The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
The posterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which contain centers for auditory function.
The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.
A part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA situated in the olivary body. It is involved with motor control and is a major source of sensory input to the CEREBELLUM.
MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION in which the inferior wall of the heart is involved. It is often caused by occlusion of the right coronary artery.
Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.
The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.
Mechanical devices inserted in the inferior vena cava that prevent the migration of blood clots from deep venous thrombosis of the leg.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.
A vein which arises from the right ascending lumbar vein or the vena cava, enters the thorax through the aortic orifice in the diaphragm, and terminates in the superior vena cava.
NEURAL PATHWAYS and connections within the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, beginning at the hair cells of the ORGAN OF CORTI, continuing along the eighth cranial nerve, and terminating at the AUDITORY CORTEX.
Inferior and external epigastric arteries arise from external iliac; superficial from femoral; superior from internal thoracic. They supply the abdominal muscles, diaphragm, iliac region, and groin. The inferior epigastric artery is used in coronary artery bypass grafting and myocardial revascularization.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.
The scroll-like bony plates with curved margins on the lateral wall of the NASAL CAVITY. Turbinates, also called nasal concha, increase the surface area of nasal cavity thus providing a mechanism for rapid warming and humidification of air as it passes to the lung.
The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.
Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Traumatic injuries to the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. It may result in extreme pain, abnormal sensation in the areas the nerve innervates on face, jaw, gums and tongue and can cause difficulties with speech and chewing. It is sometimes associated with various dental treatments.
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.
Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.
Veins which drain the liver.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.
Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.
Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.
Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.
A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.
A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.
A dead body, usually a human body.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.
Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Techniques used mostly during brain surgery which use a system of three-dimensional coordinates to locate the site to be operated on.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.
A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
A neurotoxic isoxazole (similar to KAINIC ACID and MUSCIMOL) found in AMANITA mushrooms. It causes motor depression, ataxia, and changes in mood, perceptions and feelings, and is a potent excitatory amino acid agonist.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
The relationships between symbols and their meanings.
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.
A beta-carboline alkaloid isolated from seeds of PEGANUM.
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.
Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.
The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.
Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.
A spectrum of congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities in BLOOD VESSELS that can adversely affect the normal blood flow in ARTERIES or VEINS. Most are congenital defects such as abnormal communications between blood vessels (fistula), shunting of arterial blood directly into veins bypassing the CAPILLARIES (arteriovenous malformations), formation of large dilated blood blood-filled vessels (cavernous angioma), and swollen capillaries (capillary telangiectases). In rare cases, vascular malformations can result from trauma or diseases.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.
Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.
A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.
The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.
Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.
An order of BIRDS with the common name owls characterized by strongly hooked beaks, sharp talons, large heads, forward facing eyes, and facial disks. While considered nocturnal RAPTORS, some owls do hunt by day.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.
An auditory orientation mechanism involving the emission of high frequency sounds which are reflected back to the emitter (animal).
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.
Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.
Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.
Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
The inferior and superior venae cavae.
The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.
The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.
Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
Pathological processes of the BREAST.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)
The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.
A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.
The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)
An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.
A sarcoma containing large spindle cells of smooth muscle. Although it rarely occurs in soft tissue, it is common in the viscera. It is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract and uterus. The median age of patients is 60 years. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1865)
Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.
A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).
Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.
Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.
Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.
A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.
The use of diffusion ANISOTROPY data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging results to construct images based on the direction of the faster diffusing molecules.
A malignancy arising in uterine cervical epithelium and confined thereto, representing a continuum of histological changes ranging from well-differentiated CIN 1 (formerly, mild dysplasia) to severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, CIN 3. The lesion arises at the squamocolumnar cell junction at the transformation zone of the endocervical canal, with a variable tendency to develop invasive epidermoid carcinoma, a tendency that is enhanced by concomitant human papillomaviral infection. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
The superficial GRAY MATTER of the CEREBELLUM. It consists of two main layers, the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulosum.
A noninvasive technique that enables direct microscopic examination of the surface and architecture of the SKIN.
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
The brain stem nucleus that receives the central input from the cochlear nerve. The cochlear nucleus is located lateral and dorsolateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncles and is functionally divided into dorsal and ventral parts. It is tonotopically organized, performs the first stage of central auditory processing, and projects (directly or indirectly) to higher auditory areas including the superior olivary nuclei, the medial geniculi, the inferior colliculi, and the auditory cortex.
The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.
The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.
The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.
A physical property showing different values in relation to the direction in or along which the measurement is made. The physical property may be with regard to thermal or electric conductivity or light refraction. In crystallography, it describes crystals whose index of refraction varies with the direction of the incident light. It is also called acolotropy and colotropy. The opposite of anisotropy is isotropy wherein the same values characterize the object when measured along axes in all directions.
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.
Paired bodies containing mostly GRAY MATTER and forming part of the lateral wall of the THIRD VENTRICLE of the brain.
The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).
Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.
Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.
Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Tests for central hearing disorders based on the competing message technique (binaural separation).
Use of ultrasound for imaging the breast. The most frequent application is the diagnosis of neoplasms of the female breast.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Anteroinferior Bankart lesion that extends upward to include a separation of the biceps tendon. Type VI - 11 o'clock to 1 ... labrum/glenoid separation at the tendon of the biceps muscle Bankart lesion - labrum/glenoid separation at the inferior ... "Is there an association between SLAP lesions and biceps pulley lesions?". Arthroscopy. 27 (5): 611-8. doi:10.1016/j.arthro. ... The SLAP lesion decreases the stability of the joint which, when combined with lying in bed, causes the shoulder to drop. For ...
