Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.United StatesRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Confounding Factors (Epidemiology): Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Manipulation, Osteopathic: Musculoskeletal manipulation based on the principles of OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE developed in 1874 by Dr Andrew Taylor Still.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Duplicate Publication as Topic: Simultaneous or successive publishing of identical or near- identical material in two or more different sources without acknowledgment. It differs from reprinted publication in that a reprint cites sources. It differs from PLAGIARISM in that duplicate publication is the product of the same authorship while plagiarism publishes a work or parts of a work of another as one's own.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Manuscripts, MedicalRange of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.CaliforniaSurgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Osteopathic Physicians: Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Epidemiologic Research Design: The form and structure of analytic studies in epidemiologic and clinical research.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Epidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Publication Bias: The influence of study results on the chances of publication and the tendency of investigators, reviewers, and editors to submit or accept manuscripts for publication based on the direction or strength of the study findings. Publication bias has an impact on the interpretation of clinical trials and meta-analyses. Bias can be minimized by insistence by editors on high-quality research, thorough literature reviews, acknowledgement of conflicts of interest, modification of peer review practices, etc.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Great BritainAging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Bibliography as Topic: Discussion of lists of works, documents or other publications, usually with some relationship between them, e.g., by a given author, on a given subject, or published in a given place, and differing from a catalog in that its contents are restricted to holdings of a single collection, library, or group of libraries. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
By {{author.name}}. Using the context: var context = { title: "How handlebars makes writing templates easier", author: { id: 47 ... or: }} {{#author}} {{name}}. {{/author}} And a few other functionalities mostly related to making usage easier. "Smashing ... name: "An author Name" }, body: "Handlebars is a bit easier for simple things." }; Where as the same in Mustache would require ...
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These may contain author or copyright information, or links to other pages. Standardized in HTML5. .... Used for document ... Contact information for the document author. ADDRESS existed in HTML Tags, and was standardized in HTML 2.0; still current. ... ... Can be used to specify additional metadata about a document, such as its author, publication date, expiration date, page ... Practical concerns due to browser non-compliance may force authors to find workarounds. The cite attribute gives the source, ...
"Authors". World Economic Forum. "Press Release: African Data platform launched to challenge global development community for ...
Travis has authored 9 books on decorating and painting techniques, as well as an autobiographical book on parenting. In 2005, ... "Authors". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2015-11-19. Alexander, Renee (2005-12-05). "Canadian Tire -- Auto Response". BusinessWeek. ...
"Alec Foege , Authors". Macmillan Publishers. Retrieved 23 June 2013. "Weddings; Erica Sanders And Alec Foege". New York Times. ... A former contributing editor to Rolling Stone and senior writer for People magazine, he is the author of four books. His ... Alec Foege is an American author and magazine journalist. ...
Recent Foreign Affairs authors include Robert O. Keohane, Hillary Clinton, Donald H. Rumsfeld, Ashton Carter, Colin L. Powell, ... Although in the early days of publication the journal did not have many female authors, in the late 1930s American journalist ... "Authors". Foreign Affairs. Retrieved September 27, 2016. "CFR History". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved September 27, ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Bae, H; Roberts, DP; Lim, HS; Strem, MD; Park, SC; Ryu, CM; Melnick, RL; Bailey ... Authors; Chong, FW; Chakravarthi, S; Nagaraja, HS; Thanikachalam, PM; Lee, N (Jun 2009). "Expression of transforming growth ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Li Destri Nicosia, M.G., Mosca, S., Mercurio, R., Schena, L. (2015). "Dieback of ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Rifai, M. A. 1969. A revision of the genus Trichoderma. Mycol. Pap. 116:1-56. ...
Authors:. "D.O.H.: Dojo Objective Harness - The Dojo Toolkit - Reference Guide". Dojotoolkit.org. Retrieved 2012-11-12. "lbrtw/ ...
