Antacids: Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Magnesium Hydroxide: An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral brucite. It acts as an antacid with cathartic effects.Aluminum Hydroxide: A compound with many biomedical applications: as a gastric antacid, an antiperspirant, in dentifrices, as an emulsifier, as an adjuvant in bacterins and vaccines, in water purification, etc.Simethicone: A poly(dimethylsiloxane) which is a polymer of 200-350 units of dimethylsiloxane, along with added silica gel. It is used as an antiflatulent, surfactant, and ointment base.Magnesium Oxide: Magnesium oxide (MgO). An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral periclase. In aqueous media combines quickly with water to form magnesium hydroxide. It is used as an antacid and mild laxative and has many nonmedicinal uses.Silicic Acid: A hydrated form of silicon dioxide. It is commonly used in the manufacture of TOOTHPASTES and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY.Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.Heartburn: Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.Histamine H2 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.Ranitidine: A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Sodium Bicarbonate: A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.Cimetidine: A histamine congener, it competitively inhibits HISTAMINE binding to HISTAMINE H2 RECEPTORS. Cimetidine has a range of pharmacological actions. It inhibits GASTRIC ACID secretion, as well as PEPSIN and GASTRIN output.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Duodenoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.Food-Drug Interactions: The pharmacological result, either desirable or undesirable, of drugs interacting with components of the diet. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Gastric Acidity Determination: Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.Technetium Tc 99m Pyrophosphate: A radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in scintigraphy or tomography of the heart to evaluate the extent of the necrotic myocardial process. It has also been used in noninvasive tests for the distribution of organ involvement in different types of amyloidosis and for the evaluation of muscle necrosis in the extremities.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Famotidine: A competitive histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Its main pharmacodynamic effect is the inhibition of gastric secretion.Dosage Forms: Completed forms of the pharmaceutical preparation in which prescribed doses of medication are included. They are designed to resist action by gastric fluids, prevent vomiting and nausea, reduce or alleviate the undesirable taste and smells associated with oral administration, achieve a high concentration of drug at target site, or produce a delayed or long-acting drug effect.Anti-Ulcer Agents: Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.Sucralfate: A basic aluminum complex of sulfated sucrose.Carbonates: Salts or ions of the theoretical carbonic acid, containing the radical CO2(3-). Carbonates are readily decomposed by acids. The carbonates of the alkali metals are water-soluble; all others are insoluble. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.Dimethylpolysiloxanes: Silicone polymers which consist of silicon atoms substituted with methyl groups and linked by oxygen atoms. They comprise a series of biocompatible materials used as liquids, gels or solids; as film for artificial membranes, gels for implants, and liquids for drug vehicles; and as antifoaming agents.Enoxacin: A broad-spectrum 6-fluoronaphthyridinone antibacterial agent that is structurally related to NALIDIXIC ACID.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Gastric Acid: Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.Pneumonia, Aspiration: A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Histocompatibility Antigens Class I: Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.Genes, MHC Class I: Genetic loci in the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex which encode polymorphic characteristics not related to immune responsiveness or complement activity, e.g., B loci (chicken), DLA (dog), GPLA (guinea pig), H-2 (mouse), RT-1 (rat), HLA-A, -B, and -C class I genes of man.Calcium Signaling: Signal transduction mechanisms whereby calcium mobilization (from outside the cell or from intracellular storage pools) to the cytoplasm is triggered by external stimuli. Calcium signals are often seen to propagate as waves, oscillations, spikes, sparks, or puffs. The calcium acts as an intracellular messenger by activating calcium-responsive proteins.Calcium Channels: Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Calcium Isotopes: Stable calcium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element calcium, but differ in atomic weight. Ca-42-44, 46, and 48 are stable calcium isotopes.Calcium Chloride: A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.

