A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.
A phylum of radially symmetrical invertebrates characterized by possession of stinging cells called nematocysts. It includes the classes ANTHOZOA; CUBOZOA; HYDROZOA, and SCYPHOZOA. Members carry CNIDARIAN VENOMS.
The order Actiniaria, in the class ANTHOZOA, comprised of large, solitary polyps. All species are carnivorous.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.
The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.

Color transitions in coral's fluorescent proteins by site-directed mutagenesis. (1/1076)

BACKGROUND: Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) cloned from jellyfish Aequorea victoria and its homologs from corals Anthozoa have a great practical significance as in vivo markers of gene expression. Also, they are an interesting puzzle of protein science due to an unusual mechanism of chromophore formation and diversity of fluorescent colors. Fluorescent proteins can be subdivided into cyan (approximately 485 nm), green (approximately 505 nm), yellow (approximately 540 nm), and red (>580 nm) emitters. RESULTS: Here we applied site-directed mutagenesis in order to investigate the structural background of color variety and possibility of shifting between different types of fluorescence. First, a blue-shifted mutant of cyan amFP486 was generated. Second, it was established that cyan and green emitters can be modified so as to produce an intermediate spectrum of fluorescence. Third, the relationship between green and yellow fluorescence was inspected on closely homologous green zFP506 and yellow zFP538 proteins. The following transitions of colors were performed: yellow to green; yellow to dual color (green and yellow); and green to yellow. Fourth, we generated a mutant of cyan emitter dsFP483 that demonstrated dual color (cyan and red) fluorescence. CONCLUSIONS: Several amino acid substitutions were found to strongly affect fluorescence maxima. Some positions primarily found by sequence comparison were proved to be crucial for fluorescence of particular color. These results are the first step towards predicting the color of natural GFP-like proteins corresponding to newly identified cDNAs from corals.  (+info)

Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis. (2/1076)

BACKGROUND: Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP) homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs) and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs). Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. RESULTS: Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595) from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP) were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield (< 0.001). These spectral characteristics allow one to regard DsRed-NF as a true chromoprotein. CONCLUSIONS: We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165) mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed.  (+info)

Additional cytotoxic diacetylenes from the stony coral Montipora sp. (3/1076)

Three new diacetylenes (1, 4, 6) have been isolated as cytotoxic constituents from the methanolic extract of the stony coral Montipora sp. The structures have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. The compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against a small panel of human tumor cell lines and showed moderate to significant activity.  (+info)

Sympatric populations of the highly cross-fertile coral species Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora cytherea are genetically distinct. (4/1076)

High cross-fertilization rates in vitro and non-monophyletic patterns in molecular phylogenies challenge the taxonomic status of species in the coral genus Acropora. We present data from eight polymorphic allozyme loci that indicate small, but significant, differentiation between sympatric populations of Acropora cytherea and Acropora hyacinthus (F(ST) = 0.025-0.068, p < 0.05), a pair of acroporid corals with very high interspecific fertilization rates in vitro. Although no fixed allelic differences were found between these species, the absence of genetic differentiation between widely allopatric populations suggests that allele frequency differences between A. cytherea and A. hyacinthus in sympatry are biologically significant. By contrast, populations of Acropora tenuis, a species which spawns 2-3 hours earlier and shows low cross-fertilization rates with congeners in vitro, were clearly distinct from A. cytherea and A. hyacinthus (F(ST) = 0.427-0.465, p < 0.05). Moreover, allopatric populations of A. tenuis differed significantly, possibly as a consequence of its relatively short period of larval competency. Our results effectively rule out the possibility that A. hyacinthus and A. cytherea are morphotypes within a single species, and indicate that hybridization occurs relatively infrequently between these taxa in nature.  (+info)

Effect of increased calcium concentration in sea water on calcification and photosynthesis in the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis. (5/1076)

