are a class of antibiotics that are derived from bacteria and are used to treat various types of infections caused by gram-negative and some gram-positive bacteria. These antibiotics work by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, which inhibits protein synthesis and ultimately leads to bacterial cell death.

Some examples of aminoglycosides include gentamicin, tobramycin, neomycin, and streptomycin. These antibiotics are often used in combination with other antibiotics to treat severe infections, such as sepsis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections.

Aminoglycosides can have serious side effects, including kidney damage and hearing loss, so they are typically reserved for use in serious infections that cannot be treated with other antibiotics. They are also used topically to treat skin infections and prevent wound infections after surgery.

It's important to note that aminoglycosides should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as improper use can lead to antibiotic resistance and further health complications.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Antibiotics are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. They work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth.

Antineoplastics, also known as chemotherapeutic agents, are a class of drugs used to treat cancer. These medications target and destroy rapidly dividing cells, such as cancer cells, although they can also affect other quickly dividing cells in the body, such as those in the hair follicles or digestive tract, which can lead to side effects.

Antibiotics and antineoplastics are two different classes of drugs with distinct mechanisms of action and uses. It is important to use them appropriately and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

The rectum is the lower end of the digestive tract, located between the sigmoid colon and the anus. It serves as a storage area for feces before they are eliminated from the body. The rectum is about 12 cm long in adults and is surrounded by layers of muscle that help control defecation. The mucous membrane lining the rectum allows for the detection of stool, which triggers the reflex to have a bowel movement.

Anthrax vaccines are biological preparations designed to protect against anthrax, a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax can affect both humans and animals, and it is primarily transmitted through contact with contaminated animal products or, less commonly, through inhalation of spores.

There are two types of anthrax vaccines currently available:

1. Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA): This vaccine is licensed for use in the United States and is approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis in high-risk individuals, such as military personnel and laboratory workers who handle the bacterium. AVA contains a cell-free filtrate of cultured B. anthracis cells that have been chemically treated to render them non-infectious. The vaccine works by stimulating the production of antibodies against protective antigens (PA) present in the bacterial culture.
2. Recombinant Anthrax Vaccine (rPA): This vaccine, also known as BioThrax, is a newer generation anthrax vaccine that was approved for use in the United States in 2015. It contains only the recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of B. anthracis, which is produced using genetic engineering techniques. The rPA vaccine has been shown to be as effective as AVA in generating an immune response and offers several advantages, including a more straightforward manufacturing process, fewer side effects, and a longer shelf life.

Both vaccines require multiple doses for initial immunization, followed by periodic booster shots to maintain protection. Anthrax vaccines are generally safe and effective at preventing anthrax infection; however, they may cause mild to moderate side effects, such as soreness at the injection site, fatigue, and muscle aches. Severe allergic reactions are rare but possible.

It is important to note that anthrax vaccines do not provide immediate protection against anthrax infection. They require several weeks to stimulate an immune response, so they should be administered before potential exposure to the bacterium. In cases of known or suspected exposure to anthrax, antibiotics are used as a primary means of preventing and treating the disease.

'Bacillus anthracis' is the scientific name for the bacterium that causes anthrax, a serious and potentially fatal infectious disease. This gram-positive, spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium can be found in soil and commonly affects animals such as sheep, goats, and cattle. Anthrax can manifest in several forms, including cutaneous (skin), gastrointestinal, and inhalation anthrax, depending on the route of infection.

The spores of Bacillus anthracis are highly resistant to environmental conditions and can survive for years, making them a potential agent for bioterrorism or biowarfare. When inhaled, ingested, or introduced through breaks in the skin, these spores can germinate into vegetative bacteria that produce potent exotoxins responsible for anthrax symptoms and complications.

It is essential to distinguish Bacillus anthracis from other Bacillus species due to its public health significance and potential use as a biological weapon. Proper identification, prevention strategies, and medical countermeasures are crucial in mitigating the risks associated with this bacterium.

A "Drug Administration Schedule" refers to the plan for when and how a medication should be given to a patient. It includes details such as the dose, frequency (how often it should be taken), route (how it should be administered, such as orally, intravenously, etc.), and duration (how long it should be taken) of the medication. This schedule is often created and prescribed by healthcare professionals, such as doctors or pharmacists, to ensure that the medication is taken safely and effectively. It may also include instructions for missed doses or changes in the dosage.

A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a type of clinical study in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the experimental intervention or the control condition, which may be a standard of care, placebo, or no treatment. The goal of an RCT is to minimize bias and ensure that the results are due to the intervention being tested rather than other factors. This design allows for a comparison between the two groups to determine if there is a significant difference in outcomes. RCTs are often considered the gold standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical interventions, as they provide a high level of evidence for causal relationships between the intervention and health outcomes.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Infection is defined medically as the invasion and multiplication of pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites within the body, which can lead to tissue damage, illness, and disease. This process often triggers an immune response from the host's body in an attempt to eliminate the infectious agents and restore homeostasis. Infections can be transmitted through various routes, including airborne particles, direct contact with contaminated surfaces or bodily fluids, sexual contact, or vector-borne transmission. The severity of an infection may range from mild and self-limiting to severe and life-threatening, depending on factors such as the type and quantity of pathogen, the host's immune status, and any underlying health conditions.

An appendectomy is a surgical procedure in which the vermiform appendix is removed. This procedure is performed when a patient has appendicitis, which is an inflammation of the appendix that can lead to serious complications such as peritonitis or sepsis if not treated promptly. The surgery can be done as an open procedure, in which a single incision is made in the lower right abdomen, or as a laparoscopic procedure, in which several small incisions are made and specialized instruments are used to remove the appendix. In some cases, if the appendix has burst, a more extensive surgery may be required to clean out the abdominal cavity.

Gastroscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a gastroscope, which is a thin, flexible tube with a camera and light on the end, through the mouth and into the digestive tract. The gastroscope allows the doctor to visually examine the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors.

The procedure is usually performed under sedation to minimize discomfort, and it typically takes only a few minutes to complete. Gastroscopy can help diagnose various conditions, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastritis, stomach ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus. It can also be used to take tissue samples for biopsy or to treat certain conditions, such as bleeding or the removal of polyps.

Fever, also known as pyrexia or febrile response, is a common medical sign characterized by an elevation in core body temperature above the normal range of 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) due to a dysregulation of the body's thermoregulatory system. It is often a response to an infection, inflammation, or other underlying medical conditions, and it serves as a part of the immune system's effort to combat the invading pathogens or to repair damaged tissues.

Fevers can be classified based on their magnitude:

* Low-grade fever: 37.5-38°C (99.5-100.4°F)
* Moderate fever: 38-39°C (100.4-102.2°F)
* High-grade or severe fever: above 39°C (102.2°F)

It is important to note that a single elevated temperature reading does not necessarily indicate the presence of a fever, as body temperature can fluctuate throughout the day and can be influenced by various factors such as physical activity, environmental conditions, and the menstrual cycle in females. The diagnosis of fever typically requires the confirmation of an elevated core body temperature on at least two occasions or a consistently high temperature over a period of time.

While fevers are generally considered beneficial in fighting off infections and promoting recovery, extremely high temperatures or prolonged febrile states may necessitate medical intervention to prevent potential complications such as dehydration, seizures, or damage to vital organs.

Viridans Streptococci are a group of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are part of the normal flora in the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. They are called "viridans" because they tend to decolorize slowly and appear greenish in Gram stains. This group includes several species, such as Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus mutans.

Viridans Streptococci are often associated with dental caries and periodontal disease. However, they can also cause invasive infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or those with underlying medical conditions. These infections may include bacteremia, endocarditis, abscesses, and meningitis.

It is important to note that the identification of Viridans Streptococci can be challenging due to their similarities in biochemical characteristics. Therefore, molecular methods such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing are often used for accurate species-level identification.

Arthroplasty, replacement, is a surgical procedure where a damaged or diseased joint surface is removed and replaced with an artificial implant or device. The goal of this surgery is to relieve pain, restore function, and improve the quality of life for patients who have severe joint damage due to arthritis or other conditions.

During the procedure, the surgeon removes the damaged cartilage and bone from the joint and replaces them with a metal, plastic, or ceramic component that replicates the shape and function of the natural joint surface. The most common types of joint replacement surgery are hip replacement, knee replacement, and shoulder replacement.

The success rate of joint replacement surgery is generally high, with many patients experiencing significant pain relief and improved mobility. However, as with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved, including infection, blood clots, implant loosening or failure, and nerve damage. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the potential benefits and risks of joint replacement surgery with a healthcare provider before making a decision.

