Anthroposophy: Knowledge of the nature of man. A spiritual and mystical doctrine that grew out of theosophy and derives mainly from the philosophy of Rudolph Steiner, Austrian social philosopher (1861-1925). (Webster, 3d ed)HumanitiesLiterature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Humanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.National Socialism: The doctrines and policies of the Nazis or the National Social German Workers party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933-1945. These doctrines and policies included racist nationalism, expansionism, and state control of the economy. (from Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. and American Heritage College Dictionary, 3d ed.)Occultism: The belief in or study of practices and knowledge of magical, mystical, or supernatural powers. ALCHEMY, astrology, and many RELIGIOUS PHILOSOPHIES are based upon occult principles.Parapsychology: Branch of psychology that deals with paranormal behavior and events such as telepathy, precognition, and clairvoyance, which are not explicable by present day "natural laws".Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Buddhism: The teaching ascribed to Gautama Buddha (ca. 483 B.C.) holding that suffering is inherent in life and that one can escape it into nirvana by mental and moral self-purification. (Webster, 3d ed)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Double Effect Principle: Guideline for determining when it is morally permissible to perform an action to pursue a good end with knowledge that the action will also bring about bad results. It generally states that, in cases where a contemplated action has such double effect, the action is permissible only if: it is not wrong in itself; the bad result is not intended; the good result is not a direct causal result of the bad result; and the good result is "proportionate to" the bad result. (from Solomon, "Double Effect," in Becker, The Encyclopedia of Ethics, 1992)Hair Cells, Ampulla: Sensory cells in the ampullary crest of each of the semicircular ducts, with their apical STEREOCILIA embedded in a wedge-shaped gelatinous cupula. These hair cells sense the movement of ENDOLYMPH resulting from angular acceleration of the head, and send signals via the VESTIBULAR NERVE to the brain to maintain balance.Natural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Faith Healing: The use of faith and spirit to cure disease.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Cognitive Dissonance: Motivational state produced by inconsistencies between simultaneously held cognitions or between a cognition and behavior; e.g., smoking enjoyment and believing smoking is harmful are dissonant.Exercise Movement Techniques: Methods or programs of physical activities which can be used to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Massage: The systematic and methodical manipulations of body tissues best performed with the hands for the purpose of affecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation.Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Menstruation: The periodic shedding of the ENDOMETRIUM and associated menstrual bleeding in the MENSTRUAL CYCLE of humans and primates. Menstruation is due to the decline in circulating PROGESTERONE, and occurs at the late LUTEAL PHASE when LUTEOLYSIS of the CORPUS LUTEUM takes place.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Menstruation Disturbances: Variations of menstruation which may be indicative of disease.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Menstrual Cycle: The period from onset of one menstrual bleeding (MENSTRUATION) to the next in an ovulating woman or female primate. The menstrual cycle is regulated by endocrine interactions of the HYPOTHALAMUS; the PITUITARY GLAND; the ovaries; and the genital tract. The menstrual cycle is divided by OVULATION into two phases. Based on the endocrine status of the OVARY, there is a FOLLICULAR PHASE and a LUTEAL PHASE. Based on the response in the ENDOMETRIUM, the menstrual cycle is divided into a proliferative and a secretory phase.Menstrual Hygiene Products: Personal care items used during MENSTRUATION.Dysmenorrhea: Painful menstruation.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Body Modification, Non-Therapeutic: The wounding of the body or body parts by branding, cutting, piercing (BODY PIERCING), or TATTOOING as a cultural practice or expression of creativity or identity.Meditation: A state of consciousness in which the individual eliminates environmental stimuli from awareness so that the mind can focus on a single thing, producing a state of relaxation and relief from stress. A wide variety of techniques are used to clear the mind of stressful outside interferences. It includes meditation therapy. (Mosby's Medical, Nursing, and Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)Proprotein Convertase 2: A serine endopeptidase that has specificity for cleavage at ARGININE. It cleaves a variety of prohormones including PRO-OPIOMELANOCORTIN, proluteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone, proenkephalins, prodynorphin, and PROINSULIN.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Art Therapy: The use of art as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of neurological, mental, or behavioral disorders.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).