"Authors". Nostra Ediciones. Retrieved 2012-08-03. "Escriben cuento más corto que El dinosaurio". El Universal. 17 May 2005. ... He made a personal choice that included stories from well-known authors and also from young and relatively unknown writers. ... draws on the author's experience when staying in Medellín in 2001. Lomelí was supported when writing this novel by the Mexico- ...
"Authors". Popular Archaeology. 2015. Retrieved 30 September 2015. "Overview". Mesoamerican Research Center. Fedick, Scott L. ( ...
... is a historian and author. He is a professor in the Department of History and War Studies at the Royal ... He is the author of books including Scipio Africanus: Rome's Greatest General, Hannibal: The Military Biography of Rome's ... Authors , Macmillan". us.macmillan.com. Retrieved 2015-11-15. "Richard A. Gabriel , New York journal of books". ... "Richard A. Gabriel (Author of Scipio Africanus)". goodreads.com. Retrieved 2015-11-15. https://potomac.presswarehouse.com/Books ...
"Jennifer Chang , Authors , Alice James Books". alicejamesbooks.org. Retrieved 2017-06-08. "Jennifer Chang's first book The ... Profile: Alice James Books > Authors > Jennifer Chang Profile: George Washington University > English Department Faculty > ...
Sean Michael Burke is a Perl programmer, author, and linguist. He was a columnist for The Perl Journal from 1998 and has ... Authors.) Dictionary of Jicarilla Apache: Abáachi Mizaa Iłkeeʼ Siijai. Axelrod, Melissa; Gómez de García, Jule; Lachler, Jordan ... and Burke, Sean (Eds.). Author of its section "Technical Notes on the Production of the Dictionary". University of New Mexico ...
"About the Author". Literati.net. Retrieved May 27, 2011. " The quote: "I would be happy to give him a blowjob just to thank him ... Her father is author Robert Burleigh, a University of Chicago professor. Burleigh's family moved to the Haight-Ashbury area of ... "Meet the Author: Nina Burleigh". Center for Inquiry. Retrieved 2012-08-22. "Calendar of Program & Events". The Explorer's Club ... "Voices of Reason - Author Nina Burleigh: Unholy Business". Center for Inquiry. Retrieved 2012-08-22. "Biblical Archaeology, the ...
... (aka P. J. Brackston and P. J. Davy) is the New York Times bestselling author of The Witch's Daughter and other ... "Paula Brackston , Authors , Macmillan". US Macmillan. Retrieved 2018-01-24. Brown, Eric (2015-01-16). "The best science fiction ... "Author: Brackston, Paula". NoveList Plus. Retrieved 2017-05-30. Fergus, Stefan (2013-09-19). "Civilian Reader: An Interview ... "Catching up with Paula Brackston, author of Lamp Black, Wolf Grey , My Bookish Ways". www.mybookishways.com. Retrieved 2016-12- ...
"Gerald Rose". Authors. Bloomsbury Publishing. "Kate Greenaway Medal" Archived September 16, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.. 2007 ...
Authors , Macmillan Retrieved 2013-02-9. Saxon, W. (August 3, 1994). Valerie Worth, 60, Is Dead; A Novelist for Young Readers ...
Authors. p. 544. Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. XIII, p. 167. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934. Skinner, Roger ...
... (born 1949) is an author and publisher on the topic of visual communication and typography. His most significant ... Authors , Hyphen Press Kinross, Robin, Modern Typography: An Essay in Critical History, Hyphen Press, 1992. Eye Magazine , ...
authors. "Articles by author". zookeys.pensoft.net. Retrieved 2016-06-04. "Antarctica". www.cambridge.org. Cambridge University ... Her co-authored 2007 Nature publication was designated as 4th of the 10 most important scientific discoveries 2007 by Time ... "Publications Authored by Angelika Brandt, http:". www.pubfacts.com. Retrieved 2016-06-04. "Angelika Brandt". bionames.org. ...