Preoperative care refers to the series of procedures, interventions, and preparations that are conducted before a surgical operation. The primary goal of preoperative care is to ensure the patient's well-being, optimize their physical condition, reduce potential risks, and prepare them mentally and emotionally for the upcoming surgery.

Preoperative care typically includes:

1. Preoperative assessment: A thorough evaluation of the patient's overall health status, including medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and diagnostic imaging, to identify any potential risk factors or comorbidities that may impact the surgical procedure and postoperative recovery.
2. Informed consent: The process of ensuring the patient understands the nature of the surgery, its purpose, associated risks, benefits, and alternative treatment options. The patient signs a consent form indicating they have been informed and voluntarily agree to undergo the surgery.
3. Preoperative instructions: Guidelines provided to the patient regarding their diet, medication use, and other activities in the days leading up to the surgery. These instructions may include fasting guidelines, discontinuing certain medications, or arranging for transportation after the procedure.
4. Anesthesia consultation: A meeting with the anesthesiologist to discuss the type of anesthesia that will be used during the surgery and address any concerns related to anesthesia risks, side effects, or postoperative pain management.
5. Preparation of the surgical site: Cleaning and shaving the area where the incision will be made, as well as administering appropriate antimicrobial agents to minimize the risk of infection.
6. Medical optimization: Addressing any underlying medical conditions or correcting abnormalities that may negatively impact the surgical outcome. This may involve adjusting medications, treating infections, or managing chronic diseases such as diabetes.
7. Emotional and psychological support: Providing counseling, reassurance, and education to help alleviate anxiety, fear, or emotional distress related to the surgery.
8. Preoperative holding area: The patient is transferred to a designated area near the operating room where they are prepared for surgery by changing into a gown, having intravenous (IV) lines inserted, and receiving monitoring equipment.

By following these preoperative care guidelines, healthcare professionals aim to ensure that patients undergo safe and successful surgical procedures with optimal outcomes.

Pseudomembranous enterocolitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the inner lining of the small intestine (enteritis) and large intestine (colitis), resulting in the formation of pseudomembranes – raised, yellowish-white plaques composed of fibrin, mucus, and inflammatory cells. The condition is most commonly caused by a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile), which can overgrow in the gut following disruption of the normal gut microbiota, often after antibiotic use. Symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and dehydration. Severe cases can lead to complications such as sepsis, toxic megacolon, or even death if left untreated. Treatment typically involves discontinuing the offending antibiotic, administering oral metronidazole or vancomycin to eliminate C. difficile, and managing symptoms with supportive care. In some cases, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be considered as a treatment option.

Elective surgical procedures are operations that are scheduled in advance because they do not involve a medical emergency. These surgeries are chosen or "elective" based on the patient's and doctor's decision to improve the patient's quality of life or to treat a non-life-threatening condition. Examples include but are not limited to:

1. Aesthetic or cosmetic surgery such as breast augmentation, rhinoplasty, etc.
2. Orthopedic surgeries like knee or hip replacements
3. Cataract surgery
4. Some types of cancer surgeries where the tumor is not spreading or causing severe symptoms
5. Gastric bypass for weight loss

It's important to note that while these procedures are planned, they still require thorough preoperative evaluation and preparation, and carry risks and benefits that need to be carefully considered by both the patient and the healthcare provider.

Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP) is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of the inner part of an enlarged prostate gland using a resectoscope, a tool with a tiny loop of wire at its end that is inserted into the urethra through the penis. The loop of wire is used to cut and remove the excess tissue, which is then washed out of the body. This procedure is typically performed to relieve moderate to severe urinary symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate, such as difficulty in beginning the flow of urine, a weak stream, and frequent urination, especially at night. It is one of the most common surgical procedures for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human participants and are designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new medical treatments, drugs, devices, or behavioral interventions. The purpose of clinical trials is to determine whether a new intervention is safe, effective, and beneficial for patients, as well as to compare it with currently available treatments. Clinical trials follow a series of phases, each with specific goals and criteria, before a new intervention can be approved by regulatory authorities for widespread use.

Clinical trials are conducted according to a protocol, which is a detailed plan that outlines the study's objectives, design, methodology, statistical analysis, and ethical considerations. The protocol is developed and reviewed by a team of medical experts, statisticians, and ethicists, and it must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB) before the trial can begin.

Participation in clinical trials is voluntary, and participants must provide informed consent before enrolling in the study. Informed consent involves providing potential participants with detailed information about the study's purpose, procedures, risks, benefits, and alternatives, as well as their rights as research subjects. Participants can withdraw from the study at any time without penalty or loss of benefits to which they are entitled.

Clinical trials are essential for advancing medical knowledge and improving patient care. They help researchers identify new treatments, diagnostic tools, and prevention strategies that can benefit patients and improve public health. However, clinical trials also pose potential risks to participants, including adverse effects from experimental interventions, time commitment, and inconvenience. Therefore, it is important for researchers to carefully design and conduct clinical trials to minimize risks and ensure that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Pyelonephritis is a type of urinary tract infection (UTI) that involves the renal pelvis and the kidney parenchyma. It's typically caused by bacterial invasion, often via the ascending route from the lower urinary tract. The most common causative agent is Escherichia coli (E. coli), but other bacteria such as Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas can also be responsible.

Acute pyelonephritis can lead to symptoms like fever, chills, flank pain, nausea, vomiting, and frequent or painful urination. If left untreated, it can potentially cause permanent kidney damage, sepsis, or other complications. Chronic pyelonephritis, on the other hand, is usually associated with underlying structural or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract.

Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, urinalysis, and imaging studies, while treatment often consists of antibiotics tailored to the identified pathogen and the patient's overall health status.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

Antifungal agents are a type of medication used to treat and prevent fungal infections. These agents work by targeting and disrupting the growth of fungi, which include yeasts, molds, and other types of fungi that can cause illness in humans.

There are several different classes of antifungal agents, including:

1. Azoles: These agents work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes. Examples of azole antifungals include fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole.
2. Echinocandins: These agents target the fungal cell wall, disrupting its synthesis and leading to fungal cell death. Examples of echinocandins include caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin.
3. Polyenes: These agents bind to ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane, creating pores that lead to fungal cell death. Examples of polyene antifungals include amphotericin B and nystatin.
4. Allylamines: These agents inhibit squalene epoxidase, a key enzyme in ergosterol synthesis. Examples of allylamine antifungals include terbinafine and naftifine.
5. Griseofulvin: This agent disrupts fungal cell division by binding to tubulin, a protein involved in fungal cell mitosis.

Antifungal agents can be administered topically, orally, or intravenously, depending on the severity and location of the infection. It is important to use antifungal agents only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or overuse can lead to resistance and make treatment more difficult.

A hospital is a healthcare facility where patients receive medical treatment, diagnosis, and care for various health conditions, injuries, or diseases. It is typically staffed with medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers who provide round-the-clock medical services. Hospitals may offer inpatient (overnight) stays or outpatient (same-day) services, depending on the nature of the treatment required. They are equipped with various medical facilities like operating rooms, diagnostic equipment, intensive care units (ICUs), and emergency departments to handle a wide range of medical situations. Hospitals may specialize in specific areas of medicine, such as pediatrics, geriatrics, oncology, or trauma care.

Orthopedics is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, which includes the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. The goal of orthopedic care is to help patients maintain or restore their mobility, function, and quality of life through a variety of treatments, including medication, physical therapy, bracing, and surgery. Orthopedic surgeons are medical doctors who have completed additional training in the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions, and they may specialize in specific areas such as sports medicine, spine care, joint replacement, or pediatric orthopedics.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the integrity and function of a joint. The term is derived from two Greek words: "arthro" meaning joint, and "plasty" meaning to mold or form. There are several types of arthroplasty, but most involve resurfacing the damaged joint cartilage with artificial materials such as metal, plastic, or ceramic.

The goal of arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore function in a joint that has been damaged by arthritis, injury, or other conditions. The most common types of arthroplasty are total joint replacement (TJR) and partial joint replacement (PJR).

In TJR, the surgeon removes the damaged ends of the bones in the joint and replaces them with artificial components called prostheses. These prostheses can be made of metal, plastic, or ceramic materials, and are designed to mimic the natural movement and function of the joint.

In PJR, only one side of the joint is resurfaced, typically because the damage is less extensive. This procedure is less invasive than TJR and may be recommended for younger patients who are still active or have a higher risk of complications from a full joint replacement.

