Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Anthropology, Medical: Field of social science that is concerned with differences between human groups as related to health status and beliefs.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Forensic Anthropology: Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)Sex Determination by Skeleton: Validation of the sex of an individual by means of the bones of the SKELETON. It is most commonly based on the appearance of the PELVIS; SKULL; STERNUM; and/or long bones.Forensic Dentistry: The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Interdisciplinary Studies: Programs of study which span the traditional boundaries of academic scholarship.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.Social Marginalization: Individuals or groups, excluded from participation in the economic, social, and political activities of membership in a community.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Dracunculiasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus Dracunculus. One or more worms may be seen at a time, with the legs and feet being the most commonly infected areas. Symptoms include pruritus, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or asthmatic attacks.EuropeBook Reviews as Topic: Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.Book ReviewsTransportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Dominica: An island republic of the West Indies. Its capital is Roseau. It was discovered in 1493 by Columbus and held at different times by the French and the British in the 18th century. A member of the West Indies Federation, it achieved internal self-government in 1967 but became independent in 1978. It was named by Columbus who discovered it on Sunday, Domingo in Spanish, from the Latin Dominica dies, the Lord's Day. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.BerlinNew YorkMigraine Disorders: A class of disabling primary headache disorders, characterized by recurrent unilateral pulsatile headaches. The two major subtypes are common migraine (without aura) and classic migraine (with aura or neurological symptoms). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Migraine with Aura: A subtype of migraine disorder, characterized by recurrent attacks of reversible neurological symptoms (aura) that precede or accompany the headache. Aura may include a combination of sensory disturbances, such as blurred VISION; HALLUCINATIONS; VERTIGO; NUMBNESS; and difficulty in concentrating and speaking. Aura is usually followed by features of the COMMON MIGRAINE, such as PHOTOPHOBIA; PHONOPHOBIA; and NAUSEA. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Social Determinants of Health: The circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work, and age, as well as the systems put in place to deal with illness. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and politics (http://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/).History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Sociology, Medical: The study of the social determinants and social effects of health and disease, and of the social structure of medical institutions or professions.HumanitiesSocial Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.Hospital Shared Services: Cooperation among hospitals for the purpose of sharing various departmental services, e.g., pharmacy, laundry, data processing, etc.LondonSocial Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.History, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.

Applying anthropology to eliminate tobacco-related health disparities. (1/12)

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The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice. (2/12)

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The science behind pre-Columbian evidence of syphilis in Europe: research by documentary. (3/12)

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Armor and anesthesia: exposure, feeling, and the soldier's body. (4/12)

For many civilians, the high-tech weapons, armor, and military medicine with which U.S. soldiers are equipped present an image of lethal capacity and physical invulnerability. But, as this article explores, soldiers themselves just as often associate the life-sustaining technology of modern warfare with feelings that range from a pragmatic ambivalence about exposure to harm all the way to profoundly unsettling vulnerability. This article, based on fieldwork among soldiers and military families at the U.S. Army's Ft. Hood, examines sensory and affective dimensions of soldiers' intimate bodily relationships with the technologies that alternately or even simultaneously keep them alive and expose them to harm. I argue that modern military discipline and technology conspire to cultivate soldiers as highly durable, capable, unfeeling, interchangeable bodies, or what might be called, after Susan Buck-Morss (1992), anesthetic subjects. But for soldiers themselves, their training, combat environment, protective gear, and weapons are a rich font of both emotional and bodily feeling that exists in complex tension with the also deeply felt military imperative to carry on in the face of extreme discomfort and danger.  (+info)

'This year I will not put her to work': the production/reproduction nexus in Burkina Faso. (5/12)

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The cultural construction of mental illness in prison: a perfect storm of pathology. (6/12)

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Participant observation and change of perspectives: medical anthropology and the encounter with socially marginalised groups. First experiences with a new teaching concept. (7/12)

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"Stuck in the muck": an eco-idiom of distress from childhood respiratory diseases in an urban mangrove in Northeast Brazil. (8/12)