The lesion is associated with any damage to the antero-inferior labrum. Most commonly due to anterior shoulder dislocation. The ... Perthes lesion is a variant of Bankart lesion, presenting as an anterior glenohumeral injury that occurs when the scapular ... 1. Perthes Lesion (A Variant of the Bankart Lesion): MR Imaging and MR Arthrographic Findings with Surgical Correlation ... Differential diagnoses include: Bankart lesion Alpsa lesion GLAD[clarification needed] HAGL[clarification needed] BHAGL[ ...
... revealing both a bony Bankart lesion and a Hill-Sachs lesion. CT scan showing a bony Bankart lesion at the antero-inferior ... lesion Bankart lesion seen at arthroscopy Radiograph showing a bony Bankart lesion with stationary fragment at the inferior ... A Bankart lesion is an injury of the anterior (inferior) glenoid labrum of the shoulder due to anterior shoulder dislocation. ... A bony Bankart is a Bankart lesion that includes a fracture of the anterior-inferior glenoid cavity of the scapula bone. The ...
Complications may include a Bankart lesion, Hill-Sachs lesion, rotator cuff tear, or injury to the axillary nerve. A shoulder ... Inferior dislocation is the least likely, occurring in less than 1%. This condition is also called luxatio erecta because the ... Cunningham NJ (2005). "Techniques for reduction of anteroinferior shoulder dislocation". Emergency Medicine Australasia. 17 (5- ... Bankart lesions are disruptions of the glenoid labrum with or without an avulsion of bone fragment.[citation needed] Damage to ...
The symptoms include sudden onset of vertigo and vomiting, nystagmus, dysarthria, falling to the side of the lesion (due to ... but usually includes the anteroinferior surface of the cerebellum, the flocculus, middle cerebellar peduncle and inferolateral ... The anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) is one of three pairs of arteries that supplies blood to the cerebellum. It ... "Anterior inferior cerebellar artery". Radiopaedia.org. Retrieved 31 May 2015. Atkinson WJ (1952). "The effects of occlusion of ...
For example, brain atlases often use the external auditory meatus, the inferior orbital ridges, the median point of the maxilla ... On top of patient immobilization challenges and the associated patient motion, extra-cranial lesions move with respect to the ... depth and antero-posterior (or axial) location. The mechanical device has head-holding clamps and bars which puts the head in a ... From then on, thalamic lesions became the target point with more satisfactory results. More recent clinical applications can be ...
... inferior dental canal is suspected Assessment of unerupted teeth Prior to implant placement Assessment of pathological lesions ... and an antero-posterior radiograph provides a face-forward view. Lateral cephalometric radiography (LCR) is a standardized and ... 2) Assess the size of lesions such as cyst or tumours at anterior area of mandible 2. Lateral oblique occlusal mandible - 45° ... Assess the size of lesions such as cyst or tumours in the posterior of body and angle of mandible A full mouth series is a ...
Inferior to the nasal conchae (turbinates) is the meatus space, with names that correspond to the turbinates, e.g. superior ... The most common cause (etiology) for a nasal reconstruction is skin cancer, especially the lesions to the nose of melanoma and ... which is a region in the anteroinferior-third of the nasal septum, (in front and below). Furthermore, the nasal vein ... First, the resultant scar often is a wide patch of tissue that is aesthetically inferior to the scars produced with other nasal ...
Magalhães, Romero Antero de. "Um novo método de governo: Francisco Xavier de Mendonça Furtado, Governador e Capitão-General do ... He was a duplication in inferior material of the illustrious brother [ie Carvalho e Melo], a tentacle by which [the brother] ... skin lesions; and convulsions. Common conditions among enslaved populations included: beriberi (caused by a deficiency of ... particularly one whom he regarded as inferior, who held views contrary to his own; he was therefore entirely uncompromising." ...
Nové-Josserand L, Gerber C, Walch G (1997) Lesions of the antero-superior rotator cuff. Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia[page ... While using MRI, true lesions at the rotator interval region between the parts of the supraspinatus and subscapularis are all ... reached through two readers a significant better visibility of pully lesions at the rotator interval and the expected location ... Lesions of the anterior and posterior socket border, or of the tuberculum minus ...
Results: The first and most constant lesion is the periosteal avulsion of the antero-inferior labrum ("single lesion": healing ... Arthroscopic aspects and chronologic outcome of lesions of the labro-ligament complex in post-traumatic antero-inferior ... the integration of all the described lesions into literature and to produce a natural history of lesions in antero-inferior ... The authors present a prospective and mono-operator study of 91 gleno-humeral arthroscopies for post-traumatic antero-inferior ...
CM-I and space-occupying intracranial lesions. In 30 patients, CM-I was associated with a space-occupying intracranial lesion ... Ranges of summated inferior and superior foramen magnum outlet areas stratified by etiology. In patients with CM-I, means are ... The FM was characteristically large with increases of the transverse diameter (P , 0.001), antero-posterior diameter (P , 0.001 ... e The maximum transverse diameter of the inferior outlet of the foramen magnum was measured at the level of the basion (b) and ...
Computed tomographic arthrogram showing a Bankart lesion with a spur extending off the inferior glenoid. The anteroinferior ... Computed tomographic arthrogram showing a Bankart lesion with a spur extending off the inferior glenoid. The anteroinferior ... The SLAP lesion (superior labrum anterior and posterior) and other glenoid labral tears are common in throwing athletes who ... Impingement lesions. Clin Orthop. 1983:70-7.. 18. Neer CS 2d. Anterior acromioplasty for the chronic impingement syndrome in ...
The lesion is associated with any damage to the antero-inferior labrum. Most commonly due to anterior shoulder dislocation. The ... Perthes lesion is a variant of Bankart lesion, presenting as an anterior glenohumeral injury that occurs when the scapular ... 1. Perthes Lesion (A Variant of the Bankart Lesion): MR Imaging and MR Arthrographic Findings with Surgical Correlation ... Differential diagnoses include: Bankart lesion Alpsa lesion GLAD[clarification needed] HAGL[clarification needed] BHAGL[ ...