The relationship between calcification and photosynthesis in coral was investigated using standard sea water with enhanced calcium concentration. In standard sea water at 23 degrees C with the calcium concentration increased by 2.5 mmol l(-1), incorporation of calcium into the skeleton increased by 30-61 %, depending on the method of data normalisation, and photosynthesis, measured as (14)C incorporation into the tissues, also increased by 87 %. At 29 degrees C, calcium incorporation into the skeleton increased by 54-84 % and (14)C incorporation increased by 32 % when sea water calcium concentration was increased by 5 mmol l(-1). However, photosynthesis measured as net photosynthetic oxygen production did not increase. Similarly there was no change in respiration rate when coral polyps were incubated in high-calcium sea water. It is conjectured that an increase in photorespiration may be responsible for the latter observations. Bisphosphonate has been considered to inhibit calcification but not photosynthesis in corals. We show that bisphosphonate may not inhibit formation of amorphous calcium carbonate and that the inhibition of calcification is possibly illusory. The data are consistent with the trans-calcification model, which suggests that calcification is a source of CO(2) for photosynthesis in corals.  (+info)

Coral development: from classical embryology to molecular control. (6/1076)

The phylum Cnidaria is the closest outgroup to the triploblastic metazoans and as such offers unique insights into evolutionary questions at several levels. In the post-genomic era, a knowledge of the gene complement of representative cnidarians will be important for understanding the relationship between the expansion of gene families and the evolution of morphological complexity among more highly evolved metazoans. Studies of cnidarian development and its molecular control will provide information about the origins of the major bilaterian body axes, the origin of the third tissue layer, the mesoderm, and the evolution of nervous system patterning. We are studying the cnidarian Acropora millepora, a reef building scleractinian coral, and a member of the basal cnidarian class, the Anthozoa. We review ourwork on descriptive embryology and studies of selected transcription factor gene families, where our knowledge from Acropora is particularly advanced relative to other cnidarians. We also describe a recent preliminary whole genome initiative, a coral EST database.  (+info)

An optical marker based on the UV-induced green-to-red photoconversion of a fluorescent protein. (7/1076)

We have cloned a gene encoding a fluorescent protein from a stony coral, Trachyphyllia geoffroyi, which emits green, yellow, and red light. The protein, named Kaede, includes a tripeptide, His-Tyr-Gly, that acts as a green chromophore that can be converted to red. The red fluorescence is comparable in intensity to the green and is stable under usual aerobic conditions. We found that the green-red conversion is highly sensitive to irradiation with UV or violet light (350-400 nm), which excites the protonated form of the chromophore. The excitation lights used to elicit red and green fluorescence do not induce photoconversion. Under a conventional epifluorescence microscope, Kaede protein expressed in HeLa cells turned red in a graded fashion in response to UV illumination; maximal illumination resulted in a 2,000-fold increase in the ratio of red-to-green signal. These color-changing properties provide a simple and powerful technique for regional optical marking. A focused UV pulse creates an instantaneous plane source of red Kaede within the cytosol. The red spot spreads rapidly throughout the cytosol, indicating its free diffusibility in the compartment. The extensive diffusion allows us to delineate a single neuron in a dense culture, where processes originating from many different somata are present. Illumination of a focused UV pulse onto the soma of a Kaede-expressing neuron resulted in filling of all processes with red fluorescence, allowing visualization of contact sites between the red and green neurons of interest.  (+info)

Low temperature X-ray microanalysis of calcium in a scleractinian coral: evidence of active transport mechanisms. (8/1076)

Element concentrations were measured by X-ray microanalysis in seawater (SW) compartments and mucocytes in bulk, frozen-hydrated preparations of the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis. Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of polyps sampled in the daytime revealed that concentrations of the elements Na, S, K and Ca were all significantly higher in a thin (10-20 micro m) external SW layer adjacent to the oral ectoderm (P<0.05, <0.05, <0.0001 and <0.01, respectively) than in standard SW. In polyps sampled during night-time, concentrations of Ca and S in this external SW layer were significantly reduced (P<0.05). Ca concentration in the coelenteron and extrathecal coelenteron was significantly higher (P<0.001) than in the external SW layer, regardless of time of sampling, suggesting that Ca(2+) transport across the oral epithelium occurs via an active, transcellular route. X-ray microanalyses of mucocytes revealed that the concentration of S was high and did not vary between epithelial layers, while that of Ca increased in an inward gradient toward the skeleton. We suggest that throughout the day, secreted mucus behaves as a Donnan matrix at the oral ectoderm-SW interface, facilitating intracellular Ca(2+) uptake. The accumulation within internal SW compartments of high concentrations of Ca relative to standard SW levels, however, appears to be independent of mucus secretion and is likely to be a consequence of active transport processes.  (+info)

Anthozoa is a major class of marine animals, which are exclusively aquatic and almost entirely restricted to shallow waters. They are classified within the phylum Cnidaria, which also includes corals, jellyfish, sea anemones, and hydroids. Anthozoans are characterized by their lack of medusa stage in their life cycle, as they exist solely as polyps.