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  • 2017). Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 (IRMER). (springer.com)
  • Justin's research interests lie at the intersection of the anthropology of medicine and science, and he is currently working on the social science component of the FIEBRE study in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia ( https://amr.lshtm.ac.uk/2017/04/19/febrile-illness-etiologies-broad-range-endemicities-fiebre/ ). (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • Justin's research with SATVI was conducted within a broader project run by the University of Cape Town's anthropology department on 'Social Markers of TB' ( https://www.news.uct.ac.za/article/-2017-04-03-uncovering-the-social-symptoms-of-tb-1 ). (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • This course builds on basic concepts introduced in ANTH 2504 with an emphasis on the contributions of medical anthropological theories and concepts towards an understanding of complex health-related behavior. (unb.ca)
  • Anthropology courses are designated by ANTH. (mun.ca)
  • Students are required to complete 18 hours via courses approved for the Departmental Certificate in Applied Anthropology, including a core course in Applied Anthropology (ANTH 567). (niu.edu)
  • The more we know how health and disease are managed in different cultures, the more we can recognize what is "culture bound" in our own medical belief and practice. (sewanee.edu)
  • The course introduces both the specificity of local medical cultures and the global processes that increasingly link these systems of knowledge and practice. (edu.au)
  • 1.1 Herbalism Herbalism is one of the traditional or folk medicine practice which is also known as medical herbalism, botanical medicine, herbology, herbal medicine, and phytotherapy. (ipl.org)
  • A wonderful feat by an eminent group of scholars, this exhilarating book charts medical anthropology's diverse intellectual history and future challenges and shows why the field is so critical for anthropological theory and practice today. (marciainhorn.com)
  • Maintaining Excellence and Expertise Within Medical Imaging: A Sustainable Practice? (springer.com)
  • By bringing together e xpertise from various regional settings and thematic areas of medical anthropology, we aim to challenge and redefine the concept of health-seeking behavior in relation to ongoing shifts in local and national healthcare systems. (fu-berlin.de)
  • Since 1993 he has worked in western Kenya, conducting first medical research and then several years of ethnographic fieldwork. (berghahnbooks.com)
  • His anthropology graduate studies, fieldwork, and his first book - Eloquence in Trouble: Poetics and Politics of Complaining in Bangladesh - combined his lifelong interests in language, illness, and healing. (routledge.com)
  • He did fieldwork in the Chandpur and Comilla Districts, focusing on suffering and its discursive expressions in domestic and medical settings. (routledge.com)
  • If offers students the opportunity to combine applied-oriented course work and fieldwork/internship experiences with a premier education in four-field anthropology. (niu.edu)
  • Lenore Manderson has worked for 40 years in the field of medical anthropology, finding answers to problems of health and disease inequalities, and lack of access to care. (who.int)
  • In regard to the growing relevance of resource constraints, we encourage participants to consider that marginalized people are not mere victims suffering from manifold adversities and inequalities, but may also actively engage in practices of exclusion themselves in their attempts to secure medical treatment and other health-related privileges. (fu-berlin.de)
  • My original graduate training was in both Folklore and Anthropology, and my interest in ritual was sparked by one of my Folklore professors, Roger Abrahams , whose writings on ritual I found enticing. (almagottlieb.com)
  • Residence and other basic requirements for the degree in anthropology are set by The Graduate School. (sc.edu)
  • A Master's Degree in Anthropology with a Departmental Certificate in Applied Anthropology is designed to attract and train graduate students to prepare them for advanced study in anthropology and/or to ready them for work outside academia. (niu.edu)
  • Faculty, students, and fellows at Harvard have actively engaged many of these issues now central to medical and psychiatric anthropology. (harvard.edu)
  • These core issues are being addressed in the research and academic writing and teaching by faculty, fellows and students in the medical anthropology program. (harvard.edu)
  • All students who major in Anthropology will be assisted by a faculty advisor who will help them in planning their academic programs. (mun.ca)