Anteroinferior Bankart lesion that extends upward to include a separation of the biceps tendon. Type VI - 11 oclock to 1 ... labrum/glenoid separation at the tendon of the biceps muscle Bankart lesion - labrum/glenoid separation at the inferior ... "Is there an association between SLAP lesions and biceps pulley lesions?". Arthroscopy. 27 (5): 611-8. doi:10.1016/j.arthro. ... The SLAP lesion decreases the stability of the joint which, when combined with lying in bed, causes the shoulder to drop. For ...
Anterior-Inferior Instability: Open 17. Anterior And Anteroinferior Instability: Arthroscopic 18. Posterior Instability 19. ... American Shoulder And Elbow Surgeons Curriculum Guide For ...SLAP Lesions 12. Traumatic Muscle Ruptures 13. Anatomy, ... Explain Why Cranial Nerves Are So Important In Localizing Lesions. • Name Reflexes That Test These Nerves And Brain Stem Levels ...
Get precise with anatomy to help code SLAP lesions and Bankart defects. Ken Camilleis, CPC, CPC-I, CMRS, CCS-P Coding shoulder- ... A Bankart tear is an avulsion of the periosteal sleeve off the anteroinferior labrum, and is a variant lesion typically ... Teres minor - A muscle that extends medially from the lateral edge of the scapula, with an attachment point at the inferior ... The ICD-9-CM code to represent a SLAP lesion is 840.7 Superior glenoid labrum lesion. Degenerative or recurrent shoulder tears ...
Lesions to this area can result in multiple deficits in visual tracking and oculomotor control (such as nystagmus and vertigo ... It is placed on the anteroinferior surface of cerebellum. This region of the cerebellum has important connections to the ... The posterior lobe receives input mainly from the brainstem (i.e., reticular formation and inferior olivary nucleus) and ... infection can cause internal sores, also called lesions, and the thickening of tissues. Villi, which are tiny fingerlike ...
In the second le- sion there is greater posterior displacement of the shaft and more soft tissue injury than is suggested by ... Type VI Inferior dislocation of the distal clavicle or type VI acromioclavicular dislocation, is an exceedingly rare injury. ... The displacement of the humeral head may be anteroinferior, posterior, or superior; but no instance of superi- or displacement ... The full extent of the displace- ment in Type II lesions is not shown by routine roentgenographic stud- ies, especially when ...
What is Bankart lesion? Meaning of Bankart lesion as a legal term. What does Bankart lesion mean in law? ... Definition of Bankart lesion in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... However, changes to the inferior capsular-labral complex, including a Bankart lesion, are most likely due to trauma, and ... Quantitative assessment of classic anteroinferior bony Bankart lesions by radiography and computed tomography.. Management of ...
Bankart Lesion / Fracture. *Chip fracture of the antero-inferior glenoid rim with detachment of the glenoid labrum. ...
Patients (greater than 14 years) diagnosed with multi-directional instability or multi-directional laxity with antero-inferior ... Patients with bone lesions or labral, biceps anchor, or full-thickness rotator cuff tears were excluded intra-operatively. ... The Bankart lesion is a specific injury to a part of the shoulder joint called the labrum. ... For long-term shoulder health, anatomic stabilization of the Bankart lesion is the first priority because it corrects uni- ...
Incidence, etiology, pathogenesis of oral lesions of the oral cavity. Anatomical elements of the lingual nerve and the inferior ... The fibula flap, iliac crest, antero-lateral of the thigh, anti-brachial, brachial, latissimo of the back, rectus of the ... Surgery of the trigeminal nerve: Elements of pathogenesis and healing of nerve lesions and their classification. ... study of precancerous lesions, etiology and pathogenesis of tumors, their biology and clinical behavior, diagnostic and ...
Quantitative assessment of classic anteroinferior bony Bankart lesions by radiography and computed tomography. Am J Sports Med ... Inferior capsular shift procedure for anterior-inferior shoulder instability in athletes. Am J Sports Med 22(5): 578-84, 1994 ... Inferior capsular shift for involuntary inferior and multidirectional instability of the shoulder. A preliminary report. J Bone ... Tensile properties of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. J Orthop Res 10(2): 187-97, 1992CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ...
Dislocation of the glenohumeral joint is often associated with a bony lesion of the antero-inferior glenoid rim. This can be ... the antero-inferior rim is 14.6 mm. Bone loss of the antero-inferior glenoid is associated with failure of soft tissue repairs ... However, the bare spot is significantly further away from the antero-inferior rim of the glenoid by 1.4 mm. The median distance ... 2. Itoi E et al. Quantitative assessment of classic anteroinferior bony Bankart lesions by radiography and computed tomography ...
The Bankart lesion is considered the critical lesion in anterior shoulder instability, in which the anteroinferior glenoid ... The pathological cascade which results in the SLAP lesion consists of a combination of posterior inferior capsular tightness ... No difference was seen with the inferior marker during inferior edge loading (0.93 0.15 [95% CI, 0.56-1.29] versus 0.78 0.06 [ ... SLAP Lesions: Trends in Treatment ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY Erickson, B. J., Jain, A., Abrams ...
Since the site of origin in our case was the antero-inferior septum where there is no fascia basalis, we propose that it could ... This lesion differs from than that of the classical nasopharyngeal variety in being more common in females, older individuals, ... Since the site of origin in our case was the antero-inferior septum where there is no fascia basalis, we propose that it could ... We report a case of 37-year old female with four months history of a bleeding right nasal mass originating from antero-inferior ...
