Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Rebuilding of the ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT to restore functional stability of the knee. AUTOGRAFTING or ALLOGRAFTING of tissues is often used.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Posterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the anterolateral surface of the medial condyle of the femur, passes posteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the posterior intercondylar area of the tibia.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Ligaments: Shiny, flexible bands of fibrous tissue connecting together articular extremities of bones. They are pliant, tough, and inextensile.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Grafting: Fixation of the ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT, during surgical reconstruction, by the use of a bone-patellar tendon graft.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Patellar Ligament: A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.Menisci, Tibial: The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Ganglion Cysts: Nodular tumor-like lesions or mucoid flesh, arising from tendon sheaths, LIGAMENTS, or JOINT CAPSULE, especially of the hands, wrists, or feet. They are not true cysts as they lack epithelial wall. They are distinguished from SYNOVIAL CYSTS by the lack of communication with a joint cavity or the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Medial Collateral Ligament, Knee: The ligament that travels from the medial epicondyle of the FEMUR to the medial margin and medial surface of the TIBIA. The medial meniscus is attached to its deep surface.Knee: A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.Patella: The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.Basketball: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular court having a raised basket at each end.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Longitudinal Ligaments: Two extensive fibrous bands running the length of the vertebral column. The anterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale anterius; lacertus medius) interconnects the anterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies; the posterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale posterius) interconnects the posterior surfaces. The commonest clinical consideration is OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Quadriceps Muscle: The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Arthrometry, Articular: Measurements of joint flexibility (RANGE OF MOTION, ARTICULAR), usually by employing an angle-measuring device (arthrometer). Arthrometry is used to measure ligamentous laxity and stability. It is often used to evaluate the outcome of ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT replacement surgery.Thigh: The portion of the leg in humans and other animals found between the HIP and KNEE.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Hemarthrosis: Bleeding into the joints. It may arise from trauma or spontaneously in patients with hemophilia.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Joint DiseasesStress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Knee Dislocation: Slippage of the FEMUR off the TIBIA.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: A calcification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spinal column, usually at the level of the cervical spine. It is often associated with anterior ankylosing hyperostosis.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Broad Ligament: A broad fold of peritoneum that extends from the side of the uterus to the wall of the pelvis.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Cartilage Diseases: Pathological processes involving the chondral tissue (CARTILAGE).Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Platelet-Rich Plasma: A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.Athletic Performance: Carrying out of specific physical routines or procedures by one who is trained or skilled in physical activity. Performance is influenced by a combination of physiological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Allografts: Tissues, cells, or organs transplanted between genetically different individuals of the same species.Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Joint Loose Bodies: Fibrous, bony, cartilaginous and osteocartilaginous fragments in a synovial joint. Major causes are osteochondritis dissecans, synovial chondromatosis, osteophytes, fractured articular surfaces and damaged menisci.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Electrosurgery: Division of tissues by a high-frequency current applied locally with a metal instrument or needle. (Stedman, 25th ed)Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Round Ligament: A fibromuscular band that attaches to the UTERUS and then passes along the BROAD LIGAMENT, out through the INGUINAL RING, and into the labium majus.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Arthroscopes: Endoscopes for visualizing the interior of a joint.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Tenodesis: Fixation of the end of a tendon to a bone, often by suturing.Volleyball: A team sport in which two teams hit an inflated ball back and forth over a high net using their hands.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Lateral Ligament, Ankle: LATERAL LIGAMENTS of the ANKLE JOINT. It includes inferior tibiofibular ligaments.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Second-Look Surgery: A followup operation to examine the outcome of the previous surgery and other treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Epiphyses: The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Physical Conditioning, Human: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities.Osteophyte: Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Spiral Ligament of Cochlea: A spiral thickening of the fibrous lining of the cochlear wall. Spiral ligament secures the membranous COCHLEAR DUCT to the bony spiral canal of the COCHLEA. Its spiral ligament fibrocytes function in conjunction with the STRIA VASCULARIS to mediate cochlear ion homeostasis.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Musculoskeletal Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Polydioxanone: An absorbable suture material used also as ligating clips, as pins for internal fixation of broken bones, and as ligament reinforcement for surgically managed ligament injuries. Its promising characteristics are elasticity, complete biodegradability, and lack of side effects such as infections.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.

Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: comparison of outside-in and all-inside techniques. (1/1002)

The aim of this prospective study was to compare two arthroscopic techniques for reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament, the "outside-in" (two incisions) and the "all-inside" (one incision) techniques. The results obtained for 30 patients operated on using the "outside-in" technique (group I) were compared with those for 29 patients operated on using the "all-inside" technique (group II). Before surgery, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, patellofemoral pain score, or knee laxity. Both groups displayed significant improvements in Lysholm score after 24 months, from 69 (16) to 91 (9) in group I and from 70 (17) to 90 (15) in group II (means (SD)). There were also significant improvements in patellofemoral pain scores in both groups, from 13 (6) to 18 (5) in group I and from 14 (6) to 18 (4) in group II after 24 months. No difference was found between the groups in knee stability at the 24 month follow up. The IKDC score was identical in both groups at follow up. The operation took significantly longer for patients in group I (mean 94 (15)) than for those in group II (mean 86 (20)) (p = 0.03). The mean sick leave was 7.7 (6.2) weeks in group I and 12.3 (9.7) weeks in group II (p = 0.026), indicating that there may be a higher morbidity associated with the "all-inside" technique. It can be concluded that there were no significant differences between the two different techniques in terms of functional results, knee laxity, or postoperative complications. The results were satisfactory and the outcome was similar in both treatment groups.  (+info)

Neurogenic origin of articular hyperemia in early degenerative joint disease. (2/1002)

It has been speculated that joint instability resulting from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture could be exacerbated by changes in vasomotor activity in the remaining supporting structures. In this study, the effect of ACL transection on medial collateral ligament (MCL) basal perfusion and its responsiveness to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and sympathetic adrenergic influences was examined. Using urethan-anesthetized rabbits, we tested the effects of CGRP and its antagonist CGRP-(8-37) by topical application of these agents to the exposed knee while sympathetic influences were tested by electrically stimulating the saphenous nerve. It was found that MCL basal perfusion was elevated in ACL-sectioned joints; however, this effect was abrogated by prior resection of the articular nerve supply. At the doses tested, the normal vasodilator response to CGRP was abolished in ACL-sectioned joints, whereas the response to CGRP-(8-37) was attenuated. Even under the influence of increased constrictor tone, MCL and capsule blood vessels still showed substantially reduced responses to exogenous CGRP administration. By contrast, nerve-mediated constrictor responses were mostly unaffected by joint instability. This study suggests that posttraumatic knee joint hyperemia is neurogenically mediated, possibly by increased secretion of CGRP.  (+info)

Diacerhein treatment reduces the severity of osteoarthritis in the canine cruciate-deficiency model of osteoarthritis. (3/1002)

OBJECTIVE: To determine if diacerhein protects against the early stages of joint damage in a canine model of osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: OA was induced in 20 adult mongrel dogs by transection of the anterior cruciate ligament of the left knee. Beginning the day after surgery, dogs in the active treatment group were dosed twice a day with capsules of diacerhein, providing a total daily dose of 40 mg/kg, for 32 weeks. Dogs in the control group received placebo capsules on the same schedule. Pathology in the unstable knee was assessed arthroscopically 16 weeks after surgery and by direct observation when the dogs were killed 32 weeks after surgery. The severity of gross joint pathology was recorded, and samples of the medial femoral condyle cartilage and the synovial tissue adjacent to the central portion of the medial meniscus were collected for histologic evaluation. Water content and uronic acid concentration of the articular cartilage from the femoral condyle were determined, and collagenolytic activity in extracts of cartilage pooled from the medial and lateral tibial plateaus was assayed against 14C-labeled collagen fibers. RESULTS: Diacerhein treatment slowed the progression of OA, as measured by grading of gross changes in the unstable knee at arthroscopy 16 weeks after cruciate ligament transection (P = 0.04) and at the time the animals were killed, 32 weeks after surgery (P = 0.05). However, 32 weeks after ACL transection, the mean proteoglycan concentration and water content of the OA cartilage and the level of collagenolytic activity in extracts of the cartilage were not significantly different in the diacerhein treatment group than in the placebo treatment group. CONCLUSION: Diacerhein treatment significantly reduced the severity of morphologic changes of OA compared with placebo. These findings support the view that diacerhein may be a disease-modifying drug for OA.  (+info)

Effects of aggressive early rehabilitation on the outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with multi-strand semitendinosus tendon. (4/1002)

To evaluate the effects of aggressive early rehabilitation on the clinical outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using semitendinosus (and gracilis) tendon, 103 of 110 consecutive patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using multistrand semitendinosus tendon (ST) or the central one-third of patellar tendon with bony attachments (BTB) were analyzed prospectively. Subjectively, the Lysholm score was not different among the groups. The Lachman test indicated a trend of less negative grade in the ST men's group than that in the BTB men's group. On the patellofemoral grinding test, only women patients of both groups showed pain, with less positive crepitation in the ST group than in the BTB group. KT measurements at manual maximum showed more patients with more than 5 mm differences in the ST group than in the BTB group. The results of this study suggest that aggressive early rehabilitation after the ACL reconstruction using the semitendinosus (and gracilis) tendon has more risk of residual laxity than with the BTB.  (+info)

Ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments detected by MRI. (5/1002)

Eight patients with ganglion cysts arising from the cruciate ligaments of the knee joint underwent arthroscopic excision after the MR examination. The MR findings, clinical features and arthroscopic findings were evaluated comparatively.  (+info)

Mucoid cystic degeneration of the cruciate ligament. (6/1002)

A 35-year-old man was seen with pain in the back of the knee. MRI showed a mass in the anterior cruciate ligament. Biopsy indicated mucoid degeneration. Arthroscopic resection of the ligament was carried out, with relief of symptoms.  (+info)