This class is divided into two main subclasses: Hexacorallia (also known as Zoantharia) and Octocorallia (also known as Alcyonaria). The primary differences between these subclasses lie in the structure of their polyps and the composition of their skeletons.

1. Hexacorallia: These are commonly referred to as 'stony' or 'hard' corals, due to their calcium carbonate-based skeletons. They have a simple polyp structure with six-fold symmetry (hence the name Hexacorallia), featuring 6 tentacles around the mouth opening. Examples of Hexacorallia include reef-building corals, sea fans, and black corals.
2. Octocorallia: These are also called 'soft' corals or 'leather' corals because they lack a calcium carbonate skeleton. Instead, their supporting structures consist of proteins and other organic compounds. Octocorallia polyps exhibit eight-fold symmetry (hence the name Octocorallia), with eight tentacles around the mouth opening. Examples of Octocorallia include sea fans, sea whips, and blue corals.

Anthozoa species are primarily found in tropical and subtropical oceans, but some can be found in colder, deeper waters as well. They play a crucial role in marine ecosystems by providing habitats and shelter for various other marine organisms, particularly on coral reefs. Additionally, they contribute to the formation of limestone deposits through their calcium carbonate-based skeletons.

Cnidaria is a phylum of aquatic animals that includes jellyfish, sea anemones, hydra, and corals. They are characterized by the presence of specialized stinging cells called cnidocytes, which they use for defense and capturing prey. Cnidarians have a simple body organization with two basic forms: polyps, which are typically cylindrical and attached to a substrate; and medusae, which are free-swimming and bell-shaped. Some species can exist in both forms during their life cycle.

Cnidarians have no true organs or organ systems, but they do have a unique tissue arrangement with two main layers: an outer epidermis and an inner gastrodermis, separated by a jelly-like mesoglea. They have a digestive cavity called the coelenteron, where they absorb nutrients after capturing and digesting prey. Cnidarians reproduce both sexually and asexually, with some species exhibiting complex life cycles involving multiple forms and reproductive strategies.

Sea Anemones are not considered a medical term, but they are rather marine biology organisms. They are a group of predatory sea animals belonging to the phylum Cnidaria, which also includes corals, jellyfish, and hydras. Sea anemones typically have a cylindrical or bell-shaped body crowned with tentacles that bear stinging cells used for capturing prey.

However, in a medical context, the term "anemone" is sometimes used to describe a type of skin lesion characterized by its resemblance to the sea anemone's shape and appearance. An anemone lesion is a rare cutaneous condition that presents as a solitary, red, or purple papule with multiple radiating fronds, often occurring on the face or neck. The lesions may be tender or pruritic (itchy) and can persist for several weeks to months.

It's important to note that sea anemones themselves do not have a direct medical relevance, but they can serve as a source of inspiration for medical terminology due to their unique morphological features.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Luminescent proteins are a type of protein that emit light through a chemical reaction, rather than by absorbing and re-emitting light like fluorescent proteins. This process is called bioluminescence. The light emitted by luminescent proteins is often used in scientific research as a way to visualize and track biological processes within cells and organisms.

One of the most well-known luminescent proteins is Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which was originally isolated from jellyfish. However, GFP is actually a fluorescent protein, not a luminescent one. A true example of a luminescent protein is the enzyme luciferase, which is found in fireflies and other bioluminescent organisms. When luciferase reacts with its substrate, luciferin, it produces light through a process called oxidation.

Luminescent proteins have many applications in research, including as reporters for gene expression, as markers for protein-protein interactions, and as tools for studying the dynamics of cellular processes. They are also used in medical imaging and diagnostics, as well as in the development of new therapies.

In the context of medical terminology, 'color' is not defined specifically with a unique meaning. Instead, it generally refers to the characteristic or appearance of something, particularly in relation to the color that a person may observe visually. For instance, doctors may describe the color of a patient's skin, eyes, hair, or bodily fluids to help diagnose medical conditions or monitor their progression.