Health costs in anthroposophic therapy users: a two-year prospective cohort study. (1/11)

BACKGROUND: Anthroposophic therapies (counselling, special medication, art, eurythmy movement, and rhythmical massage) aim to stimulate long-term self-healing processes, which theoretically could lead to a reduction of healthcare use. In a prospective two-year cohort study, anthroposophic therapies were followed by a reduction of chronic disease symptoms and improvement of quality of life. The purpose of this analysis was to describe health costs in users of anthroposophic therapies. METHODS: 717 consecutive outpatients from 134 medical practices in Germany, starting anthroposophic therapies for chronic diseases, participated in a prospective cohort study. We analysed direct health costs (anthroposophic therapies, physician and dentist consultations, psychotherapy, medication, physiotherapy, ergotherapy, hospital treatment, rehabilitation) and indirect costs (sick leave compensation) in the pre-study year and the first two study years. Costs were calculated from resource utilisation, documented by patient self-reporting. Data were collected from January 1999 to April 2003. RESULTS: Total health costs in the first study year (bootstrap mean 3,297 Euro; 95% confidence interval 95%-CI 3,157 Euro to 3,923 Euro) did not differ significantly from the pre-study year (3,186 Euro; 95%-CI 3,037 Euro to 3,711 Euro), whereas in the second year, costs (2,771 Euro; 95%-CI 2,647 Euro to 3,256 Euro) were significantly reduced by 416 Euro (95%-CI 264 Euro to 960 Euro) compared to the pre-study year. In each period hospitalisation and sick-leave together amounted to more than half of the total health costs. Anthroposophic therapies and medication amounted to 3%, 15%, and 8% of total health costs in the pre-study year, first year, and second study year, respectively. The cost reduction in the second year was largely accounted for by a decrease of inpatient hospitalisation, leading to a hospital cost reduction of 519 Euro (95%-CI 377 Euro to 904 Euro) compared to the pre-study year. CONCLUSION: In patients starting anthroposophic therapies for chronic disease, total health costs did not increase in the first year, and were reduced in the second year. This reduction was largely explained by a decrease of inpatient hospitalisation. Within the limits of a pre-post design, study findings suggest that anthroposophic therapies are not associated with a relevant increase in total health costs.  (+info)

Anthroposophic medical therapy in chronic disease: a four-year prospective cohort study. (2/11)

BACKGROUND: The short consultation length in primary care is a source of concern, and the wish for more consultation time is a common reason for patients to seek complementary medicine. Physicians practicing anthroposophic medicine have prolonged consultations with their patients, taking an extended history, addressing constitutional, psychosocial, and biographic aspect of patients' illness, and selecting optimal therapy. In Germany, health benefit programs have included the reimbursement of this additional physician time. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical outcomes in patients with chronic diseases treated by anthroposophic physicians after an initial prolonged consultation. METHODS: In conjunction with a health benefit program in Germany, 233 outpatients aged 1-74 years, treated by 72 anthroposophic physicians after a consultation of at least 30 min participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and patients' assessment on numerical rating scales 0-10) and quality of life (adults: SF-36, children aged 8-16: KINDL, children 1-7: KITA). Disease Score was documented after 0, 6 and 12 months, other outcomes after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and (Symptom Score and SF-36) 48 months. RESULTS: Most common indications were mental disorders (17.6% of patients; primarily depression and fatigue), respiratory diseases (15.5%), and musculoskeletal diseases (11.6%). Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 0.5-9.8 years). The consultation leading to study enrolment lasted 30-60 min in 51.5% (120/233) of patients and > 60 min in 48.5%. During the following year, patients had a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 1.0-7.0) prolonged consultations with their anthroposophic physicians, 86.1% (167/194) of patients used anthroposophic medication. All outcomes except KITA Daily Life subscale and KINDL showed significant improvement between baseline and all subsequent follow-ups. Improvements from baseline to 12 months were: Disease Score from mean (standard deviation) 5.95 (1.74) to 2.31 (2.29) (p < 0.001), Symptom Score from 5.74 (1.81) to 3.04 (2.16) (p < 0.001), SF-36 Physical Component Summary from 44.01 (10.92) to 47.99 (10.43) (p < 0.001), SF-36 Mental Component Summary from 42.34 (11.98) to 46.84 (10.47) (p < 0.001), and KITA Psychosoma subscale from 62.23 (19.76) to 76.44 (13.62) (p = 0.001). All these improvements were maintained until the last follow-up. Improvements were similar in patients not using diagnosis-related adjunctive therapies within the first six study months. CONCLUSION: Patients treated by anthroposophic physicians after an initial prolonged consultation had long-term reduction of chronic disease symptoms and improvement of quality of life. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that physician-provided anthroposophic therapy may play a beneficial role in the long-term care of patients with chronic diseases.  (+info)