CT-scans (a-d) show diffuse thickening of the septum along its entire antero-posterior and supero-inferior dimensions, ... The lesion appears heterogeneous (b and c), and extends to involve the cribriform plate/olfactory fossa (a and b), and as far ... CT-scans (a-d) show diffuse thickening of the septum along its entire antero-posterior and supero-inferior dimensions, ... The lesion appears heterogeneous (b and c), and extends to involve the cribriform plate/olfactory fossa (a and b), and as far ...
Bankart lesion - the classic injury to the labrum with detachment of the antero-inferior capsulolabral complex and rupture of ... GLAD lesion (glenolabral articular disruption) - a superficial tear of the antero-inferior labrum with an adjacent articular ... Bony Bankart lesion is an avulsion fracture of the glenoid rim that carries with it the capsulolabral complex.. Perthes lesion ... GARD lesion (the Glenoid Rim Articular Divot lesion) - is not associated with instability. ...
Several variants of Bankart lesion have been described. In Perthes lesion, avulsion of the anteroinferior labrum is associated ... usually anterior-inferior and posterior-inferior (49).. The two main anatomic lesions associated with MDI are failure of the ... A) Bankart lesion; (B) Perthes lesion; (C) ALPSA lesion; (D) GLAD lesion. ... GLAD lesions consist of a superficial anterior inferior labral tear with an associated articular cartilage injury. Because the ...
glad lesion. - glenolabral articular disruption;. - lesion consists of an anterior-inferior labral tear associated with an ... arthroscopic inferior capsular shift: (arthroscopic knots). - surgeon establishes an antero-superior portal and a antero- ... perthes lesion:. - variation of the Bankart lesion;. - lesion occurs when the scapular periosteum remains intact but is ... rotator interval lesion - hill sachs lesion. - remplissage: partial transfer of infraspinatus into defect;. - ref: Anatomical ...
7 Osseous Bankart lesions include both labral and osseous injuries of the anterior inferior glenoid (Figure 7). Bankart lesions ... Bankart lesions are caused by the collision of the humeral head with the anteroinferior glenoid during forceful abduction, ... Perthes lesions are seen as a gap between the labrum and the glenoid with an intact periosteal sleeve (Figure8).8 ALPSA lesions ... Wischer TK, Bredella MA, Genant HK, et al.Perthes lesion (a variant of the Bankart lesion): MR imaging and MR arthrographic ...
The inferior axillary pouch is examined for loose bodies. The joint is thoroughly irrigated to wash away loose chondral debris ... Biceps lesions should be addressed with either tenotomy or subpectoral tenodesis. A capsular release may then be performed ... A West Point view may also be obtained for improved visualization of the anteroinferior glenoid. MRI is useful to detect ... Arthroscopy allows for definitive characterization of chondral lesions if the diagnosis remains unclear or if advanced imaging ...
Anterior or anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament. The ligament originates in the anterior tubercle of the tibia (5 mm in ... The inferior segment of the interosseous membrane also helps stabilize the tibiofibular syndesmosis. Distal to the insertion ... The added influence of plantar or dorsiflexion on the injury mechanism will mean that the lesion is predominantly anterior or ... 1 Tip of the fibula; 2 superior and inferior bands of the anterior talofibular ligament; 3 calcaneofibular ligament; 4 lateral ...
... hyperintense lesions were restricted to the anteroinferior portion of the putamen in initial images. Subsequently, lesions ... However, two striatal lesions in one patient in the late stage were category A (ie, diffusion-weighted imaging was inferior to ... lesions, cortical lesions, thalamic lesions, and lesions of the globus pallidus. When a patient was examined more than twice in ... We also noted that putaminal lesions always accompanied ipsilateral caudate head lesions. Even when the putaminal lesion was ...
Bassett [11] described an impingement lesion involving a thickening of the inferior aspect of the anterior inferior tibio- ... A second diagnostic test is to place the arthroscope in the antero-lateral gutter and have an assistant perform an eversion ... such as talar dome lesions, fibrous lesions, or impingement lesions, can be treated at the time of the stabilization. If the ... Often, a meniscoid lesion forms in the lateral aspect of the ankle joint secondary to trauma. This lesion may develop as a ...
... making it more difficult for a concomitant Hill-Sachs lesion to engage the anteroinferior glenoid rim and increasing the amount ... C. S. Neer II and C. R. Foster, "Inferior capsular shift for involuntary inferior and multidirectional instability of the ... Inferior glenoid bone loss can be appreciated as a percentage of its normal area when looking at sagittal imaging. A best-fit ... L. A. Danzig, G. Greenway, and D. Resnick, "The Hill-Sachs lesion. An experimental study," The American Journal of Sports ...
