Anterior Temporal Lobectomy: A neurosurgical procedure that removes the anterior TEMPORAL LOBE including the medial temporal structures of CEREBRAL CORTEX; AMYGDALA; HIPPOCAMPUS; and the adjacent PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS. This procedure is generally used for the treatment of intractable temporal epilepsy (EPILEPSY, TEMPORAL LOBE).Psychosurgery: Treatment of chronic, severe and intractable psychiatric disorders by surgical removal or interruption of certain areas or pathways in the brain, especially in the prefrontal lobes.Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Amobarbital: A barbiturate with hypnotic and sedative properties (but not antianxiety). Adverse effects are mainly a consequence of dose-related CNS depression and the risk of dependence with continued use is high. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p565)Kluver-Bucy Syndrome: A neurobehavioral syndrome associated with bilateral medial temporal lobe dysfunction. Clinical manifestations include oral exploratory behavior; tactile exploratory behavior; hypersexuality; BULIMIA; MEMORY DISORDERS; placidity; and an inability to recognize objects or faces. This disorder may result from a variety of conditions, including CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; infections; ALZHEIMER DISEASE; PICK DISEASE OF THE BRAIN; and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS.Sclerosis: A pathological process consisting of hardening or fibrosis of an anatomical structure, often a vessel or a nerve.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Seizures: Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders: Cognitive disorders including delirium, dementia, and other cognitive disorders. These may be the result of substance use, trauma, or other causes.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Epilepsy, Complex Partial: A disorder characterized by recurrent partial seizures marked by impairment of cognition. During the seizure the individual may experience a wide variety of psychic phenomenon including formed hallucinations, illusions, deja vu, intense emotional feelings, confusion, and spatial disorientation. Focal motor activity, sensory alterations and AUTOMATISM may also occur. Complex partial seizures often originate from foci in one or both temporal lobes. The etiology may be idiopathic (cryptogenic partial complex epilepsy) or occur as a secondary manifestation of a focal cortical lesion (symptomatic partial complex epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317-8)Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Brain Damage, Chronic: A condition characterized by long-standing brain dysfunction or damage, usually of three months duration or longer. Potential etiologies include BRAIN INFARCTION; certain NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ANOXIA, BRAIN; ENCEPHALITIS; certain NEUROTOXICITY SYNDROMES; metabolic disorders (see BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC); and other conditions.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Seizures, Febrile: Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Split-Brain Procedure: Complete severing of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. In humans it is usually performed to treat medically intractable, multifocal EPILEPSY. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS of split brain preparations are used in research.Corpus Callosum: Broad plate of dense myelinated fibers that reciprocally interconnect regions of the cortex in all lobes with corresponding regions of the opposite hemisphere. The corpus callosum is located deep in the longitudinal fissure.Epilepsia Partialis Continua: A variant of epilepsy characterized by continuous focal jerking of a body part over a period of hours, days, or even years without spreading to other body regions. Contractions may be aggravated by movement and are reduced, but not abolished during sleep. ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY demonstrates epileptiform (spike and wave) discharges over the hemisphere opposite to the affected limb in most instances. The repetitive movements may originate from the CEREBRAL CORTEX or from subcortical structures (e.g., BRAIN STEM; BASAL GANGLIA). This condition is associated with Russian Spring and Summer encephalitis (see ENCEPHALITIS, TICK BORNE); Rasmussen syndrome (see ENCEPHALITIS); MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS; DIABETES MELLITUS; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS. (From Brain, 1996 April;119(pt2):393-407; Epilepsia 1993;34;Suppl 1:S29-S36; and Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p319)Arthritis, Juvenile: Arthritis of children, with onset before 16 years of age. The terms juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refer to classification