For example, jaundice is a yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes that can indicate liver problems, while cyanosis refers to a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes due to insufficient oxygen in the blood. Similarly, doctors may describe the color of stool or urine to help diagnose digestive or kidney issues.

Therefore, 'color' is not a medical term with a specific definition but rather a general term used to describe various visual characteristics of the body and bodily fluids that can provide important diagnostic clues for healthcare professionals.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The name "Anthozoa" comes from the Greek words άνθος (ánthos; "flower") and ζώα (zóa; "animals"), hence ανθόζωα (anthozoa) = " ... ISBN 978-0-521-88485-3. Media related to Anthozoa at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Anthozoa at Wikispecies (Pages using the ... Waggoner, Ben M. (2000). Smith, David; Collins, Allen (eds.). "Anthozoa: Fossil Record". Anthozoa. UCMP. Retrieved 9 March 2020 ... "Systematic relationships within the Anthozoa (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) using the 5'-end of the 28S rDNA". Molecular Phylogenetics ...
"Anthozoa". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 23 January 2009. "Cnidaria". Integrated Taxonomic Information ...
Polyps with eight branched tentacles and eight septa Bourne, Gilbert Charles (1911). "Anthozoa" . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). ...
Anthozoa)". Bulletin of Marine Science. 28 (2): 354-362. LaJeunesse, T. (2002). "Diversity and community structure of symbiotic ...
Cnidaria; Anthozoa; Actiniaria; Edwardsiidae) from Japan". Zootaxa. 4661 (3): 533-544. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4661.3.7. v t e ( ... Anthozoa, Actiniaria) from the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa". Marine Biology Research. 8 (3): 233-245. doi:10.1080/ ...
Waggoner, Ben M. (2000). Smith, David; Collins, Allen (eds.). "Anthozoa: Fossil Record". Anthozoa. UCMP. Retrieved 9 March 2020 ... Hoeksema, Bert (2015). "Anthozoa". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2015-04-24. Ramírez-Portilla, Catalina; ... Corals are marine invertebrates within the class Anthozoa of the phylum Cnidaria. They typically form compact colonies of many ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Corals and Anthozoa. Coral Reefs The Ocean Portal by the Smithsonian Institution NOAA - ...
It is an anthozoa in the actiniidae family and is very similar to Anemonia natalensis and Pseudactinia varia from South Africa ... Cnidaria: Anthozoa). An invader or an indicator for environmental change in shallow water?". Organisms Diversity & Evolution. 1 ... Bocharova, E.S.; Kozevich, I.V. (2012-02-07). "Modes of reproduction in sea anemones (Cnidaria, Anthozoa)". Biology Bulletin. ... Anthozoa) on hard substrates". Revista de Biologia Marina y Oceanografia. 56 (2): 102-110. doi:10.22370/rbmo.2021.56.2.3054. ...
Anthozoa sp., Camarotoechia sp., Cryptonella sp., Cyphaspis sp., Cryphaeus sp., Dalmanites sp., Derbyina sp., Gastropoda sp., ...
vietnamensis and Zoanthus kuroshio (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia)." Zoological Science 23.9 (2006): 755-761. Reimer, James Davis. " ... "Molecular evidence suggesting interspecific hybridization in Zoanthus spp.(Anthozoa: Hexacorallia)." Zoological Science24.4 ( ... Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) from Southwestern Japan, with Descriptions of Two New Species". Zoological Science. 23 (3): 261-275. ...
Manuel, R.L. (1981). British Anthozoa. Synopses of the British Fauna (New Series) (ed. D.M. Kermack & R.S.K. Barnes), The ... Considering the fact that most temperate anthozoa are found at depths of greater than 9 meters, it is suggested that ... Picton, B. E. (1985). "Anthozoans (Coelenterata: Anthozoa) New to Ireland and New Records of Some Rarely Recorded Species". The ...