Eurythmy therapy in chronic disease: a four-year prospective cohort study. (3/11)

BACKGROUND: Many patients with chronic diseases use complementary therapies, often provided by their physicians. In Germany, several physician-provided complementary therapies have been reimbursed by health insurance companies as part of health benefit programs. In most of these therapies, the patient has a predominantly passive role. In eurythmy therapy, however, patients actively exercise specific movements with the hands, the feet or the whole body. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical outcomes in patients practising eurythmy therapy exercises for chronic diseases. METHODS: In conjunction with a health benefit program, 419 outpatients from 94 medical practices in Germany, referred to 118 eurythmy therapists, participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and patients' assessment on numerical rating scales 0-10) and quality of life (adults: SF-36, children aged 8-16: KINDL, children 1-7: KITA). Disease Score was documented after 0, 6 and 12 months, other outcomes after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and (SF-36 and Symptom Score) 48 months. RESULTS: Most common indications were mental disorders (31.7% of patients; primarily depression, fatigue, and childhood emotional disorder) and musculoskeletal diseases (23.4%). Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 1.0-8.5). Median number of eurythmy therapy sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10-19), median therapy duration was 119 days (84-188). All outcomes improved significantly between baseline and all subsequent follow-ups (exceptions: KITA Psychosoma in first three months and KINDL). Improvements from baseline to 12 months were: Disease Score from mean (standard deviation) 6.65 (1.81) to 3.19 (2.27) (p < 0.001), Symptom Score from 5.95 (1.75) to 3.49 (2.12) (p < 0.001), SF-36 Physical Component Summary from 43.13 (10.25) to 47.10 (9.78) (p < 0.001), SF-36 Mental Component Summary from 38.31 (11.67) to 45.01 (11.76) (p < 0.001), KITA Psychosoma from 69.53 (15.45) to 77.21 (13.60) (p = 0.001), and KITA Daily Life from 59.23 (21.78) to 68.14 (18.52) (p = 0.001). All these improvements were maintained until the last follow-up. Improvements were similar in patients not using diagnosis-related adjunctive therapies within the first six study months. Adverse reactions to eurythmy therapy occurred in 3.1% (13/419) of patients. No patient stopped eurythmy therapy due to adverse reactions. CONCLUSION: Patients practising eurythmy therapy exercises had long-term improvement of chronic disease symptoms and quality of life. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that eurythmy therapy can be useful for patients motivated for this therapy.  (+info)

Assessing the order of magnitude of outcomes in single-arm cohorts through systematic comparison with corresponding cohorts: an example from the AMOS study. (4/11)

 (+info)

Combined bias suppression in single-arm therapy studies. (5/11)

 (+info)

Eurythmy Therapy in clinical studies: a systematic literature review. (6/11)

 (+info)

Patient satisfaction with primary care: an observational study comparing anthroposophic and conventional care. (7/11)

 (+info)

Anthropomorphism influences perception of computer-animated characters' actions. (8/11)

 (+info)

