Antiaris: A plant genus of the family MORACEAE. Members have been used as an arrow poison.Pan troglodytes: The common chimpanzee, a species of the genus Pan, family HOMINIDAE. It lives in Africa, primarily in the tropical rainforests. There are a number of recognized subspecies.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.Ape Diseases: Diseases of chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Pan paniscus: The pygmy chimpanzee, a species of the genus Pan, family HOMINIDAE. Its common name is Bonobo, which was once considered a separate genus by some; others considered it a subspecies of PAN TROGLODYTES. Its range is confined to the forests of the central Zaire basin. Despite its name, it is often of equal size to P. troglodytes.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Cardiac Glycosides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.Digoxin: A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone DIGOXIGENIN. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in ATRIAL FIBRILLATION and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Glycosides: Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Digitoxin: A cardiac glycoside sometimes used in place of DIGOXIN. It has a longer half-life than digoxin; toxic effects, which are similar to those of digoxin, are longer lasting. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p665)Cardenolides: C(23)-steroids with methyl groups at C-10 and C-13 and a five-membered lactone at C-17. They are aglycone constituents of CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES and must have at least one double bond in the molecule. The class includes cardadienolides and cardatrienolides. Members include DIGITOXIN and DIGOXIN and their derivatives and the STROPHANTHINS.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Spasm: An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.Curare: Plant extracts from several species, including genera STRYCHNOS and Chondodendron, which contain TETRAHYDROISOQUINOLINES that produce PARALYSIS of skeletal muscle. These extracts are toxic and must be used with the administration of artificial respiration.Defecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Moraceae: The mulberry plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. They have milky latex and small, petalless male or female flowers.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Ficus: A plant genus of the family MORACEAE. It is the source of the familiar fig fruit and the latex from this tree contains FICAIN.Phytochemicals: A broad range of biologically active compounds which occur naturally in plants having important medicinal and nutritional properties.Logic: The science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference and deals with the canons and criteria of validity in thought and demonstration. This system of reasoning is applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Coniferophyta: A plant division of GYMNOSPERMS consisting of cone-bearing trees and shrubs.Cupressaceae: A plant family of the order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta (conifers). They are mainly resinous, aromatic evergreen trees.Ocotea: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The common name of stinkwood is also used for Zieria (RUTACEAE).Genome Components: The parts of a GENOME sequence that are involved with the different functions or properties of genomes as a whole as opposed to those of individual GENES.New Caledonia: A group of islands in Melanesia constituting a French overseas territory. The group includes New Caledonia (the main island), Ile des Pins, Loyalty Island, and several other islet groups. The capital is Noumea. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1774 and visited by various navigators, explorers, and traders from 1792 to 1840. Occupied by the French in 1853, it was set up as a penal colony 1864-94. In 1946 it was made a French overseas territory. It was named by Captain Cook with the 5th and 6th century A.D. Latin name for Scotland, Caledonia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p830 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)Melanesia: The collective name for the islands of the Pacific Ocean northeast of Australia, including NEW CALEDONIA; VANUATU; New Hebrides, Solomon Islands, Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, FIJI, etc. Melanesia (from the Greek melas, black + nesos, island) is so called from the black color of the natives who are generally considered to be descended originally from the Negroid Papuans and the Polynesians or Malays. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p748 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p344)Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Abscisic Acid: Abscission-accelerating plant growth substance isolated from young cotton fruit, leaves of sycamore, birch, and other plants, and from potatoes, lemons, avocados, and other fruits.Plant Dormancy: The state of failure to initiate and complete the process of growth, reproduction, or gemination of otherwise normal plants or vegetative structures thereof.Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Lepidium sativum: A plant species of the genus LEPIDIUM, family BRASSICACEAE that is a fast-growing, often weedy native of western Asia. It is widely grown, especially in its curl-leaved form, and used as a garnishDictionaries, MedicalApocynaceae: The dogbane family of the order Gentianales. Members of the family have milky, often poisonous juice, smooth-margined leaves, and flowers in clusters. Asclepiadacea (formerly the milkweed family) has been included since 1999 and before 1810.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Nerium: A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE. It is a very poisonous plant that contains cardioactive agents.Strophanthus: A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE that contains OUABAIN cardiac glycosides.Methomyl: A carbamate insecticide with anticholinesterase activity.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Bible: The book composed of writings generally accepted by Christians as inspired by God and of divine authority. (Webster, 3d ed)Greek World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the influence of Greek civilization, culture, and science. The Greek Empire extended from the Greek mainland and the Aegean islands from the 16th century B.C., to the Indus Valley in the 4th century under Alexander the Great, and to southern Italy and Sicily. Greek medicine began with Homeric and Aesculapian medicine and continued unbroken to Hippocrates (480-355 B.C.). The classic period of Greek medicine was 460-136 B.C. and the Graeco-Roman period, 156 B.C.-576 A.D. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed)Poisons: Substances which, when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed, or when applied to, injected into, or developed within the body in relatively small amounts may, by their chemical action, cause damage to structure or disturbance of function. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Hydra: A genus of freshwater polyps in the family Hydridae, order Hydroida, class HYDROZOA. They are of special interest because of their complex organization and because their adult organization corresponds roughly to the gastrula of higher animals.Ouabain: A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.Arthropods: Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.Arthropod Venoms: Venoms from animals of the phylum Arthropoda. Those most investigated are from scorpions and spiders of the class Arachnidae and from ant, bee, and wasp families of the Insecta order Hymenoptera. The venoms contain protein toxins, enzymes, and other bioactive substances and may be lethal to man.Immunity: Nonsusceptibility to the invasive or pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or to the toxic effect of antigenic substances.Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.