The effects of hyaluronan on matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), interleukin-1beta(IL-1beta), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) gene expression during the development of osteoarthritis. (7/1002)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of intra-articular injection of hyaluronan (HA) on expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), interleukin-1beta(IL-1beta), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in cartilage and synovium during the process of osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Eighteen mature New Zealand white rabbits underwent unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and were divided into two groups. The first group (HA injection group) received 0.3 ml of intra-articular HA injections into the ACLT knees 4 weeks after transection, once a week for 5 weeks as per clinical treatment presently utilized. The animals in the second group (no injection group) were not injected after ACLT. At death, 9 weeks following surgery, synovium and cartilage were harvested and total RNA was extracted. Gene expressions of MMP-3, IL-1beta and TIMP-1 were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for each subgroup created according to morphological grade of OA. RESULTS: The extent and grade of cartilage damage in the HA injection group was less severe than in the no injection group. In synovium, expression of MMP-3 and IL-1beta mRNA was suppressed in the mild grades of OA in the HA injection group. HA treatment had either no effect on MMP-3 expression in cartilage at all grades of OA or on enhanced MMP-3 and IL-1beta expression in synovium at a progressed grade. No effect of HA treatment on TIMP-1 expression was observed in either cartilage or synovium. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that one of the mechanism of therapeutic effect of HA is down-regulation of MMP-3 and IL-1beta in synovium during early development of OA.  (+info)

Treatment with calcitonin suppresses the responses of bone, cartilage, and synovium in the early stages of canine experimental osteoarthritis and significantly reduces the severity of the cartilage lesions. (8/1002)

OBJECTIVE: To relate the rate of bone resorption to serum levels of both hyaluronan (HA) and antigenic keratan sulfate (KS) in canine experimental osteoarthritis (OA) and to evaluate the effects of calcitonin on these parameters and the OA lesions of the unstable knee. METHODS: Twenty-two dogs underwent anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and 6 dogs underwent sham operation. Urinary pyridinium crosslinks were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunoassays quantified hyaluronan (HA) and antigenic KS. Macroscopic and histologic OA lesions were scored. Calcitonin treatment was started on day 14 postsurgery and stopped on either day 49 or day 104 postsurgery. Control dogs and all treated dogs were killed on day 105. RESULTS: All ACLT joints developed OA. In contrast to sham-operated animals, all operated dogs exhibited an early and sustained rise in the levels of their urinary and serum markers. Calcitonin markedly reduced the levels of these markers and the severity of OA lesions. Furthermore, the longer the period of calcitonin therapy, the lower the score of the OA lesions. CONCLUSION: Bone, synovium, and articular cartilage all appear to be involved in the state of hypermetabolism that develops in unstable joints. Furthermore, the rate of bone resorption increases markedly in the early stages of this OA model and is likely to contribute to cartilage breakdown. Since calcitonin reduced the severity of OA changes, this form of therapy may have benefits for humans who have recently experienced a traumatic knee injury.  (+info)

*Posterior cruciate ligament

Ligaments are sturdy bands of tissues that connect bones. Similar to the anterior cruciate ligament, the PCL connects the femur ... The PCL is an intracapsular ligament along with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) because it lies deep within the knee joint ... The posterior cruciate ligament (or PCL) is one of the four major ligaments of the knee. It connects the posterior ... Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation demonstrating normal signal of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (arrows). ...

*Anterior cruciate ligament

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) ... The joint through which the anterior cruciate ligament passes, along with the actual size of the anterior cruciate ligament, is ... Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction Anterior drawer test Anterolateral ligament Lateral collateral ligament Medial ... it is also referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament. The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the four main ligaments of ...

*Meniscus transplant

Uncorrected varus or valgus axial malalignment Uncorrected knee joint instability Anterior cruciate ligament deficiency Knee ... Levy, IM; Torzilli, PA; Warren, RF (Jul 1982). "The effect of medial meniscectomy on anterior-posterior motion of the knee". ... Swenson, TM; Harner, CD (Jul 1995). "Knee ligament and meniscal injuries. Current concepts". The Orthopedic clinics of North ...

*Kinesiophobia

PMID 23736903 Free full text Czuppon S, et al Variables associated with return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament ... and persisten knee symptoms are common factors for lack of return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction". ...

*Posterior cruciate ligament injury

Ligaments are sturdy bands of tissues that connect bones. Similar to the anterior cruciate ligament, the PCL connects the femur ... in injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament. Patients who are suspected to have a posterior cruciate ligament injury should ... Ligament tears account for more than forty percent of knee injuries and the posterior cruciate ligament is considered one of ... "Anatomy of the posterior cruciate ligament and the meniscofemoral ligaments". Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. ...

*Transverse ligament of knee

... both of which originate on the anterior horn of their namesake meniscus, passes between the cruciate ligaments, and attaches to ... The transverse or [anterior] meniscomeniscal ligament is a ligament in the knee joint that connects the anterior convex margin ... When the knee is being extended the ligament prevents the anterior horns of the menisci from moving forward, and the condylar ... Anterior view. Knee joint. Deep dissection. Anterior view. Behnke, Robert S. (2006). Kinetic Anatomy: The Essentials of Human ...

*Femur

... of the knee joint is attached to the lower and front part of the medial wall of the fossa and the anterior cruciate ligament to ... It has a small groove, or fovea, connected through the round ligament to the sides of the acetabular notch. The head of the ... The medial epicondyle is a large convex eminence to which the tibial collateral ligament of the knee-joint is attached. At its ... These three bordes separates the shaft into three surfaces: One anterior, one medial and one lateral. Due to the vast ...

*Mark Tauscher

Tauscher suffered a sprained medial collateral ligament and a torn anterior cruciate ligament. As a result, he underwent ... Tauscher suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament and missed the remaining three games of the season. After the 2008 season ...

*Anterior cruciate ligament injury

... is when the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is either stretched, partially torn, or ... "Gender differences in anterior cruciate ligament injury vary with activity: epidemiology of anterior cruciate ligament injuries ... involves injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the medial collateral ligament, and the medial meniscus. Women in sports ... Choice of anterior cruciate ligament augmentation, patellar tendon or hamstring tendon. These issues are fully explored in ACL ...

*Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament is the ligament that keeps the knee stable. Anterior Cruciate Ligament damage is a very common ... "Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries". www.webmd.com. Retrieved 25 April 2016. "Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries ... Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL reconstruction) is a surgical tissue graft replacement of the anterior cruciate ... "Ligament Tissue Engineering and Its Potential Role in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction". Stem Cells International. ...

*Sprain

See Anterior cruciate ligament injury. Ligaments between the spinal vertebrae The fingers. The wrist. The toes. The first ... One of the more talked about sprains is that to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee. This is a disabling sprain ... A sprain, also known as a torn ligament, is damage to one or more ligaments in a joint, often caused by trauma or the joint ... is performed to look at surrounding soft tissues and the ligament. First degree sprain - the fibres of the ligament are ...

*Sports medicine

ACL tears - The anterior cruciate ligament; one of four major knee ligament necessary for comfortable knee movement, tears, ... The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament involved in knee stabilization. An ACL rupture can occur when the foot is ... Ankle sprain - The ligaments that hold the ankle bones in place can easily be overstretched. Shin splints - The tissue that ... SEM doctors treat injuries such as muscle, ligament, tendon and bone problems, but may also treat chronic illnesses that can ...

*Macoumba Kandji

... he suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament. He underwent surgery to fix the torn ligament at the Hospital for Special ...

*Unhappy triad

The medial collateral ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament, and lateral collateral ligament are ... Anterior cruciate ligament injury Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction Shelbourne K, Nitz P (1991). "The O'Donoghue triad ... "tibial collateral ligament") The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the four crucial ligaments in the knee. It originates ... Injury An anterior cruciate ligament injury results from excess tension on the ligament. This can come from a sudden stop or ...

*Arinn Young

An MRI revealed an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Her meniscus was damaged and her femur, patella and fibula were bone on ...

*Darius Vassell

The injury was a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament. Vassell left the club on 30 June after not being offered a new contract. ...

*Kaya Turski

In mid-2013, she tore her anterior cruciate ligament. Involved in aggressive inline skating in her early teen years, Turski had ...

*Steven Morris (Australian footballer)

Williams, Rebecca (5 June 2016). "Richmond confirms Steven Morris has ruptured anterior cruciate ligament". Herald Sun. News ... later confirmed to be a rupture of his anterior cruciate ligament. It was to be a season-ending injury, with Morris finishing ...

*James McFadden

McFadden suffered anterior cruciate ligament damage in August 2010. He returned to training in March, but suffered a setback ...

*Frank Klopas

In early 1994, Klopas returned from surgery on his anterior cruciate ligament and began working towards a place on the hosting ... However, he tore his anterior cruciate ligament in 1991. That injury and a subsequent infection hindered his playing for nearly ...

*Smail Prevljak

Prevljak tore his anterior cruciate ligament in April 2016. On 1 September 2014, he was loaned out to Liefering. He made his ...

*ACL injuries in the Australian Football League

The Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee injury is one of the three major and common injuries that occur in the AFL. The ACL ... AFL is said to be a contact sport, which it is, but not ever Anterior cruciate ligament injury occurs due to contact. Studies ... Cochrane, J. L., Lloyd, D. G., Buttfield, A., Seward, H., & McGivern, J. (2007). Characteristics of anterior cruciate ligament ... If an ACL rupture occurs, it immediately forces an increase for not only the anterior tibial translation but also the internal ...

*Joint replacement

The cartilages and the anterior cruciate ligament are removed; the posterior cruciate ligament may also be removed but the ... Jacobs, WC; Clement, DJ; Wymenga, AB (Oct 19, 2005). "Retention versus sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament in total ... tibial and fibular collateral ligaments are preserved. Metal components are then impacted onto the bone or fixed using ...