  • Perthes lesion is a variant of Bankart lesion, presenting as an anterior glenohumeral injury that occurs when the scapular periosteum remains intact but is stripped medially and the anterior labrum is avulsed from the glenoid but remains partially attached to the scapula by intact periosteum. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1. Perthes Lesion (A Variant of the Bankart Lesion): MR Imaging and MR Arthrographic Findings with Surgical Correlation Thorsten K. Wischer, Miriam A. Bredella, Harry K. Genant, David W. Stoller, Frederic W. Bost, and Phillip F. J. Tirman AJR January 2002 178:233-237 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anteroinferior Bankart lesion that extends upward to include a separation of the biceps tendon. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, changes to the inferior capsular-labral complex, including a Bankart lesion , are most likely due to trauma, and surgery is often needed. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • TUBS and AMBRI are the acronyms, where TUBS stand for traumatic, unidirectional instability, Bankart lesion and surgery, which is the mainstay of the treatment. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The Bankart lesion is a specific injury to a part of the shoulder joint called the labrum. (aetna.com)
  • For long-term shoulder health, anatomic stabilization of the Bankart lesion is the first priority because it corrects uni-directional anterior subluxation/dislocation. (aetna.com)
  • Bony Bankart lesion is an avulsion fracture of the glenoid rim that carries with it the capsulolabral complex. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • 24 individuals had an associated Bankart lesion. (unicare.com)
  • For individuals with anterior instability plus a Bankart lesion, 7 of 24 individuals (26%) had failed results. (unicare.com)
  • For those with anterior instability without a Bankart lesion, 10 of 27 individuals (33%) had failed results. (unicare.com)
  • An osseous Bankart lesion was detected in all shoulders. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The osseous Bankart lesion is an avulsion of the humeral labral complex with an anterior rim fracture. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Only limited evidence regarding the risk factors for recurrent instability and absorption are available for patients with first-time anterior shoulder dislocations and a bony Bankart lesion. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The recurrence rate for a shoulder dislocation in the young athlete is between 50-80%, with approximately 5-30% of acute anterior dislocations showing evidence of a glenoid rim fracture (bony Bankart lesion) ( Figure 1 ). (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Patients under the age of 20 who sustain a shoulder dislocation often have an associated Bankart lesion ( Figure 2 ), while patients over 60 will likely have a concomitant rotator cuff tear. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • 3D CT reconstruction demonstrating a bony Bankart lesion evidenced by the inverted pear shaped glenoid. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Anteroinferior glenoid deciency bony bankart lesion. (carpaccioatbalharbour.com)
  • A tear of the rim below the middle of the glenoid socket that also involves the inferior glenohumeral ligament is called a Bankart lesion. (london-shoulder.co.uk)
  • The purpose is to reattach the detached artero-inferior labrum (Bankart lesion) to the glenoid with minimal restriction of external rotation. (london-shoulder.co.uk)
  • In this way the Bankart lesion is repaired, allowing the tissues to heal in this position. (london-shoulder.co.uk)
  • This is where the Bankart lesion and variants are seen. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • The Bankart lesion is considered the critical lesion in anterior shoulder instability, in which the anteroinferior glenoid labrum separates from the glenoid rim. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • Anterior glenohumeral dislocation is commonly associated with a Bankart lesion, in which the anteroinferior glenoid labrum separates from the glenoid rim. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • Arthroscopic aspects and chronologic outcome of lesions of the labro-ligament complex in post-traumatic antero-inferior instability of the shoulder. (nih.gov)
  • The authors present a prospective and mono-operator study of 91 gleno-humeral arthroscopies for post-traumatic antero-inferior instability of the shoulder. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of the study was to obtain a dynamic understanding of the relationship between the anatomic lesions to allow the integration of all the described lesions into literature and to produce a natural history of lesions in antero-inferior shoulder instability. (nih.gov)
  • They propose a physiopathological classification in 4 stages where each lesions has its own healing potential, which explains the apparent large variation in endoscopic aspects of antero-inferior shoulder instability. (nih.gov)
  • The SLAP lesion decreases the stability of the joint which, when combined with lying in bed, causes the shoulder to drop. (wikipedia.org)
  • Let's explore in detail the anatomy and coding related to two common shoulder diagnoses: superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions and Bankart defects. (aapc.com)
  • A SLAP tear is identified by a discontinuity across the biceps tendon, extending from the anterosuperior and anteroinferior areas of the shoulder to the area posterior to the tendon. (aapc.com)
  • In ICD-10-CM, codes S43.43- Superior glenoid labrum lesion and M24.41- Recurrent dislocation, shoulder map to 840.7 and 718.31, respectively, but require additional digits to describe concepts such as laterality and the stage of healing. (aapc.com)
  • Weber BG, Simpson LA, Hardegger F. Rotational humeral osteotomy for recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder associated with a large Hill-Sachs lesion. (springer.com)
  • Bone loss of the antero-inferior glenoid is associated with failure of soft tissue repairs after shoulder dislocation. (scielo.org.za)
  • These causes include AMBRII (atraumatic, multidirectional, bilateral, rehabilitation is the main treatment, inferior capsular tightening and interval reconstruction in case patients need surgery) ( 6 ), and a group of subtle conditions defined as "minor shoulder instability", that are also responsible for shoulder pain and dysfunction ( 7 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Arthroscopic repair of anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability using a portal at the 5:30-o'clock position: analysis of the effects of age, fixation method, and concomitant shoulder injury on surgical outcomes. (wheelessonline.com)
  • The lack of musculature and the redundant capsule in the inferior aspect of the glenohumeral joint are the main contributors to the anterior/inferior instability of the shoulder joint. (hindawi.com)
  • D'Alessandro and colleagues (2004) conducted a nonrandomized, prospective study of 81 individuals (84 shoulders) who underwent thermal capsulorrhaphy of the shoulder for traumatic anterior dislocation, recurrent anterior or anterior/inferior subluxation without prior dislocation, and multidirectional instability. (unicare.com)
  • Traumatic, but two of their results, the authors found % had residual shoulder pain, posterior glenoid wear, alnot jy lpaule paralytique de ladulte par lesions nerveuses peripheriques post. (goodsamatlanta.org)