systems for chronic arthritis in children. Only one subtype of juvenile arthritis (polyarticular-onset, rheumatoid factor-positive) clinically resembles adult rheumatoid arthritis and is considered its childhood equivalent.Vanilla: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that is the source of the familiar flavoring used in foods and medicines (FLAVORING AGENTS).Paeonia: A plant genus of the family Paeoniaceae, order Dilleniales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. These perennial herbs are up to 2 m (6') tall. Leaves are alternate and are divided into three lobes, each lobe being further divided into three smaller lobes. The large flowers are symmetrical, bisexual, have 5 sepals, 5 petals (sometimes 10), and many stamens.Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Chorda Tympani Nerve: A branch of the facial (7th cranial) nerve which passes through the middle ear and continues through the petrotympanic fissure. The chorda tympani nerve carries taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and conveys parasympathetic efferents to the salivary glands.Supratentorial Neoplasms: Primary and metastatic (secondary) tumors of the brain located above the tentorium cerebelli, a fold of dura mater separating the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM from the cerebral hemispheres and DIENCEPHALON (i.e., THALAMUS and HYPOTHALAMUS and related structures). In adults, primary neoplasms tend to arise in the supratentorial compartment, whereas in children they occur more frequently in the infratentorial space. Clinical manifestations vary with the location of the lesion, but SEIZURES; APHASIA; HEMIANOPSIA; hemiparesis; and sensory deficits are relatively common features. Metastatic supratentorial neoplasms are frequently multiple at the time of presentation.Karnofsky Performance Status: A performance measure for rating the ability of a person to perform usual activities, evaluating a patient's progress after a therapeutic procedure, and determining a patient's suitability for therapy. It is used most commonly in the prognosis of cancer therapy, usually after chemotherapy and customarily administered before and after therapy. It was named for Dr. David A. Karnofsky, an American specialist in cancer chemotherapy.Glioblastoma: A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological: Physiological disturbances in normal sexual performance in either the male or the female.Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological: Disturbances in sexual desire and the psychophysiologic changes that characterize the sexual response cycle and cause marked distress and interpersonal difficulty. (APA, DSM-IV, 1994)Libido: The psychic drive or energy associated with sexual instinct in the broad sense (pleasure and love-object seeking). It may also connote the psychic energy associated with instincts in general that motivate behavior.Erectile Dysfunction: The inability in the male to have a PENILE ERECTION due to psychological or organ dysfunction.Orgasm: The climax of sexual excitement in either humans or animals.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Sexuality: The sexual functions, activities, attitudes, and orientations of an individual. Sexuality, male or female, becomes evident at PUBERTY under the influence of gonadal steroids (TESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL), and social effects.Vagus Nerve Stimulation: An adjunctive treatment for PARTIAL EPILEPSY and refractory DEPRESSION that delivers electrical impulses to the brain via the VAGUS NERVE. A battery implanted under the skin supplies the energy.Epilepsies, Partial: Conditions characterized by recurrent paroxysmal neuronal discharges which arise from a focal region of the brain. Partial seizures are divided into simple and complex, depending on whether consciousness is unaltered (simple partial seizure) or disturbed (complex partial seizure). Both types may feature a wide variety of motor, sensory, and autonomic symptoms. Partial seizures may be classified by associated clinical features or anatomic location of the seizure focus. A secondary generalized seizure refers to a partial seizure that spreads to involve the brain diffusely. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317)Electric Stimulation Therapy: Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.Epilepsy, Generalized: Recurrent conditions characterized by epileptic seizures which arise diffusely and simultaneously from both hemispheres of the brain. Classification is generally based upon motor manifestations of the seizure (e.g., convulsive, nonconvulsive, akinetic, atonic, etc.) or etiology (e.g., idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic). (From Mayo Clin Proc, 1996 Apr;71(4):405-14)Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.