anguina (Anthozoa, Antipatharia) from the Indonesian Marine Park of Bunaken." Invertebrate Reproduction & Development 51.3 ( ... "2 The Biology and Ecology of Black Corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Antipatharia)."Advances in marine biology 63 (2012 ... "Sperm morphology in the black coral Cirrhipathes sp.(Anthozoa, Antipatharia)." Invertebrate Biology 127.3 (2008): 249-258. ... Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Antipatharia)". Advances in Marine Biology Volume 63. Advances in Marine Biology. Vol. 63. pp. 67-132. ...
Manual, R.L. (1988). British Anthozoa. London: Academic Press. [Synopses of the British Fauna No. 18.] v t e (Articles with ...
". "Marine Species Identification Portal". Manuel, R.L., (1988). British Anthozoa. London: Academic Press. Synopses of the ...
"Molecular phylogenetic hypotheses of Zoanthus species (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) using RNA secondary structure of the internal ... "Molecular evidence suggesting interspecific hybridization in Zoanthus spp.(Anthozoa: Hexacorallia)." Zoological Science24.4 ( ... Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) from Southwestern Japan, with Descriptions of Two New Species". Zoological Science. 23 (3): 261-275. ...
"Anthozoa - Fam mondiali". "Antipodactinidae". www.gbif.org. v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ...
"ZEISS Microscopy Online Campus , Anthozoa Fluorescent Proteins". zeiss-campus.magnet.fsu.edu. Retrieved 2018-11-15. Subach, ...
Anthozoa - general features. In : Treatise on invertebrate palaeontology, Part F, Caelenterata, Moore, R.C. (ed.), Geological ...
And Mich.) (Coelenterata, Anthozoa)". The Biological Bulletin. 149 (3): 590-600. doi:10.2307/1540389. JSTOR 1540389. PMID ...
Stromatoporoidea, Anthozoa, and Gastropoda. Journal of Paleontology 9(3):341-355 (Coordinates on Wikidata, Carboniferous Iowa, ...
Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) in Japan. Coral Reefs 25 (4): 521-527. Light. Sol Felty (2007). The Light and Smith Manual: Intertidal ... Zoanthids (Anthozoa, Hexacorallia) Sold in the Home Aquarium Trade. PLoS ONE 6(4): e18235. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0018235 ... Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Zoantharia) from a northwest Pacific methane cold seep. Inv. Syst. 21: 255-262. Reimer JD, Nonaka M, ... Anthozoa, Hexacorallia) based on the mitochondrial ribosomal genes. Mar. Biol. 147 (5): 1121-1128. Reimer J.D., Takishita K., ...
Anderluch, G., Macek, P. (2002) Cytolytic Peptide and Protein Toxins from Sea Anemones, Anthozoa, 40, 111-124. Ruppert, E.E.; ... Biology Journal, 46, 39-48 Hyman, L.H. (1940). Class Anthozoa: Subclass Zoantharia. Biology Bullitin, 38, 9 Ivanova-Zazas, O.M ... Anthozoa, Hexacorallia) reveals a novel group of hexacorals. Gusmão, ,L.C., Berniker, L., V, V. D., Harris, O., & Rodríguez, E ... 1975). Class Anthozoa, Coral Polyps. Comparative Embryology of Invertebrates: Protists and Lower Multicellular Organisms. 190- ...
Neogene paleontology in the northern Dominican Republic, 3. The family Poritidae (Anthozoa, Scleractinia). Bulletins of ... Neogene paleontology in the northern Dominican Republic, 5. The suborders Caryophylliina and Dendrophylliina (Anthozoa, ...
"Corals and sea anemones (anthozoa)". Smithsonian's National Zoo. 2018-12-11. Retrieved 2022-09-24. Grazhdankin, Dima (February ...
". "Are corals animals or plants?". "Corals and sea anemones (Anthozoa)". 11 December 2018. Euphyllidae Rossi, Sergio; Rizzo, ... ". "Corals and sea anemones (Anthozoa)". 11 December 2018. "WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species - Euphylliidae Milne ...
3. Las anémonas Acontiaria (Coelenterata, Anthozoa). Neotrópica, 25(74): 145-154. Daly, M.; Fautin, D. (2021). World List of ...
de Kluijver, N.J.; Ingalsuo, S.S. "Jewel anemone (Corynactis viridis)". Macrobenthos of the North Sea: Anthozoa. Marine Species ...
"Calliactis parasitica". Macrobenthos of the North Sea: Anthozoa. Universiteit van Amsterdam. Archived from the original on July ...
de Kluijver, M. J.; Ingalsuo, S. S. "Caryophyllia smithii". Macrobenthos of the North Sea: Anthozoa. Marine Species Information ...