A new cytotoxic 19-nor-cardenolide from the latex of Antiaris toxicaria. (1/3)

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Cardiac glycosides from Antiaris toxicaria with potent cardiotonic activity. (2/3)

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Nitric oxide enhances desiccation tolerance of recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seeds via protein S-nitrosylation and carbonylation. (3/3)

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Antiarins are cardiac glycoside poisons produced by the upas tree (Antiaris toxicaria). There are two forms, α-antiarin and β-antiarin. β-Antiarin, a cardiac glycoside steroid, can be isolated from upas tree latex (Antiaris toxicaria). Its use ranges from medical use, such as hypertension treatment, to arrow poison application. It also proves to be more poisonous than curare, sporting a low LD50 of 0.1 mg/kg in most mammals. To date, β-antiarin has only been isolated from the upas tree by the scientist H. Kiliani in 1896; no synthetic synthesis has yet been achieved. Upon β-antiarin poisoning, when observed in animals such as frogs and small mammals, visible symptoms include muscle spasms - particularly of the head and neck - and excess defecation. Paralysis can also be presented before death. The primary physiological system affected is the cardiac muscle, though gastro-intestinal tissue has also been known to be severely affected by this type of poisoning. Convulsions and spasms are not ...
從清朝 日治時代直到現在3台灣的鳳梨品系一直都一樣嗎?當然不是囉(最早的鳳梨被稱為「在來種「3後來日治時代為了製作罐頭方便3從夏威夷引進了開英種4到了1980年以後3因為罐頭外銷敵不過競爭3台灣的鳳梨改為內銷且以鮮食為主3為了挽救鳳梨產業3農改場 農試所便培育出各種不同適合鮮食的鳳梨4包括不用削皮可以直接剝來吃的釋迦鳳梨(台農4號(3最適合在秋冬生產的冬蜜鳳梨(台農13號(3有特殊香氣的香水鳳梨(台農11號(3以及因為果肉乳白色被稱為牛奶鳳梨的台農20號等 ...
Leaves: 8 to 16, ensiform, distichous, erect, coriaceous, glaucous, closely ribbed, narrowed gradually to the point, finally up to 50 cm. long, 2,5 to 6 cm broad, hairy on the margin, not ciliated, often much undulated; peduncle stout, ancipitous, glaucous, 1/2-1 ft. long ...
Natural News) Stroke is one of the few things that often appears on the short list of illnesses that doctors - as well as the media - often refer to as silent killers. It works quietly, in the background, and rather quickly after it starts, so one of the best strategies that you can employ to stand a chance against it is to simply prevent it from happening in the first place.. Indeed, as the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure. But in case you find that its too late to prevent a stroke, new research suggests that you can now use plants that are rich in antioxidant phytochemicals for effective treatment. Researchers looked at one plant in particular, called Antiaris africana Engl. (Moraceae), in order to gather data on its anti-stroke potential.. The logic behind why exactly the researchers sought to determine the efficacy of a plant for the treatment and prevention of stroke is actually rather simple. In their papers introduction, they reason that many drugs ...