Pharmacokinetics of ethambutol under fasting conditions, with food, and with antacids. (1/380)

Ethambutol (EMB) is the most frequent "fourth drug" used for the empiric treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a frequently used drug for infections caused by Mycobacterium avium complex. The pharmacokinetics of EMB in serum were studied with 14 healthy males and females in a randomized, four-period crossover study. Subjects ingested single doses of EMB of 25 mg/kg of body weight under fasting conditions twice, with a high-fat meal, and with aluminum-magnesium antacid. Serum was collected for 48 h and assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with zero-order absorption and first-order elimination. Both fasting conditions produced similar results: a mean (+/- standard deviation) EMB maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) of 4.5 +/- 1.0 micrograms/ml, time to maximum concentration of drug in serum (Tmax) of 2.5 +/- 0.9 h, and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-infinity) of 28.9 +/- 4.7 micrograms.h/ml. In the presence of antacids, subjects had a mean Cmax of 3.3 +/- 0.5 micrograms/ml, Tmax of 2.9 +/- 1.2 h, and AUC0-infinity of 27.5 +/- 5.9 micrograms.h/ml. In the presence of the Food and Drug Administration high-fat meal, subjects had a mean Cmax of 3.8 +/- 0.8 micrograms/ml, Tmax of 3.2 +/- 1.3 h, and AUC0-infinity of 29.6 +/- 4.7 micrograms.h/ml. These reductions in Cmax, delays in Tmax, and modest reductions in AUC0-infinity can be avoided by giving EMB on an empty stomach whenever possible.  (+info)

Prescription of acid-suppressing drugs in relation to endoscopic diagnosis: a record-linkage study. (2/380)

BACKGROUND: Although widely used, few data are available on the appropriateness of prescribing of acid-suppressing drugs (ASDs), despite guidelines on the investigation and treatment of dyspeptic patients. METHODS: We created a database of 62 000 endoscopy examinations and record-linked these to a prescribing database. Endoscopic diagnoses were classified into peptic, nonpeptic and others. The H2-antagonists, omeprazole and misoprostol, were studied. RESULTS: 35 000 patients had one or more endoscopies during 1978-93; two-thirds were over 45 years of age at first endoscopy. A quarter of all patients who had been endoscoped had consistently normal examinations. Peptic oesophageal pathology was the commonest positive finding. A quarter of those prescribed ASDs between 1989 and 1993 had been endoscoped between 1978 and 1993. In those with a peptic diagnosis prescribed any ASD, the pathologies found were: oesophageal (42.9%), duodenal (36.3%) and gastro-pyloric (21.3%). Patients prescribed omeprazole were more likely to have undergone endoscopy than those prescribed other ASDs, and they were also more likely to have peptic oesophageal pathology. Long-term prescribing (>56 days per year) occurred in two-thirds of patients prescribed ASDs and 40% had at least one endoscopy. In those prescribed short-term ASDs, 20% had undergone at least one endoscopy. Peptic and nonpeptic endoscopic pathology was associated with increased ASD prescribing, but a normal endoscopy did not reduce prescribing. CONCLUSION: ASD prescribing appeared to be mainly symptom-driven. Positive endoscopic findings increased the prescribing of ASDs, but normal findings did not reduce it.  (+info)

Pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin and interaction with an antacid containing aluminum and magnesium. (3/380)

The pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin (400 mg orally) and the influence of the antacid aluminum magnesium hydroxide (20 ml of Maalox 70) on the bioavailability of gatifloxacin in 24 healthy volunteers were assessed. In an open, randomized, six-period crossover study, the volunteers received either gatifloxacin alone (treatments A and D); aluminum magnesium hydroxide concomitant with gatifloxacin (treatment C); or aluminum magnesium hydroxide 2 h before (treatment B), 2 h after (treatment E), or 4 h after gatifloxacin administration (treatment F). Gatifloxacin concentrations were measured by a validated bioassay and high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetics of a single 400-mg dose of gatifloxacin alone were characterized as follows (mean +/- standard deviation): peak concentration (Cmax), 3.8 +/- 0. 5 (treatment A) and 3.4 +/- 0.9 (treatment D) microgram/ml; time to Cmax, 1.4 +/- 0.8 (treatment A) and 1.7 +/- 0.7 (treatment D) h; area under the curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0-infinity), 33. 5 +/- 5.9 (treatment A) and 31.4 +/- 3.4 (treatment D) microgram. h/ml; urine recovery, (83 +/- 6)% (treatment A) and (84 +/- 8)% (treatment D). Comparison of the results obtained by bioassay showed a good correlation. Aluminum magnesium hydroxide administration 2 h before (treatment B) or concomitant with (treatment C) gatifloxacin decreased the Cmax by 45% (2.1 +/- 1.2 microgram/ml) or even 68% (1.2 +/- 0.4 microgram/ml) highly significantly (P < 0.01). AUC0-infinity was significantly reduced from 33.5 +/- 5.9 to 19.4 +/- 6.9 microgram. h/ml (by 42%) or even to 11.9 +/- 3.3 microgram. h/ml (by 64%) (P < 0. 01). If aluminum magnesium hydroxide was given 2 h after gatifloxacin (treatment E), there was no significant reduction of concentration in serum but AUC0-infinity was significantly reduced from 31.4 +/- 3.4 to 25.9 +/- 5.3 microgram. h/ml (18%) (P < 0.01). Aluminum magnesium hydroxide given 4 h after gatifloxacin (treatment F) showed no influence on the gatifloxacin pharmacokinetics. Therefore, the optimal time between gatifloxacin application and the intake of an aluminum-containing antacid should be 4 h.  (+info)

Salmonellosis in North Thames (East), UK: associated risk factors. (4/380)

We assessed the rate of salmonella infections and risk factors associated with infection in North East Thames in 1993. Cases of culture confirmed infection were identified through microbiology laboratories and environmental health officers in the North East Thames. A total of 1730 cases were reported and 209 of these individuals (those who could be contacted within a 3-week interval after onset of symptoms) and matched controls were interviewed by telephone. In addition randomly selected controls were interviewed over a 4-month period about recent gastric acid lowering medication and antimicrobial ingestion. Sixty-six serotypes were identified: S. enteritidis was isolated from 1179 (69%) cases, S. typhimurium from 221 (13%), S. virchow from 77 (4%) and S. newport 25 (1%). Infections were more frequent in summer months. Highest rates were documented in children under 2 years of age for S. enteritidis (108/100,000) and under 1 year for S. typhimurium (36/100,000). Using the Townsend score, highest isolation rates of S. enteritidis were in more prosperous areas (36/100,000 vs. 27/100,000; odds ratio (OR) 1.3, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 1.2-1.6, P < 0.0001), while for S. typhimurium, there was no relation between deprivation index and isolation rates areas (6.4/100,000 vs. 6.1/100,000; OR 1.1, 95% CIs 0.8-1.5, P = 0.77). The case control study showed a significant association between ingestion of products containing raw eggs and S. enteritidis infection (8/111 cases vs. 0/110 controls; OR undefined, lower 95% CIs 3.4). Individuals with salmonella infection were significantly more likely to have travelled abroad in the week before the onset of illness [42/186 (23%) vs. 1/182 (0.5%); OR 40, 95% CIs = 5.5-291, P < 0.001] and to report gastroduodenal disease [11/143 (7%) vs. 3/143 (2%); OR 5.0, 95% CIs = 1.1-23, P = 0.04]. There was an association between illness and gastric acid-lowering medications [unmatched controls OR 22.3 (95% CIs 1.5-3.7, P = 0.0002), matched controls OR 3.7 (95% CIs 1.0-3.8, P = 0.07)], but no association with antimicrobial ingestion.  (+info)

Evaluation of treatment regimens to cure Helicobacter pylori infection--a meta-analysis. (5/380)