"Author Tom Lutz Appears On UI Radios Stations Sept. 8 And 12", University of Iowa News Release, Aug. 29, 2006 An interview with ... "UCR Newsroom: Acclaimed Author Joins UCR". Newsroom.ucr.edu. 2006-09-20. Retrieved 2017-04-25. "CHASS: Tom Lutz is a Recipient ... "Tom Lutz , Authors , Macmillan". Us.macmillan.com. Retrieved 2017-04-25. Faculty page at Univ of Calif-Riverside "Tom Lutz", ...
Howard v. Arkansas 2004 - Trial Court Decision "Michael Lamb". Authors. Psychology Today. 2011. Retrieved 13 November 2011. ...
"Authors". The Engineering Journal, 53(1) p. 6. Engineers Honored. The Globe and Mail, October 5, 1982, p. F4. Engineering ... and as a prolific author. He was a lifelong advocate of education and the engineering profession. Hershfield' parents Aaron and ...
"Eleanor Graham". Authors. Persephone Books. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 31 January 2011. Ellis, Peter ... was a book editor and children's book author. She worked for Muriel Paget's aid mission in Czechoslovakia before becoming an ...
... using separate copies if necessary or one author should sign the form on behalf of all authors. Should any further author(s) be ... Guide to Authors & Copyright. *The manuscript should be written in English and the desired of contents is: Title, Authors name ... Authors (please complete in full): ______________________________________________________. The undersigned authors agree to the ... The authors shall not grant the right to print, publish, copy, or store electronically any part of the article to any other ...
ALA has a interview with the authors of Coaching Copyright, Kevin L. Smith and Erin L. Ellis. Smith and Ellis released this new ... Second, there needs to be a easy way of reporting to an author or publisher when an item do not appear to be a legal copy ... In other words, not the authors personal email account.) You may read my two points above and think they will never come to be ... I think what this really means is that authors need to put their contact information on their works, including their books. ...
Title to the materials remains with us or with the authors of the materials contained on this web site. All rights not ...
3) According to French copyright law, copyrighted works are protected for 70 years after the authors death. ...
Any opinions (express or implied) are those of the individual authors and not necessarily those of Progressive Trade Media ...
Authors must provide a final list of authors at the time of submission, ensuring the correct sequence of the names of authors, ... Authors must provide a final list of authors at the time of submission, ensuring the correct sequence of the names of authors, ... For Authors. ⇨ Author Guidelines⇨ Animated Abstracts⇨ Submit Abstracts Online⇨ Submit Manuscripts Online⇨ Open Access Funding⇨ ... Where an author does not opt-in to this paid service, then the authors article will be published only on Bentham Sciences ...
For Authors For Reviewers For Editors For Librarians For Publishers For Societies ... We note that the authors stand by the content as published. Since the nature of the claims against the paper concern ...
From: Queensland Brain Institute General anaesthetics do more than put you to sleep. A new understanding of the complex ways in which general anaesthetics act on the brain could eventually lead to improved drugs for surgery. It remains unclear how general anaesthesia works, even though it is one of the most common medical procedures worldwide.. University of Queensland researcher, Associate Professor Bruno van Swinderen, said his team had overturned previous understanding of what general anaesthetics do to the brain, finding the drugs did much more than induce sleep.. "We looked at the effects of propofol - one of the most common general anaesthetic drugs used during surgery - on synaptic release," the UQ Queensland Brain Institute scientist said.. Synaptic release is the mechanism by which neurons - or nerve cells - communicate with each other.. "We know from previous research that general anaesthetics including propofol act on sleep systems in the brain, much like a sleeping pill," Associate ...
Its one thing to have a bad study, a study full of error, and for the authors then to admit that they made errors, Fiona ... Most of his co-authors withdrew their names from the study in 2004 after learning he had had been paid by a law firm that ... Editors note: Watch Anderson Coopers interview with the author of the discredited study, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, on AC360° at ... An investigation published by the British medical journal BMJ concludes the studys author, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, ...