*Sara Lindén

Lindén suffered an anterior cruciate ligament injury in September 2012. Outside of football she is employed by ICA Banken in ...

*Jim Detwiler

He had surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament. In 1966, he returned from his injury, but he never fully recovered ...

*Ferrie Bodde

His season came to a premature end on 21 November, when he suffered anterior cruciate knee ligament damage and torn cartilage ... He was immediately flown back to Netherlands for tests which revealed he had ruptured the anterior cruciate ligament in his ...

*Leroy Burrell

He tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee. He finished second at the meet, but many people[who?] feared the ...
BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee is prone to osteoarthritis and meniscus lesions. Very little, however, is known about the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees. PURPOSE To evaluate biomechanical and macroscopical cartilage changes in the knee joint with respect to the time after anterior cruciate ligament rupture. HYPOTHESIS Chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficiency induces cartilage softening. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS Cartilage stiffness of 50 patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery because of symptomatic knee instability after chronic anterior cruciate ligament rupture was measured with an arthroscopic indenter device, and the number and size of cartilage lesions were evaluated. RESULTS The cartilage stiffness did not correlate with time from trauma to surgery (r = 0.002, P = .99), but the number of cartilage lesions in the knee increased
TY - JOUR. T1 - Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on quadriceps strength, function, and patient-oriented outcomes. T2 - A systematic review. AU - Kim, Min. AU - Croy, Ted. AU - Hertel, Jay. AU - Saliba, Susan. PY - 2010/1/1. Y1 - 2010/1/1. N2 - Study Design: Systematic Literature review. Objective: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on quadriceps strength, functional performance, and self-reported function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Background: Conflicting evidence exists regarding the effectiveness of NMES following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Searches were performed for randomized controlled trials using electronic databases from 1966 through October 2008. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale. Between- group effect sizes and 95% confidence ...
What is anterior cruciate ligament injury? Learn about anterior cruciate ligament injury symptoms, anterior cruciate ligament injury causes, diagnosis, and...
OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of graft choice (allograft, bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, or hamstring autograft) on deep tissue infections following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND POPULATION Patients from 6 US health plans who underwent ACL reconstruction from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2008. METHODS We identified ACL reconstructions and potential postoperative infections using claims data. A hierarchical stratified sampling strategy was used to identify patients for medical record review to confirm ACL reconstructions and to determine allograft vs autograft tissue implanted, clinical characteristics, and infection status. We estimated infection rates overall and by graft type. We used logistic regression to assess the association between infections and patients demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and choice of graft. RESULTS On review of 1,452 medical records, we found 55 deep wound infections. With ...
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0005]Single tunnel single bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (STSBACLR) has long been established as a method of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A variety of graft choices are available to surgeons during ACL reconstruction. These choices include autogenous patellar or quadriceps tendon with bone blocks, or hamstring tendons. In addition, changed here tendon allografts (from donors) may be used. The main portion of the ACL which needs to be reconstructed is the anterolateral bundles. Arthroscopic assisted or open ACL reconstructions involve removing the remaining native ACL and drilling a tunnel at the anatomic attachment site of the anterolateral or posterior medial bundle at the anterolateral wall of the intercondylar notch. This tunnel is drilled in line with the roof of the notch and about 1-3 mm from the posterior articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle. The tibial attachment site is then prepared by identifying the normal attachment site of the ACL ...
View details of top anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction hospitals in Bangalore. Get guidance from medical experts to select best anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction hospital in Bangalore
TY - JOUR. T1 - Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. T2 - A literature review of the anatomy, biomechanics, surgical considerations, and clinical outcomes. AU - Beasley, Leslie S.. AU - Weiland, Daniel E.. AU - Vidal, Armando F.. AU - Chhabra, Anikar. AU - Herzka, Andrea S.. AU - Feng, Matthew T.. AU - West, Robin V.. PY - 2005/1. Y1 - 2005/1. N2 - Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures are some of the most common knee injuries seen by sports medicine physicians. However, given the complex anatomy and function of the ACL, reconstruction of this ligament is anything but straightforward. The last decade has seen much advancement in ACL reconstruction, with an improved knowledge of the biology and biomechanics of graft incorporation, new choices for graft material and graft fixation devices, and more accelerated rehabilitation protocols. Although there are numerous studies in the literature on ACL reconstruction, there is yet to be a consensus among surgeons on the "best" graft choice and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Characterization of biochemical cartilage change after anterior cruciate ligament injury using T1ρ mapping magnetic resonance imaging. AU - Osaki, Kanji. AU - Okazaki, Ken. AU - Takayama, Yukihisa. AU - Matsubara, Hirokazu. AU - Kuwashima, Umito. AU - Murakami, Koji. AU - Doi, Toshio. AU - Matsuo, Yoshio. AU - Honda, Hiroshi. AU - Iwamoto, Yukihide. PY - 2015/1/1. Y1 - 2015/1/1. N2 - Background: Patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-injured knees are at an increased risk of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (OA). OA changes secondary to ACL injuries have many variations, and when and where early cartilage degenerative change begins has not yet been established. Purpose: To characterize the location of cartilage degeneration after ACL injury associated with time since injury using T1rho (T1ρ) mapping. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: In this study, 49 knees with ACL injuries and 14 normal knees from uninjured volunteers were imaged with a ...
article{81c6e193-5e66-414f-8ca7-4d15931965ba, abstract = {,p,All players in Swedish soccer teams are required to have insurance in the same company. from the archives of the insurance company, all 3,735 injuries reported in 1986 in 188,152 Swedish soccer players were reviewed. of these, 937 were knee injuries. All players were asked by mail to fill in a questionnaire and 83 percent replied. the patient records from the different hospitals were requested. the anterior cruciate injuries represented one third of the reported knee injuries. the relative risk of sustaining an anterior cruciate ligament Injury was increased in female players, in elite players, and in players in the forward position. the odds ratios were 1.6 (1.3-2.1), 3.3 (1.7-6.1) and 1.8 (1.4-2.5), respectively. the injuries occurred at a younger age in females than in males. 50 percent of the injured players were treated with anterior cruciate ligament surgery, predominantly as a reconstructive procedure, with use of a patellar ...
PhD Completion Seminar - Corticomotor and biomechanical adaptations following anterior cruciate ligament rupture and reconstruction page in the Melbourne School of Health Sciences site.
Introduction : Several studies have suggested that anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) without wound drainage has no impact on long-term follow-up. Aim: To investigate a prospective patient series as measured by the patient-administered disease-specific questionnaire Knee...
Anterior cruciate ligament tear. Coloured computer tomography (CT) scan of the knee joint of a patient with a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). This ligament is one of the four major ligaments holding the knee joint together, joining the femur (thigh bone, top) and the tibia (bottom). Injuries to this ligament are a relatively common sporting injury, and surgery is needed to restore full function to the knee. Here, the injured area is the light pink area (centre right) between the ends of the two bones (dark red). - Stock Image C007/4096
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Introduction The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The ligament is most commonly injured during an athletic activity. Due
The purpose of the current analysis was to determine which PNMT exercises had a greater prophylactic effect in clinical trials that aimed to reduce ACL injury in young females. Four exercise categories, balance, plyometrics, strength and proximal control training, were examined. The results indicated that clinical trials that instituted PNMT with strength and proximal control training demonstrated the greatest prophylactic effects. Prophylactic effects were not statistically different between PNMT with and without plyometrics, but greater ACL injury reduction was recorded in PNMT with plyometrics. More specifically, incorporating plyometrics, strengthening and proximal control training into PNMT programmes can lead to ACL injury risk reduction by 61% in plyometrics, 68% in strengthening, and 67% in proximal control in young females. Balance exercises demonstrated a 41% reduction in ACL injury rate compared to a 66% reduction by PNMT without balance exercises (figure 2).. Plyometric exercises in ...
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) in the human knee. The two ligaments are also called cruciform ligaments, as they are arranged in a crossed formation. In the quadruped stifle joint (analogous to the knee), based on its anatomical position, it is also referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament. The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the four main ligaments of the knee, providing 85% of the restraining force to anterior tibial displacement at 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion. The ACL originates from deep within the notch of the distal femur. Its proximal fibers fan out along the medial wall of the lateral femoral condyle. There are two bundles of the ACL: the anteromedial and the posterolateral, named according to where the bundles insert into the tibial plateau. (The tibia plateau is a critical weight-bearing region on the upper extremity of the tibia). The ACL attaches in front of the ...
Knee strength deficits after hamstring tendon and patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Knee bracing after ACL reconstruction: effects on postural control and proprioception
Find and save ideas about Anterior cruciate ligament tear on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Acl tear, Anatomy of the knee and Knee pictures.
Results Forty-eight studies evaluating 5770 participants at a mean follow-up of 41.5 months were included for review. Overall, 82% of participants had returned to some kind of sports participation, 63% had returned to their preinjury level of participation, and 44% had returned to competitive sport at final follow-up. Approximately 90% of participants achieved normal or nearly normal knee function when assessed postoperatively using impairment-based outcomes such as laxity and strength, and 85% when using activity-based outcomes such as the International Knee Documentation Committee knee evaluation form. Fear of reinjury was the most common reason cited for a postoperative reduction in or cessation of sports participation.. ...
Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions (ACLRs) are frequently performed on young, active patients and can result in persistent knee symptoms and activity limitations that may affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To date, there has been no systematic review of HRQoL outcomes after ACLR. Purpose: The objectives of this study were to report HRQoL ≥5 years after ACLR, compare HRQoL outcomes with available population norms, and describe factors that may affect HRQoL in this population. Study Design: Systematic review. Methods: All studies reporting HRQoL ≥5 years after ACLR with hamstring or patellar tendon autografts were eligible for review. Common HRQoL outcomes were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis and compared with published population norms. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r) was used to identify variables associated with HRQoL outcomes. Where insufficient data were available, outcomes were reported descriptively. Results: Fourteen studies ...
All-Inside Versus Inside-Out Meniscal Repair With Concurrent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Meta-regression Analysis .
Successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a tendon graft necessitates solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Improvement of graft healing to bone is crucial for facilitating an early and aggressive rehabilitation and ensuring rapid return to pre-injury levels activity. Tendon graft healing in a bone tunnel requires bone ingrowth into the tendon. Indirect Sharpey fiber formation and direct fibrocartilage fixation confer different anchorage strength and interface properties at the tendon-bone interface. For enhancing tendon graft-to-bone healing, we introduce a strategy that includes the use of periosteum, hydrogel supplemented with periosteal progenitor cells and bone morphogenetic protein-2, and a periosteal progenitor cell sheet. Future studies include the use of cytokines, gene therapy, stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, and mechanical stress for tendon-to-bone healing. These strategies are currently under investigation, and will be applied in the clinical setting in the
The aim of the current study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the lever sign test and the widely used basic tests of the Lachman, anterior drawer and pivot shift tests, both under anaesthesia and without anaesthesia, according to the gold standard diagnostic arthroscopic results in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The study included 117 patients, diagnosed with ACL tear which was definitively determined during an arthroscopic surgical procedure applied. Before anaesthesia and while under anaesthesia, the Lachman, anterior drawer, pivot shift and lever sign tests were applied to all patients. Evaluation was made of MR images for each patient and documented. The patients comprised 96 males and 21 females, witha mean age of 25.8 ± 5.9 years (range, 17-45 years). Total tear was determined in 82 cases, anteromedial (AM) bundle in 14, posterolateral (PL) bundle in 13 and elongation in 8. Preanaesthesia positivity was found in lever sign at 94.2 %, Lachman at 80.5 %, ...