OBJECTIVE: To assess effectiveness of treatment to cure Helicobacter pylori infection. DATA SYNTHESIS: Meta-analysis of 666 manuscripts (full papers, abstracts, letters to the editor) identified through Medline and a manual search (1986 to January 1998). Data were overviewed by regression analysis with weighted random effects models. SUBJECTS: 53 228 patients with H. pylori infection. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were treated with 132 different medication combinations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cure of H. pylori infection per protocol and intention-to-treat basis at least 28 days after treatment. RESULTS: The nationality of the patients and therapeutic regimen have a significant impact on the results, after correction for the heterogeneity in the precision of the cure rate caused by different study sizes and random effect for study. On the basis of the original sample size, cure rates of 80-85% were achieved using combinations of a proton-pump inhibitor or ranitidine bismuth citrate with two antibiotics including clarithromycin, amoxycillin and metronidazole or tinidazole. Comparable cure rates were also achieved using a combination of a proton-pump inhibitor or H2-receptor antagonist with bismuth subcitrate or tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate, metronidazole and tetracycline. The dose of clarithromycin influenced cure rates. Treatment duration did not influence the outcome. CONCLUSION: Several therapeutic regimens are eligible to cure H. pylori infection. However, none of the medication combinations were able to cure H. pylori infection in more than 85% of the patients assessed by intention-to-treat. The countries in which the studies were performed also had a significant impact on eradication rates.  (+info)

The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on gastro-oesophageal reflux. (6/380)

BACKGROUND: Increased prevalence of oesophagitis has been reported following eradication of Helicobacter pylori. We hypothesized that H. pylori eradication might increase gastro-oesophageal acid reflux in patients with reflux oesophagitis. METHODS: Twenty-five consecutive patients (13 male, 12 female) with H. pylori infection and reflux oesophagitis grade I (22 patients) or II (three patients) were enrolled; mean age 49.9 (range 33-75) years. Twenty-four hour intra-oesophageal pH recording was performed before and 12 weeks after eradication of H. pylori, which was achieved using bismuth subnitrate suspension 150 mg q.d.s., oxytetracycline 500 mg q.d.s. and metronidazole 400 mg t.d.s. for 10 days. Eradication was confirmed by 14C-urea breath test 12 weeks after completion of treatment. The patients did not receive acid-suppressive medication. RESULTS: All patients had abnormal gastro-oesophageal reflux before anti-H. pylori treatment. After treatment, there was no significant change in the percentage of total time oesophageal pH < 4 (P=0.46) in the 23 patients in whom the infection had been cured. Nine of the cured patients had increased acid exposure, whereas 14 had decreased acid exposure. No significant change in reflux symptom scores was found. There was no relationship between change in acid exposure and symptom improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Twelve weeks after H. pylori eradication there was no consistent change in gastro-oesophageal acid reflux in patients with mild or moderate reflux oesophagitis.  (+info)

Outcome of oesophagogastric carcinoma in young patients. (7/380)

The survival of young patients (< or = 50 years of age) with carcinoma of the oesophagus or stomach has been reported to be poorer than that of their older counterparts. The aim of the current study was to review the outcome of such young patients with oesophagogastric cancer and to compare the outcome in patients with carcinoma of the oesophagus/cardia with patients with carcinoma of the more distal stomach. The study population was 50 patients. Tumour location was oesophagus/cardia (n = 33) and gastric body/antrum (n = 17). The most common presenting symptoms were weight loss (66%), epigastric pain (54%), dysphagia (50%), and heartburn (40%). Seventeen patients had experienced foregut symptoms for a period of > or = 6 months. These patients were more likely to have symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and to have received acid suppression therapy than patients with shorter symptom durations. Only 20 patients underwent a potentially curative resection, while 10 underwent open and close laparotomy. The overall median survival was 7 months and the 5-year survival was 8%. Multivariate analysis revealed that surgical resection and UICC stage were the only factors that significantly influenced survival. There was no difference in the survival of patients with proximally situated tumours compared to those with distally located tumours. Wide variations in clinical practice were seen between different surgeons. Consequently, a multidisciplinary team designed to manage all patients with oesophagogastric cancer according to nationally agreed protocols has been established in our hospital. Earlier diagnosis of these tumours is to be encouraged, even if this necessitates the more liberal use of endoscopy in the evaluation of young patients with persistent foregut symptoms.  (+info)

