Anterior Spinal Artery Syndrome: Ischemia or infarction of the spinal cord in the distribution of the anterior spinal artery, which supplies the ventral two-thirds of the spinal cord. This condition is usually associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS of the aorta and may result from dissection of an AORTIC ANEURYSM or rarely dissection of the anterior spinal artery. Clinical features include weakness and loss of pain and temperature sensation below the level of injury, with relative sparing of position and vibratory sensation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1249-50)Infarction: Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: DUODENAL OBSTRUCTION by the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) which travels in the root of the MESENTERY and crosses over the DUODENUM. The syndrome is characterized by the dilated proximal duodenum and STOMACH, bloating, ABDOMINAL CRAMPS, and VOMITING. Often it is observed in patient with body casts after spinal surgery.Spinal Cord Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS feeding the SPINAL CORD, such as the anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries or their many branches. Disease processes may include ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; and ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS leading to ISCHEMIA or HEMORRHAGE into the spinal cord (hematomyelia).Duodenostomy: Surgical formation of an opening into the DUODENUM.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Duodenal Obstruction: Hindrance of the passage of luminal contents in the DUODENUM. Duodenal obstruction can be partial or complete, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Simple obstruction is associated with diminished or stopped flow of luminal contents. Strangulating obstruction is associated with impaired blood flow to the duodenum in addition to obstructed flow of luminal contents.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Enterostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening or fistula in the intestines.Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Fibrocartilage: A type of CARTILAGE whose matrix contains large bundles of COLLAGEN TYPE I. Fibrocartilage is typically found in the INTERVERTEBRAL DISK; PUBIC SYMPHYSIS; TIBIAL MENISCI; and articular disks in synovial JOINTS. (From Ross et. al., Histology, 3rd ed., p132,136)Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Paresis: A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.Melissa: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE. The common names of beebalm or lemonbalm are also used for MONARDA.BaltimoreNeurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Lamiaceae: The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Williams Syndrome: A disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, including the ELASTIN gene. Clinical manifestations include SUPRAVALVULAR AORTIC STENOSIS; MENTAL RETARDATION; elfin facies; impaired visuospatial constructive abilities; and transient HYPERCALCEMIA in infancy. The condition affects both sexes, with onset at birth or in early infancy.New YorkCellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.New York CityHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)AxisTeaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.BooksAutonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Culdoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the female pelvic viscera by means of an endoscope introduced into the pelvic cavity through the posterior vaginal fornix.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Multiple Sclerosis: An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)Respiratory Paralysis: Complete or severe weakness of the muscles of respiration. This condition may be associated with MOTOR NEURON DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; injury to the PHRENIC NERVE; and other disorders.Vocal Cord Paralysis: Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA.Paralyses, Familial Periodic: A heterogenous group of inherited disorders characterized by recurring attacks of rapidly progressive flaccid paralysis or myotonia. These conditions have in common a mutation of the gene encoding the alpha subunit of the sodium channel in skeletal muscle. They are frequently associated with fluctuations in serum potassium levels. Periodic paralysis may also occur as a non-familial process secondary to THYROTOXICOSIS and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1481)ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.

The crossing of the spinothalamic tract. (1/5)

The question whether the spinothalamic and spinoreticular fibres cross the cord transversely or diagonally was investigated in cases of anterolateral cordotomy and in a case of thrombosis of the anterior spinal artery. The pattern of sensory loss following transection of the anterolateral quadrant of the cord consists of a narrow area of decreased nociception and thermanalgesia at the level of the incision; it extends for 1-2 segments cranial and cordal to the incision. This area is immediately cranial to the area of total loss of these modalities. This pattern of sensory loss is explained as follows. The cordotomy incision transects two groups of fibres: those that are already within the anterior and anterolateral funiculi and those that are crossing the cord. The area of total thermanaesthesia and analgesia is due to transection of fibres that are already within this region. The area of partial sensory loss is due to transection of the fibres that are crossing the cord at that level. Owing to the craniocaudal extent of the branches of the dorsal roots, there is an overlap of their collaterals that results in every spinothalamic neurone receiving an input from several dorsal roots. The narrow cordotomy incision thus divides the few fibres crossing at that level, causing diminished noxious and thermal sensibility over a few segments above and below the incision. These facts can be accounted for only on the assumption that these spinothalamic fibres are crossing the cord transversely. This evidence of transverse crossing was found in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar segments. There were three of 63 cordotomies for which this explanation of the partial sensory loss could not be maintained. Although no explanation has been suggested, this is unlikely to be due to the fibres crossing the cord diagonally.  (+info)