  • Currently, the most sensitive, specific, and valid method in making the diagnosis of shoulder lesions is MRI. (meandrosmedicaljournal.org)
  • Inferior (luxatio erecta) and superior shoulder dislocations are rare, accounting for approximately 0.5% of cases. (farmertechgroup.com)
  • o Explain the functional loss of the muscles of the shoulder and arm resulting from nerve lesions to these muscles. (euservice24.info)
  • o Describe shoulder dislocation injuries, particularly antero-inferior dislocations, and explain the nerve injuries that might accompany shoulder dislocations. (euservice24.info)
  • To understand the pathomechanism leading to shoulder cartilage damage, we conducted a systematic review on the subject of articular cartilage lesions caused by traumas where non impression fracture of the subchondral bone is present. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The traumatic events were divided into two categories: 1) acute trauma which refers to any single impact situation which directly damages the articular cartilage, and 2) chronic trauma which means cartilage lesions due to overuse or disuse of the shoulder joint. (biomedcentral.com)
  • And at increased risk for such cartilage lesions are active sportsmen with high shoulder demand or athletes prone to shoulder injury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As in adults, the lesions of the shoulder with the waning of sport succeed either to a single violent trauma (macro-trauma which processing rules are no different from that of pediatric orthopedic surgery) either to use on a growing skeleton (micro-trauma), which brings the child to the consultation. (sportsurgeryparis.com)
  • Traumatic glenohumeral bone defects and their relationship to failure of arthroscopic Bankart repairs: significance of the inverted-pear glenoid and the humeral engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. (scielo.org.za)
  • A SLAP tear or SLAP lesion is an injury to the glenoid labrum (fibrocartilaginous rim attached around the margin of the glenoid cavity). (wikipedia.org)
  • A SLAP lesion forms in the uppermost portion of the glenoid socket at the insertion point of the long head of the biceps (referred to as the superior glenoid labrum). (aapc.com)
  • The ICD-9-CM code to represent a SLAP lesion is 840.7 Superior glenoid labrum lesion . (aapc.com)
  • Chip fracture of the antero-inferior glenoid rim with detachment of the glenoid labrum. (lifeinthefastlane.com)
  • SLAP Lesion (Superior Labral, Anterior and Posterior tear) - often seen in athletes involved in sports requiring repetitive overhead use of the arm and varying in severity but involving the superior portion of the glenoid labrum and, sometimes, the biceps anchor. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • GLOM lesion (glenoid labrum ovoid mass) - a small low signal intensity mass occasionally seen anterosuperiorly in the setting of labral injury on the axial images. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • Cartilaginous Bankart lesions will involve tears of the glenoid labrum with an intact osseous glenoid (Figure6). (appliedradiology.com)
  • The bare spot was present in nearly 90% of shoulders and is centrally placed in the antero-posterior plane. (scielo.org.za)
  • Anterior rhinoscopy revealed a smooth pinkish, pedunculated, mass originating from the antero-inferior part of cartilaginous septum filling the right nasal cavity (Figure 1), while posterior rhinoscopy showed no mass. (ispub.com)
  • Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT)-scan showed heterogeneous soft-tissue thickening of the septum that extended throughout its antero-posterior and cranio-caudal dimensions, involving the cribriform area/olfactory fossa [ Fig. 2 ]. (elsevier.es)
  • Mc Laughlin sign or reverse Hill Sach's lesion is a compression fracture of the anterior aspect of the humeral head associated with posterior dislocation. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • Bennett lesion Enthesophyte that arises from the posteroinferior portion of the glenoid rim, often seen in baseball pitchers and probably arising at the site of insertion of the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • Trough Lesion - Fracture of the medial surface of the humeral head indicative of previous posterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • Chapter glenohumeral instability anterior, posterior, and inferior bone struts. (goodsamatlanta.org)
  • Two brain MRIs including thin-slice sections of the posterior fossa found no brainstem or cavernous sinus lesions but an MR scan 4 months later revealed gliomatosis not only of the temporal lobes but also involving midbrain and pons, mandating chemotherapy. (neuroophthalmology.ca)
  • A SLAP lesion (superior labrum, anterior (front) to posterior (back) is a tear of the rim above the middle of the socket. (london-shoulder.co.uk)
  • Luxation may take place either anterior, posterior, superior or inferior. (farmertechgroup.com)
  • o Describe the signs and symptoms of lesions of the medial, lateral and posterior cords of the brachial plexus. (euservice24.info)
  • The distal fibula or lateral malleolus is bound to the distal tibia by the anterior and posterior inferior tibiofibular ligaments, an inferior transverse ligament, and a syndesmosis ligament. (medscape.com)
  • We use a posterior portal (3) 2 cm inferior to the posterolateral corner of the acromion and an anterosuperior portal (1) in the rotator interval just anterior to the biceps. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • A posterior viewing portal is created approximately 2 cm inferior to the posterolateral corner of the acromion, and a 30° arthroscope is inserted. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • Twelve varieties of SLAP lesion have been described, with initial diagnosis by MRI or arthrography and confirmation by direct arthroscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anterior extension of the SLAP lesion beneath the middle glenohumeral ligament. (wikipedia.org)
  • The etiology of a SLAP lesion can vary. (aapc.com)
  • Athletes who perform strenuous activities, such as throwing a baseball, subject their shoulders to extreme wear and tear, and are especially vulnerable to a SLAP lesion. (aapc.com)
  • Pain in the lateral bend of the ankle is associated with lateral impingement lesions, often secondary to talar dome lesions or severe ankle sprain. (footankleinstitute.com)
  • These lesions include peroneal tendon injuries, chondral and osteochondral lesions of the tibial plafond and talar dome, intraarticular loose bodies, anterior/anterolateral ankle soft tissue impingement, lateral malleolus ossicles, tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries, and peroneal nerve injuries. (omicsonline.org)
  • However, 13 to 35 percent of patients have persistent pain and symptoms after a successful lateral ligament reconstruction which some attribute to concomitant intraarticular lesions [ 13 , 14 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Resection of the lateral and inferior walls of the right middle turbinate was performed under general anesthesia combined with a right frontal sinusotomy. (nih.gov)
  • Inferior and lateral ST elevation with reciprocal ST depression in aVL . (blogspot.com)
  • So this was an antero-infero-lateral MI. (blogspot.com)