Detection of visual field defects in patients after anterior temporal lobectomy for mesial temporal sclerosis-establishing eligibility to drive. (1/100)

AIMS: The aim of this study is to quantify visual field defects after temporal lobectomy for mesial temporal sclerosis and to establish eligibility for driving. METHODS: Automated static perimetry was performed on 14 patients who had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy for mesial temporal sclerosis. Perimetry consisted of monocular Humphrey Field Analyser (HFA) 30-2 test and a binocular Esterman 120 test. RESULTS: Of the 14 patients, three had no loss or non-specific loss, eight had partial homonymous quadrantanopia, one had complete homonymous quadrantanopia and two had concentric loss attributable to vigabatrin, which may have masked any loss occurring due to surgery. Of these, only seven passed the standardised DVLA visual fields. Of the seven who failed DVLA visual field, one had complete quadrantanopia, four had partial quadrantanopia and two had concentric loss (due to vigabatrin). CONCLUSIONS: Visual field defects contribute a great deal in the reduction of the quality of life in patients who have had surgery for mesial temporal sclerosis. Potential surgically induced visual field defects that could preclude driving need to be discussed with each patient preoperatively. In our study 50% of patients did not meet the required DVLA standards.  (+info)

Emotional facial paresis in temporal lobe epilepsy: its prevalence and lateralizing value. (2/100)

The selection of patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) for surgery depends on the concordance of data from clinical, imaging and electroencephalographic evaluation. Though clinical examination is often normal, emotional facial paresis has been described in patients with TLE. Utilizing a well-characterized group of mesial TLE (MTLE) patients, who have achieved excellent seizure outcome following anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy (ATL), we investigated the prevalence, predictive value and associations of emotional facial paresis. When compared to 8 out of 50 control subjects (16%), 36 out of 50 MTLE patients (72%) exhibited unilateral emotional facial paresis; the difference was highly significant (P<0.0001). The presence of contralateral emotional facial paresis correctly predicted the side of ATL in 86.1% patients. The occurrence of emotional facial paresis was significantly associated with longer duration of epilepsy prior to ATL and left ATL. Our observations confirm that emotional facial parersis contralateral to the side of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is a valuable localizing sign in correctly predicting the epileptogenic temporal lobe. We hypothesize that the presence of an intact right hemisphere and pathological changes more extensive than MTS may be required for emotional facial paresis to readily manifest.  (+info)

Unexpected amnesia: are there lessons to be learned from cases of amnesia following unilateral temporal lobe surgery? (3/100)

Cases of amnesia following unilateral temporal lobe surgery are rare, but they may provide important insights into human brain functioning. Such cases are reconsidered here in the light of recent developments in clinical and cognitive neuroscience. Descriptions of preoperative seizure activity in these cases indicate the potentially valuable role of ictal semiology in localizing the source of epileptiform discharges. Cases of amnesia after unilateral temporal lobectomy illustrate the complexity of intra- and inter-hemispheric propagation of epileptiform discharges and highlight possible neurophysiological mechanisms underlying false localization of abnormal EEG activity. This review points to the value of preoperative neuropsychological assessment in providing information on the likely primary locus of pathology and in predicting outcome after surgery. The analysis of cases upholds the benefits of the Wada procedure, but it highlights the variability in Wada test procedures and the fact that Wada test scores themselves may be open to varying interpretation. These cases of postoperative amnesia are further considered in the context of the cognitive neuroscience of human memory and, in particular, mechanisms underlying the human amnesic syndrome. They confirm the critical role of bilateral medial temporal lobe structures in anterograde memory, but they also highlight the complexity in teasing apart neural mechanisms underlying remote memory loss.  (+info)

A specific role for the human amygdala in olfactory memory. (4/100)

The medial temporal lobe is known to play a role in the processing of olfaction and memory. The specific contribution of the human amygdala to memory for odors has not been addressed, however. The role of this region in memory for odors was assessed in patients with unilateral amygdala damage due to temporal lobectomy (n = 20; 11 left, 9 right), one patient with selective bilateral amygdala damage, and in 20 age-matched normal controls. Fifteen odors were presented, followed 1 h later by an odor-name matching test and an odor-odor recognition test. Signal detection analyses showed that both unilateral groups were impaired in their memory for matching odors with names, these patients were not significantly impaired on odor-odor recognition. Bilateral amygdala damage resulted in severe impairment in both odor-name matching as well as in odor-odor recognition memory. Importantly, none of the patients were impaired on an auditory verbal learning task, suggesting that these findings reflect a specific impairment in olfactory memory, and not merely a more general memory deficit. Taken together, the data provide neuropsychological evidence that the human amygdala is essential for olfactory memory.  (+info)

Emotional memory and perception in temporal lobectomy patients with amygdala damage. (5/100)