  • One who is willing can indeed find the basic principles of anthroposophy in my Philosophy of Freedom' Prokofieff discusses the Christian nature of the anthroposophical method of cognition, and how it is integrally related to freedom and love. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • This concurs with the basic concepts of anthroposophy and anthroposophical medicine, the justification of which is discussed in relation to the history and methodology of science as well as evidence based medicine. (peterlang.com)
  • That Steiner was trying to prevent the type of racial and national chauvenism that animated the Third Reich is testified to by the Nazis themselves in their systematic denunciations of Anthroposophy and Steiner himself and their unambiguous efforts to destroy the Anthroposophical Society. (uncletaz.com)
  • page To carry anthroposophical knowledge in one's memory is a sign of imperfection, for Anthroposophy must be a living spring which constantly renews itself within the soul. (doyletics.com)
  • I just barely met Dr. Thomas Cowan, he is an MD, and he's studied and written about a lot of subjects in medicine, including nutrition, anthroposophical medicine, you're gonna find out what anthroposophy is, and herbal medicine. (greensmoothiegirl.com)
  • The true German culture comes to expression in Idealism, Goetheanism, Anthroposophy, and Social Threefolding. (cassiopaea.org)
  • What must be stressed is that an adherence to Anthroposophy and aspects of this pedagogy can lead teachers to make decisions about individual children based on race and disability, which many people would consider to be outright discrimination. (dcscience.net)
  • From this definition it follows that anthroposophy is not a dogma or a science in the ordinary sense, but one for the production of which deeper lying forces of knowledge are to be called up. (rsarchive.org)
  • Anthroposophy aims to attain in its study of spiritual experience the precision and clarity attained by the natural sciences in their investigations of the physical world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here he says: "Anthroposophy is a road to knowledge leading the spiritual part of the human being to the spirit of the universe. (rsarchive.org)
  • Lifestyle factors associated with anthroposophy may lessen the risk of atopy in childhood. (nih.gov)
  • The author attempts to provide the reader and fellow student of Anthroposophy with a guide and workbook, sharing ideas and practical examples on how to work with the sixfold path, without being dogmatic or narrow in the approach to and practice of meditation. (lulu.com)
  • ELIANT is an alliance of 10 European associations of applied anthroposophy set up in 2006 to make a civic contribution towards improving quality of life and cultural diversity in Europe. (eliant.eu)
  • In June, 1910, Rudolf Steiner, the founder of anthroposophy, began a speaking tour of Norway with a lecture to a large and attentive audience in Oslo. (new-compass.net)
  • New Home, Same Community Dear Friends of Anthroposophy NYC and the Rudolf Steiner Bookstore, As you have already been made aware, the Bookstore and the NYC Branch of the Anthroposophical Society in America have been closed since March 16th as a result of the COVID non-essential business Anthroposophy book. (charlesrosier.com)
  • Anthroposophy and National Socialism both have deep roots in the confluence of nationalism, right-wing populism, proto-environmentalist romanticism and esoteric spiritualism that characterized much of German and Austrian culture at the end of the nineteenth century. (new-compass.net)
  • Radical, thought-provoking, and indeed mind-boggling, it leads to a completely new way of looking at what it means to be human--a spiritual being in a universe that itself is Anthroposophy in Everyday Life book. (charlesrosier.com)
  • Here we have a set of beliefs, anthroposophy, which addresses the issue of life after death, espousing human-to-human reincarnation," said the group's president, Brad Dacus. (capitolweekly.net)
  • Anthroposophy does espouse what some would call a spiritual philosophy, emphasizing objectivity and intellectual understanding, but lacks what is many consider to be the normal trappings of a church, such as holding services. (capitolweekly.net)
  • This is a genuine problem for anthroposophy, and one that isn't really being addressed by the rest of the anthroposophist movement…it is a particularly disturbing instance of the broader anthroposophist predilection for conspiracy theories, combined with longstanding anthroposophist beliefs about Jews and Jewishness. (ukanthroposophy.blog)