de Kluijver, N.J.; Ingalsuo, S.S. "Diadumene cincta". Macrobenthos of the North Sea: Anthozoa. Marine Species Identification ...
Photoreceptor Diversification Accompanies the Evolution of Anthozoa Sebastian G Gornik 1 , Bruno Gideon Bergheim 1 , Benoit ... Photoreceptor Diversification Accompanies the Evolution of Anthozoa Sebastian G Gornik et al. Mol Biol Evol. 2021. . ... Anthozoa have a more diverse opsin repertoire than Medusozoa. (A) A majority-rule extended consensus tree topology generated ... Similarly, in Anthozoa, we documented three photolyase classes and two cryptochrome (CRY) classes, whereas CRYs are entirely ...
Anthozoa (Subphylum). *Hexacorallia (Class). *Scleractinia (Order). *Refertina (Suborder). *Acroporidae (Family). *Astreopora ( ...
Anthozoa (Subphylum). *Hexacorallia (Class). *Actiniaria (Order). *Enthemonae (Suborder). *Metridioidea (Superfamily). * ...
SKU 911562 Category Acabaria Species Tags Acabaria Species, Alcyonacea, Anthozoa, Cnidaria, Melithaeidae, Sea Fans ... Class: ANTHOZOA. Family: MELITHAEIDAE. Species: Acabaria species. Dive Info:. locality: Cebu. Olango Island. Sitio Suba. Sabang ...
Phylogeny of the order Zoantharia (Anthozoa, Hexacorallia) based on the mitochondrial ribosomal genes Sinniger, F. ; Montoya- ...
Anthozoa. Jamaica 4. [Coral] Publication: London : Printed by B. M. for the author, 1707-1725 Subject(s): Anthozoa 5. Manual of ... Anthozoa. Fossils 2. Black coral =: Corallium nigrum Author(s): Blackwell, Elizabeth, active 1737., engraver Publication: ... Anthozoa. Fossils 6. Geology and paleontology Publication: [Salem, Mass.?] : [publisher not identified], December 17th, 1889 ... Anthozoa. Proboscidea Mammal. Geological Phenomena 7. On the monticuliporoid corals of the Cincinnati group: with a critical ...
additional source Evcen, A.; Özalp, B. (2023). Marine invertebrate fauna (Porifera, Anthozoa) and biodiversity status on the ...
MeSH Terms: Animals; Anthozoa/drug effects*; Anthozoa/metabolism; Anthozoa/physiology*; Biomarkers/metabolism; Coral Reefs*; ...
Zoanthids (Class Anthozoa, Subclass Hexacorallia, Order Zoanthidia [colonial anemones]) are common in home aquariums. They are ...
The molecular properties and applications of Anthozoa fluorescent proteins and chromoproteins. Verkhusha VV, Lukyanov KA. ...
Stable expression of Anthozoa fluorescent proteins in mammalian cells.. Richards B; Zharkikh L; Hsu F; Dunn C; Kamb A; Teng DH ...
Anthozoa Center. ants center. Arachnid Center. arachnid coloring. arctic fox. argus monitor. Arthropod Center. asian elephant. ...
Anthozoa: Scleractinia). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 171(2), 277-355. ...
Corallimorpharia[1] in uska ordo han Anthozoa. An Corallimorpharia in nahilalakip ha classis nga Anthozoa, phylum nga Cnidaria ...
Class: Anthozoa Period: Silurian Coordinates Available?: No Country: Sweden State/Province/Territory: Gotland ...
Anthozoa B01.050.500.308.237.700 Renilla B01.050.500.308.237.750 Sea Anemones B01.050.500.308.361 Cubozoa B01.050.500.308.485 ...
Class Anthozoa * Order Actiniaria * Family Actiniidae * Genus Bunodosoma * Species Bunodosoma caissarum * Species Bunodosoma ...
Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Zoantharia) species diversity from localities in Taiwan, no study has yet examined the molecular ... Reimer JD, Foord C, Irei Y: Species diversity of shallow water zoanthids (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) in Florida. J Mar ... Hirose M, Obuchi M, Hirose E, Reimer JD: Timing of spawning and early development of Palythoa tuberculosa (Anthozoa, Zoantharia ... Ryland JS: Budding in Acrozoanthus Saville-Kent, 1893 (Anthozoa: Zoanthidea). In Proceedings of the 6th International ...
Anthozoa. We have a rich collection of Anthozoa (a class of marine invertebrates that includes the sea anemones, stony corals ...
Anthozoa - Preferred Concept UI. M0412731. Scope note. A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones ... Species of ANTHOZOA which secrete a skeleton and are responsible for the formation of CORAL REEFS. ...