The greatest public health concern about water is directed to its ever increasing number of contaminants. Public distribution systems, though accessible only to a limited population, mainly make use of chemicals in the treatment processes. Such water treatment systems overlay burden on the developing nations financial resources. Moreover, reports states that such chemicals can cause severe health hazards. These points out the need for low-cost, replicable non-chemicals, which would be effective in the treatment of water contaminants. In the present study, treatment potentialities of vegetative parts of certain hydrophytic / mesophytic plants like Lagenandra toxicaria Dalz, Aloe barbedensis Mill., Canna indica. L and Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst, on Turbidity, Hardness, Iron and microbial count of contaminated water has been worked out.. Batch treatment has been followed and the performance evaluation of plants under varying concentration of plant materials and retention time has been worked out. ...
Hearst Television participates in various affiliate marketing programs, which means we may get paid commissions on purchases made through our links to retailer sites.. ...
1), Antiaris(23), Artocarpus(1), Dorstenia(39), Ficus(329), Milicia(5), Morus(28), Musanga(17), Myrianthus(10), Treculia(11), Trilepisium(11).. ...
In the present study, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, that high glucose was able to attenuate the overall level of protein S-nitrosylation in primary human endothelial cells. We have identified at least seven proteins that were reduced by high glucose in their S-nitrosylation status as shown in Fig. 1 and Table 1. These decreased S-nitrosylated proteins can be classed as 1) cytoskeleton proteins (β-actin, paxillin, vimentin, and vinculin), 2) metabolic enzymes (eNOS and diacylglycerol kinase-α), 3) chaperone (GRP78), 4) signaling molecules (H-ras and ERK-1), and 5) transcription factor (NF-κB). It is noted that although the level of a vast majority of S-nitrosylated proteins was decreased, the extent of a number of them was actually either increased or unchanged under high-glucose conditions, suggesting a specific role for high glucose in the regulation of protein S-nitrosylation. Because S-nitrosylation has been implicated in the regulation of numerous protein activities ...
Kit for S-nitrosylated proteins. Kit for protein S-nitrosylation. Highly Specific Mouse Monoclonal Antibody. Thoroughly Validated by Western Blotting and ELISA.
Antiaris toxicaria Lesch. Anticharis senegalensis (Walp.) Bhandari Antidesma rufescens Tul. Antidesma venosum E.Mey. ex Tul. ...
... s are cardiac glycoside poisons produced by the upas tree (Antiaris toxicaria). There are two forms, α-antiarin and β- ... The glycosides of Antiaris toxicaria". Helvetica Chimica Acta. 38: 1364-96. doi:10.1002/hlca.19550380608. Zahorka, Herwig. " ... "Blowpipe dart poison in Borneo and the secret of its production: the latex of Antiaris toxicaria; the poison-making procedure; ... β-Antiarin, a cardiac glycoside steroid, can be isolated from upas tree latex (Antiaris toxicaria). Its use ranges from medical ...
1 sp.) Castillineae Clement & Weiblen 2009 Antiaris Lesch. (1 sp.) Castilla Cerv. (3 spp.) Helicostylis Trécul (7 spp.) Maquira ...
The larvae feed on Antiaris africana. "GlobIZ search". Global Information System on Pyraloidea. Retrieved 2014-07-15. Afro ...
... antiaris (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.750.088 --- artocarpus (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.750.144 ...
It feeds on Albizia adianthifolia, Celtis zenkeri, Petersianthus macrocarpus, and Antiaris africana. Frea unifasciata var. ...
Antiaris Antiaropsis Castilla Helicostylis Maquira Mesogyne Naucleopsis Perebia Poulsenia Pseudolmedia Sparattosyce Zerega, ...
The main plant sources for the poisons are members of the Antiaris, Strychnos and Strophanthus genera. Antiaris toxicaria for ...
Among the common trees are Kapok, Celtis zenkeri, Triplochiton scleroxylon, Antiaris africana, Pycnanthus angolensis and ...
The larvae possibly feed on Antiaris toxicaria, Ritchiea capparioides, Antiaris africana and Ficus species (including F. ...
Antiaris toxicaria (upas tree): antiarin. *Strophanthus kombe (Strophanthus vine): ouabain (g-strophanthin) and other ...
Antiaris - antiaris trees Antiaris toxicaria - upas; ipoh; dart-poison tree Artocarpus - breadfruits and jackfruits Artocarpus ...
Some plants found in the area are Odyendea zimmermanni, Uapaca guineensis, Antiaris toxicaria, Elaeis guineensis, Erythrophleum ...