There is a greater risk of tibial component loosening when mobile unicompartmental knee replacement is performed in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees. We previously reported on a cohort of anterior cruciate ligament deficient patients (n=46) who had undergone surgery, but no difference was found in implant survivorship at a mean 5-year follow-up. The purpose of this study was to examine the kinematic behaviour of a subcohort of these patients.The kinematic behaviour of anterior cruciate deficient knees (n=16) after mobile unicompartmental knee replacement was compared to matched intact knees (n=16). Sagittal plane knee fluoroscopy was taken while patients performed step-up and forward lunge exercises. The patellar tendon angle, knee flexion angle and implant position was calculated for each video frame.The patellar tendon angle was 5° lower in the deficient group, indicating greater anterior tibial translation compared to the intact group between 30 and 40° of flexion. Large variability,
Background:The main goal of physiotherapy for patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is to improve postural control and retain knee function. Therefore, clinicians need to use evaluative tools that assess postural changes during physiotherapy. To maximize the clinical utility of the results of these tools, the extracted measures should have appropriate psychometric properties of reliability, validity and responsiveness. No study has yet addressed responsiveness of postural measures in these patients. This study was designed to investigate the responsiveness and determine the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) of static and dynamic postural measures in patients with (ACL-R) following physiotherapy. Methods: Static and dynamic postural measures were evaluated at first occasion and again after four weeks physiotherapy. The static measures consisted of center of pressure (COP) parameters while dynamic measures included the stability indices. Correlation analysis and ROC
Background:The main goal of physiotherapy for patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is to improve postural control and retain knee function. Therefore, clinicians need to use evaluative tools that assess postural changes during physiotherapy. To maximize the clinical utility of the results of these tools, the extracted measures should have appropriate psychometric properties of reliability, validity and responsiveness. No study has yet addressed responsiveness of postural measures in these patients. This study was designed to investigate the responsiveness and determine the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) of static and dynamic postural measures in patients with (ACL-R) following physiotherapy. Methods: Static and dynamic postural measures were evaluated at first occasion and again after four weeks physiotherapy. The static measures consisted of center of pressure (COP) parameters while dynamic measures included the stability indices. Correlation analysis and ROC
Arthroscopy of the left knee was performed with the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Removal of loose bodies. Medial femoral chondroplasty and
Where is the anterior cruciate ligament is located in the human body - Where is the anterior cruciate ligament is located in the human body? The knee. The anterior cruciate ligament is located directly in the center of the knee and is a major stabilizer of the knee joint.
Anterior Cruciate Ligament injuries are common knee injuries that need proper non-surgical and maybe surgical treatment. When an ACL injury occurs, the knee becomes less stable. Such instability will make sudden pivoting movements difficult. This type of damage to the knee may also make you prone to developing arthritis and cartilage tears.The symptoms of an ACL injury may include a sudden giving way of the knee, a
Semantic Scholar extracted view of Bicompartmental (medial and lateral) displaced bucket-handle meniscal tears with associated anterior cruciate ligament rupture. by Stephen A. Parada et al.
There are an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs in the United States each year. Most ACL tears occur from noncontact injuries. Women experience ACL tears up to nine times more often than men. Evaluation of the ACL should be performed immediately after an injury if possible, but is often limited by swelling and pain. When performed properly, a complete knee examination is more than 80 percent sensitive for an ACL injury. The Lachman test is the most accurate test for detecting an ACL tear. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary study used to diagnose ACL injury in the United States. It can also identify concomitant meniscal injury, collateral ligament tear, and bone contusions. Treatment consists of conservative management or surgical intervention, with the latter being the better option for patients who want to return to a high level of activity. Patients who undergo surgery must commit to appropriate rehabilitation for the best outcome. Long-term sequelae of ACL
Sturnick, D. R., Van Gorder, R., Vacek, P. M., DeSarno, M. J., Gardner-Morse, M. G., Tourville, T. W., Slauterbeck, J. R., Johnson, R. J., Shultz, S. J. and Beynnon, B. D. (2014), Tibial articular cartilage and meniscus geometries combine to influence female risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. J. Orthop. Res., 32: 1487-1494. doi: 10.1002/jor.22702 ...
Learn more about Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury at Reston Hospital Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Radiographic enlargement of bone tunnels following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been recently introduced in the literature; however, the etiology and clinical relevance of this
The aim of this study is to directly compare the clinical outcomes of both the celecoxib and placebo groups following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study will have short and long term goals. Validated outcome measures will aim to quantify pain control at 2 weeks after surgery, as well as knee function at 2 year follow-up. Groups will be compared using pain control scales, and functional knee outcome scores. The first null hypothesis tested by this study is that the celecoxib group experiences equal pain control compared with the placebo group. The second null hypothesis is that no knee function difference will be found between the celecoxib and placebo groups ...
International Scholarly Research Notices is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal covering a wide range of subjects in science, technology, and medicine. The journals Editorial Board as well as its Table of Contents are divided into 108 subject areas that are covered within the journals scope.
This placebo-controlled study investigated the analgesic efficacy and tolerability outcomes of pregabalin given prior to surgery on postoperative pain in Thai
Examining the Effect of Anterior Drawer and Lachman Test on Lysholm Score in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon
Examining the Effect of Anterior Drawer and Lachman Test on Lysholm Score in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are serious injuries that occur at a higher rate in female athletes when compared to male athletes. Despite considerable research investigating this complex sports medicine problem, the primary factor(s) that underlie the sex disparity in ACL injury remains unknown. Recent literature suggests that diminished lower extremity control may increase the risk of ACL injury in females. The primary objective of this dissertation was to develop a method designed to quantify the capability of the lower limb to dynamically interact with the ground (i.e., the lower extremity dexterity test, or LED-test), and to evaluate whether this method is reliable and informative of lower extremity function in the context of ACL injury risk and change of direction ability. In Chapter III, the LED-test is described, test-retest reliability was assessed, and the extent to which performance was associated with lower limb strength and anthropometry was examined. Test-retest reliability ...
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are serious injuries that occur at a higher rate in female athletes when compared to male athletes. Despite considerable research investigating this complex sports medicine problem, the primary factor(s) that underlie the sex disparity in ACL injury remains unknown. Recent literature suggests that diminished lower extremity control may increase the risk of ACL injury in females. The primary objective of this dissertation was to develop a method designed to quantify the capability of the lower limb to dynamically interact with the ground (i.e., the lower extremity dexterity test, or LED-test), and to evaluate whether this method is reliable and informative of lower extremity function in the context of ACL injury risk and change of direction ability. In Chapter III, the LED-test is described, test-retest reliability was assessed, and the extent to which performance was associated with lower limb strength and anthropometry was examined. Test-retest reliability ...
Prospective, controlled, randomized, single blind study in patients undergoing rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. 96 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group Group KH (Kneehab n=33)trained with a new type of NMES with multipath activation for 20 minutes, 3 times per day, 5 days per week for 12 weeks; Group PS (Poli-Stim n=29) trained with standard neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week for 12 weeks; Group CO (Control - n=34), which did not use muscle stimulation, performed voluntary isometric quadriceps muscle contractions. Patients receiving either form of NMES treatment were instructed to isometrically contract the quadriceps muscle voluntarily with each electrical muscle stimulation. All three groups superimposed this training schedule on the standard post-ACL reconstruction rehabilitation protocol used at the clinic.. The study design corresponded to a two-way variance analysis with three ...
Athletes who have sustained an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury often opt for an ACL reconstruction (ACLR) with the goal and expectation to resume sports. Unfortunately, the proportion of...
Background: The goal of this study is to provide outcomes data for ACL reconstruction surgeries to a single physician/surgeon and the patient. Outcomes data collected and analyzed for a single physician will provide the surgeon with information that can be given to patients seeking ACL reconstruction surgery. This information will help the patient know what to expect in terms of recovery, infection rate, and failure rate. It will also aid the surgeon in identifying areas of strength and weakness in his practice. To accomplish this goal a database was created using Filemaker Pro 7 software that allows for data entry at the point of care and basic data analysis. The analyzed data will be given to ACL reconstruction surgery candidates likely in the form of a handout or pamphlet during the informed consent process. Hypothesis: Collection of subjective and objective data should allow for a better understanding of the post-operative outcomes of a single surgeon for ACL reconstruction surgery and improve the
Following ACL rupture, the tibial insertion of the ACL can no longer function as a fulcrum and therefore anterior translation of the tibia is relatively unrestricted. (The ACL has been found to provide 86% of the resistance to anterior translation of the tibia.5) When performing the Lachman test on an ACL-deficient knee, the patients heel acts as the primary fulcrum and the anterior pull of the examiners hand produces anterior translation of the tibia and rotation around the heel; there is no significant moment to lift the patients foot off the table (Figure 1B). The result is a class 2 lever system (Figure 2B).. In the acutely injured knee, where manual examination may be limited by pain, a similar phenomenon can be observed using the no touch ACL test previously described by the senior author.6 Using this technique, the patient is placed supine with the injured knee flexed and bolstered at approximately 30°.. While the examiner observes the lateral aspect of the knee, the patient is ...
The elements that give stability to the joints are the ligaments. They are arranged in a certain way in the joint to avoid movements that the joint should not perform.. In the case of the knee are 4 ligaments whose only function is to keep it stable: the collateral ligaments and the cruciate ligaments. Here is an image with the graphic representation of the different structures of the knee joint:. On the collateral ligaments, we will not explain too much because they are not the central theme of the article: these are located one on each side of the knee (i.e. an internal collateral ligament and an external collateral ligament).. On the other hand, we will speak in depth of the cruciate ligaments, within the joint capsule of the knee. The cruciate ligaments are 2 structures that are very deep in the knee joint. The cruciate ligaments are 2: one that is located in the anterior part and one that is located in the back.. The posterior cruciate ligament extends between the posterior intercondylar ...
PURPOSE:External loading of osteoarthritic and healthy knees correlates with current and future osteochondral tissue state. These relationships have not been examined following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We hypothesised greater magnitude tibiofemoral contact forces were related to increased prevalence of osteochondral pathologies, and these relationships were exacerbated by concomitant meniscal injury. METHODS:This was a cross-sectional study of 100 individuals (29.7 ± 6.5 years, 78.1 ± 14.4 kg) examined 2-3 years following hamstring tendon anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Thirty-eight participants had concurrent meniscal pathology (30.6 ± 6.6 years, 83.3 ± 14.3 kg), which included treated and untreated meniscal injury, and 62 participants (29.8 ± 6.4 years, 74.9 ± 13.3 kg) were free of meniscal pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed knees was used to assess prevalence of tibiofemoral osteochondral pathologies (i.e., cartilage defects and bone ...
AbstractBackground. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries can have an influence on the rest of the personslife, with difficulties to participate in sports or limit the choice of work and leisure activities. Earlier studieshave successfully decreased ACL injuries with strength training in different sports, however no study havebeen made on competitive alpine ski racers. The purpose of the study is to see if a nine month strengthtraining program for the lower extremities and core can increase strength and prevent ACL injuries inadolescents who compete in alpine skiing. Method. Twelve adolescents (mean age 13,1) trained a specialdesigned training program for nine months, twice a week, to improve strength and control in the lowerextremities and core. Eight adolescents (mean age 14,1) functioned as a control group (CG) and trainednormal during the intervention time. Both groups performed the baseline- and end point test in April 2011 andApril 2012. Result. Significant results were found in the ...