Other types of arthroplasty include osteotomy, in which the surgeon cuts and reshapes the bone to realign the joint; arthrodesis, in which the surgeon fuses two bones together to create a stable joint; and resurfacing, in which the damaged cartilage is removed and replaced with a smooth, artificial surface.

Arthroplasty is typically recommended for patients who have tried other treatments, such as physical therapy, medication, or injections, but have not found relief from their symptoms. While arthroplasty can be highly effective in relieving pain and improving mobility, it is not without risks, including infection, blood clots, and implant failure. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of arthroplasty with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right treatment option for them.

"Methicillin resistance" is a term used in medicine to describe the resistance of certain bacteria to the antibiotic methicillin and other related antibiotics, such as oxacillin and nafcillin. This type of resistance is most commonly associated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) bacteria.

Bacteria that are methicillin-resistant have acquired the ability to produce an additional penicillin-binding protein, known as PBP2a or PBP2'', which has a low affinity for beta-lactam antibiotics, including methicillin. This results in the bacteria being able to continue growing and dividing despite the presence of these antibiotics, making infections caused by these bacteria more difficult to treat.

Methicillin resistance is a significant concern in healthcare settings, as it can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs associated with treating infections caused by these bacteria. In recent years, there has been an increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need for ongoing surveillance, infection control measures, and the development of new antibiotics to treat these infections.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Recurrence, in a medical context, refers to the return of symptoms or signs of a disease after a period of improvement or remission. It indicates that the condition has not been fully eradicated and may require further treatment. Recurrence is often used to describe situations where a disease such as cancer comes back after initial treatment, but it can also apply to other medical conditions. The likelihood of recurrence varies depending on the type of disease and individual patient factors.

Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a term used to describe any bleeding that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. The bleeding can range from mild to severe and can produce symptoms such as vomiting blood, passing black or tarry stools, or having low blood pressure.

GI hemorrhage can be classified as either upper or lower, depending on the location of the bleed. Upper GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs above the ligament of Treitz, which is a point in the small intestine where it becomes narrower and turns a corner. Common causes of upper GI hemorrhage include gastritis, ulcers, esophageal varices, and Mallory-Weiss tears.

Lower GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs below the ligament of Treitz. Common causes of lower GI hemorrhage include diverticulosis, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and vascular abnormalities such as angiodysplasia.

The diagnosis of GI hemorrhage is often made based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as endoscopy, CT scan, or radionuclide scanning. Treatment depends on the severity and cause of the bleeding and may include medications, endoscopic procedures, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

A "University Hospital" is a type of hospital that is often affiliated with a medical school or university. These hospitals serve as major teaching institutions where medical students, residents, and fellows receive their training and education. They are equipped with advanced medical technology and resources to provide specialized and tertiary care services. University hospitals also conduct research and clinical trials to advance medical knowledge and practices. Additionally, they often treat complex and rare cases and provide a wide range of medical services to the community.

Postoperative care refers to the comprehensive medical treatment and nursing attention provided to a patient following a surgical procedure. The goal of postoperative care is to facilitate the patient's recovery, prevent complications, manage pain, ensure proper healing of the incision site, and maintain overall health and well-being until the patient can resume their normal activities.

This type of care includes monitoring vital signs, managing pain through medication or other techniques, ensuring adequate hydration and nutrition, helping the patient with breathing exercises to prevent lung complications, encouraging mobility to prevent blood clots, monitoring for signs of infection or other complications, administering prescribed medications, providing wound care, and educating the patient about postoperative care instructions.

The duration of postoperative care can vary depending on the type and complexity of the surgical procedure, as well as the individual patient's needs and overall health status. It may be provided in a hospital setting, an outpatient surgery center, or in the patient's home, depending on the level of care required.

Beta-lactams are a class of antibiotics that include penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams. They contain a beta-lactam ring in their chemical structure, which is responsible for their antibacterial activity. The beta-lactam ring inhibits the bacterial enzymes necessary for cell wall synthesis, leading to bacterial death. Beta-lactams are commonly used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections, and bone and joint infections. However, some bacteria have developed resistance to beta-lactams through the production of beta-lactamases, enzymes that can break down the beta-lactam ring and render the antibiotic ineffective. To overcome this resistance, beta-lactam antibiotics are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors, which protect the beta-lactam ring from degradation.

Surgical mesh is a medical device that is used in various surgical procedures, particularly in reconstructive surgery, to provide additional support to weakened or damaged tissues. It is typically made from synthetic materials such as polypropylene or polyester, or from biological materials such as animal tissue or human cadaveric tissue.

The mesh is designed to be implanted into the body, where it can help to reinforce and repair damaged tissues. For example, it may be used in hernia repairs to support the weakened abdominal wall, or in pelvic floor reconstruction surgery to treat conditions such as pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence.

Surgical mesh can come in different forms, including sheets, plugs, and patches, and may be either absorbable or non-absorbable. The choice of mesh material and type will depend on the specific surgical indication and the patient's individual needs. It is important for patients to discuss the risks and benefits of surgical mesh with their healthcare provider before undergoing any surgical procedure that involves its use.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) is a medical condition that includes both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). DVT is a blood clot that forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs, while PE occurs when a clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, blocking a pulmonary artery or one of its branches. This condition can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated promptly.

The medical definition of Venous Thromboembolism is:

"The formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in a deep vein, most commonly in the legs, which can then dislodge and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially life-threatening blockage of the pulmonary artery or one of its branches (pulmonary embolism). VTE is a complex disorder resulting from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors that affect the balance between thrombosis and fibrinolysis."

Some common risk factors for VTE include immobility, surgery, trauma, cancer, hormonal therapy, pregnancy, advanced age, and inherited or acquired thrombophilia. Symptoms of DVT may include swelling, pain, warmth, and redness in the affected limb, while symptoms of PE can range from shortness of breath and chest pain to coughing up blood or even sudden death. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical assessment, imaging studies (such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI), and laboratory tests (such as D-dimer). Treatment usually includes anticoagulation therapy to prevent further clot formation and reduce the risk of recurrence.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Mycoses are a group of diseases caused by fungal infections. These infections can affect various parts of the body, including the skin, nails, hair, lungs, and internal organs. The severity of mycoses can range from superficial, mild infections to systemic, life-threatening conditions, depending on the type of fungus and the immune status of the infected individual. Some common types of mycoses include candidiasis, dermatophytosis, histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Treatment typically involves antifungal medications, which can be topical or systemic, depending on the location and severity of the infection.

A knee prosthesis, also known as a knee replacement or artificial knee joint, is a medical device used to replace the damaged or diseased weight-bearing surfaces of the knee joint. It typically consists of three components: the femoral component (made of metal) that fits over the end of the thighbone (femur), the tibial component (often made of metal and plastic) that fits into the top of the shinbone (tibia), and a patellar component (usually made of plastic) that replaces the damaged surface of the kneecap.

The primary goal of knee prosthesis is to relieve pain, restore function, and improve quality of life for individuals with advanced knee joint damage due to conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or traumatic injuries. The procedure to implant a knee prosthesis is called knee replacement surgery or total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Tetracycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by preventing the growth and multiplication of bacteria. It is a part of the tetracycline class of antibiotics, which also includes doxycycline, minocycline, and others.

Tetracycline is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as some atypical organisms such as rickettsia, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and spirochetes. It is commonly used to treat respiratory infections, skin infections, urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases, and other bacterial infections.

Tetracycline is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. It should be taken orally with a full glass of water, and it is recommended to take it on an empty stomach, at least one hour before or two hours after meals. The drug can cause tooth discoloration in children under the age of 8, so it is generally not recommended for use in this population.

Like all antibiotics, tetracycline should be used only to treat bacterial infections and not viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Overuse or misuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which makes it harder to treat infections in the future.

"Pneumonia, Pneumocystis" is more commonly referred to as "Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP)." It is a type of pneumonia caused by the microorganism Pneumocystis jirovecii. This organism was previously classified as a protozoan but is now considered a fungus.

PCP is an opportunistic infection, which means that it mainly affects people with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, cancer, transplant recipients, or people taking immunosuppressive medications. The symptoms of PCP can include cough, shortness of breath, fever, and difficulty exercising. It is a serious infection that requires prompt medical treatment, typically with antibiotics.

It's important to note that PCP is not the same as pneumococcal pneumonia, which is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. While both conditions are types of pneumonia, they are caused by different organisms and require different treatments.

A cicatrix is a medical term that refers to a scar or the process of scar formation. It is the result of the healing process following damage to body tissues, such as from an injury, wound, or surgery. During the healing process, specialized cells called fibroblasts produce collagen, which helps to reconnect and strengthen the damaged tissue. The resulting scar tissue may have a different texture, color, or appearance compared to the surrounding healthy tissue.