  • The posterolateral portal-located 4 cm lateral to the posterolateral corner of the acromion-simplifies and improves anchor placement, trajectory, and anatomic capsulolabral repair of the inferior glenoid. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • For arthroscopic inferior labral repair with the posterolateral portal, the patient is positioned in the lateral decubitus position. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • 2 The peroneus longus tendon courses inferior to the cuboid bone within the cuboid tunnel and inserts onto the plantar aspect of the first cuneiform and the proximal first metatarsal. (radsource.us)
  • GLAD lesion (glenolabral articular disruption) - a superficial tear of the antero-inferior labrum with an adjacent articular cartilage injury. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • The age factor and duration of evolution were not negligible and one must associate the "labro-ligament complex" studies with the avulsion lesions of the long head of the biceps (SLAP lesions) in which the frequency varies from 15 per cent to 30 per cent and which was consistently present in patients above 35 years of age. (nih.gov)
  • Type XI - Extends into superior glenohumeral ligament Type XII - Superior labrum anterior cuff lesion There is evidence in literature to support both surgical and non-surgical forms of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • HAGL lesion (Humeral Avulsion Glenhumeral Ligament) - a capsule avulsion of the capsule including the IGHL from the neck of the humerus . (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • SIS is associated with various degenerative changes occurring in the coracoacromial ligament, the anterior part of the inferior surface of the acromion, and sometimes in the acromioclavicular joint. (meandrosmedicaljournal.org)
  • The coracohumeral ligament is the prominent portion of the axial skeleton, including the inferior capsule that allows a double - disruption injuries to the tuberosities and the severity of glenoid defects. (carpaccioatbalharbour.com)
  • Look for HAGL-lesion (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament). (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Therefore it is critical to anatomically reduce the anterior-band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • Even though maxillary sinus is the most common site for the origin of this lesion, angiofibroma arising from the nasal septum is extremely rare. (ispub.com)
  • It may be mistaken for bleeding polypus septum and the lesion poses a great diagnostic challenge requiring a high index of suspicion. (ispub.com)
  • We report a case of 37-year old female with four months history of a bleeding right nasal mass originating from antero-inferior septum. (ispub.com)
  • 4 Herein a case is reported of angiofibroma in 37 year old female, originating from antero-inferior part of cartilaginous nasal septum mimicking bleeding polypus septum and the likely theory of origin is discussed. (ispub.com)
  • It was found to be attached to the anteroinferior part of the cartilaginous septum. (ispub.com)
  • Epistaxis, or nosebleed, is a feature of secondary hemostasis (blood clotting) characterized by fragility of a plexus of blood vessels in the antero-inferior septum (just inside nostril) and/or abnormal blood coagulation. (glutenfreeworks.com)
  • Formal Echo later showed moderate hypokinesis of the septum and dense hypokinesis of the apex and inferior wall. (blogspot.com)
  • Occipital bone size and PCFV were normal in 225 patients with CM-I and occipitoatlantoaxial joint instability, 55 patients with CM-I and tethered cord syndrome (TCS), 30 patients with CM-I and intracranial mass lesions, and 28 patients with CM-I and lumboperitoneal shunts. (springer.com)
  • Associated injuries to the labrum, to the glenoid bone, described in up to 40% of the cases ( 3 ), and to the humeral head (known as Hill-Sachs lesions), have been described in 38-88% of the cases ( 4 , 5 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In Reading Exercise 2, MRI of the hip of 18 subjects from a randomized controlled trial, assessed at 2 timepoints, and 27 subjects from a cross-sectional study were read for HIMRISS and HOAMS bone marrow lesions (BML) and synovitis. (jrheum.org)
  • These advances have been assisted by advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uniquely identifies important features of disease such as bone marrow lesions (BML), and the development and validation of scoring systems that allow semiquantitative assessment of various structural abnormalities on MRI 1 . (jrheum.org)
  • This motion reproduces pain with impingement lesions of all stages, and it can elicit pain in many other conditions (adhesive capsulitis, osteoarthritis, calcific tendinitis, and bone lesions). (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • and liable to be torn off the edge of the glenoid bone following anterior 9or anterior- inferior) dislocation. (london-shoulder.co.uk)
  • Glenohumeral cartilage lesions with an intact subchondral bone and caused by an acute trauma are either rare or overlooked. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In a first step, however, it is necessary to get a clear picture about GH articular cartilage lesions where the subchondral bone is not fractured. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The glenoid profile view (West-Point or Bernageau) assesses the anteroinferior glenoid rim and showed an osseous lesion of the glenoid in 78.8% of the shoulders with recurrent dislocation ( 11 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Applying our treatment algorithm for acute osseous Bankart lesions consisting of a conservative strategy for small defect sizes and a surgical approach for medium-sized and large defects leads to encouraging mid-term results and a low rate of recurrent instability in active patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Recurrent Artery of Heubner (supplies head of caudate and anteroinferior internal capsule). (luc.edu)
  • Moreover, recurrent instability is anterior and inferior. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • Group V, lesser-tuberosity displacement The two-part lesion occurs as an isolate avulsion or in association with an undisplaced fracture of the surgical neck. (pili.org)
  • In the four-part fracture, both tuberosities are re- tracted and, as in all four-part fracture, both tuberosities are retracted and, as in all four-part lesions, the blood supply to the humeral head has been severed. (pili.org)
  • Hill-Sachs Lesion - Fracture of the posterolateral surface of the humeral head indicative of previous anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation . (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • Anterior inferior dislocation of the right glenohumeral joint with a comminuted and displaced fracture of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. (farmertechgroup.com)
  • A clinical problem with regard to traumatic events is the early detection of changes in the cartilage structure without concomitant bony fracture, e.g. when GH cartilage lesions do not present together with subchondral fracture in patients with traumatic anterior instability. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Arthroscopy allows for definitive characterization of chondral lesions if the diagnosis remains unclear or if advanced imaging is inconclusive. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Improvements in ankle arthroscopy and preoperative imaging modalities have aided in the identification and treatment of these lesions. (omicsonline.org)