BACKGROUND: The human amygdala is implicated in the formation of emotional memories and the perception of emotional stimuli--particularly fear--across various modalities. OBJECTIVES: To discern the extent to which these functions are related. METHODS: 28 patients who had anterior temporal lobectomy (13 left and 15 right) for intractable epilepsy were recruited. Structural magnetic resonance imaging showed that three of them had atrophy of their remaining amygdala. All participants were given tests of affect perception from facial and vocal expressions and of emotional memory, using a standard narrative test and a novel test of word recognition. The results were standardised against matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Performance on all emotion tasks in patients with unilateral lobectomy ranged from unimpaired to moderately impaired. Perception of emotions in faces and voices was (with exceptions) significantly positively correlated, indicating multimodal emotional processing. However, there was no correlation between the subjects' performance on tests of emotional memory and perception. Several subjects showed strong emotional memory enhancement but poor fear perception. Patients with bilateral amygdala damage had greater impairment, particularly on the narrative test of emotional memory, one showing superior fear recognition but absent memory enhancement. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral amygdala damage is particularly disruptive of emotional memory processes in comparison with unilateral temporal lobectomy. On a cognitive level, the pattern of results implies that perception of emotional expressions and emotional memory are supported by separate processing systems or streams.  (+info)

Schizophrenia-like psychosis arising de novo following a temporal lobectomy: timing and risk factors. (6/100)

OBJECTIVES: To clarify risk factors for the development of schizophrenia-like psychotic disorders following temporal lobectomy, and to explore the possibility that the early postoperative period is a time of high risk for the onset of such chronic psychotic disorders. METHODS: Patients who developed schizophrenia-like psychosis were identified from a series of 320 patients who had a temporal lobectomy for medically intractable epilepsy. The relationship of their disorders to both the operation and subsequent seizure activity was examined. Using a retrospective case-control design, risk factors for the development of schizophrenia-like psychosis were established. RESULTS: Eleven patients who developed schizophrenia-like psychosis postoperatively were identified and compared with 33 control subjects who remained free of psychosis postoperatively. The onset of de novo psychotic symptoms was typically in the first year following the operation. No clear relationship between postoperative seizure activity and fluctuations in psychotic symptoms emerged. Compared with the controls, patients who become psychotic had more preoperative bilateral electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities, pathologies other than mesial temporal sclerosis in the excised lobe and a smaller amygdala on the unoperated side. CONCLUSIONS: Temporal lobectomy for medically intractable epilepsy may precipitate a schizophrenia-like psychosis. Patients with bilateral functional and structural abnormalities, particularly of the amygdala, may be at particular risk for the development of such psychoses.  (+info)

Temporal lobectomy: long-term seizure outcome, late recurrence and risks for seizure recurrence. (7/100)

There is little information available relevant to long-term seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy, particularly at extended postoperative periods. The aim of this study was an in-depth examination of patterns of longitudinal outcome and potential risk factors for seizure recurrence after lobectomy, utilizing a large patient sample with long follow-up. Included were 325 patients who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy between 1978 and 1998 (mean follow-up 9.6 +/- 4.2 years). Retrospective data were analysed using survival analysis and multivariate regression with Cox proportional hazard models. The probability of complete seizure freedom at 2 years post-surgery was 55.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 50-61]; at 5 years, 47.7% (95% CI 42-53); and at 10 postoperative years it was 41% (95% CI 36-48). Patients with discrete abnormalities preoperatively (i.e. lesions and hippocampal sclerosis) had a significantly higher probability of seizure freedom than patients without obvious abnormality. The latter group had a pattern of recurrence similar to that in patients with lesions outside the area of excision. After adjustment for preoperative pathology, only the presence of preoperative secondarily generalized seizures had a significant association with recurrence [occasional preoperative generalized seizures, hazard ratio (HR) 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3; frequent seizures, HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-2.9 compared with absence of preoperative generalized seizures]. Duration of preoperative epilepsy, age of seizure onset and age at surgery did not have an effect on outcome. Patients with two seizure-free postoperative years had a 74% (95% CI 66-81) probability of seizure freedom by 10 postoperative years. This late seizure recurrence was not associated with any identified risk factors. Specifically, patients with hippocampal sclerosis were not at higher risk. Surprisingly, complete discontinuation of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) after two postoperative years was not associated with an increased risk of recurrence (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.5-2.1). This may be because selection of patients for AED discontinuation is biased towards those individuals perceived as 'low risk'. The results of this study indicate that the lack of an obvious abnormality or the presence of diffuse pathology, and preoperative secondarily generalized seizures are risk factors for recurrence after surgery. Late recurrence after initial seizure freedom is not a rare event; risk factors specific to this phenomenon are as yet unidentified.  (+info)