The anterior cruciate ligament is a short ligament, very durable. It is stretched between the femur and tibia. He participates in the central pivot with the posterior cruciate ligament is behind him. It works in synergy with the external and internal lateral ligament ...
The importance of the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) to knee stability can not be overstated. Next in line for importance is proper rehabilitation after an ACL injury and surgery. Lets start with the basics. The ACL is responsible for keeping your knee from sliding or twisting behind your hamstring. If the ACL is
Anterior cruciate ligament is one of the most important ligaments inside human knee joint. Knee joint is the meeting point of thigh bone known as femur and shinbone known as tibia. Best treatment for this condition can be obtained from a knee injury doctor. Conservative medicines and physical therapy are useful only in
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important stabilizing ligament in the knee. It is frequently injured by athletes and trauma victims; in the United States alone, there are between 100,000 and 200,000 ACL tears per year.This topic review wil
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the four main ligaments in the knee. It binds the back of the thigh bone (femur) to the front of the shin bone (tibia).way.
We reviewed 5086 patients with a mean age of 30 years (9 to 69) undergoing primary reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in order to determine the incidence of secondary pathology with respect to the time between injury and rec
Knee services from Dr. Moira M. McCarthy in NYC and Stamford include Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction, Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction & Meniscus Tear Repair. Click here to know more.
We describe the diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and complications of a 27-year-old male paraskiier who sustained a closed high-velocity knee dislocation after colliding with a tree at a speed of 45 mph and falling 40 feet to the ground. Extensive surgery to repair and reconstruct the knee included open lateral capsular repair, open anatomical posterolateral corner reconstruction with split Achilles tendon allograft, open iliotibial band reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, and double-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft for the anterolateral bundle and tibialis anterior tendon allograft for the posteromedial bundle ...
which is placed into the knee joint through a small incision. A camera is used and the image is viewed on a TV monitor to look and take pictures. The arthroscope allows evaluation of the entire knee joint, including the knee cap (patella), the cartilage surfaces, the meniscus, the ligaments (ACL & PCL), and the joint lining. Small instruments ranging from 3-5 millimeters in size are inserted through addi-tional incisions so that the joint structures can be evaluated for any damage, any injury can be diagnosed, and damaged tissue can be repaired, reconstructed, or removed.. The word arthroscopy comes from two Greek words,. "arthro" (joint) and "skopein" (to look).. ACL Reconstruction is a Good option for symptomatic Grade II and Grade III injury:. The goal of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) surgery is to restore ...
ACL injury - Animation Lets talk today about ACL injuries. Do you remember that old childrens song that goes, The knee bones connected to the thigh bone, and so on? Well the thigh bones connected to the shin bone, and one of the four ligaments that connects these two bones is called the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL. The ACL sits in the middle of the knee. Its main job is to prevent the shin bone from sliding in front of the thigh bone. So, how do most ACL injuries occur? Well, getting tackled in football is just one way to hurt your ACL. You could also over extend your knee joint while playing other sports, like basketball or soccer, or while skiing. Or, you could injure your ACL if you quickly change direction while running, or land the wrong way from a jump. Some ACL tears are just partial, while others are complete. The injury that has damaged your ACL can also tear other ligaments or cartilage in your knee. So, what should you do if you think that you might have a torn ACL? Well, ...
The ACL Study Group is a group of orthopedic surgeons with a common interest in the anterior cruciate ligament. The ACL Study Group is organizing a meeting to share and learn about knee injuries and meniscus injuries, ACL research and the latest advances in ACL reconstruction.
THE MID - TERM EFFECT OF KINESIO TAPING ON PEAK POWER OF QUADRICEPS AND HAMSTRING MUSCLES AFTER ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION
We identified one study in which 141 young, active adults with acute ACL injury were randomised to either ACL reconstruction followed by structured rehabilitation (results reported for 62 participants) or conservative treatment comprising structured rehabilitation alone (results reported for 59 participants). Built into the study design was a formal option for subsequent (delayed) ACL reconstruction in the conservative treatment group, if the participant requested surgery and met pre-specified criteria.. This study was deemed at low risk of selection and reporting biases, at high risk of performance and detection biases because of the lack of blinding and at unclear risk of attrition bias because of an imbalance in the post-randomisation exclusions. According to GRADE methodology, the overall quality of the evidence was low across different outcomes.. This study identified no difference in subjective knee score (measured using the average score on four of the five sub-scales of the KOOS score ...
The ACL ligament is one of the bands of tissue that connects the femur to the tibia. An ACL tear can be painful. It can cause the knee to become unstable.
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the two cruciate ligaments that stabilise the knee joint. Gross anatomy The ACL arises from the anteromedial aspect of the intercondylar area on the tibial plateau and passes upwards and backwards to ...
Cruciate Ligament Deficiency and Reconstruction Like a meniscus tear, chronic effusion associated with cruciate ligament deficiency can lead eventually to patellar articular cartilage softening. Quadriceps atrophy in association with ligament insufficiency may also lead to patellar problems, particularly if there is patellar malalignment. Patellar crepitation and pain are common after cruciate ligament reconstruction (27), but may have had origin before reconstruction when patellar articular cartilage had experienced insult from the original injury or instability with effusion. Shino et al (28), however, have shown that immobilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction leads to a high incidence of patellofemoral articular degeneration. Early mobilization of the knee following ACL reconstruction, as recommended by Shelbourne (29), is important in minimizing patellofemoral degeneration after ACL reconstruction. Paulos et al (30) pointed out the importance of delaying ACL ...
Fong, L.; Fu, S.; Helquist, T.; and Davenport, Todd E., "Surgical anatomy and technique of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a semitendinosus-gracilis autograft in a human cadaver model" (2003). School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Faculty Presentations. 52 ...
The Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Injury Prevention and Treatment. Charles Ruotolo, MD FAAOS Chairman, Dept. of Orthopedics Nassau University Medical Center. Anatomy. Anteromedial bundle Smaller, tight in flexion Posterolateral bundle Larger, tight in extension Slideshow 158410 by Thomas
femur; tibia; fibula; anterior cruciate ligament; posterior cruciate ligament; lemniscus; tibial collateral ligament; fibular collateral ligament; fibular condy
All devices and instrumentations used in this clinical investigation bear the CE mark. They belong to the regular implants used for ACL repair at the study hospital since 2002. Except different graft anchoring, similar treatments apply to patients in both study groups. All participants undergo internationally accepted surgically procedures by a single surgeon (D.C.) with extensive experience in ACL repair using both the BioCryl® screw and RigidFix® cross pins. Also, postoperative care and rehabilitation programs do not differ from those employed outside a clinical trial.. All repairs are carried out under general anaesthesia, with the patient in a supine position. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis comprises 2 g of cefotiam. Patients receive 40 mg of enoxaparin daily for prophylaxis of thromboembolic events until full weight bearing.. The knee joint is accessed through two to three standard portals. Meniscal injuries are addressed with partial resection or repair.. Hamstring tendons are ...
The knee joint of the cat is one of the weakest in its body. It is relatively unstable because there are no interlocking bones in the knee joint. Instead, it is held together by several ligaments, including the cruciate ligaments, which allow it to move back and forth like a hinge, but restrict its front-to-back and side-to-side motion.. When severe twisting of the knee joint occurs; the anterior or cranial cruciate ligament most commonly tears or breaks. When the cranial cruciate ligament is torn, instability occurs that allows the bones to move in an abnormal fashion in relation to each other. It is difficult for the cat to bear weight on the leg without it collapsing. This condition is painful and, if untreated, can lead to permanent joint complications.. ...
PURPOSE: To compare acute ACL reconstruction (ACLR) within 8 days of injury with delayed reconstruction after normalized range of motion (ROM), 6-10 weeks after injury. It was hypothesized that acute ACL reconstruction with modern techniques is safe and can be beneficial in terms of patient-reported outcomes and range of motion. METHODS: Sample size calculation indicated 64 patients would be required to find a 5° difference in ROM at 3 months. Seventy patients with high recreational activity level, Tegner level 6 or more, were randomized to acute (within 8 days) or delayed (6-10 weeks) ACLR between 2006 and 2013 ...
Anatomy Research International is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of basic and clinical anatomy.
Athletic Training and Sports Health Care | Patients who undergo anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery experience not only physical problems, but also psychological distress such as anger, depression, anxiety, and fear.1 These psychological issues are said to be responsible for up to 50% of athletes failing to return to their preinjury level of sport following ACL surgery, despite being fully physically rehabilitated.2 Therefore, it is
In a follow-up of a randomized controlled trial, a strategy of rehabilitation plus early acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction did not provide better results at 5 years than a strategy of initial rehabilitation with the option of having a later ACL reconstruction. Results did not differ between knees surgically reconstructed early or late and those treated with rehabilitation alone. These results should encourage clinicians and young active adult patients to consider rehabilitation as a primary treatment option after an acute ACL tear, say the authors in their article published this month in BMJ. This study included 121 young, active adults (mean age 26 years) with acute ACL injury to a previously uninjured knee. All patients received similar structured rehabilitation. In addition to rehabilitation, 62 patients were assigned to early ACL reconstruction and 59 were assigned to the option of having a delayed ACL reconstruction if needed. One patient was lost to 5-year ...
In a follow-up of a randomized controlled trial, a strategy of rehabilitation plus early acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction did not provide better results at 5 years than a strategy of initial rehabilitation with the option of having a later ACL reconstruction. Results did not differ between knees surgically reconstructed early or late and those treated with rehabilitation alone. These results should encourage clinicians and young active adult patients to consider rehabilitation as a primary treatment option after an acute ACL tear, say the authors in their article published this month in BMJ. This study included 121 young, active adults (mean age 26 years) with acute ACL injury to a previously uninjured knee. All patients received similar structured rehabilitation. In addition to rehabilitation, 62 patients were assigned to early ACL reconstruction and 59 were assigned to the option of having a delayed ACL reconstruction if needed. One patient was lost to 5-year ...
Diagnosing ACL. Physical examination is done to ascertain the injury. The doctor will ask questions pertaining to the symptoms you have as well as your medical history. He will also check each of the structures of the affected knee and compares the findings to the non-affected knee. Ligament injuries are commonly diagnosed if a comprehensive physical examination of the knee has been undertaken.. Imaging tests can also be done so that your doctor can verify your diagnosis. X-rays are taken in order to see if a broken bone is also there. However, they will not reveal any anterior cruciate ligament injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also done in order to have a better view of soft tissues such as the anterior cruciate ligament. But, most of the time, an MRI is really not needed to come up with a diagnosis of ACL injury.. Management for ACL Injuries. Based on individual needs, management for ACL injuries can vary from person to person. Treatment for a young athlete who is into agility ...
Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has become the gold standard for ACL insufficiency in active patients. Hamstring tendon is the most favoured graft choice for ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate the clinical outcome of a series of 30 patients who underwent Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons with suspensory method of fixation using Endobutton on femur and titanium suture disc on the tibial end, with a follow-up of 2 years.
Surgery for ACL tears or to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament has come a long way in the last 15 years. We do the surgery arthroscopically, in other words we dont have to open up your knee joint to reconstruct the ligament. We can do it through two or three small quarter-inch incisions in the knee.