They are part of the phylum Cnidaria, in a class called Anthozoa or "flower animals". The lifespan of the largest brain corals ...
Anthozoa Preferred Term Term UI T479881. Date01/29/2002. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2003). ... Species of ANTHOZOA which secrete a skeleton and are responsible for the formation of CORAL REEFS.. Terms. Corals Preferred ... Anthozoa Preferred Concept UI. M0412731. Registry Number. txid6101. Scope Note. A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised ... Anthozoa. Tree Number(s). B01.050.500.308.237. Unique ID. D037421. RDF Unique Identifier. http://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/D037421 ...
Anthozoa Preferred Term Term UI T479881. Date01/29/2002. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2003). ... Species of ANTHOZOA which secrete a skeleton and are responsible for the formation of CORAL REEFS.. Terms. Corals Preferred ... Anthozoa Preferred Concept UI. M0412731. Registry Number. txid6101. Scope Note. A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised ... Anthozoa. Tree Number(s). B01.050.500.308.237. Unique ID. D037421. RDF Unique Identifier. http://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/D037421 ...
Tapeta Wallquest NV60110 Nova w kategorii Wallquest Nova. ✔️ Szybka wysyłka. Sprawdź i dokonaj zakupu teraz!
Class Anthozoa (organism) {421900003 , SNOMED-CT } Other Relationships No other relationships present. ...
A Short-Term Winner? Dramatic Increases in the Population of Mushroom Coral Lobactis scutaria (Anthozoa: Fungiidae) in Ka- ...
Anthozoa 63. The dragon-tree =: Draco arbor Author(s): Blackwell, Elizabeth, active 1737., engraver Publication: London : ...
... which is not mediated by any known receptor in Anthozoa (Martin,2002), but is presumably associated with neurons concentrated ...
Ecology of Ceriantharia (Coelenterata, Anthozoa) of the northwest Atlantic from Cape Hatteras to Nova Scotia ...
  • Anthozoa is included within the phylum Cnidaria, which also includes the jellyfish, box jellies and parasitic Myxozoa and Polypodiozoa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phylogenetic relationships among sea anemones (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria). (marbef.org)
  • Anthozoa is a class of marine invertebrates which includes the sea anemones, stony corals and soft corals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Filling in the gaps: description of novel families of azooxanthellate corals (Anthozoa, Scleractinia) and new insights on the evolutionary history of the order. (usp.br)
  • Vaga CF, Seiblitz IGL, Cairns SD, Quek ZBR, Huang D, Quattrini AM, Kitahara MV. Filling in the gaps: description of novel families of azooxanthellate corals (Anthozoa, Scleractinia) and new insights on the evolutionary history of the order [Internet]. (usp.br)
  • Further contributions to the knowledge of the cnidom in the Anthozoa especially in the Actiniaria. (marinespecies.org)
  • Anthozoa is subdivided into three subclasses: Octocorallia, Hexacorallia and Ceriantharia, which form monophyletic groups and generally show differentiating reflections on symmetry of polyp structure for each subclass. (wikipedia.org)
  • The subphyla Anthozoa and Myxozoa have also been implicated in envenomation. (medscape.com)
  • 2008, 'Sox genes in the coral Acropora millepora: divergent expression patterns reflect differences in developmental mechanisms within the Anthozoa', BMC Evolutionary Biology (now BMC Ecology and Evolution), vol. 8, no. 311, pp. 1-16. (edu.au)
  • animals"), hence ανθόζωα (anthozoa) = "flower animals", a reference to the floral appearance of their perennial polyp stage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species of ANTHOZOA which secrete a skeleton and are responsible for the formation of CORAL REEFS. (bvsalud.org)
  • Echinomuricea costata [1] in uska species han Anthozoa nga ginhulagway ni Nutting hadton 1910. (wikipedia.org)