Cerebellar hemorrhage as a complication of temporal lobectomy for refractory medial temporal epilepsy: report of three cases. (8/100)

Cerebellar hemorrhage is listed among the potential complications following neurosurgical procedures. In this scenario it is usually reported as a rare condition. However, it seems that epilepsy surgery patients are somewhat more prone to this kind of complication, compared to other surgical groups. Head positioning, excessive cerebral spinal fluid draining and the excision of non-expanding encephalic tissue (or combinations among the three) are likely to be cause underlying remote cerebellar hemorrhage. Out of the 118 ATL/AH performed at our institution, between 1996 and 2002, we identified 3 (2.5%) patients presenting with cerebellar hemorrhage. We report on such cases and review the literature on the topic.  (+info)

  • Aims: To investigate the surgical outcomes of anterior corpus callosotomy (aCCT) combined with anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mental retardation (MR). Methods: Sixty patients with TLE and MR were carefully selected and randomly divided into two equal groups: ATL and aCCT, in which they were treated with ATL or ATL combined with aCCT, respectively. (mendeley.com)
  • A modification popularized by the Yale group limits neocortical resection to 3.5 cm from the temporal pole and spares the superior temporal gyrus, obviating the need for language mapping in most cases. (medscape.com)
  • The strongest evidence supporting ATL over continued medical therapy for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy is a prospective, randomized trial of ATL compared to best medical therapy (anticonvulsants), which convincingly demonstrated that the seizure-free rate after surgery was ~ 60% as compared to only 8% for the medicine only group. (wikipedia.org)
  • The systematic review of 19 studies of medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy yielded a rate of freedom from seizure of 50% (42% for SRS), and that the exclusion of a randomized, controlled trial for radiosurgery did not affect the results of the meta-analysis. (bioworld.com)
  • With an eye toward defining ways in which APOE ε3 alleles may foster neuronal well-being in epilepsy and/or APOE ε4 alleles exacerbate neuronal decline, neuronal and glial characteristics were studied in temporal lobectomy specimens from epilepsy patients of either APOE ε4,4 or APOE ε3,3 genotype. (springer.com)
  • Presurgical Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography (fTCD) with Intravenous Echo Enhancing Agent SonoVue Enables Determination of Language Lateralization in Epilepsy Patients with Poor Temporal Bone Windows Epilepsia. (jove.com)
  • however, methodological concerns from combining potentially biased studies have strengthened the call for a randomized controlled trial of SAH versus ATL for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. (medscape.com)
  • Exner's and basal temporal language areas). (springer.com)
  • The language/semantic region of vATL, namely, the basal temporal language area (BTLA) was defined by 50 Hz electrical stimulation with 5-6 language/semantic tasks. (jnss.org)
Neurocognitive and Seizure Outcomes of Selective Amygdalohippocampectomy versus Anterior Temporal Lobectomy for Mesial Temporal...
Neurocognitive and Seizure Outcomes of Selective Amygdalohippocampectomy versus Anterior Temporal Lobectomy for Mesial Temporal... (hindawi.com)
Amygdalohippocampectomy: Overview, Periprocedural Care, Technique
Amygdalohippocampectomy: Overview, Periprocedural Care, Technique (emedicine.medscape.com)
Localization of musicogenic epilepsy to Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal plane: case report in: Journal of Neurosurgery...
Localization of musicogenic epilepsy to Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal plane: case report in: Journal of Neurosurgery... (thejns.org)
Presurgical Language fMRI in Epilepsy: An Introduction | SpringerLink
Presurgical Language fMRI in Epilepsy: An Introduction | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Decoding and disrupting left midfusiform gyrus activity during word reading | PNAS
Decoding and disrupting left midfusiform gyrus activity during word reading | PNAS (pnas.org)
A Quantitative Meta-analysis of Olfactory Dysfunction in Epilepsy | SpringerLink
A Quantitative Meta-analysis of Olfactory Dysfunction in Epilepsy | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Cortical language localization in left, dominant hemisphere in: Journal of Neurosurgery Volume 71 Issue 3 (1989)
Cortical language localization in left, dominant hemisphere in: Journal of Neurosurgery Volume 71 Issue 3 (1989) (thejns.org)