  • Prior to the rise in prevalence of ankle arthroscopy, intraarticular lesions were evaluated through an open ankle arthrotomy which has limited visualization and increased morbidity compared to arthroscopy. (omicsonline.org)
  • Quantitative assessment of classic anteroinferior bony Bankart lesions by radiography and computed tomography. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 10 ] found, that bony Bankart lesions were associated with good functional outcomes in cases of first time dislocations and conservative therapy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 13 ] found less favourable outcomes in patients after arthroscopically treatment of chronic bony bankart lesions compared to acute ones. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 6 ] classified bony Bankart lesions in three types depending on the lesion size. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Stryker Notch and West Point axillary views should also be performed to best evaluate for Hill-Sachs ( Figure 3 ) and bony Bankart lesions respectively. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Common injuries include Bankart lesions (cartilaginous and osseous), Perthes lesions and anterior labral periosteal sleeve avulsions (ALPSA). (appliedradiology.com)
  • 8 ALPSA lesions are similar to Perthes lesions apart from further stripping of the periosteal sleeve from the glenoid, allowing the labroligamentous complex to fold back medially onto the scapular neck (Figure9). (appliedradiology.com)
  • It is named after Georg C. Perthes (1869-1927), a German Surgeon and X-Ray diagnostic pioneer who first described the lesion in 1905. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perthes lesion - a lesion with incomplete avulsion of the labrum and capsular stripping from the scapular neck. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • a feature that distinguishes them from Perthes lesions. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Perthes lesions are seen as a gap between the labrum and the glenoid with an intact periosteal sleeve (Figure8). (appliedradiology.com)
  • Supplies head of caudate and anteroinferior internal capsule. (luc.edu)
  • The internal capsule is present medial to almost all insular limiting sulci and most of the insular surface, but not to their most anteroinferior portions. (neurosurgicalatlas.com)
  • At this level also look for Hill-Sachs lesion on the posterolateral margin of the humeral head. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • A narrated overview of the use of the posterolateral portal in arthroscopic capsulolabral repair of the inferior glenoid, focusing on how this portal improves suture shuttling and anchor placement. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • In our experience with arthroscopic Bankart repair, the 7-o'clock posterolateral portal provides optimal access to the inferior glenoid. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • The first and most constant lesion is the periosteal avulsion of the antero-inferior labrum ("single lesion": healing potential of +/- 30 per cent, in ectopic position in +/- 90 per cent). (nih.gov)
  • Because of the intact periosteum these lesions may be occult at both imaging and surgery. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • The lesion is best identified on MR arthrography. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adding an ABER sequence to the imaging protocol significantly increases the sensitivity of MR arthrography in detecting these lesions by placing the IGHL complex under tension. (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • 7 Osseous Bankart lesions include both labral and osseous injuries of the anterior inferior glenoid (Figure 7). (appliedradiology.com)
  • Studies dealing with acute osseous Bankart lesions and corresponding treatment strategies are rare. (biomedcentral.com)
  • At cath, the culprit was a proximal LAD lesion (open, with TIMI-3 flow)! (blogspot.com)
  • The proximal lesion was stented and the distal was treated with antiplatelet and antithrombotic therapy. (blogspot.com)
  • citation needed] A SLAP tear or lesion occurs when there is damage to the superior (uppermost) area of the labrum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sensitivity of diffusion-weighted imaging in depicting lesions was superior or at least equal to that of FLAIR imaging. (ajnr.org)
  • Tears can be located either above (superior) or below (inferior) the middle of the glenoid socket. (london-shoulder.co.uk)
  • Segment divides into superior and inferior divisions which can be a site for an embolus to lodge. (luc.edu)
  • It is bounded by the anterior limiting sulcus, the superior limiting sulcus, and the inferior limiting sulcus. (neurosurgicalatlas.com)
  • GARD lesion (the Glenoid Rim Articular Divot lesion) - is not associated with instability . (shoulderdoc.co.uk)
  • Acute trauma refers to any single impact situation which directly damages the articular cartilage, whereas chronic trauma means cartilage lesions due to overuse or disuse of the GH joint. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Radiographs show osseous lesions of the humerus or glenoid in 95% of patients with chronic anterior instability. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Bankart lesions are caused by the collision of the humeral head with the anteroinferior glenoid during forceful abduction, extension and external rotation of the humerus. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The statistical evaluation of each individual data item gathered value allowed the selection of the most significant lesions and to regroup them into "lesions families", relations to the same physiopathological mechanism (traumatic or degenerative). (nih.gov)
  • Surgery of the trigeminal nerve: Elements of pathogenesis and healing of nerve lesions and their classification. (unimi.it)
  • however, this modality has limitations on the ability to detect full thickness cartilage lesions. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • The great majority of glenohumeral cartilage lesions without any bony lesions are the results of overuse. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We present our preferred technique for capsulolabral repair of the inferior glenoid. (perezartro.com.mx)
  • Furthermore, diffusion-weighted imaging has been reported to depict characteristically distinct hyperintense lesions in CJD ( 4 - 8 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Get precise with anatomy to help code SLAP lesions and Bankart defects. (aapc.com)
  • I don't have the full angio report so can't comment on the exact location of the lesion or the anatomy of the LAD. (blogspot.com)
  • This anteroinferior portion of the central core has a more complex anatomy and is distinguished in this paper as the "anterior perforated substance region. (neurosurgicalatlas.com)
  • Based on the MRI results, this is likely bilateral partial nuclear lesions sparing Edinger-Westphal nucleus located rostrally. (neuroophthalmology.ca)
  • In our case, there was likely partial involvement of the dorsal, intermediate and ventral subnuclei, responsible for the inferior rectus, inferior oblique and medial rectus muscles respectively. (neuroophthalmology.ca)
  • Fukuda k, chen c - and partial elevation of the inferior aspect of the. (carpaccioatbalharbour.com)