Among the many species described in the Herbarium was the Upas tree (Antiaris toxicaria), the toxicity of the tree was ...
The Mentawai people generally put poison on the tips of their arrows, using a mixture of omai (Antiaris toxicaria), lombok ( ...
Convallaria majalis (Lily of the Valley): convallotoxin Antiaris toxicaria (upas tree): antiarin Strophanthus kombe ( ...
The ingredients for the creation of these poisons are mainly extracted from plants of the Antiaris, Strychnos and Strophanthus ... genera, and Antiaris toxicaria (a tree of the mulberry and breadfruit family), for example, is used in the Java island of ...
Terminalia superba Strombosia glaucescens Cola gigantean Mansonia altissima Celtis zenkeri Ricinodendron heudelotii Antiaris ...
Antiaris africana, Terminalia superba which is known locally as Afara, Entandrophragma or Sapele, Lophira alata, Triplochiton ...
... which houses a collection of trees producing arrow poison from Africa and Malaya such as Antiaris toxicaria. Although the ...
Vernacular names [edit wikidata Category:Antiaris toxicaria linked to current category] [edit wikidata Antiaris toxicaria ... Le faut iroko (Antiaris toxicaris) dans la forêt de Niaouli.jpg 1,728 × 3,072; 1.94 MB. ... Media in category "Antiaris toxicaria". The following 48 files are in this category, out of 48 total. ... Antiaris toxicaria - Palta - North 24 Parganas 2012-04-11 9599.JPG 4,288 × 2,848; 8.16 MB. ...
USDA, ARS, Germplasm Resources Information Network. Antiaris toxicaria in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U ... Retrieved from "https://species.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Antiaris_toxicaria&oldid=5762731" ...
Antiaris toxicaria aqueous extract therefore possesses anticonvulsant activity.. 1. Introduction. The plant Antiaris toxicaria ... Antiaris toxicaria aqueous extract (200, 400, and 800 mg kg−1) significantly (. ) shortened the duration of convulsions in PTZ ... of Antiaris toxicaria aqueous extract (AAE).. 2.3. Animals. Male ICR mice and Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 20 and 25 g ... Preparation of Antiaris toxicaria Aqueous Extract. Dried stem bark was milled into powder using a commercial grinder. The ...
Two new cytotoxic cardenolides from the latex of Antiaris toxicaria.. *Hao Dai, Yu-Juan Gan, Dong-Mei Que, Jiao Wu, Zhen-Chang ... A new drimane sesquiterpenoid glycoside from the seeds of Antiaris toxicaria.. *Wenhua Dong, Wen-li Mei, You-Xing Zhao, Yan-Bo ... Antiaris toxicaria (Moraceae) was evaluated for anticonvulsant activity in rodents. Animal models used include maximal… (More) ... A new 10β-hydroxy-19-nor-cardenolide, named toxicarioside M (1), was isolated from the trunk bark of Antiaris toxicaria (Pers… ...
The plant Antiaris toxicaria (family Moraceae) is a common plant in Ghanaian forests. It has been employed traditionally as an ... Preparation of Antiaris toxicaria aqueous extract. The dry stem bark was powdered using a commercial grinder. The coarse powder ... Anticonvulsant effect of Antiaris toxicaria (Pers.) Lesch. (Moraceae) aqueous extract in rodents. ISRN Pharmacol. 2013;2013:9. ... Antiaris toxicaria has previously shown anticonvulsant activity in acute animal models of epilepsy. The aqueous extract (AAE) ...
A pilot study on the efficacy of an Antiaris toxicaria subsp. africana (Engl.) C.C. Berg based Ghanaian herbal product in the ... Efficacy of Antiaris toxicaria subsp. africana in peripheral neuropathy. December 15, 2018. Clinical Pharmacology, Clinical ... A pilot study on the efficacy of an Antiaris toxicaria subsp. africana (Engl.) C.C. Berg based Ghanaian herbal product in the ... Estudio piloto sobre la eficacia de un producto herbal de Ghana a base de Antiaris toxicaria subsp. africana (Engl.) C.C. Berg ...
今天看到其中一種說法是3九大劇毒中有一種是「箭毒木「(Antiaris toxicaria(》箭毒木是桑科3在英語的世界裡常見的俗稱是upas tree》. ... 標籤4 九大劇毒 番木鼈鹼 箭毒
Recipes : H(013) skin diseases, H(104) insecticide.crushed or pounded leaves, bark of Antiaris toxicaria, local application ... Recipes : H(018) headache, H(091) weakness in pregnancy, crush leaves of Antiaris toxicaria in H2O and bathe ... Recipes : H(201) superstitious purposes, the whole plant of Antiaris toxicaria is used as a charm ...