  • Career paths and opportunities will be discussed and students will develop hypothetical course plans for a B.A. in Anthropology and subsequent career plans in conjunction with the faculty member/advisor in charge of the course. (temple.edu)
  • they offer emphases within the field of anthropology to guide students toward the development of marketable skills for practicing anthropology within a flexible curriculum adaptable to a variety of students interests and career expectations. (sc.edu)
  • I found that there was real medical mistreatment of poor bodies in clinics, in forensic institutes, and in the graveyard. (antropologi.info)
  • But then underneath the legend were these real experiences that poor people encountered in forensic medical institutes or police morgues where the unidentified, unclaimed body was, in fact, state property, and (to be crude) chopped up and harvested. (antropologi.info)
  • Phytoecological findings demonstrate the presence of several very important species in local Mohegan ethnobotany history, including the presence of a unique Cornus species and unique Penstemon species with a characteristic short growing season, which is detailed as a Moravian medicine by local famed 18th century female botanist Jane Colden, ca. 1759, and by a later 19th century medical journal article on the same topic. (brianaltonenmph.com)
  • With special behind-the-scenes access to Museum exhibits, you will explore the ways social scientists, microbiologists, and medical professionals work together to cure disease. (amnh.org)
  • This course is designed to allow students to explore Anthropology as a possible major and/or career path. (temple.edu)
  • The goals of anthropology are to discover fundamental similarities and differences between cultures and to understand why people choose their actions from the alternatives available to them. (canadiem.org)
  • Anthropology studies the varied nature of human experience in American society and in the cultures of the world. (csudh.edu)
  • Medical research has been central to biomedicine in Africa for over a century, and Africa, along with other tropical areas, has been crucial to the development of medical science. (berghahnbooks.com)
  • Bordieuan perspectives have predominated the field of sociologic research in medical education. (canadiem.org)
  • Her research on the global governance of South Asian women's reproduction focuses on the global mobility and circulation of research, therapeutics, and medical technologies for female reproductive cancers across institutional and geographic borders, and the effects these processes on South Asian women's bodies and social relations. (google.com)
  • Should we require consent for the use of dead bodies or organs in medical research? (bookdepository.com)
  • An Anthropology of Biomedicine is an exciting new introduction to biomedicine and its global implications. (wiley.com)
  • Herba Artemisiae annuae) in the Chinese materia medica Elisabeth Hsu (in consultation with Frederic Obringer) Anthropology Editorial introduction Stephen Harris Chapter 3. (nhbs.com)
  • If you encounter documents written more than 50 years ago, discuss how political-economic (e.g., globalization, introduction of market economy and democracy) and other forces may have affected the medical system (e.g., increased use of biomedical products). (yale.edu)
  • The same techniques used in molecular anthropology can also be applied to evolutionary questions in other species, to determine the evolutionary relations between different animal species, for instance, or even between bacteria and humans. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Comparative and evolutionary, scientific and humanistic, Anthropology provides a unique opportunity for broadening and integrating one's view of human existence. (csudh.edu)
The Incidence, Duration and Cost of Futile Treatment in End-of-Life Hospital Admissions to Three Australian Public-Sector...
The Incidence, Duration and Cost of Futile Treatment in End-of-Life Hospital Admissions to Three Australian Public-Sector... (papers.ssrn.com)
Psychedelic Medicine for Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: Overcoming Social and Legal Obstacles by Mason Marks ::...
Psychedelic Medicine for Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders: Overcoming Social and Legal Obstacles by Mason Marks ::... (papers.ssrn.com)
Evaluating the Legality of Age-Based Criteria in Health Care: From Nondiscrimination and Discretion to Distributive Justice by...
Evaluating the Legality of Age-Based Criteria in Health Care: From Nondiscrimination and Discretion to Distributive Justice by... (papers.ssrn.com)
Homepage Archive filtered by Academics category | Haverford College
Homepage Archive filtered by Academics category | Haverford College (haverford.edu)