Reader Impact Factor: 0.86 The RIF of an author expresses how many times more often the texts of this author have been ... downloaded than the average text, i.e., RIF = dn/D, with d = number of downloads of all texts of this author, D = number of all ...
Grants held by different authors should be identified as belonging to individual authors by the authors initials, for example ... An Author Publishing Agreement must be executed before an article can be published. Government authors whose articles were ... Papers with multiple authors are reviewed with the assumption that all authors have approved the submitted manuscript and ... Conflicts of Interest do not necessarily mean that an authors work has been compromised. Authors should declare any real or ...
If there are more than 3 authors, name only the first 3 authors and then use et al. Refer to the List of Journals Indexed in ... Authorship, and order of authors, should be agreed upon prior to initial submission. Additions or deletions to lists of authors ... and a Change of Authorship Form completed by ALL authors. Only an author can request to have his or her name removed from a ... with which all of the authors are affiliated. Authors should mask patients eyes and remove patients names from figures unless ...
This web focus compiles articles from Molecular Psychiatry and Translational Psychiatry that have been authored by Nobel Prize ... Focus on Nobel Laureate Authors. This web focus compiles articles from Molecular Psychiatry and Translational Psychiatry that ...
NPGs author license page provides details of the policy and a sample form. Authors are encouraged to submit their version of ... Authors of original research articles are encouraged to submit the authors version of the accepted paper (the unedited ... NPGs open access journals allow authors to comply with all funders open access policies worldwide. Authors may need to take ... Authors should cite the publication reference and doi number on any deposited version, and provide a link from it to the ...
since they were also youths, but: They were youths, yet mature youths, their eyes fresh and free of evil, their feet refrained from approaching falsehood and futility. They sacrificed and expended themselves in worship and in withholding themselves from sleep. They sold their souls which were to pass away for souls which would never die. Allaah saw them in the latter part of the night, bending their backs, reciting the Qur aan. Whenever one of them came to an Ayah mentioning Paradise, he would weep, longing for it. Whenever he came upon an Ayah mentioning the fire he would groan out of fear, as if the Hell-fire were directly in front of him. The earth devoured their knees their hands and their foreheads. They joined exhaustion in the night with exhaustion in the day. Their colour becoming yellowed and their bodies emaciated through standing long in prayer and frequent fasting whilst they regarded their own actions to be negligible before Allaah. They fulfilled their covenant with Allaah and ...
Authors reply. BMJ 1996; 313 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.313.7064.1084c (Published 26 October 1996) Cite this as: BMJ ...
Authors reply. BMJ 1995; 310 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6987.1139b (Published 29 April 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995; ...
I would really appreciate your frank opinion about my shrinking testicles. I am in my mid-40s, a father of two, and have been facing a shrinking "crown jewel" in the sac for the last three years.. ...
Authors best friends. When Word for Word adapts short works of fiction for the stage, not one syllable is added or subtracted. ... The next thing the author knew he was invited to a theater here to see a play based on his story "Slaughterhouse." ... "When youre editing, you lose the authors voice in some sense. Whats beautiful about this style of theater is that youre ... Weve never had an author say, Its wrong. ". The companys latest production is "The Fall River Axe Murders," which opened ...
First-hand reports from all the major battlefronts have been compiled for Journalism in War, to be published by the American Council on Public Affairs. The book has been assembled by the School of Journalism of the University of Missouri, and edited by Dean Frank L. Mott of that institution ...
Publication Cover: If you are a published PCD author, you may add this PDF page as a cover for your published manuscript. ... The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department ... of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors ...
This is a digitized version of an article from The Timess print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems. Please send reports of such problems to [email protected] ...
We are keeping this Blast Sign Up Open to Authors until August 18th. Your invoice must be paid by August 21st.. Please note ... that this BLAST will feature MULTIPLE Titles and Authors.. Cami Hensley. RABT ...
