Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Skull Base Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).Skull Fracture, Depressed: A skull fracture characterized by inward depression of a fragment or section of cranial bone, often compressing the underlying dura mater and brain. Depressed cranial fractures which feature open skin wounds that communicate with skull fragments are referred to as compound depressed skull fractures.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Ethmoid Bone: A light and spongy (pneumatized) bone that lies between the orbital part of FRONTAL BONE and the anterior of SPHENOID BONE. Ethmoid bone separates the ORBIT from the ETHMOID SINUS. It consists of a horizontal plate, a perpendicular plate, and two lateral labyrinths.Esthesioneuroblastoma, Olfactory: A malignant olfactory neuroblastoma arising from the olfactory epithelium of the superior nasal cavity and cribriform plate. It is uncommon (3% of nasal tumors) and rarely is associated with the production of excess hormones (e.g., SIADH, Cushing Syndrome). It has a high propensity for multiple local recurrences and bony metastases. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3rd ed, p1245; J Laryngol Otol 1998 Jul;112(7):628-33)Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the nose. Common etiologies include trauma, neoplasms, and prior surgery, although the condition may occur spontaneously. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Apr;116(4):442-9)Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Skull Fracture, Basilar: Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Skull Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the external auditory meatus or through the eustachian tube into the nasopharynx. This is usually associated with CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE involving the TEMPORAL BONE;), NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; or other conditions, but may rarely occur spontaneously. (From Am J Otol 1995 Nov;16(6):765-71)Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Head Injuries, Penetrating: Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Chordoma: A malignant tumor arising from the embryonic remains of the notochord. It is also called chordocarcinoma, chordoepithelioma, and notochordoma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Traumatic: Bleeding into the SUBARACHNOID SPACE due to CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Minor hemorrhages may be asymptomatic; moderate to severe hemorrhages may be associated with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION and VASOSPASM, INTRACRANIAL.Golf: A game whose object is to sink a ball into each of 9 or 18 successive holes on a golf course using as few strokes as possible.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of OSTEOPOROSIS.Radius FracturesBrain Hemorrhage, Traumatic: Bleeding within the brain as a result of penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Traumatically induced hemorrhages may occur in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRUM; BRAIN STEM (see BRAIN STEM HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC); and CEREBELLUM.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Glasgow Coma Scale: A scale that assesses the response to stimuli in patients with craniocerebral injuries. The parameters are eye opening, motor response, and verbal response.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial: Accumulation of blood in the EPIDURAL SPACE between the SKULL and the DURA MATER, often as a result of bleeding from the MENINGEAL ARTERIES associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. Epidural hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features may include HEADACHE; VOMITING; HEMIPARESIS; and impaired mental function.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Fractures, Open: Fractures in which there is an external wound communicating with the break of the bone.Integrin-Binding Sialoprotein: A highly glycosylated and sulfated phosphoprotein that is found almost exclusively in mineralized connective tissues. It is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to hydroxyapatite through polyglutamic acid sequences and mediates cell attachment through an RGD sequence.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Superior Sagittal Sinus: The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as one of the TRANSVERSE SINUSES.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Rib FracturesMeningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Sphenoid Sinus: One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Cranial Fossa, Posterior: The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Base Pairing: Pairing of purine and pyrimidine bases by HYDROGEN BONDING in double-stranded DNA or RNA.Occipital Bone: Part of the back and base of the CRANIUM that encloses the FORAMEN MAGNUM.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Petrous Bone: The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Fractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Neuronavigation: Intraoperative computer-assisted 3D navigation and guidance system generally used in neurosurgery for tracking surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy. The pre-operative diagnostic scan is used as a reference and is transferred onto the operative field during surgery.Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Cranial Sutures: A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Mixed Function Oxygenases: Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.Cranial Fossa, Middle: The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Colles' Fracture: Fracture of the lower end of the radius in which the lower fragment is displaced posteriorly.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Craniosynostoses: Premature closure of one or more CRANIAL SUTURES. It often results in plagiocephaly. Craniosynostoses that involve multiple sutures are sometimes associated with congenital syndromes such as ACROCEPHALOSYNDACTYLIA; and CRANIOFACIAL DYSOSTOSIS.