Bodies and Lives in Ancient America : Debra L. Martin : 9781138902879
Bodies and Lives in Ancient America : Debra L. Martin : 9781138902879 (bookdepository.com)
Social and Cultural Lives of Immune Systems: 1st Edition (Paperback) - Routledge
Social and Cultural Lives of Immune Systems: 1st Edition (Paperback) - Routledge (routledge.com)
Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome | Nature
Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome | Nature (nature.com)
Morbid Road Trip: Medical Oddities Around the World   | Mental Floss
Morbid Road Trip: Medical Oddities Around the World | Mental Floss (mentalfloss.com)
TDR | TDR Global profile: A medical anthropology career serving those most in need
TDR | TDR Global profile: A medical anthropology career serving those most in need (who.int)
January 2015 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 : Journal of the American Academy of PAs
January 2015 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 : Journal of the American Academy of PAs (journals.lww.com)
Does probability come from quantum physics? | UC Davis
Does probability come from quantum physics? | UC Davis (ucdavis.edu)
Towards) An Anthropology of Therapy and Healing ... (Example) - MindMeister
Towards) An Anthropology of Therapy and Healing ... (Example) - MindMeister (mindmeister.com)
Manuscript Format | PNAS
Manuscript Format | PNAS (pnas.org)
Health effects of tobacco - Wikipedia
Health effects of tobacco - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
Pfizer - Wikipedia
Pfizer - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
Leprosy - Wikipedia
Leprosy - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
William G. Schuett, Jr., Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory | Hematology and Oncology | Medical College of Wisconsin
William G. Schuett, Jr., Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory | Hematology and Oncology | Medical College of Wisconsin (mcw.edu)
Graduate Studies - SMU
Graduate Studies - SMU (smu.edu)
Written in Bone - Collaborators
Written in Bone - Collaborators (anthropology.si.edu)
Developing and Evaluating an Innovative Structural Competency Curriculum for Pre-Health Students | SpringerLink
Developing and Evaluating an Innovative Structural Competency Curriculum for Pre-Health Students | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Maintaining Excellence and Expertise Within Medical Imaging: A Sustainable Practice? | SpringerLink
Maintaining Excellence and Expertise Within Medical Imaging: A Sustainable Practice? | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships: Ryan, Christopher, Jetha, Cacilda:...
Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships: Ryan, Christopher, Jetha, Cacilda:... (amazon.com)
Justin Dixon | LSHTM
Justin Dixon | LSHTM (lshtm.ac.uk)
Magdalen College | University of Oxford
Magdalen College | University of Oxford (ox.ac.uk)
Understanding trauma integrating biological clinical and cultural perspectives | Health and clinical psychology | Cambridge...
Understanding trauma integrating biological clinical and cultural perspectives | Health and clinical psychology | Cambridge... (cambridge.org)
SMU Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences - Dedman College - SMU
SMU Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences - Dedman College - SMU (smu.edu)
Cholera - Wikipedia
Cholera - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
Using PCD's First-Ever External Review to Enhance the Journal's Worldwide Usefulness to Researchers, Practitioners, and Policy...
Using PCD's First-Ever External Review to Enhance the Journal's Worldwide Usefulness to Researchers, Practitioners, and Policy... (cdc.gov)
Volker Sommer | UCL Anthropology - UCL - University College London
Volker Sommer | UCL Anthropology - UCL - University College London (ucl.ac.uk)
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) - Major Concentration International Development Studies | eCalendar - McGill University
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) - Major Concentration International Development Studies | eCalendar - McGill University (mcgill.ca)
Choosing Primary Field - NSF Graduate Research Fellowships Program (GRFP)
Choosing Primary Field - NSF Graduate Research Fellowships Program (GRFP) (nsfgrfp.org)
Building Transnational Bodies: Norway and the International Development of Laboratory Animal Science, ca. 1956-1980 | Science...
Building Transnational Bodies: Norway and the International Development of Laboratory Animal Science, ca. 1956-1980 | Science... (cambridge.org)
Big data - Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Big data - Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University (sfu.ca)
Project MUSE - Under the Medical Gaze
Project MUSE - Under the Medical Gaze (muse.jhu.edu)