2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting Los Angeles, CA • April 22-26, 2017 in: Journal of Neurosurgery Volume 126 Issue 4 (2017)
2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting Los Angeles, CA • April 22-26, 2017 in: Journal of Neurosurgery Volume 126 Issue 4 (2017) (thejns.org)
Survival benefit of lobectomy over gross-total resection without lobectomy in cases of glioblastoma in the noneloquent area: a...
Survival benefit of lobectomy over gross-total resection without lobectomy in cases of glioblastoma in the noneloquent area: a... (thejns.org)
Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery and the quest for optimal extent of resection: A review - Schramm - 2008 - Epilepsia - Wiley...
Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery and the quest for optimal extent of resection: A review - Schramm - 2008 - Epilepsia - Wiley... (onlinelibrary.wiley.com)
Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy | SpringerLink
Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Epilepsy | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test - A Review | Springer for Research & Development
Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test - A Review | Springer for Research & Development (rd.springer.com)
Table of contents | Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry
Table of contents | Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (jnnp.bmj.com)
Lumbar_puncture
Lumbar_puncture (bionity.com)
AIIMS NEW
AIIMS NEW (aiims.edu)
Hope for epileptics as scientists discover implanting stem cells into the brain could stop seizures | Daily Mail Online
Hope for epileptics as scientists discover implanting stem cells into the brain could stop seizures | Daily Mail Online (dailymail.co.uk)
Outcome following surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal involvement in preadolescent children: emphasis on mesial...
Outcome following surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal involvement in preadolescent children: emphasis on mesial... (thejns.org)
Publications - Mayo Clinic
Publications - Mayo Clinic (mayo.edu)
Hippocampal viscoelasticity and episodic memory performance in healthy older adults examined with magnetic resonance...
Hippocampal viscoelasticity and episodic memory performance in healthy older adults examined with magnetic resonance... (link.springer.com)
Neurosurgery - procedure, recovery, blood, removal, pain, complications, adults, time
Neurosurgery - procedure, recovery, blood, removal, pain, complications, adults, time (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
Theory of Mind in Patients with Epilepsy: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis | SpringerLink
Theory of Mind in Patients with Epilepsy: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Apolipoprotein epsilon 3 alleles are associated with indicators of neuronal resilience | Springer for Research & Development
Apolipoprotein epsilon 3 alleles are associated with indicators of neuronal resilience | Springer for Research & Development (rd.springer.com)
Abnormalities in the Temporal Lobe | LIVESTRONG.COM
Abnormalities in the Temporal Lobe | LIVESTRONG.COM (livestrong.com)
John Libbey Eurotext - Epileptic Disorders - Surgical treatment of extra-hypothalamic epilepsies presenting with gelastic...
John Libbey Eurotext - Epileptic Disorders - Surgical treatment of extra-hypothalamic epilepsies presenting with gelastic... (jle.com)
Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy | Science Translational...
Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy | Science Translational... (stm.sciencemag.org)
Limbic System -Bales Flashcards by Brianna Thiessen | Brainscape
Limbic System -Bales Flashcards by Brianna Thiessen | Brainscape (brainscape.com)
Epilepsy duration and seizure outcome in epilepsy surgery | Neurology
Epilepsy duration and seizure outcome in epilepsy surgery | Neurology (n.neurology.org)
Identification of Potential Epilepsy Surgery Candidates: Overview, Medical Intractability, Consequences of Uncontrolled Epilepsy
Identification of Potential Epilepsy Surgery Candidates: Overview, Medical Intractability, Consequences of Uncontrolled Epilepsy (emedicine.medscape.com)
Presurgical Functional MRI in Patients with Brain Tumors | SpringerLink
Presurgical Functional MRI in Patients with Brain Tumors | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Mesial temporal sclerosis | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org
Mesial temporal sclerosis | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org (radiopaedia.org)