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important ligament that checks the forward sliding of the tibia bone on the femur bone in the knee. This ligament can be injured with sports or falls, especially with blows to the knee from the side, while the foot is planted on the ground. The ACL can be sprained which means it is still intact. If ruptured it is completely broken. When an ACL injury involves a sprain, there is typically swelling that occurs in the knee and a feeling of instability with walking. Sprains are classified according to their severity, with grades 1 through 3. Grades 1 and 2 are often treatable without surgery, while grade 3 is most often a complete tear and typically requires surgery.. With a sprain, the ligament is overstretched and micro-tearing results, causing pain and inflammation. There is little blood flow to the ligaments and they get most of their nutrition from the joint fluid. This means, that their healing is a lot slower than most other tissues. Depending on the ...
Most people who have who have torn their ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) need surgery to return to full activity and reduce the risk of further knee injury.
If you have knee pain inside your knee, most commonly youve torn your ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). At The Stone Clinic in San Francisco we can reconstruct the ACL using donor tissue.
An ACL injury occurs when the knee is sharply extended beyond its normal range of motion-including when the knee is bent backward, twisted, or bent side to side. If more than one of these movements occurs simultaneously, the chance of injury is even higher. An ACL injury can also be the result of contact (being hit by a person or object), which causes the knee to extend beyond its normal range. ACL injuries often occur during sports, particularly sports with a lot of stop-and-go movements, jumping, or change in direction. The injury can happen when the foot is firmly planted, the knee is bent, and a sudden change in direction happens or when the foot is firmly planted and a sudden force hits the knee. Some common sports associated with ACL injuries are: football, basketball, soccer, and skiing. These sports require movements that cause the femur to pivot on the tibia. ACL injuries are common in skiing because the length of the ski adds extra force to the twisting motion. Physical contact, like ...
ACL tears and sprains are among the most detrimental of all sports-related injuries. Improper treatment of the ACL has, in fact, ended athletic careers. To correct these conditions, Orthopedic Doctors perform ACL reconstruction surgery when required to repair the tendon.. What is ACL Surgery?. ACL reconstruction surgery requires the use of grafts. The surgeon uses these grafts to recreate the tendon. These grafts are acquired from the patellar or hamstring tendons. The patient could also receive a donation from a cadaver.. The surgery is performed arthroscopically. This enables the surgeons to acquire a clear view of the knee. The smaller incisions reduce the risks that are associated with open knee surgery. The surgeon could also diagnose any additional damage sustained during the injury.. How is the Surgery Performed?. The Orthopedic Doctors in Panama City FL area use the small incisions to produce anchors for the graft. These anchors are holes drilled into the surrounding bones. To secure the ...
Participants in a trial of treatments for acute ACL injury express a variety of views and beliefs about those treatments, and trial participation happens in the absence of equipoise. Furthermore, opting for surgical reconstruction does not necessarily provide patients with satisfactory outcomes. Def …
The anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) at the front and back of the knee, are the central pillars of the joint and as such, the essential stabilisers. They connect the front top of the tibia (lower leg bone), to the rear bottom of the femur (thigh bone). A rupture of one of the ligaments causes instability, which if not treated, leads to considerable attritional damage to the cartilage in the knee joint (arthrosis). Clinical and experimental examinations have proven that a damaged frontal cruciate knee ligament will not heal by itself.
we see at BluePearl is rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), comparable to a humans anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).. One of our Pet 411 readers contacted me because his 12-year-old dog suffered damage to his CCL and hes wondering about the best treatment options. Since CCL surgery is typically handled by our skilled BluePearl surgeons, I reached out to my colleague Dr. Amanda Conkling, who is board-certified in veterinary surgery, to get her input on the best course of action for our reader. Heres what she had to say:. The CCL joins the thigh bone or femur to the tibia or shin bone at the knee joint. This ligament plays an important role in stabilizing the knee joint and giving it flexibility. In our canine friends, CCL rupture is actually a very complex degenerative process. CCL rupture can affect virtually any breed of dog, but among the most susceptible are Labrador retrievers, Newfoundlands, golden retrievers, German shepherds and Rottweilers. There are also certain factors ...
Depending on your desired lifestyle, SSOC offers both nonsurgical and surgical procedures for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries. Learn more about the ACL procedure and post-op here.
Mr Long specialises in Anterior Cruciate Ligament ACL Surgery & Shoulder Surgery at Aut Even Hospital, Kilkenny and Bon Secours Hospital Limerick at Barringtons Ireland
An ACL injury may develop into long-lasting and recurrent (chronic) ACL deficiency that leads to an unstable knee-the knee buckles or gives out, sometimes with pain and swelling. This can occur if you had an ACL injury in the past and didnt know it or if your ACL has not been treated or has been treated unsuccessfully. ACL deficiency can cause damage to the joint, including osteoarthritis. But not everyone with an ACL injury gets ACL deficiency.. People with minor ACL injuries usually begin treatment with a physical rehab program. Rehab exercises build strength and flexibility in the muscles on the front of the thigh (quadriceps) and strengthen and tighten the muscles in the back of the thigh (hamstrings). Most people return to their normal activities after a few weeks of rehab.. More serious ACL injuries may need several months of rehab or surgery followed by several months of rehab to regain your knee strength, knee stability, and range of motion.. Not all ACL injuries require surgery. But ...
Arthroscopic or open reconstruction and autotransplantation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury (costs for program #113365) ✔ Asklepios Academic City Hospital Bad Wildungen ✔ Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology ✔ BookingHealth.com
|p|The purpose of this study was to investigate the responses elicited during aquatic and land rehabilitation to establish the comparison among parameters such as, range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, circumference of muscle mass and swelling. Thirteen individuals with an anterior reconstruction ligament with a concomitant meniscal injury participated in the study who established 2 groups: the land rehabilitation (LR), patients who were followed by a land program and the water rehabilitation (WR) whose patients had an aquatic program. Clinical evaluations were applied in the 0, 3, 6 and 9 weeks measuring the parameters. The patients from the WR reached the best results for all parameters which were evaluated. We concluded the aquatic rehabilitation allowed earlier function recuperation than the land program.|/p|
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury | Arthroscopic or open reconstruction and autotransplantation. Orthopedics: Treatment in Berlin, Germany ✈. Prices on BookingHealth.com - booking treatment online!
The patient is an 8 year old white male with no significant past medical history who complains of right knee pain, swelling, and decreased range of motion after having his knee slammed in a car door 5 weeks prior to presentation. At the time of injury, the patient was seen in the Emergency Room where X-rays were negative, and the patient was told he had a contusion of the knee. Patient denies locking of the knee, but gives a questionable history of giving way of the knee. It is unclear whether these episodes are truly secondary to instability. On physical examination, the patient has a small effusion. There is no medial or lateral joint line tenderness. There is no tenderness around the collateral ligaments. Range of motion is 30-90 degrees. There is no instability to varus or valgus stressing at 0 degrees and 30 degrees. MacMurray test is negative. Lachman test shows a slight increase in laxity compared to the contralateral side, but with an endpoint. Anterior drawer test also shows a good ...
Prof. Dr. P. Knaus (Principle Investigator FUB, FB Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie). PD Dr. G. Schulze-Tanzil (Principle Investigator CUB, Klinik für Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie). Collaborating Researchers: Prof. Dr. W. Ertel (CUB), Dr. K. Ruschke (FUB). Project Summary Anterior cruciate ligament degeneration might lead to joint instability and favour progression of osteoarthritis of the knee. However, it remains unclear, whether a dysregulation of complement and growth factors contributes to age- or OA-associated ACL degeneration. Therefore, the aim is to study regulation, activity and crosstalk of complement and TGFβ/ body morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling in ACLs from patients of different ages suffering from OA.. ...
A method of replacing an ACL with a graft. The method provides for the drilling bone tunnels in a femur and a tibia. A replacement graft is provided having first and second ends. A biodegradable composite screw is provided. The screw is made from a biodegradable polymer and a bioceramic or a bioglass. At least one end of the graft is secured in a bone tunnel using the biodegradable composite screw.
Find Sports Medicine Specialists that treat Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury, See Reviews and Book Online Instantly. Its free! All appointment times are guaranteed by our dentists and doctors.
Long-term studies after primary and revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction using different types of autograft? with special emphasis on the clinical, radiographic, histological and ultrastructural results Mattias Lid?n Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, G?teborg, Sweden The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome after primary ACL reconstruction surgery using either BPTB or HT autografts and, in addition, ACL revision surgery using re-harvested patellar tendon autografts. Clinical and standard radiographic assessments were made of both the primary ACL-reconstructed knees and the patients who underwent ACL revision surgery using re-harvested patellar tendon autografts. Furthermore, in the revised knees, the patellar tendon underwent radiographic evaluations using MRI two and ten years after the index operation and histological and ultrastructural evaluations using a light and transmission ...
Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction is performed by Dr. Haissam Elzaim in Mission, Edinburg and McAllen. Learn more about knee arthroscopic surgery.
Corrective osteotomy, fixation and ligament reconstruction surgery cost in India starts from USD 4000. Find affordable packages, best specialists, hospitals and patient experiences for Corrective osteotomy, fixation and ligament reconstruction surgery in India through Vaidam.
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: ACL Reconstruction, Ankle Injuries, Arthroscopic Surgery, Discoid Meniscus, Elbow Injuries, Growth Plate and Physeal-Sparing ACL Reconstruction, Knee Dislocations, Knee Injuries, Lateral Collateral Ligament Tears (LCL) Injury, Leg Length Inequality, Loose Body Removal (Knee), Medial Collateral Ligament Tears (MCL) Injury, Medial Patellar Femoral Ligament (MPFL) Injury, Meniscus Tears, Multi-Ligament Knee Injuries, Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedics, Osteochondral Defects, Osteochondral Lesions, Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee, Patellar Dislocations, Patellar Instability Stabilization, Pediatric ACL Reconstruction, Shoulder Dislocations, Shoulder Disorders, Shoulder Instability Stabilization Surgery, Shoulder Labral Tear, Sports Injuries, Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior (SLAP) Lesions, Tear - Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), Tear - Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL), Tibial Spine/Eminence ...
Definition of medial collateral ligament injury in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is medial collateral ligament injury? Meaning of medial collateral ligament injury as a legal term. What does medial collateral ligament injury mean in law?
Isolated partial rupture of the knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most common traumatic knee ligament injury. Owing to the good short- and medium-term functional results after conservative treatment, this injury has been regarded as harmless. The outcome after combination injuries, with simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is more uncertain.. The main purpose of this investigation was to improve the diagnosis of MCL injury and of concomitant injuries in acute knee trauma, in order to differentiate between the long-term effects of isolated and combined MCL injuries on knee function, sports participation, knee biomechanics and the development of secondary changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone.. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used with the aim to replace arthroscopy in the diagnosis of acute knee injuries with hemarthrosis. In patients, knee function and stability were assessed 4 years following conservative treatment of isolated partial MCL ...
This study compares in vivo sagittal plane kinematics of the Oxford mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) at 1 and 10 years postsurgery (10 knees) with a fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (5 knees) and the normal knee (5 knees), using dynamic fluoroscopic measurement of the patellar tendon angle. The Oxford UKA preserved normal changes in patellar tendon angle with flexion, and this was maintained at 10 years. In contrast, an abnormal pattern was seen with the TKA. The results suggest that a normal pattern of sagittal plane knee kinematics exists following Oxford medial UKA and imply that anterior cruciate ligament function is maintained in the long term.
Find the best ankle ligament rupture doctors in Chennai. Get guidance from medical experts to select ankle ligament rupture specialist in Chennai from trusted hospitals - credihealth.com
This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury Specialists. You will find helpful, informative articles about Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury Specialists, including Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries: Diagnosis and Treatment. You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Norwich, CT that will answer all of your questions about Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury Specialists.