Review article: drug interactions with agents used to treat acid-related diseases. (8/380)

Patients with acid-related diseases often need to take multiple medications. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection often includes either a histamine type 2 (H2)-receptor antagonist or a proton pump (H+,K(+)-ATPase) inhibitor (proton pump inhibitor), administered in conjunction with one or more antimicrobials. Also, treatment for acid-related diseases often requires extended therapy during which many concomitant medications may be administered for concurrent disease states. Polypharmacy may be the result, particularly in elderly patients, who are at increased risk for both acid-related and many other diseases. Thus, it is important to understand the potential for clinically significant drug-drug interactions in this setting. H2-receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors can influence the pharmacokinetic profiles of other commonly administered medications by elevating intragastric pH, which can alter drug absorption, and by interacting with the cytochrome P (CYP) 450 enzyme system, which can affect drug metabolism and clearance. Such interactions are particularly important when they affect the pharmacokinetics of drugs with narrow therapeutic ranges (e.g. warfarin, digoxin). In these cases, drug-drug interactions can result in significant toxicity and even death. There are marked differences among H2-receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors in their potential for such interactions. The oldest drugs in each class, cimetidine and omeprazole, respectively, have the greatest potential to alter CYP activity and change the pharmacokinetics of other drugs. The most recently developed H2-receptor antagonist, famotidine, and the newer proton pump inhibitors, rabeprazole and pantoprazole, are much less likely to induce or inhibit CYP and thereby change the metabolism of other medications. These differences are important when choosing medications for the safe treatment of patients with acid-related diseases.  (+info)