Antiaris toxicaria (plant). Rosales: Moraceae: …latex of Antiaris toxicaria (upas tree) contains an extremely toxic cardiac ...
Antiaris toxicaria Lesch. Anticharis senegalensis (Walp.) Bhandari Antidesma rufescens Tul. Antidesma venosum E.Mey. ex Tul. ...
Wild animals increasingly inhabit human-influenced environments such as forest fragments amid agricultural systems. Dietary studies provide a means of assessing wildlife responses to anthropogenic hab
Antiarins are cardiac glycoside poisons produced by the upas tree (Antiaris toxicaria). There are two forms, α-antiarin and β- ... The glycosides of Antiaris toxicaria". Helvetica Chimica Acta. 38: 1364-96. doi:10.1002/hlca.19550380608. Zahorka, Herwig. " ... "Blowpipe dart poison in Borneo and the secret of its production: the latex of Antiaris toxicaria; the poison-making procedure; ... β-Antiarin, a cardiac glycoside steroid, can be isolated from upas tree latex (Antiaris toxicaria). Its use ranges from medical ...
1 sp.) Castillineae Clement & Weiblen 2009 Antiaris Lesch. (1 sp.) Castilla Cerv. (3 spp.) Helicostylis Trécul (7 spp.) Maquira ...
The larvae feed on Antiaris africana. "GlobIZ search". Global Information System on Pyraloidea. Retrieved 2014-07-15. Afro ...
Antiaris toxicaria. Eucalyptus spp.. Pangium edule. Araucaria cunninghamii. Euadia hortensis. Parinari glaberrima. ...
Antiaris toxicaria (upas tree): antiarin. *Strophanthus kombe (Strophanthus vine): ouabain (g-strophanthin) and other ...
... antiaris (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.750.088 --- artocarpus (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.750.144 ...
It feeds on Albizia adianthifolia, Celtis zenkeri, Petersianthus macrocarpus, and Antiaris africana. Frea unifasciata var. ...
Tags: alternative medicine, anti-stroke, Antiaris africana, antioxidants, bark cloth tree, cerebral ischemia, excitotoxicity, ... It should be noted that A. africana is sometimes referred to as simply Antiaris, bark cloth tree, and false iroko. It has a ... Researchers looked at one plant in particular, called Antiaris africana Engl. (Moraceae), in order to gather data on its anti- ...
Antiaris Antiaropsis Castilla Helicostylis Maquira Mesogyne Naucleopsis Perebia Poulsenia Pseudolmedia Sparattosyce Zerega, ...
antiaris africana. A t J A A t J A A t J ... antiaris africana. A t J A A t J A A t J ... antiaris africana. A t J A A t J A A t J ...
The main plant sources for the poisons are members of the Antiaris, Strychnos and Strophanthus genera. Antiaris toxicaria for ...
Bersama abyssinica, Bridelia micrantha, Canarium schweinfurthii and Antiaris toxicaria stem bark extracts; Aspilia natalensis, ...
Among the common trees are Kapok, Celtis zenkeri, Triplochiton scleroxylon, Antiaris africana, Pycnanthus angolensis and ...
The larvae possibly feed on Antiaris toxicaria, Ritchiea capparioides, Antiaris africana and Ficus species (including F. ...
  • or in home gardens in densely settled urban areas and monocultural rural agricultural areas, Pacific Islanders have selected for incorporation into their agroforestry systems a wide range of tree and tree-like species that meet their particular en vironmental and cultural needs. (nzdl.org)
  • Antiaris toxicaria for example, a tree of the mulberry and breadfruit family, is commonly used on Java and its neighbouring islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • A notable tree is the Antiaris saccidora , or sack-tree, of Western India, the inner bark of which forms a very good material for sacking, and also for cordage. (wikisource.org)
  • The ipoh tree is also known as antiaris toxicaria , the sap of which is poisonous and is used by the orang asli in their poison darts ( sumpit ) for hunting. (wordpress.com)
  • It is divided into an orchid garden, which hosts a rare specimen of Queen of Orchids(Cattleya), forest path, palms garden, Japanese garden, Educational garden and a medicinal garden, which houses a collection of trees producing arrow poison from Africa and Malaya such as Antiaris toxicaria. (wikipedia.org)