  • Chapter 2: The Politics of the Unpolitical: German Anthroposophy in Theory and Practice Before 1933, 64. (marquette.edu)
  • 4 Its rejection of reason in favor of mystical experience, its subordination of human action to supernatural forces, and its thoroughly hierarchical model of spiritual development all mark anthroposophy as inimical to humanist values. (new-compass.net)
  • Even if PLANS and their allies could show that anthroposophy is a religion, Ross added, it's also important to note that each school is merely "Waldorf-inspired. (capitolweekly.net)
Anthroposophical Society in Great Britain, Rudolf Steiner and Anthroposophy
Anthroposophical Society in Great Britain, Rudolf Steiner and Anthroposophy (anthroposophy.org.uk)
Soul - Wikipedia
Soul - Wikipedia (en.m.wikipedia.org)
Stewart C Books New, Rare & Used Books - Alibris
Stewart C Books New, Rare & Used Books - Alibris (alibris.com)
Waldorf education : Wikis (The Full Wiki)
Waldorf education : Wikis (The Full Wiki) (thefullwiki.org)
The Quackometer Blog
The Quackometer Blog (quackometer.net)
Menstruation: Is It Necessary Or A Modern Myth | Waldorf Homeschoolers
Menstruation: Is It Necessary Or A Modern Myth | Waldorf Homeschoolers (waldorfhomeschoolers.com)
Good Morning on the Rebound - A Perfect Way to Begin Your Day | Waldorf Homeschoolers
Good Morning on the Rebound - A Perfect Way to Begin Your Day | Waldorf Homeschoolers (waldorfhomeschoolers.com)
Anthroposophic medicine at the University of Michigan? Say it ain't so! | ScienceBlogs
Anthroposophic medicine at the University of Michigan? Say it ain't so! | ScienceBlogs (scienceblogs.com)
Jean-Michel David's Books and Publications Spotlight
Jean-Michel David's Books and Publications Spotlight (lulu.com)
Meditation in journals and communities LJ
Meditation in journals and communities LJ (livejournal.com)
Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (goodreads.com)
Åbo Akademi
Åbo Akademi (doria.fi)
Approaching Religion
Approaching Religion (doria.fi)
Lotus Guide, Author at Lotus Guide
Lotus Guide, Author at Lotus Guide (lotusguide.com)
New book: Between Occultism and Nazism | Institute for Social Ecology
New book: Between Occultism and Nazism | Institute for Social Ecology (social-ecology.org)
The true nature of Steiner (Waldorf) education. Mystical barmpottery at taxpayers' expense. Part 1   - DC's Improbable Science
The true nature of Steiner (Waldorf) education. Mystical barmpottery at taxpayers' expense. Part 1 - DC's Improbable Science (dcscience.net)
Language of consciousness - Blog - SteinerBooks
Language of consciousness - Blog - SteinerBooks (steinerbooks.org)
Online Calendar:  [Month view: 1/18]
Online Calendar: [Month view: 1/18] (localendar.com)
Steiner Waldorf Schools Part 3. The problem of racism - DC's Improbable Science
Steiner Waldorf Schools Part 3. The problem of racism - DC's Improbable Science (dcscience.net)
Anthroposophy and the Philosophy of Freedom : Anthroposophy and Its Method of Cognition, the Christological and Cosmic-Human...
Anthroposophy and the Philosophy of Freedom : Anthroposophy and Its Method of Cognition, the Christological and Cosmic-Human... (barnesandnoble.com)
Rudolf Steiner Archive & e.Lib: What's New
Rudolf Steiner Archive & e.Lib: What's New (rsarchive.org)
Rudolf Steiner Archive & e.Lib: GA
Rudolf Steiner Archive & e.Lib: GA (rsarchive.org)
The Bank that likes to say 'Quack': Triodos - The Quackometer Blog
The Bank that likes to say 'Quack': Triodos - The Quackometer Blog (quackometer.net)
Rudolf Steiner Archive & e.Lib: Lectures:GA 203
Rudolf Steiner Archive & e.Lib: Lectures:GA 203 (rsarchive.org)
Ten Things You Should Know About Waldorf/Steiner Schools - The Quackometer Blog
Ten Things You Should Know About Waldorf/Steiner Schools - The Quackometer Blog (quackometer.net)
On the Mystery Plays: Lecture I: Self-Knowledge Portrayed in the Rosicrucian Mystery, The Portal of Initiation
On the Mystery Plays: Lecture I: Self-Knowledge Portrayed in the Rosicrucian Mystery, The Portal of Initiation (wn.rsarchive.org)
Anthroposophic vs. conventional therapy of acute respiratory and ear infections | SpringerLink
Anthroposophic vs. conventional therapy of acute respiratory and ear infections | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Garden Is a Seedbed for Green Cosmetics - The New York Times
Garden Is a Seedbed for Green Cosmetics - The New York Times (nytimes.com)
Government forced to reveal what they knew about racism and bullying in Steiner Schools - The Quackometer Blog
Government forced to reveal what they knew about racism and bullying in Steiner Schools - The Quackometer Blog (quackometer.net)
Homeopathy on Farm Animals
Homeopathy on Farm Animals (alternativevet.org)