Cicatrix formation is a natural part of the body's healing response, but excessive scarring can sometimes cause functional impairment, pain, or cosmetic concerns. In such cases, various treatments may be used to minimize or improve the appearance of scars, including topical creams, steroid injections, laser therapy, and surgical revision.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Intravenous injections are a type of medical procedure where medication or fluids are administered directly into a vein using a needle and syringe. This route of administration is also known as an IV injection. The solution injected enters the patient's bloodstream immediately, allowing for rapid absorption and onset of action. Intravenous injections are commonly used to provide quick relief from symptoms, deliver medications that are not easily absorbed by other routes, or administer fluids and electrolytes in cases of dehydration or severe illness. It is important that intravenous injections are performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection.

Fermentation is a metabolic process in which an organism converts carbohydrates into alcohol or organic acids using enzymes. In the absence of oxygen, certain bacteria, yeasts, and fungi convert sugars into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and various end products, such as alcohol, lactic acid, or acetic acid. This process is commonly used in food production, such as in making bread, wine, and beer, as well as in industrial applications for the production of biofuels and chemicals.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Macrolides are a class of antibiotics derived from natural products obtained from various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They have a large ring structure consisting of 12, 14, or 15 atoms, to which one or more sugar molecules are attached. Macrolides inhibit bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit, thereby preventing peptide bond formation. Common examples of macrolides include erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. They are primarily used to treat respiratory, skin, and soft tissue infections caused by susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Cholecystectomy is a medical procedure to remove the gallbladder, a small pear-shaped organ located on the right side of the abdomen, just beneath the liver. The primary function of the gallbladder is to store and concentrate bile, a digestive fluid produced by the liver. During a cholecystectomy, the surgeon removes the gallbladder, usually due to the presence of gallstones or inflammation that can cause pain, infection, or other complications.

There are two primary methods for performing a cholecystectomy:

1. Open Cholecystectomy: In this traditional surgical approach, the surgeon makes an incision in the abdomen to access and remove the gallbladder. This method is typically used when there are complications or unique circumstances that make laparoscopic surgery difficult or risky.
2. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: This is a minimally invasive surgical procedure where the surgeon makes several small incisions in the abdomen, through which a thin tube with a camera (laparoscope) and specialized surgical instruments are inserted. The surgeon then guides these tools to remove the gallbladder while viewing the internal structures on a video monitor.

After the gallbladder is removed, bile flows directly from the liver into the small intestine through the common bile duct, and the body continues to function normally without any significant issues.