Nira Rittenberg is an occupational therapist who specializes in geriatrics and dementia care at Baycrest Health Sciences Centre and in private practice. She is a former freelance contributor for the Star.
Being authors from Asian countries make it a vulnerable target for Editor to coerce citation. Journal editors can strategically ... Coercive citation in Asian Authors * 1. Coercive Citation in Asian Authors By : rohwani Being authors from Asian countries make ... Coercive Citation in Asian Authors Coercive Citation in Asian Authors 1 * 2. Coercive Citation to Asian Authors Coercive ... They also found that while the majority of authors disapprove of the practice, most Coercive Citation in Asian Authors 3 ...
  • In that spirit, below find ten African-American authors whose works should rest prominently on every educated American's bookshelf (or Amazon Kindle , Barnes and Noble Nook , or Apple iPad ). (forbes.com)
  • Both in print and online, these changes have been developed over more than a year in consultation with members of the scientific community in their guises of readers, authors and peer-reviewers, with much positive feedback in the process. (nature.com)
  • In addition, authors may note up to 2 reviewers they wish to exclude and reason(s) for exclusion. (jci.org)
  • If an article is within scope, then the Editor will ideally solicit at least two external peer reviewers (whose identities will remain anonymous to the authors) to assess the article before confirming a decision to accept. (hindawi.com)
  • This change in status was requested by the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines Working Group ( AUWG ) because the issues raised by reviewers during the Last Call period led the working group to make substantial modifications that may require further refinement before proceeding again to Last Call. (w3.org)
  • Reviewers' comments, when available, are provided to authors. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Authors are welcome to suggest the names of individuals they consider qualified to serve as reviewers. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The workshop participants are the authors of those submissions and any other reviewers the authors choose to accept. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reviewers discussing a work are careful to make productive comments, both because the author is listening and because in other sessions that author will become the reviewer and make comments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some editors coerce authors into adding superfluos citations (of the editor's paper) to the submitted paper before it can be published. (slideshare.net)
  • The most important changes allow for the Italian Society of Authors and Editors, or SIAE, to circulate a list of written works sold each quarter along with the requirement that royalties be paid within 60 days from when the document is circulated. (hollywoodreporter.com)
  • A one-paragraph biography describing the credentials of each of the authors/editors for preparing the work, highlighting editing, writing, and other relevant experience. (ala.org)
  • Editorial Division Asia (EDA) supports authors, editors, societies and companies in China, Japan, India and throughout the region with publications, consulting and editorial solutions to meet their individual needs. (karger.com)
  • Bioedit language services employs subject-specific editors in life science and medical research to assist authors in publishing in high-impact bioscience/medical journals. (karger.com)
  • 107 experts from 52 countries were selected as Coordinating Lead Authors and Lead Authors - who are working on each individual chapter - and Review Editors, who ensured that comments by experts and governments were given appropriate consideration as the report developed. (ipcc.ch)
  • The full list of Coordinating Lead Authors, Lead Authors and Review Editors is here . (ipcc.ch)
  • A call for nomination of authors was sent to governments , observer organizations and IPCC Bureau Members on 5 April 2017. (ipcc.ch)
  • We note that the authors stand by the content as published. (mdpi.com)
  • By learning how to create their own content, our students aren't just becoming better teachers but passionate authors of Gaelic textbooks that are needed in Irish schools. (apple.com)
  • By the time they graduate, Seán's students have become content creators, published authors, and experienced teachers. (apple.com)
  • As an Oxford University Press (OUP) author, you are contributing to a global effort that encourages the dissemination and accessibility of trusted, digital reference content. (oxfordreference.com)
  • This specification provides guidelines for designing Web content authoring tools that are more accessible for people with disabilities. (w3.org)
  • An authoring tool that conforms to these guidelines will promote accessibility by providing an accessible authoring interface to authors with disabilities as well as enabling, supporting, and promoting the production of accessible Web content by all authors. (w3.org)