  • be relieved by taking over-the-counter antacids or avoiding spicy or acidic foods. (glennvilleproduce.com)
  • A new study published this month in the journal Pediatrics concludes that infants who are given antacids in their first year of life have a significantly higher risk for bone fractures as they get older. (healthline.com)
  • Recent Examples on the Web Babies who are given antacids or antibiotics during their first 6 months of life may have a sharply higher risk for allergies or asthma, a large new study warns. (bboasi.net)
  • It is scarcely credible to what extent the use of antacids may be carried to relieve the cardialgia of pregnancy. (thesaurus.com)
  • In this article, we look at different types of antacids, how they work, and their side effects. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A person should always read the instructions before taking antacids, as different types of antacids contain different active ingredients. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Different types of antacids can interfere with the absorption of various minerals. (medicalcityhospital.com)
Antacids Synonyms, Antacids Antonyms | Thesaurus.com
Antacids Synonyms, Antacids Antonyms | Thesaurus.com (thesaurus.com)
Class I. Antacids
Class I. Antacids (chestofbooks.com)
Smith's Food and Drug - FDgard Antacids in Health & Wellness Department
Smith's Food and Drug - FDgard Antacids in Health & Wellness Department (smithsfoodanddrug.com)
ROLAIDS ULTRA STRENGTH ANTACID ORANGE (calcium carbonate and magnesium hydroxide tablet, chewable) | Healthgrades.com
ROLAIDS ULTRA STRENGTH ANTACID ORANGE (calcium carbonate and magnesium hydroxide tablet, chewable) | Healthgrades.com (healthgrades.com)
Online Health Store | Buy Health, Medication, Remedies & Dietary Supplements, Medication & Remedies, Medications & Treatments,...
Online Health Store | Buy Health, Medication, Remedies & Dietary Supplements, Medication & Remedies, Medications & Treatments,... (fishpond.com.au)
Alka-Seltzer Antacid and Pain Relief Medicine, Two-Pack, 50 Packs/Box
Alka-Seltzer Antacid and Pain Relief Medicine, Two-Pack, 50 Packs/Box (foodservicedirect.com)
Gastroesophageal reflux disease - Wikipedia
Gastroesophageal reflux disease - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
Put Heartburn on Hold - How to Prevent and Treat Heartburn (Sponsored)
Put Heartburn on Hold - How to Prevent and Treat Heartburn (Sponsored) (webmd.com)
Peptic Ulcer Disease Symptoms, Treatment, Diet, and Causes
Peptic Ulcer Disease Symptoms, Treatment, Diet, and Causes (medicinenet.com)
Heartburn and nausea: 5 possible causes
Heartburn and nausea: 5 possible causes (medicalnewstoday.com)
Gastritis: Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment
Gastritis: Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment (healthline.com)
Stomach Spasms: Causes, Treatment, Home Remedies, and More
Stomach Spasms: Causes, Treatment, Home Remedies, and More (healthline.com)
Avelox - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Avelox - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers) | NIDDK
Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers) | NIDDK (niddk.nih.gov)
Valium (Diazepam Tablets): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Valium (Diazepam Tablets): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Apriso (Mesalamine Extended-Release Capsules): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Apriso (Mesalamine Extended-Release Capsules): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Prenatal Medication and OTC Drug Safety  - FamilyEducation
Prenatal Medication and OTC Drug Safety - FamilyEducation (familyeducation.com)
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Lifestyle Modifications, Pharmacologic Therapy
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Lifestyle Modifications, Pharmacologic Therapy (emedicine.medscape.com)
Allegra - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Allegra - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Heartburn: causes, symptoms, treatment and risk factors
Heartburn: causes, symptoms, treatment and risk factors (netdoctor.co.uk)
5 Supplements That Aid Digestion
5 Supplements That Aid Digestion (healthgrades.com)
Antacid | medicine | Britannica.com
Antacid | medicine | Britannica.com (britannica.com)
Plaquenil (Hydroxychloroquine): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Plaquenil (Hydroxychloroquine): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Calcium Carbonate: Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings
Calcium Carbonate: Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings (rxlist.com)
Fosamax Plus D (Alendronate Sodium and Cholecalciferol): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Fosamax Plus D (Alendronate Sodium and Cholecalciferol): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
DailyMed - DIAZEPAM tablet
DailyMed - DIAZEPAM tablet (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
Peptic ulcers: treatment - myDr.com.au
Peptic ulcers: treatment - myDr.com.au (mydr.com.au)
Gastritis in cats - PDSA
Gastritis in cats - PDSA (pdsa.org.uk)
VALIUM® CIV brand of diazepam TABLETS
VALIUM® CIV brand of diazepam TABLETS (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
Antacids
Antacids (smartdraw.com)
Oracea (Doxycycline): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Oracea (Doxycycline): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Rate your experience with this treatment
Rate your experience with this treatment (webmd.com)
10 Surprising DIY Toilet Stain Cleaning Solutions | eHow
10 Surprising DIY Toilet Stain Cleaning Solutions | eHow (ehow.com)
The Full Scoop on Sodium
The Full Scoop on Sodium (goldsgym.com)
Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide: MedlinePlus Drug Information
Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide: MedlinePlus Drug Information (medlineplus.gov)
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD): Recipes, Triggers, and Treatments - Page 7 | HealthCentral
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD): Recipes, Triggers, and Treatments - Page 7 | HealthCentral (healthcentral.com)
Osteoporosis - TheBody.com
Osteoporosis - TheBody.com (thebody.com)
Felbatol (Felbamate): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Felbatol (Felbamate): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Cimetidine and Antacids | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians
Cimetidine and Antacids | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians (annals.org)
BONIVA®(ibandronate sodium)TABLETS
BONIVA®(ibandronate sodium)TABLETS (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
Choosing an Over-the-Counter Heartburn Remedy - Health
Choosing an Over-the-Counter Heartburn Remedy - Health (health.com)
Heartburn
Heartburn (rexhealth.com)
Antacids - IFFGD
Antacids - IFFGD (iffgd.org)
CellCept (Mycophenolate Mofetil): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
CellCept (Mycophenolate Mofetil): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Mycophenolate Tablets Delayed Release - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Mycophenolate Tablets Delayed Release - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Myfortic - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Myfortic - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)