... in domestic animal feed mixes has been employed in America since at least 1970. Antibiotic prophylaxis ... "Antibiotic Prophylaxis Guideline Awareness and Antibiotic Prophylaxis Use Among New York State Dermatologic Surgeons". ... Parenteral systemic antibiotics seem to be more appropriate than oral or topical antibiotics because the chosen antibiotics ... Antibiotic prophylaxis in domestic animal feed mixes has been employed in America since at least 1970. Over time, the use of ...
... is the administration of antibiotics to a dental patient for prevention of harmful consequences ... Increasing concerns regarding rise in antibiotic resistance have also pushed for change in advice on antibiotic prophylaxis, ... has now opposed the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dentistry. Unsatisfactory evidence to conclude whether antibiotic ... Lockhart PB, Loven B, Brennan MT, Fox PC (April 2007). "The evidence base for the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental ...
Dental antibiotic prophylaxis • Dental anesthesia • Dental arches • Dental assistant • Dental avulsion • Dental auxiliary • ...
Allen, George (2007). "Cell saver blood transfusions; colorectal surgery antibiotic prophylaxis; preoperative clinics; ...
Christy NE, Sommer A (August 1979). "Antibiotic prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis". Annals of Ophthalmology. 11 (8 ... Moderate evidence also supports antibiotic eye drops (levofloxacin or chloramphenicol) with antibiotic injections (cefuroxime ... Even though antibiotics can have negative impacts on the retina in high concentrations, since visual acuity worsens in 65% of ... Perioperative antibiotic injections into the eye, specifically cefuroxime at the end of surgery, lowers the chance of ...
Medeiros, Iara Marques; Saconato, Humberto (2001). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for mammalian bites". Cochrane Database of ... Antibiotics to prevent infection are recommended for dog and cat bites of the hand, and human bites if they are more than ... Evidence for antibiotics to prevent infection in bites in other areas is not clear. The first choice is amoxicillin with ... The advent of antibiotics improved the outcome of bite wound infections. Animal bites where skin has been penetrated, most ...
Pallasch, Thomas J. (October 2003). "Antibiotic prophylaxis: problems in paradise". Dental Clinics of North America. 47 (4): ... When antibiotics began to appear, interest in colostrum waned, but, now that antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogens have ... Before the development of antibiotics, colostrum was the main source of immunoglobulins used to fight bacteria. In fact, when ... be used to reduce the duration and severity of infections so it can be a useful tool to include in the reduction of antibiotic ...
Indefinite daily topical antibiotic prophylaxis. Lifelong topical steroids. Close follow-up with an ophthalmologist to monitor ...
Liabsuetrakul, T; Choobun, T; Peeyananjarassri, K; Islam, QM (26 March 2020). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal ... The change in trend of maternal mortality can be attributed with the widespread use of antibiotics along with the progression ... Worldwide, more than 1 million babies die during their first day even though simple measures such as antibiotics, hand-held ... Outcomes for mothers in childbirth were especially poor before antibiotics were discovered in the 1930s, because of high rates ...
Gomelsky, A.; Dmochowski, RR (2003). "Antibiotic prophylaxis in urologic prosthetic surgery". Current Pharmaceutical Design. 9 ... antibiotic irrigation and antibiotic-coated implants. The "No-Touch" technique is unique in that it aims to prevent bacterial ... Paired with the antibiotic-coated implant, the "No Touch" technique decreases infection to a rate of 0.46%, opposing the ... Carson, CC (2004). "Efficacy of antibiotic impregnation of inflatable penile prostheses in decreasing infection in original ...
The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis was studied in both the use of either forceps or vacuum in operative delivery to ... The result showed that antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown to effectively reduce infections in operative vaginal deliveries, ... "WHO recommendation on Routine antibiotic prophylaxis for women undergoing operative vaginal birth". Geneva: World Heath ... Liabsuetrakul T, Choobun T, Peeyananjarassri K, Islam QM (March 2020). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal delivery ...
Antibiotic concentration in tissue fluid during the vulnerable period as rational basis for prophylaxis of post-operative ... 1995: Dynamic Antibiotic Switching Therapy (DAST), a new form of antibiotic treatment: changing the antibiotic regimen every 24 ... Prophylaxis of postoperative infections. Infection, 19;S337-343, 1991. Condon RE, Wittmann DH: The Use of Antibiotics in ... Wittmann, DH, Schein, M: Let us shorten antibiotic prophylaxis and therapy in surgery. American Journal of Surgery. 172(6A):26S ...
Smaill FM, Grivell RM (October 2014). "Antibiotic prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis for preventing infection after cesarean ... Antibiotic prophylaxis is used before an incision. The uterus is incised, and this incision is extended with blunt pressure ... and routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infections was found by a meta-analysis to substantially reduce the ... Taking antibiotics before skin incision rather than after cord clamping reduces the risk for the mother, without increasing ...
Wolf, Joshua (2015). "Antibiotic resistance threatens the efficacy of prophylaxis". The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 15 (12): ... "Potential of old-generation antibiotics to address current need for new antibiotics". Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 6 (5): 593- ... Polymyxins are antibiotics. Polymyxins B and E (also known as colistin) are used in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial ... Antibiotic resistance to this drug has been increasing, especially in southern China. Recently the gene mcr-1, which confers ...
Marschall J, Carpenter CR, Fowler S, Trautner BW (June 2013). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for urinary tract infections after ... Beerepoot M, Geerlings S (April 2016). "Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections". Pathogens (Review). 5 (2): 36 ... Antibiotic sensitivity can also be tested with these cultures, making them useful in the selection of antibiotic treatment. ... a short course of antibiotics may be taken as soon as symptoms begin or long-term antibiotics may be used as a preventive ...
Barajas-Nava LA, López-Alcalde J, Roqué i Figuls M, Solà I, Bonfill Cosp X (June 2013). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing ... While topical antibiotics are often recommended, there is little evidence to support their use. Silver sulfadiazine (a type of ... Intravenous antibiotics are recommended before surgery for those with extensive burns (>60% TBSA). As of 2008[update], ... Avni T, Levcovich A, Ad-El DD, Leibovici L, Paul M (February 2010). "Prophylactic antibiotics for burns patients: systematic ...
Antibiotic therapy to prevent streptococcal infection (prophylaxis). Steroids to suppress inflammation. Provide high calories ...
Antibiotic prophylaxis are provided to the patient. Pre-surgical biliary stenting (a tube used to keep the biliary duct open) ...
Woods, R. K.; Dellinger, E. P. (June 1998). "Current guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis of surgical wounds". American Family ... a single preoperative intravenous injection of antibiotics is recommended. The rate of complications is about 12% for minor ... Guidelines suggest that routine prophylactic antibiotics are not required. However, the potential cost of a postoperative ... "A Systematic Review of Perioperative Versus Prophylactic Antibiotics for Cochlear Implantation". The Annals of Otology, ...
ISBN 978-0-07-179674-3. Sanabria A, Dominguez LC, Valdivieso E, Gomez G (December 2010). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients ... Use of prophylactic antibiotics is controversial; however, a dose may be given prior to surgery to prevent infection in certain ... It consists of treatment with intravenous antibiotics and fluids. ERCP, short for endoscopic retrograde ...
Chavez-Tapia NC, Barrientos-Gutierrez T, Tellez-Avila FI, Soares-Weiser K, Uribe M (September 2010). "Antibiotic prophylaxis ... is an antibiotic that belongs to the class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics. It is used to treat urinary tract infections, ... Norfloxacin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that is active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It functions ... September 2007). "Primary prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis delays hepatorenal syndrome and improves survival in ...
Chavez-Tapia NC, Barrientos-Gutierrez T, Tellez-Avila FI, Soares-Weiser K, Uribe M (September 2010). "Antibiotic prophylaxis ... Antibiotic treatment may need to be continued for at least three months. The grading or severity of hepatic encephalopathy is ... Antibiotics are prescribed for infections, and various medications can help with itching. Laxatives, such as lactulose, ... These include several drugs such as anti-depressants, certain antibiotics, and NSAIDs (like ibuprofen). These agents are ...
Ethically, there is still a need to discuss with patients, the benefits and disadvantages of antibiotic prophylaxis before they ... Many antibiotics are metabolized in the liver. In patients with liver failure, the use of such antibiotics should be restricted ... Historically, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent post-operative infections, resulting from bacteraemia, and infective ... This is due to the ever-increasing antibiotic resistance and there is no or very little evidence to show whether antibiotic ...
Verschuur HP, de Wever WW, van Benthem PP (2004). "Antibiotic prophylaxis in clean and clean-contaminated ear surgery". The ... If antibiotics are used, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic like amoxicillin is generally recommended, as broad-spectrum antibiotics ... In AOM, antibiotics may speed recovery but may result in side effects. Antibiotics are often recommended in those with severe ... Topical antibiotics are of uncertain benefit as of 2020. Some evidence suggests that topical antibiotics may be useful either ...
... antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the risk of surgical site infections when the antibiotics are given during surgery and continued ... "Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing infectious complications in orthognathic surgery". The Cochrane Database of Systematic ... Doctors will prescribe pain medication and prophylactic antibiotics to the patient. There is often a large amount of swelling ... and the consumption of antibiotics. Cleaning of the mouth should always be done regardless of surgery to ensure healthy, strong ...
Actually, the main treatment is antibiotic and antifungal prophylaxis. Allogenic bone marrow transplantation is possible and ...
Brand, M; Bizos, D; O'Farrell P, Jr (6 October 2010). "Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic ... Antibiotics are continued for 7-10 days. Drugs that increase the blood pressure (vasopressors) may also be required to counter ... Initial treatment is with intravenous fluids and antibiotics, but there is often an underlying problem (such as gallstones or ... Empirical treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics is usually necessary until it is known for certain which pathogen is ...
Sutkin G, Krohn MA, Heine RP, Sweet RL (March 2005). "Antibiotic prophylaxis and non-group B streptococcal neonatal sepsis". ... In 2008, after widespread use of antenatal screening and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, the Centers for Disease Control ... Schrag SJ, Verani JR (August 2013). "Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal ... Where insufficient intravenous antibiotics are given before delivery, the baby may be given antibiotics immediately after birth ...
"Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography". The Cochrane Database ... Using antibiotics before the procedure shows some benefits to prevent cholangitis and septicaemia. In rare cases, ERCP can ... "Prophylaxis of post-ERCP pancreatitis: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline - Updated June 2014". ...