  • This document specifies requirements that improve the accessibility of Web content authoring tools . (w3.org)
  • Similar to Keynote and Pages, authors can embed galleries and elements, but also include JavaScript and HTML5 code, providing them with the ability to deliver truly custom content from their computer or the Web. (thenextweb.com)
  • As a book author you can find guidelines for a smooth publication process and get in touch with an editor in your subject area. (springer.com)
  • As a Springer author you can use Article or Book Tracking . (springer.com)
  • NPR interviews with top authors and the NPR Book Tour, a weekly feature and podcast where leading authors read and discuss their writing. (npr.org)
  • August 27, 2012 The Nobel Peace Prize winner and former secretary-general of the U.N. has co-authored a book on his life's work, Interventions: A Life in War and Peace . (npr.org)
  • Scott Simon talks to Simon Winder, author of a book about Fleming's life and colorful career. (npr.org)
  • To remedy this, he has started blogging and is the author of a book on the 1E- mission and several other publications. (dlr.de)
  • Author Amelia Frahm has survived both breast cancer and publishing and now that her childrenÂ?s book, Tickles TabithaÂ?s Cancer-tankerous Mommy has appeared on The Rosie O Donnell Show she can add the Anthrax virus to her list. (prweb.com)
  • If you will be at the IBM Information on Demand Conference this October , please stop by the many book signing sessions that I have planned to congratulate an author on a job well done. (ibm.com)
  • I read the book reviews in newspapers and magazines, but that's not where I found one of my favorite authors. (wired.com)
  • M.T. Anderson, National Book Award-winning author of the novels "The. (twincities.com)
  • It hosts three literary awards each year: the Authors' Club First Novel Award, the Dolman Best Travel Book Award, and the Banister Fletcher Award for the best book on art or architecture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, please consider these authors for great books discussion groups , not just in February, but also every month of the year. (forbes.com)
  • Sign up to receive information about new books, author events, and special offers. (macmillan.com)
  • Meeting these people is the icing on the cake, but I've noticed that they have the same enthusiasm and drive as the lesser known authors who I work with to get books about DB2 and other IBM products produced. (ibm.com)
  • Author of seven books on South Florida history, McIver lives in Lighthouse Point with his journalist wife, Joan. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Not surprisingly, crime and sex were the principal subject matter for authors and books on the Gold Coast. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • She is the author of Photoshop CS3 All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies (Wiley) and has contributed as author or coauthor on numerous books on Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Illustrator, and PowerPoint. (oreilly.com)
  • In addition to writing several books on Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, Ted is the world's leading author of books on Adobe Acrobat. (oreilly.com)
  • Editorials should be less than 1000 words in length, do not have an abstract, should keep references to a minimum but definitely no more than 5, and do not have figures or tables (although they do have a photograph of the author as an illustration). (sciencemag.org)
  • If you are interested in writing a Review, please send a presubmission inquiry that includes title, author list and affiliations, and abstract to [email protected] . (sciencemag.org)
  • Therefore, authors are requested to register the clinical trial presented in the manuscript in a public trial registry and include the trial registration number at the end of the abstract. (hindawi.com)
  • Authors can deposit the first draft of a submitted article on their personal websites, their institution's repositories or any non-commercial repository for personal use, internal institutional use or for permitted scholarly posting. (benthamscience.com)
  • The first page should include the title of the paper, first name, middle initial(s) and last name of the author(s), and for each author a short institutional address, and an abbreviated title (for running headlines within the article). (tandf.co.uk)
  • Once submitted to the journal, the author will not withdraw their manuscript at any stage prior to publication. (benthamscience.com)
  • Authors may deposit the ACCEPTED VERSION of the peer-reviewed article on their personal websites, their institution's repository or any non-commercial repository such as PMC, arXiv after 12 MONTHS of publication on the journal website. (benthamscience.com)