Canine stifle joint biomechanics associated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy predicted by use of a computer model<...Canine stifle joint biomechanics associated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy predicted by use of a computer model<...

Lateral collateral ligament load was similar, medial collateral ligament load increased, and caudal cruciate ligament load ... Lateral collateral ligament load was similar, medial collateral ligament load increased, and caudal cruciate ligament load ... Lateral collateral ligament load was similar, medial collateral ligament load increased, and caudal cruciate ligament load ... Lateral collateral ligament load was similar, medial collateral ligament load increased, and caudal cruciate ligament load ...
more infohttps://ucdavis.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/canine-stifle-joint-biomechanics-associated-with-tibial-plateau-l

Hemarthrosis disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical TrialsHemarthrosis disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials

Reducing Intra-articular Hemarthrosis After Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction by the Administration of ... Trauma resulting in hemarthrosis and long medial collateral ligament desmitis of the tarsocrural joint in a horse. ( 22043073 ) ...
more infohttp://www.malacards.org/card/hemarthrosis

Retain or sacrifice the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty? A histopathological study of the cruciate...Retain or sacrifice the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty? A histopathological study of the cruciate...

... marking the femoral side of the posterior cruciate ligament.. Four normal posterior and anterior cruciate ligaments were ... 14 of the posterior cruciate ligaments), the fibre structure of the cruciate ligaments was irregular. Only six cruciate ... posterior cruciate ligament and whether it is possible to create the optimal tensioned cruciate ligament. The first issue, to ... Schutte MJ, Dabezies EJ, Zimny ML, et al. Neural anatomy of the human anterior cruciate ligament. J Bone Joint Surg Am 1987;69: ...
more infohttps://jcp.bmj.com/content/54/5/381

Rotator Cuff And Labrum.SONIMAGE HS1  Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc . Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer With Acromial...Rotator Cuff And Labrum.SONIMAGE HS1 Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc . Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer With Acromial...

Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Femoral Tunnel. XClose. <. >. img { width: normal ; max-width: 100% ; height: normal ...
more infohttp://incyder.info/rotator-cuff-and-labrum

Anterior cruciate ligament - WikipediaAnterior cruciate ligament - Wikipedia

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) ... The synovial joint through which the anterior cruciate ligament passes, along with the length of the anterior cruciate ligament ... it is also referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament.[1] The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the four main ligaments of ... Main article: Anterior cruciate ligament injury. An ACL tear is one of the most common knee injuries, with over 100,000 tears ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cranial_cruciate_ligament

Anterior cruciate ligament - WikipediaAnterior cruciate ligament - Wikipedia

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) ... The joint through which the anterior cruciate ligament passes, along with the actual size of the anterior cruciate ligament, is ... Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction Anterior drawer test Anterolateral ligament Lateral collateral ligament Medial ... it is also referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament. The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the four main ligaments of ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anterior_cruciate_ligament

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) InjuriesAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

... Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/ChildrensHealthNetwork/en/teens/acl-injuries.html?view=rr

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) InjuriesAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

... Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/PrimaryChildrens/en/teens/acl-injuries.html?view=rr

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction SurgeryAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction Surgery

The ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is a band of tissue within the knee. It gets damaged when it stretches or tears. This can ... American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "ACL injury: Does it require surgery?" "Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries." ... It serves as a sort of bridge that a new ligament will grow on as you heal. It can take many months for a new ACL to grow in ... Your doctor will remove the torn ligament from your knee and replace it with new tissue. The goal is to get your knee stable ...
more infohttps://www.webmd.com/pain-management/knee-pain/acl-surgery-what-to-expect

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) News, ResearchAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) News, Research

Graft properties affect knee ligament surgery outcome more than surgical technique In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... More than 130,000 Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) surgeries take place each year with the majority of patients not requiring ... While women are two to four times more likely than men to tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee, the cause of ... Every year, about 250,000 people in the U.S. sustain injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and about half of these ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/?tag=/Anterior-Cruciate-Ligament-

Anterior Cruciate Ligament TearAnterior Cruciate Ligament Tear

... , ACL Tear, Anterior Cruciate Deficiency, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture, ACL Rupture. ... Anterior cruciate ligament tear, Tear of ant cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament tear, anterior cruciate ligament ... Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Aka: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, ACL Tear, Anterior ... Anterior cruciate ligament rupture, Anterior cruciate ligament rupture, Rupture of anterior cruciate ligament, Tear of anterior ...
more infohttps://fpnotebook.com/Ortho/Knee/AntrCrctLgmntTr.htm

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rehabilitation in Athletes | SpringerLinkAnterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rehabilitation in Athletes | SpringerLink

Postoperative rehabilitation is a major factor in the success of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction procedure. ... Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Knee Laxity Knee Flexion Angle Anterior Cruciate Ligament ... Ligament stability two to six years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autogenous patellar tendon graft and ... The effect of rehabilitation and return to activity on anterior-posterior knee displacements after anterior cruciate ligament ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256-199622010-00005

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury: MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

An anterior cruciate ligament injury is the over-stretching or tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. A ... An anterior cruciate ligament injury is the over-stretching or tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. A ... Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL tear; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. It prevents the shin bone from sliding out in front of the thigh ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001074.htm

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) | HealthLink BCAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) | HealthLink BC

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be seen in this front view of the left knee joint. ...
more infohttps://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/hw139757

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) InjuriesAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

... About ACL Injuries. A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common knee injury ... The ACL works with the PCL (posterior cruciate ligament), which crosses over it to form an "X." Together, these two ligaments ... Anterior drawer test. During this test, the hip is flexed at 45 degrees and the knee at 90 degrees. The examiner grasps the ... The ACL is one of the four main ligaments in the knee joint that connect it to the shinbone (tibia) and thighbone (femur). Its ...
more infohttps://www.rchsd.org/health-articles/anterior-cruciate-ligament-acl-injuries-2/

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Practice Essentials, Background, FrequencyAnterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Practice Essentials, Background, Frequency

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are most often a result of low-velocity, noncontact, deceleration injuries and ... encoded search term (Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury What to Read Next on Medscape. ... Does chronic medial collateral ligament laxity influence the outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?: A ... Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury. Updated: Jun 16, 2016 * Author: Matthew Gammons, MD; Chief Editor: Sherwin SW Ho, MD more... ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/89442-overview

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear | Smore NewslettersAnterior Cruciate Ligament Tear | Smore Newsletters

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear - Kaylee Brooks by Kaylee Brooks , This newsletter was created with Smore, an online tool for ... The anterior cruciate ligament is found inside of the knee. The ACL and the PCL, posterior cruciate ligament is similar to the ... with the anterior cruciate ligament in front. These ligaments control the back and forth motion of your knee. The ACL runs ... The symptoms of an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament injury are "popping" sound at the time of injury, swelling of the ...
more infohttps://www.smore.com/t4vva-anterior-cruciate-ligament-tear

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos SyndromeAnterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

... John Williams, Jonathan Hutt, and Mark Rickman ... John Williams, Jonathan Hutt, and Mark Rickman, "Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome," Case ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/crior/2015/160381/cta/

A Brief History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament ReconstructionA Brief History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

W. Campbell, "Repair of the ligaments of the knee: report of a new operation for the repair of the anterior cruciate ligament ... K. G. Jones, "Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central one-third of the patellar ligament," Journal ... "Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament. Progression to complete ligament deficiency," Journal of Bone and Joint ... D. L. Butler, "Anterior cruciate ligament: its normal response and replacement," Journal of Orthopaedic Research, vol. 7, no. 6 ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/aos/2014/706042/

Anterior cruciate ligament - encyclopedia article - CitizendiumAnterior cruciate ligament - encyclopedia article - Citizendium

The anterior cruciate ligament or ACL is one of the four main stabilising ligaments of the knee, along with the posterior ... cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The ACL attaches to the distal ... Retrieved from "http://en.citizendium.org/wiki?title=Anterior_cruciate_ligament&oldid=100829740" ... If the ligament is completely torn, it will not heal. When torn, it can make make sudden, pivoting movements difficult, and it ...
more infohttp://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Anterior_cruciate_ligament

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia ImageAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia Image

Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is very common and usually the result of a twisting of the leg while applying ... Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is very common and usually the result of a twisting of the leg while applying ... Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/8717.htm Anterior cruciate ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/8717.htm

anterior cruciate ligament tearanterior cruciate ligament tear

What is the Anterior Cruciate Ligament?. The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is found in the knee. It joins the femur ( ... Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Skiing is a very physically demanding sport and puts a lot of strain on the body. Inexperienced ... If the tear is particularly serious, it may require reconstructive surgery to repair the ligament. You probably wont be able ...
more infohttp://www.medic8.com/healthguide/sports-medicine/skiing/anterior-cruciate-ligament-tear.html

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) InjuriesAnterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

... Topic Overview. What is an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury?. An anterior ... 2010). Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in adults. In JC DeLee et al., eds., Delee and Drezs Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: ... 2010). Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in adults. In JC DeLee et al., eds., Delee and Drezs Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: ... How an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is treated and how it heals depends on:. *The condition of the ACL before the ...
more infohttps://www.billingsclinic.com/health-info/library/document-viewer/?id=hw124401

Torn ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear): Symptoms, Signs, Causes & TreatmentTorn ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear): Symptoms, Signs, Causes & Treatment

A torn ACL refers to a tear in the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. This is one of four ligaments that stabilize the ... Torn ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear): Symptoms & Signs. *Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Melissa Conrad ... The anterior cruciate ligament helps to prevent the top and bottom of the knee from sliding back and forth. Symptoms and signs ...
more infohttps://www.medicinenet.com/torn_acl_symptoms_and_signs/symptoms.htm

An international survey on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practices | SpringerLinkAn international survey on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practices | SpringerLink

... is the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Advances in surgical... ... Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Pivot Shift Anterior Knee Pain These ... Cohen SB, Sekiya JK (2007) Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Clin Sports Med 26:597-605PubMed ... van Eck CF, Schreiber VM, Mejia HA, Samuelsson K, van Dijk CN, Karlsson J, Fu FH (2010) "Anatomic" anterior cruciate ligament ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00264-012-1611-9
  • The symptoms of an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament injury are "popping" sound at the time of injury, swelling of the knee within six hours, and pain, especially when trying to put weight on the injured knee). (smore.com)
  • The mechanism of injury and the signs and symptoms associated with initial injury to the anterior cruciate ligament were investigated in 23 subjects. (nih.gov)
  • Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is very common and usually the result of a twisting of the leg while applying full downward pressure. (floridahealthfinder.gov)
  • The two most common sources for tissue are the patellar ligament and the hamstrings tendon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biau DJ, Katsahian S, Kartus J, Harilainen A, Feller JA, Sajovic M, Ejerhed L, Zaffagnini S, Röpke M, Nizard R (2009) Patellar tendon versus hamstring tendon autografts for reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament: a meta-analysis based on individual patient data. (springer.com)
  • If a person's own tendons do not provide the best replacement for the injured ligament, the doctor may recommend using a tendon from a donor, which have been carefully screened and tested for diseases. (cooperhealth.org)
  • Smith tore his left anterior cruciate ligament after catching a screen pass on the opening drive of a 21-14 win over Fresno State last September. (merriam-webster.com)
  • In mid-2013, she tore her anterior cruciate ligament. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cruciate ligaments have been known about since old Egyptian times and their anatomy was described in the famous Smith Papyrus (3000 BC). (hindawi.com)
  • The use of long-term bioresorbable scaffolds for anterior cruciate ligament repair. (medscape.com)
  • Hippocrates also (460-370 BC) mentioned the subluxation of the knee joint with ligament pathology, but Claudius Galen, a Greek physician in the Roman Empire, was the first to describe the true nature of the ACL [ 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • According to recent studies, female athletes are two to eight times more likely to strain their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in sports that involve cutting and jumping as compared to men who play the same particular sports (soccer, basketball, and volleyball). (wikipedia.org)
  • The anterior drawer test is performed with the knee at 90° flexion, with the patient lying supine. (medscape.com)
  • The Lachman test is the most accurate test for detecting ACL injury, followed by the anterior drawer test and the pivot shift test. (aafp.org)
  • They also described the roll and glide mechanism of the knee and the tension pattern of the different bundles of the cruciate ligaments and, to our knowledge, were the first to describe that each bundle of the ACL was tensioned in different degrees of flexion of the knee joint [ 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Occasionally, stimulation of the body's natural ability to heal the native ligament, called a "healing response", is relied upon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tendons and ligaments are avascular and therefore heal at a slow rate. (citizendium.org)
  • The camera sends video to a large monitor so that the surgeon can see any damage to the ligaments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with ACL injury should be referred to an orthopedic surgeon if they have recurrent giving-way episodes, a strong desire to resume high-intensity activity, or concomitant meniscal or collateral ligament damage. (aafp.org)
  • Prior to Galen's description, it was believed that the cruciate ligaments were part of the nervous system, but Galen was the first to describe the ACL as being a structure that supports the joint and prevents abnormal knee motion. (hindawi.com)