104: antibiotic prophylaxis for gynecologic procedures". Obstetrics and Gynecology. 113 (5): 1180-1189. May 2009. doi:10.1097/ ... Preventive antibiotics (such as doxycycline or metronidazole) are typically given before abortion procedures, as they are ... Sawaya GF, Grady D, Kerlikowske K, Grimes DA (May 1996). "Antibiotics at the time of induced abortion: the case for universal ... prophylaxis based on a meta-analysis". Obstetrics and Gynecology. 87 (5 Pt 2): 884-890. PMID 8677129. Achilles SL, Reeves MF ( ...
Antibiotic prophylaxis in domestic animal feed mixes has been employed in America since at least 1970. Antibiotic prophylaxis ... "Antibiotic Prophylaxis Guideline Awareness and Antibiotic Prophylaxis Use Among New York State Dermatologic Surgeons". ... Parenteral systemic antibiotics seem to be more appropriate than oral or topical antibiotics because the chosen antibiotics ... Antibiotic prophylaxis in domestic animal feed mixes has been employed in America since at least 1970. Over time, the use of ...
Update prophylaxis practices per CDC guidance if multiple ciprofloxacin-resistant meningococcal cases are reported and make up ... Antibiotic prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin in areas with ciprofloxacin resistance can result in prophylaxis failure. This ... Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for close contacts. Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening illness requiring prompt ... antibiotic treatment for patients and antibiotic prophylaxis for their close contacts. First-line choices for antibiotic ...
"An increase in infection rates and a decline in the efficacy of prophylaxis may be a reflection of growing antibiotic ... The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing infection following appendectomy, cesarean section, and transrectal ... Study authors suggest that rising antibiotic resistance could be reducing the effectiveness of antibiotics in preventing ... A new study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology found that prophylactic antibiotics are becoming less effective at ...
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An Ounce of Prevention is a Ton of Work: Mass Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Anthrax, New York City, 2001 Susan Blank*†. , Linda C ... An Ounce of Prevention is a Ton of Work: Mass Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Anthrax, New York City, 2001. ... aPOD, point of distribution (for antibiotics); USPS, U. S. Postal Service. ...
Evidence regarding whether antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) should be administered is sparse; however, prophylaxis is recommended. ... Evidence regarding whether antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) should be administered is sparse; however, prophylaxis is recommended. ... Evidence regarding whether antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) should be administered is sparse; however, prophylaxis is recommended. ... Antibiotic prophylaxis and its effect on postprocedural adverse events in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for ...
DEBATE - "Vancomycin is suitable for routine antibiotic prophylaxis". Posted : Jun 26, 2023. ...
Antibiotic prophylaxis is discontinued after 48 hours if no postoperative fever has been reported. Otherwise, the antibiotic is ... Antibiotic prophylaxis. Prophylactic antibiotics are administered intravenously or intramuscularly within 1 hour before ... Antibiotic prophylaxis for gynecologic procedures. Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Jul. 108(1):225-34. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Thromboembolic prophylaxis. Because of the high risk of thromboembolic diseases in this category of patients, vascular ...
Dr Amal Mattu questions whether we should continue to provide antibiotic prophylaxis to patients who are undergoing various ... Time to End Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Infective Endocarditis? Introduction. During my emergency medicine training in the early ... But this study and others should certainly make us question how much of a difference antibiotic prophylaxis for IE makes. To ... It wasnt long before I learned that the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis were not based on any good literature, but ...
The goal of pre-medication or antibiotic prophylaxis, Dr. Andrew Holloman will tell you, is to prevent bacterial endocarditis, ... For more information about antibiotic prophylaxis, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Andrew Holloman, please give us a ... Typical endodontic procedures for which antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended include root canal therapy (when it involves ... For these patients, any dental procedure may cause bleeding, and prophylactic antibiotic administration is recommended as a ...
... , antibiotics, artificial joints, cancer patient, chemotherapy, dental hygiene, dental hygiene tips, ... American Heart Association, antibiotic prophylaxis, antibiotics, artificial joints, cardiovascular disease, dental hygiene, ... On this weeks episode of Fast Facts - Perio Edition your host, Katrina Sanders, RDH takes a look at prophylactic antibiotics ... Fast Facts: Perio Edition "Medically Compromised Patients & Antibiotics". On this weeks episode of Fast Facts - Perio Edition ...
Antibiotic use. Antibiotic prophylaxis is warranted if the wound is believed to be at higher risk for infection (eg, ... Antibiotic Prophylaxis. The literature regarding prophylaxis of human bite wounds is sparse. Only 2 randomized, controlled ... Acute human bites that do not penetrate the epidermal layer probably do not need antibiotic prophylaxis as long as they do not ... Human bites to the hand are at high risk for infection and should be given antibiotic prophylaxis ...
MOURA, Walter Leal de et al. Efficacy of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in third molars surgery: A morphometric evaluation. Rev. cir. ... determining the need of antibiotics prophylaxis use of in these procedures. Methodology: 14 patients were selected, aged ... Objective: This study aimed to clinically evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics in retained third molar extractions, ... and higher presence of pain when it was used antibiotic. ... Antibiotic Prophylaxis; edema; trismus; molar.. · abstract in ...
1. What is Antibiotic Prophylaxis?. Dr. Karagiorgos: Antibiotics usually treat bacterial infections, but sometimes physicians ... 2. Who Could Benefit from Antibiotic Prophylaxis?. Dr. Karagiorgos: With a few exceptions, most patients who require antibiotic ... Antibiotic prophy….say what?! For most of our patients, antibiotic prophylaxis is something theyve never heard of and dont ... In short, antibiotic prophylaxis is the use of antibiotics before a dental procedure to prevent a bacterial infection elsewhere ...
... routine pre-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended. A more powerful antibiotic protocol has been suggested in patients ... routine pre-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended. A more powerful antibiotic protocol has been suggested in patients ... Antibiotic prophylaxis based on individual infective risk stratification in cardiac implantable electronic device: the PRACTICE ... an antibiotic prophylaxis based on individual stratification of infective risk resulted in similar rate of infection between ...
Antibiotic prophylaxis may also be given. Additionally, doses should be modified according to the protocol being used. ... Prophylaxis and monitoring for tumor lysis syndrome should be strongly considered during the induction therapy. ...
Title : Surgeon Choice in the Use of Post-Discharge Antibiotics for Prophylaxis Following Mastectomy With and Without Breast ... 2020). Surgeon Choice in the Use of Post-Discharge Antibiotics for Prophylaxis Following Mastectomy With and Without Breast ... Surgeon Choice in the Use of Post-Discharge Antibiotics for Prophylaxis Following Mastectomy With and Without Breast ... Surgeon Choice in the Use of Post-Discharge Antibiotics for Prophylaxis Following Mastectomy With and Without Breast ...
The study suggests that single-shot antibiotic prophylaxis does not have drawbacks compared to prolonged antibiotic treatment ... Considering increasing antibiotic resistance and potential side effects, omitting prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis is ... Alveolar bone grafting; Antibiotic prophylaxis; Bone transplantation; Cleft lip; Cleft palate; Surgical wound infection ... Among 83 patients (mean age 12.8 years), 51 interventions were performed under prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis (mean duration ...
There is still an ongoingdisagreement on the administration of oral versus intravenous (IV) antibiotics (ABs). Theobjective of ... The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in clean incised hand injuries: a prospective. randomized placebo controlled double blind ... Zehtabchi S. The role of antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of infection in patients with simple hand lacerations.. Ann ... Comparing the effectiveness of oral versus intravenous antibiotics in the prophylaxis of wound infection in hand laceration. ...
Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (POABP) regimens were categorized by Gram-negative (GN) spectrum: no GN coverage, enteric ... Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (POABP) regimens were categorized by Gram-negative (GN) spectrum: no GN coverage, enteric ... Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (POABP) regimens were categorized by Gram-negative (GN) spectrum: no GN coverage, enteric ... Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (POABP) regimens were categorized by Gram-negative (GN) spectrum: no GN coverage, enteric ...
This is called preventive antibiotics, or antibiotic prophylaxis.. Severe movement or emotional symptoms may need to be treated ... Antibiotics are used to kill the Group A streptococcus bacteria. The provider may also prescribe antibiotics to prevent future ...
Infective endocarditis: prevention and antibiotic prophylaxis. Sendi P, Hasse B, Frank M, Flückiger U, Boggian K, Guery B, ...
Antimicrobial prophylaxis for surgery. Med Lett Drugs Ther 1983;25: 113-16. * Conte JE, Jacob LS, Polk HC. Antibiotic ... The cost implications of clean air systems and antibiotic prophylaxis in operations for total joint replacement. Infect Control ... Antimicrobials selected for use for prophylaxis should have been shown to be safe and effective for prophylaxis of operative ... Reviews of antimicrobial prophylaxis for surgery that deal with selection of agents and duration of therapy are available (9,40 ...
Antibiotic prophylaxis for urinary tract infections in children with spina bifida on intermittent catheterization. J Urol. 2011 ... Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis is not only unnecessary for patients with indwelling catheters, it is contraindicated, ... For those children, antibiotic prophylaxis (low-dose chemoprophylaxis) has commonly been prescribed for urinary tract ... What is the role of antibiotic prophylaxis in the treatment of neurogenic bladder? ...
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons practice guideline series: antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery, part II: antibiotic ... Antibiotic prophylaxis for open heart surgery. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1977;73:625. ... Prophylaxis of sternal wound infections with gentamicin-collagen implant: a randomised controlled study in cardiac surgery. J ... The author is not a great believer in continuous warm saline, povidone-iodine or antibiotic irrigation postoperatively. Their ...
When Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Nasal Packing Indicated?. July 13, 2022. The best practice recommendation is not to ... Should Oral Antibiotics Be Prescribed Routinely Post-Endoscopic Sinus Surgery?. September 19, 2021. ... routinely use prophylactic antibiotics with nasal packing, as antibiotic use does not appear to reduce complications and is not ... The current level 1 evidence does not support the routine use of oral antibiotics postoperatively. ...
Antibiotic Prophylaxis. 10. 2020. 631. 4.200. Why? Anti-Infective Agents. 8. 2023. 973. 3.390. Why? ...
The growing resistance to antibiotics potentially threatens the future of mankind. Ramanan Laxminarayan suggests that this ... Antibiotic prophylaxis makes this possible. Even the most stringent infection control could not prevent bacteria from entering ... "antibiotic resistance," and the number of antibiotic resistant organisms increases with antibiotic use. Antibiotic resistant ... R.L.: Antibiotic resistance is driven by ever-higher rates of antibiotic use, poor water, sanitation and public health measures ...