  • Cervical disease in RA usually presents itself as one of these three forms: atlantoaxial instability or subluxation, vertical instability of the axis or basilar invagination and subaxial subluxation, involved in this sequence, respectively. (clinmedjournals.org)
  • OI has multiple secondary features, including macrocephaly, blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, neurological defects (macrocephaly and basilar invagination), and cardiopulmonary complications (the major cause of mortality directly related to OI). (nih.gov)
  • Because U brought it on by compressing the back of your neck-I would suggest an MRI (no CT scan) of cervical spine to rule out chiari malformation, and/or basilar invagination. (medhelp.org)
  • Basilar fractures are sometimes associated with tearing of the dura as well as CSF leakage. (brainmind.com)
  • With the dura removed, the base of the skull is free of fractures. (crimescene.com)
  • In complex depressed fractures, the dura mater is torn. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lag between skull movement and brain movement causes stretching of veins connecting the subdural space (the space beneath the dura mater of the brain) to the surface of the brain, resulting in minor disruptions of the brain structures. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 4. Your childs skin can be seen on the proximal ends (i.E., the scalp and face, sparing the patient sit up and leaning forward, and the anterior dura mater and the. (aestheticscienceinstitute.edu)
  • The outer dura is the periosteum of the inside of the skull, and is continuous (through the sutural membranes and around the margins of the foramina) with the periosteum on the skull's outer surface. (duke.edu)
  • You will remove the skull cap (calvarium), attempting to leave behind both the periosteal and the meningeal dura. (duke.edu)
  • Sometimes, the adhesion of the dura to the inside of the calvarium cannot be easily freed, and the dura may tear away during the process of lifting the skull cap. (duke.edu)
  • Overall, the case described above details some of the classic physical exam and computed tomography findings associated with a skull base fracture and subarachnoid bleed with associated hyperacute hemorrhage after closed head injury. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The basilar part is a thick, somewhat quadrilateral piece in front of the foramen magnum and directed towards the pharynx. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two midline skull landmarks at the foramen magnum. (wikipedia.org)
  • A noncontrast head CT was subsequently performed and demonstrated an area of extra-axial hyperdensity marginating the clivus and extending from the most inferiorly visualized aspect of the anterior foramen magnum cephalad towards the left and right cerebellopontine angle cisterns (Figures 1,2). (appliedradiology.com)
  • Below the orbit is the infraorbital foramen , which is the point of emergence for a sensory nerve that supplies the anterior face below the orbit. (opentextbc.ca)
  • The foramen lacerum is a relevant skull base structure that has been neglected for many years. (thejns.org)
  • The objective of this study was to provide a detailed investigation of the surgical anatomy of the foramen lacerum and its adjacent structures based on anatomical dissections and imaging studies, propose several relevant key surgical landmarks, and demonstrate the surgical technique for its full exposure with several illustrative cases. (thejns.org)
  • The pterygoid tubercle separates the vidian canal from the pterygosphenoidal fissure, and forms the anterior wall of the lower part of the foramen lacerum. (thejns.org)
  • A right mastoid fracture extended to involve the jugular foramen and the roof of the petrous bone. (ajnr.org)
  • This portion of the skull base consists of the orbital portion of the frontal bone. (medscape.com)
  • It's the position of skull where the orbital cavities are directed forwards and lower margins (infraorbital margins) of the orbits and upper margins of external acoustic meatuses is located in the same horizontal plane (Frankfurt's plane). (earthslab.com)
  • The vasculature of the basilar and cerebral arterial circulatory systems are unremarkable. (crimescene.com)
  • Signs of basilar skull fracture, pneumocephalus, intracranial hematoma, cerebral edema, this concern is the waxing and waning symptoms) behavior agitation, hyper- or hypocalcemia, lactic acidosis, high levels of tnf- are increased if medication or household products. (org.sa)
  • Eventually, you will free the entire skull cap, leaving behind the cerebral hemispheres complete with their covering of meninges. (duke.edu)
  • However, it has been reported that patients with linear fractures who retain consciousness are 400 times more likely to develop a mass lesion (e.g. hematoma) as compared to comatose patients who are 20 times more likely to develop intracranial hemorrhage (Jennett & Teasdale, 2011). (brainmind.com)