Anterior spinal artery syndrome in a girl with Down syndrome: case report and literature review. (2/5)

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Anterior spinal artery syndrome is an extremely rare cause of acute ischemic cord infarction in children. It is caused by hypoperfusion of the anterior spinal artery, leading to ischemia in the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord. The presentation is usually with an acute and painful myelopathy with impaired bladder and bowel control. Pain and temperature sensation below the lesion are lost, whereas vibration and position sense is intact because of the preservation of the posterior columns. METHODS: Case report. RESULTS: A 16-year-old girl with Down syndrome presented with urinary retention and acute complete flaccid paralysis of the legs with absent deep tendon and abdominal reflexes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a signal abnormality in the anterior half of the thoracic cord from T5 to T12, consistent with anterior spinal artery infarction. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatricians should consider anterior spinal artery syndrome in the child who presents with acute, painful myelopathy. We summarize the etiology, neurological findings and outcomes of 19 children found in the literature with anterior spinal artery syndrome.  (+info)

Association of vascular risk factors with cervical artery dissection and ischemic stroke in young adults. (3/5)

 (+info)

Arnold-Chiari malformation type 1 complicated by sudden onset anterior spinal artery thrombosis, tetraparesis and respiratory arrest. (4/5)

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Anterior spinal cord syndrome in a patient with Behcet's disease. (5/5)

Although neurological involvement in Behcet's disease is not so uncommon, isolated spinal cord disease is quite rare and reported to be observed in about 2% of all cases with neurological involvement. Here we report a Behcet's patient with spinal cord disease presented with anterior spinal cord syndrome. This rare syndrome is caused by hypoperfusion of the anterior spinal artery and to our knowledge has not been previously reported in patients with Behcet's disease. This report defines the characteristic clinical features of this entity and emphasizes the importance of early immunosuppressive treatment and initiation of rehabilitation.  (+info)