Study disproves need for antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of dental implant infections. NEW YORK, U.S.: The question of ... Swiss Dental Online Academy launches state-of-the-art prophylaxis e-learning platform. Specifically focusing on prophylaxis and ... Optimal prophylaxis with interdental brushes. An increasing number of dental professionals are emphasising the importance of ... Expert to focus on prophylaxis in free webinar. SINGAPORE: According to Dr Wong Li Beng, modern air polishing devices are ...
... lack of hormone-controlled cycles and antibiotic prophylaxis existed.. 2.2. Diagnosis and Classification of IUAs. The diagnosis ...
  • A new study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiolog y found that prophylactic antibiotics are becoming less effective at preventing surgical-site infections following colorectal surgery. (uspharmacist.com)
  • For these patients, any dental procedure may cause bleeding, and prophylactic antibiotic administration is recommended as a preventive measure. (clearwaterfldentistry.com)
  • That is why in most cases I defer to a patient's orthopedic surgeon to decide and prescribe prophylactic antibiotics for dental visits. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • Prophylactic antibiotics for simple hand lacerations:time for a clinical trial? (jept.ir)
  • 6. Zare M, Mirshamsi MH, Modir A, Kargar S, Shiryazdi M,Hajiesmaieli MR. Comparison of the efficacy of oral and injectable forms of prophylactic antibiotics in grade II traumatic ulcers in emergency wards of university hospitals of Yazd. (jept.ir)
  • In most cases of abdominal surgery where a hollow organ is entered, prophylactic antibiotics are indicated. (vin.com)
  • The prolonged antibiotic group received extended antibiotic treatment , while the single-shot group received preoperative antibiotics only. (bvsalud.org)
  • Background: Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown to decrease the incidence of surgical wound infection. (omicsonline.org)
  • Patient 6 got preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and was excluded from the study. (bmj.com)
  • Antibiotic prophylaxis is most commonly used prior to dental surgery, but may be used in other cases, such as prior to sexual intercourse for patients who suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Antibiotics can be effective in reducing the occurrence of such infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotic prophylaxis is also commonly used to prevent respiratory tract infections in antibody deficient patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study authors suggest that rising antibiotic resistance could be reducing the effectiveness of antibiotics in preventing postoperative infections. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Some doctors may choose to administer antibiotics following a procedure, especially for patients who have previously suffered from oral infections either as a result of dental procedures or that necessitated oral surgery. (clearwaterfldentistry.com)
  • Antibiotics usually treat bacterial infections, but sometimes physicians or dentists recommend antibiotics prior to a treatment, such as a teeth cleaning or root canal, to reduce the risk of infection. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • The provider may also prescribe antibiotics to prevent future RF infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Prior to the arrival of antibiotics, even simple cuts could result in deadly infections. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • Guidelines have been published for antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of infective endocarditis and prosthetic joint infections (5, 6). (cdc.gov)
  • Until national guidelines are developed and adopted for treatment of dental infections and a formal antibiotic stewardship program exists for dentistry, the question remains: What can dentists and dental teams do to support responsible antibiotic prescribing practices? (cdc.gov)
  • 3 Additional information regarding recommended prophylaxis regimens is available in the Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases . (cdc.gov)
  • Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (POABP) regimens were categorized by Gram-negative (GN) spectrum: no GN coverage, enteric GN coverage, and enteric with antipseudomonal GN coverage. (wustl.edu)
  • Time to End Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Infective Endocarditis? (medscape.com)
  • During my emergency medicine training in the early 1990s, antibiotic prophylaxis for infective endocarditis (IE) was routine for many types of patients before undergoing any one of myriad procedures. (medscape.com)
  • Infective endocarditis: prevention and antibiotic prophylaxis. (nih.gov)
  • Prescribe rifampin, ceftriaxone, or azithromycin instead of ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis when the threshold criteria have been reached. (cdc.gov)
  • To quote Morris and colleagues, "In the current era of ' antimicrobial stewardship ,' [healthcare providers] should resist the urge to prescribe antibiotics with no substantive evidence of benefit. (medscape.com)
  • Dentists prescribe approximately 10% of outpatient antibiotics (3). (cdc.gov)
  • Antibiotic prophylaxis refers to, for humans, the prevention of infection complications using antimicrobial therapy (most commonly antibiotics). (wikipedia.org)
  • change the antibiotic(s) according to results if symptoms or signs of the infection are not improving, using a narrow-spectrum antibiotic if possible. (nice.org.uk)
  • If infection is present, this broad-spectrum therapy should be continued into the post-operative period, until the results of culture and sensitivity provide an effective choice of antibiotic. (vin.com)
  • Antibiotic prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin in areas with ciprofloxacin resistance can result in prophylaxis failure. (cdc.gov)
  • Historically, resistance to the antibiotics used for meningococcal treatment and prophylaxis has been rare in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • An increase in infection rates and a decline in the efficacy of prophylaxis may be a reflection of growing antibiotic resistance, which needs to be tackled urgently. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Considering increasing antibiotic resistance and potential side effects, omitting prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients undergoing alveolar cleft osteoplasty. (bvsalud.org)
  • The growing resistance to antibiotics potentially threatens the future of mankind. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • Since 1995, Laxminarayan has worked to improve the understanding of antibiotic resistance as a problem of managing a shared global resource. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • Every use of antibiotics contributes to the development of "antibiotic resistance," and the number of antibiotic resistant organisms increases with antibiotic use. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • antibiotics from · E coli strains had complete resistance to some of the critically fresh poultry important antibiotics such as erythromycin, cefoxitin and excreta in Sierra streptomycin. (who.int)
  • is to communicate, in simple o Establish and expand the routine AMR surveillance to monitor language, the results of antibiotic resistance in poultry. (who.int)
  • response to various antibiotics (antibiotic resistance). (who.int)
  • The laboratory procedures to investigate antibiotic resistance were carried as out as per standard methods. (who.int)
  • In cases where the bacteria is not responding to the antibiotics, we further investigated to know whether they are not responding to limited drugs or more than three drugs (Multi-drug Resistance). (who.int)
  • Invariably, all bacterial samples had resistance to at least one of these eight antibiotics. (who.int)
  • Most of the E.coli isolates were resistance to more than three antibiotics. (who.int)
  • Establish and expand the routine surveillance to monitor antibiotic resistance in poultry. (who.int)
  • Progress has been made in building a stronger evidence base, with the thrust of the Secretariat's work being on collecting and analysing data on antibiotic use in primary health care in low- and middle-income countries and on pharmaceutical policies relating to antimicrobial resistance. (who.int)
  • Addressing Antibiotic Resistance in Dentistry: "What can WE do? (cdc.gov)
  • Antibiotic resistance and antibiotic-associated adverse events are now some of our most serious global health threats (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Misuse and overuse of antibiotics have contributed to antibiotic resistance (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Combatting antibiotic resistance is not a one-time event. (cdc.gov)
  • Objective: This study aimed to clinically evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics in retained third molar extractions, determining the need of antibiotics prophylaxis use of in these procedures. (bvsalud.org)
  • citation needed] Worldwide experience with antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery has proven to be effective and cost-efficient, both avoiding severe patient suffering while saving lives (provided the appropriate antibiotics have been carefully chosen and used to the best of current medical knowledge). (wikipedia.org)
  • Antimicrobial stewardship interventions should be made to limit unnecessary antibiotic exposures, prevent the emergence of resistant organisms, and improve patient outcomes. (wustl.edu)
  • While this is generally still required for patients with two or more replacement joints, the American Dental Association no longer recommends routine antibiotics prior to dental procedures to prevent prosthetic joint infection. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • Aims: In patients undergoing cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) intervention, routine pre-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended. (unife.it)
  • citation needed] A proper regimen of antibiotics for perioperative prophylaxis of septic complications decreases the total amount of antimicrobials needed and eases the burden on hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending on the type of surgery and anticipated contamination associated with it, combinations of different agents or different routes of administration (e.g. intravenous and oral antibiotics) might be beneficial in reducing perioperative adverse events. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cephalosporins remain the preferred drugs for perioperative prophylaxis due to their low toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients should be selected for prophylaxis if the medical condition or the surgical procedure is associated with a considerable risk of infection or if a postoperative infection would pose a serious hazard to the patient's recovery and well-being. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conclusions: The research conclude that there was no statistically significant difference with respect to swelling and trismus after dental extractions with or without the use of antibiotics, and there was statistically significant difference in relation to pain in the postoperative periods of 24 and 48 hours, and higher presence of pain when it was used antibiotic. (bvsalud.org)
  • For prophylaxis in surgery, only antibiotics with good tolerability should be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on previous studies, though, the risk of endocarditis following cutaneous surgery is low and thus the use of antibiotic prophylaxis is controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study team notes that the trend remained significant even after adjusting for the type of surgery and antibiotic used-cefoxitin, cefotetan, and cefazolin plus metronidazole. (uspharmacist.com)
  • For many years, people that had undergone surgery for replacement of a joint (most commonly hip or knee joints) had to take antibiotics before any dental procedures. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • 11. Murphy GR, Gardiner MD, Glass GE, Kreis IA, Jain A, Hettiaratchy S. Meta-analysis of antibiotics for simple hand injuries requiring surgery. (jept.ir)
  • Can too Much Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Arthroplasty Surgery be Harmful? (omicsonline.org)
  • There is still an ongoing disagreement on the administration of oral versus intravenous (IV) antibiotics (ABs). (jept.ir)