  • An investigation published by the British medical journal BMJ concludes the study's author, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, misrepresented or altered the medical histories of all 12 of the patients whose cases formed the basis of the 1998 study -- and that there was 'no doubt' Wakefield was responsible. (cnn.com)
  • Authors are invited to submit additional supporting material such as data sets or video for publication in the online version of the journal. (nature.com)
  • The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • The editor forces authors to add unnecessary citations to an article before the journal will agree to publish it. (slideshare.net)
  • 2. Coercive Citation to Asian Authors Coercive citation is an unethical practice done by ediotrs of academic journal publications. (slideshare.net)
  • As a journal author go to the the journal page of your choice and submit your manuscript online. (springer.com)
  • He is also the author of Selective Memories (a biography), James Journal, and miscellaneous poetry. (prweb.com)
  • We encourage authors to ensure that their datasets are either deposited in publicly available repositories (where available and appropriate) or presented in the main manuscript or additional supporting files whenever possible. (nature.com)
  • Plagiarism is strictly forbidden, and by submitting the article for publication the authors agree that the publishers have the legal right to take appropriate action against the authors, if plagiarism or fabricated information is discovered. (benthamscience.com)
  • An Author Publishing Agreement must be executed before an article can be published. (cambridge.org)
  • To read about how to prepare your article, please read the Instructions for Authors . (nature.com)
  • Authors should cite the publication reference and doi number on any deposited version, and provide a link from it to the published article on the NPG website. (nature.com)
  • If appropriate, letters are sent to the authors of the published article under discussion for a response. (sciencemag.org)
  • We've created space for more descriptive headlines and other display elements that allow a reader to get an immediate sense of what an article has to say and who its authors are. (nature.com)
  • This pages list the authors of the publications according to the first letter in the author's name. (who.int)
  • Questia compiled this list based on the most-read African-American authors in their library (a list of most influential African-American authors might also include fellow Omahan, Malcolm X , the Reverend Martin Luther King , Eldridge Cleaver , Angela Davis , and President Barack Obama ). (forbes.com)
  • I wasn't able to list all the authors who I admire in this post, because believe me, there are many more. (ibm.com)
  • Read the rest of Judy Berna's interview with author Mary Roach on GeekMom ! (wired.com)
  • At the September 15 hearing in Chin's courtroom Google and the publishers indicated they were close to a separate settlement, leaving the authors to pursue litigation-or a settlement-on their own. (publishersweekly.com)
  • Authors should declare any real or perceived Conflicts of Interest in order to be transparent about the context of their work. (cambridge.org)
  • To punctuate their support of Black History Month, Questia is offering a reference work about each author below completely free for a month. (forbes.com)
  • Occasionally the updates and revisions made by other authors to their own work may relate to subjects covered in your entries. (oxfordreference.com)
  • All authors must disclose any financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that could inappropriately influence (bias) their work. (elsevier.com)
  • ROME -- Italy's decree governing the rights of authors was updated for the first time in 66 years Wednesday, creating more transparency in how writers are compensated but allowing for more time before payment for acquiring rights to a work is made. (hollywoodreporter.com)
  • This does not mean that authors should not express their opinion or criticize the work of others, but they should do so without resorting to polemics or slander. (tolweb.org)
  • Both of the authors say that their work is creative, quirky, original and varied. (prlog.org)
  • Unlike other authors in the region, his work transcended Latin America with One Hundred Years of Solitude, which was translated into more than 30 languages. (bbc.co.uk)
  • This process helps an author improve his or her work and learn to be a better writer for future works, both by receiving critiques of their own work and by mentoring the work of the other authors. (wikipedia.org)
  • While authors' conferences may include some such presentations, writers' conferences also include numerous sessions wherein an author does not present his or her work but rather listens while the other participants discuss the work. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this way, the author gains an understanding of what readers learn by reading the work. (wikipedia.org)
  • For references , please go to https://www.eea.europa.eu/soer/synthesis/synthesis/authors-and-acknowledgements or scan the QR code. (europa.eu)