  • Rather, ophthalmologic consultation is based on objective indicators of possible eye pathology, including findings that raise concern of possible AHT (eg, increased intracranial pressure, intracranial hemorrhage, or unexplained coma). (aappublications.org)
  • Cranial nerves are injured before, during or after their passage through the skull as a result of compression from increased intracranial pressure, traction or transection, ischemic event from an infarct, or vascular occlusion. (aapmr.org)
  • In young children, before the age of closure of skull sutures, increased intracranial pressure is reflected in widened suture lines that may be palpable and quite visible in radiographs. (dartmouth.edu)
  • Developmental and congenital abnormalities including basilar impression and Chiari malformation. (memc.com.sg)
  • In most cases syringomyelia is due to craniocervical malformations, mainly Chiari malformation and basilar impression, so all the problems due to those conditions added to those of syringomyelia, can severely affect the patient's quality of life if adequate and timely measures are not taken. (biomedcentral.com)
  • There was no correlation between mandibular fractures and any kind of skull or cranial fracture. (sacramentoinjuryattorneysblog.com)
  • Recent evidence demonstrates that there is no need to apply different treatment modalities to mandibular fractures regardless of whether the factures are favorable. (medscape.com)
  • The study, which included 114 children aged 15 years or younger, reported 47 mandibular fractures, including 18 condylar fractures and 12 body fractures. (medscape.com)
  • The study, which involved 122 patients (216 mandibular fractures), all of whom were aged 18 years or younger, found that 11 patients (9%) had a history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 23 (19%) had a history of a non-ADHD mental disorder, 17 (14%) had asthma, 18 (15%) used tobacco, 13 (11%) used alcohol, and 11 (9%) used marijuana. (medscape.com)
  • The investigators suggested that the relatively high proportion of mental disorders and substance abuse found in this report could have treatment implications in pediatric mandibular fractures. (medscape.com)
  • Vehicular accidents and assaults are the primary causes of mandibular fractures worldwide. (medscape.com)
  • A peripheral lesion involves muscles of both the upper and lower face and can involve loss of taste from the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. (aapmr.org)
  • Common symptoms of a skull fracture include having an obvious deformity to the skull, having deep bruising of the scalp, a palpable depression in the skull, unequal pupils, bruising under the eyes, bruising behind the ears, loss of vision, loss of smell, bleeding from the ear or nose or having clear fluid come from either the ear or the nose. (sacramentoinjuryattorneysblog.com)
  • In this study , 132 patients referred to the emergency department of one of the teaching hospitals in Kerman/ Iran who had signs and symptoms of skull base fracture were included. (ac.ir)
  • Normally, people suffer from a traumatic fracture as a result of them having performed an activity that subjected the bone to enduring excessive pressure, stress, or a deep impact -- for instance, a fall, or a vehicular accident. (buzzle.com)
  • The most common traumatic injury at these strong ligaments is a type II odontoid fracture. (asianspinejournal.org)
  • Body fractures often are unfavorable because of the actions of the masseter, temporalis, and medial pterygoid muscles, which distract the proximal segment superomedially. (medscape.com)
  • CN VI: Injury caused to the cavernous sinus or fractures of the skull base can result in an extraocular palsy resulting by medial deviation of ipsilateral eye and diplopia that improves when the contralateral eye is abducted. (aapmr.org)
  • #NEWinNRU The venoms of the medial epicondyle of humerus physeal fractures is stabilized medially by the american association of anaphylactic reactions with food impaction in the advanced cardiac us exam. (aestheticscienceinstitute.edu)
  • We have two ICUs and an inpatient ward manned by dedicated nurses and allied specialists who offer all round care with compassion and love with an emphasis on evidence based clinical practice. (lisiehospital.org)
  • Two antibody-based drugs with anabolic action on bone: anti-sclerostin, a negative regulator of bone formation in the Wnt pathway, and anti-TGF-β, a coordinator of bone remodeling produced by osteoblasts, have shown promising efficacy in early phase clinical trials and animal studies, respectively. (nih.gov)
  • He divided OI into four subtypes, based on clinical and radiographic features. (mif-ua.com)
  • The classification proposed by Sillence is based on clinical and radiographic criteria that distinguished four types. (mif-ua.com)
  • Ruptured oesophagus refer for liver transplantation)aliver disease tends to be timed appropriately based on clinical suspicion, but is encountered more frequently with basilar skull fracture. (buffalo.edu)