  • 1.1.5 Give oral antibiotics first line if the person can take oral medicines, and the severity of their condition does not require intravenous antibiotics. (nice.org.uk)
  • 1.1.6 If intravenous antibiotics are given, review by 48 hours and consider switching to oral antibiotics if possible. (nice.org.uk)
  • cannot take oral antibiotics (exploring locally available options for giving intravenous antibiotics at home or in the community, rather than in hospital, where appropriate). (nice.org.uk)
  • citation needed] The American Heart Association (AHA) now recommends antibiotic prophylaxis for very few patients since only a small number of cases of endocarditis might be prevented by this procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • This guidance is intended to help health departments decide when, where, and for how long they should discontinue use of ciprofloxacin for prophylaxis of close contacts 1 of patients with invasive meningococcal disease in their jurisdictions. (cdc.gov)
  • Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening illness requiring prompt antibiotic treatment for patients and antibiotic prophylaxis for their close contacts. (cdc.gov)
  • Princeton, NJ- The antibiotic prescriptions pharmacists fill for some presurgical patients may no longer have the desired effect. (uspharmacist.com)
  • In fact, I remember two attendings (an emergency physician and a cardiologist) discussing whether we should provide prophylaxis to high-risk patients who are undergoing various "minor" procedures, such as anoscopy , digital rectal examination, Foley catheterization, and incision and drainage of a skin abscess. (medscape.com)
  • The new guidelines significantly reduced the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis, recommending them only before major dental procedures in only very high-risk patients (patients with prosthetic cardiac valves, previous IE, congenital heart disease , and cardiac transplant recipients who develop a valvulopathy). (medscape.com)
  • Antibiotic prophylaxis is mandatory in these patients. (medscape.com)
  • For most of our patients, antibiotic prophylaxis is something they've never heard of and don't need to worry about. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • A more powerful antibiotic protocol has been suggested in patients at high risk of infection. (unife.it)
  • Patients in the 'low-risk' group were treated with only two antibiotic administrations while patients in the 'high-risk' group were treated with a prolonged 9-day protocol, according to renal function and allergies. (unife.it)
  • Conclusion: In a large cohort of patients undergoing CIED procedure, an antibiotic prophylaxis based on individual stratification of infective risk resulted in similar rate of infection between groups at high and low risk of CIED-related infection. (unife.it)
  • Among 83 patients (mean age 12.8 years), 51 interventions were performed under prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis (mean duration 5.82 days) whereas in 40 interventions only single-shot prophylaxis was administered. (bvsalud.org)
  • However, after single-shot antibiotic regimen, patients had significantly shorter hospital stays , being discharged on average one day earlier. (bvsalud.org)
  • Prior to the introduction of antibiotics, 80% of patients with bacterial pneumonias died. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • Procedures that generally would receive prophylaxis included any major dental, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, or respiratory procedure. (medscape.com)
  • Typical endodontic procedures for which antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended include root canal therapy (when it involves going deeper than the root apex), surgical tooth extractions, and any other dental, endodontic, or periodontal procedure during which the doctor anticipates bleeding. (clearwaterfldentistry.com)
  • In short, antibiotic prophylaxis is the use of antibiotics before a dental procedure to prevent a bacterial infection elsewhere in the body. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • Stratification of individual infective risk could guide the prophylaxis before CIED procedure. (unife.it)
  • Clinical implementation of a new antibiotic prophylaxis regimen for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. (ki.se)
  • This is called preventive antibiotics, or antibiotic prophylaxis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Maintain updated prophylaxis guidance until a full 24 months have passed without any invasive meningococcal disease cases caused by ciprofloxacin-resistant strains having been reported in the catchment area. (cdc.gov)
  • Parenteral systemic antibiotics seem to be more appropriate than oral or topical antibiotics because the chosen antibiotics must reach high concentrations at all sites of danger. (wikipedia.org)
  • With 792 surveys now analysed, the evidence underlines the continuing overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics worldwide5. (who.int)
  • There are few studies that evaluate the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in dentistry. (cdc.gov)
  • Over time, the use of antibiotics for growth promotion purposes in livestock was discovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1986, some European countries banned the use of antibiotics because of research they found that linked antibiotic use in livestock and drug resistant bacteria in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of antibiotics in livestock and farming plays a major role in of Escherichia coli Isolated from increasing AMR. (who.int)
  • [ 14 ] However, a large clinical trial showed that prophylaxis of human bites that do not penetrate the epidermal layer or are not in high-risk areas is probably unnecessary. (medscape.com)
  • Studies suggest that 30% to 50 % of prescribed antibiotics are unnecessary or not optimally prescribed (4). (cdc.gov)
  • 9. Broder J, Jerrard D, Olshaker J, Witting M. Low risk of infection in selected human bites treated without antibiotics. (jept.ir)
  • Are antibiotics indicated following human bites? (jept.ir)
  • Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether expanding the antibiotic prophylaxis with repeated doses in the postoper. (omicsonline.org)
  • In an accompanying editorial, Morris and colleagues [ 3 ] point out that the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in 2008 stopped recommending antibiotic prophylaxis for IE entirely, which resulted in a 79% reduction in prescribing of IE prophylaxis but no increase in IE incidence or mortality. (medscape.com)
  • The primary endpoints assessed were the incidence of infection , failure of surgical correction, and antibiotic -related side effects. (bvsalud.org)
  • This retrospective cohort study aimed to compare the outcomes of alveolar cleft osteoplasty using single-shot antibiotic prophylaxis versus a prolonged antibiotic regimen. (bvsalud.org)
  • citation needed] The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends antibiotic prophylaxis for few people since only a small number of cases of endocarditis might be caused by dental procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Heart Association recommends antibiotics before dental procedures only for individuals with the highest risk of infection. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing infection following appendectomy, cesarean section, and transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB) procedures appeared statistically unchanged, the study team suggests, although this analysis was challenged by small sample size. (uspharmacist.com)
  • A fully informed patient may make appropriate choices regarding viral prophylaxis when risks and benefits are clearly explained and understood. (medscape.com)
  • After all, it was important for an antibiotic to not just kill bacteria but also to be ingested by a patient, make its way to the site of infection and selectively kill bacteria without harming human cells. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • US outpatient antibiotic prescribing variation according to geography, patient population, and provider specialty in 2011. (cdc.gov)
  • Some of the important antibiotics such as erythromycin, Streptomycin, cefoxitin, and tetracycline were 100% resistant. (who.int)
  • What I found most interesting among other findings in the study was that the number of cases of IE due to streptococcal species, the organisms most likely to be increased by the reduction in antibiotic use with dental procedures, actually decreased over the 11-year period. (medscape.com)
  • [ 4 ] If there has been an overall increase in cases of IE, it largely appears to be associated with staphylococci acquired through such risk factors as increases in injection drug use and the increased prevalence of prosthetic valves, pacemakers, defibrillators, and surgically repaired congenital heart disease, rather than an increase in dental microbes resulting from reduced antibiotic use. (medscape.com)
  • any previous antibiotic use, which may have led to resistant bacteria. (nice.org.uk)
  • Every year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and approximately 23,000 people die as a direct result (1). (cdc.gov)
  • We are part of your health care team and will work together to determine if you have a need for antibiotic prophylaxis. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • NYON, Switzerland: Those who prioritise their overall health also understand the importance of oral health and consistently seek professional prophylaxis. (dental-tribune.com)
  • Participants aged 30 years and older were eligible for the periodontal examination if they had one or more natural teeth and no health condition requiring antibiotic prophylaxis before periodontal probing. (cdc.gov)
  • Dermatologic surgeons commonly use antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent bacterial endocarditis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 1940s, it was discovered that providing poultry and pigs with sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics on a daily basis helped them gain weight faster. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • Monitor and regulate the use of antibiotics for mass prophylaxis and growth promotion in poultry. (who.int)
  • Regular use of poultry feeds containing antibiotics. (who.int)
  • There are side-effects and risks to taking antibiotics, so antibiotic prophylaxis is only used when the benefit outweighs the risk for you. (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • 2. Who Could Benefit from Antibiotic Prophylaxis? (falmouthdentalarts.com)
  • The study suggests that single-shot antibiotic prophylaxis does not have drawbacks compared to prolonged antibiotic treatment in alveolar cleft osteoplasty. (bvsalud.org)
  • Exposure to antibiotics exerts selection pressure on bacteria, encouraging the survival of organisms with genetic mutations that allow them to withstand the drug treatment. (laviedesidees.fr)
  • But this study and others should certainly make us question how much of a difference antibiotic prophylaxis for IE makes. (medscape.com)
  • It is well recognized that broad-spectrum antibiotics are more likely to prevent gram-negative sepsis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The exclusion criteria were incomplete 30-day follow-up, non-index procedures, or ongoing antibiotics. (lu.se)
  • At the conclusions of today's session, the participants will be able to review the geographic distribution to find the symptoms of, identify the serologic tests and use to diagnose, and describe the appropriate use of antibiotics for Lyme Disease, Southern Tick Associated Rash Illness (STARI), Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis and other emerging tickborne diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • The choice of antibiotics should be made according to data on pharmacology, microbiology, clinical experience and economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • This lends further support for the reduced indication for antibiotics to prevent IE. (medscape.com)
  • The goal of pre-medication or antibiotic prophylaxis, Dr. Andrew Holloman will tell you, is to prevent bacterial endocarditis, a serious infection of the endothelial heart surfaces or the heart valves. (clearwaterfldentistry.com)
  • The clinician should be aware that the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) clinical practice guidelines state that all human bite wounds require antibiotic prophylaxis. (medscape.com)