  • A double blind study demonstrated a small but abnormal state that leads to hypertensive crisis can be estimated from the anterior spinal artery such as acute kidney injury [aki] in the s attributable mortality, excess length of the cardiac function sets the standard dose, and duration of antibiotic impregnated cement in total joint arthroplasty hip or spine. (medpsychmd.com)
  • Arteries that directly communicate with veins bypass the capillary network (which has not yet developed) and thus creates a shunt. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sensory loss to pain and temperature also occurs up to the level of damage on the spinal cord, as damage to different areas will affect different parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epidural oscillating field stimulation as an effective therapeutic approach in combination therapy for spinal cord injury. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To improve its efficacy, the transforaminal route has been recommended so as to deposit the drug near the nerve root and in the anterior epidural space, at the interface between the herniated disc/foraminal stenosis and the inflamed nerve roots. (asahq.org)
  • Spinal cord compression due to trauma, epidural abscess, hematomas, etc. will not be discussed here. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • In spinal epidural cord compression (ESCC) 90% of patients have back pain which is persistently gnawing and worse on coughing, sneezing or movement. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • The spinal canal contains a number of contents as well as the spinal cord (epidural vessels, fat) and the size of this space varies along the length of the column. (thegasmanhandbook.co.uk)
  • British anaesthetists of my generation never seriously considered the advantages of epidural analgesia over spinal analgesia until Gordh 1 introduced Lignocaine in 1948 and published his paper in ' Anaesthesia ' in 1949. (johnpowell.net)
  • In 1952, the year of Bromage's paper, 1 gave 115 epidural and 93 spinal anaesthetics. (johnpowell.net)
  • Amethocaine was presented as Spinal D solution and as crystals which were useful in prolonging the action of lignocaine when mixed with it for use in epidural block for longer lasting procedures before the introduction of bupivacaine. (johnpowell.net)
  • Neurosyphilis may include meningitis (acute and chronic), a myeloradiculopathy due to a pachymeningitis, and granulomatous lesions (gummas) that present as space-occupying lesions within the brain, spinal cord, or epidural space, causing compression. (enetmd.com)
  • In addition, a color-Doppler sonography of the carotid arteries displayed echogenic p. (duhnnae.com)
  • Several randomized trials have emerged with conflicting data on the overall safety of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in comparison with carotid endarterectomy (CEA). (thejns.org)
  • The peak utilization of CAS for carotid artery revascularization procedures was 15% of all cases in 2006. (thejns.org)
  • The practice of CAS in the US is expanding, from less than 3% of all carotid artery revascularization procedures to 13% in 2008. (thejns.org)
  • With the publication of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy Versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the authors predict a resultant increase in the rate of CAS for carotid artery disease in the upcoming years. (thejns.org)
  • Other important arteries are the subclavian and brachial arteries of the shoulder and arm, the carotid arteries that lead to the head, the coronary arteries that nourish the heart itself, and the iliac and femoral arteries of the abdomen and lower extremities. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • and from the lumbar artery, iliolumbar artery and lateral sacral arteries in the abdomen and pelvis. (bionity.com)
  • These branches are derived from the vertebral artery, the ascending cervical artery, a branch of the inferior thyroid artery in the neck, the intercostal arteries in the thorax, and from the lumbar artery, iliolumbar artery and lateral sacral arteries in the abdomen and pelvis. (wikipedia.org)
  • My wife has been diagnosed with Stiff Person Syndrome for 3 years after being treated for a dystonia in the lumbar region of her back for a couple of more years Her back is extremely contorted (hyper-lordosis). (news-medical.net)
  • Most common causes include iatrogenic lumbar punctures, burst fractures resulting in posterior migration of fragments of the vertebral body, severe disc herniations, spinal anaesthesia involving trauma from catheters and high local anaesthetic concentrations around the cauda equina, penetrating trauma such as knife wounds or ballistic trauma . (gutenberg.org)
  • There was significant difference between 2 groups(P=0.025).Seven out of the 51 patients had complications in group A. Two patients of neurological dysfunction showed no improvement.One patient was found having spinal cord reactive edema.Internal fixation system was removed in 2 patients because of loosening and paresthesia.Anterior spinal artery syndrome was found in 1 patient.Leakage of CSF was observed in 1 patient. (39kf.com)
  • While in the Group B , six patients neurological dysfunction showed no improvement.One patient was found having spinal cord reactive edema.Internal fixation system was removed in 1 patient.Anterior spinal artery syndrome was found in 1 patient.Leakage of CSF was observed in 2 patients. (39kf.com)
  • If you have had a spinal cord infarct, you may experience permanent neurological effects as a result. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Trauma to the spinal cord can have devastating neurological complications. (thegasmanhandbook.co.uk)
  • The publication of a number of cases of neurological sequelae following spinal analgesia is put into correct perspective when one realises that the ester drugs, Nupercaine, amethocaine and procaine can only be autoclaved once without loss of intensity and up until fairly recent times the ampoules were taken straight from their boxes or else kept in Phenol. (johnpowell.net)
  • Another cause for a subacute or delayed neurological presentation is the anterior spinal artery syndrome. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Transverse myelitis, which is an inflammation of one or more segments of the spinal cord, caused by direct viral infection, or post-infective immune complications. (news-medical.net)
  • transverse myelitis), Brown Sequard syndrome (eg. (japi.org)
  • Sensory loss to pain and temperature also occurs up to the level of damage on the spinal cord, as damage to different areas will affect different parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, potential stroke mechanisms include vertebral artery dissection, vasospasm, and intravascular injection of steroid suspension causing microvascular embolization of particulate macromolecules. (asahq.org)
  • This question is a welcome evolution of Question 3 from the second paper of 2018, where (again) the trainees were asked to compare Guillaine-Barre syndrome to another lower motor neuron disease. (derangedphysiology.com)
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