  • NPG's author license page provides details of the policy and a sample form. (nature.com)
  • If you are a published PCD author, you may add this PDF page as a cover for your published manuscript. (cdc.gov)
  • It also includes a new page, World View , in which external authors give prompt personal perspectives on live issues. (nature.com)
  • If you have questions about subscriptions, please visit the how to subscribe page or to purchase print titles, please visit the OUP website , and don't forget your author discount. (oxfordreference.com)
  • A guide to RAND authors, who provide objective, quality research on a variety of topics in the public and private sector. (rand.org)
  • The Internet Puiblic Library's, Special Collections, Native American Authors, provides you with information on North American Authors with bibliographies of their published works, biographical information, and links to online resources, including interviews, online texts, and tribal websites. (merlot.org)
  • In particular, the requirements for the accessibility of the authoring interface, which in the Last Call Working Draft strongly depended on an ISO document, have been updated and expanded to remove that dependency. (w3.org)
  • Please note that this BLAST will feature MULTIPLE Titles and Authors. (google.com)
  • The authors note that vaccination against the polysaccharide encapsulated bacteria Neisseria meningitidis ( meningococcus ), Hemophilus influenzae , and Streptococcus pneumoniae ( pneumococcus ) is recommended by the Canadian National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), as published in the 2006 Canadian Immunization Guide. (cmaj.ca)
  • I should also make a note here to congratulate those authors who are writing in English even though English is their second language! (ibm.com)
  • Very large datasets may be submitted as supplemental material and cited in the text with a URL to the material, hosted on an author-affiliated website or data repository, or may appear with a note that the data is available upon request to the author. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Being authors from Asian countries make it a vulnerable target for Editor to coerce citation. (slideshare.net)
  • citation needed] An authors' conference consists of two phases, shepherding and writers' workshops. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] One popular series of authors' conferences is the Pattern Languages of Programming conferences, held to encourage and assist authors of software design patterns and pattern languages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most optical disc authoring utilities create a disc image and copy it to the disc in one bundled operation, so that end-users often do not know the distinction between creating and burning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, there are the people who want to be authors who find the time to create a proposal and send it to me. (ibm.com)
  • The Minnesota Author, Publisher and Cancer Survivor, is not a postal worker, politician, or employed by any of the network news organizations, yet she found herself a target of the Anthrax virus when a scheduled appearance on the Rosie O Donnell Show was cancelled due to Anthrax being found at New York City s Rockefeller Plaza where the show airs. (prweb.com)
  • To provide additional and useful navigation for readers and authors, these contributions are presented online by subject as well as in the more conventional temporal ( by issue ) method. (nature.com)
  • 4. Zora Neale Hurston was an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author of four novels and over fifty short stories, plays and essays. (forbes.com)
  • Optical disc authoring , including DVD and Blu-ray Disc authoring, is the process of assembling source material-video, audio or other data-into the proper logical volume format to then be recorded ("burned") onto an optical disc (typically a compact disc or DVD ). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many optical disc authoring technologies for optimizing the authoring process and preventing errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under Resources for Authors you find all the necessary information about the publishing process at Karger. (karger.com)
  • However, the brief in support of the motion does not address concerns about adequate class representation raised throughout the settlement process, specifically whether the guild, an organization which represents a sliver of the wide universe of authors, can effectively speak for the varied, and divergent interests of "authors" writ large. (publishersweekly.com)
  • At Springer, we recognize that our authors are at the heart of what we do and we are committed to providing the resources, support and advice you need to help you succeed. (springer.com)
  • The authors of the excerpt above should recognize that the primary objective of the first paragraph is to explain the purpose of their paper and thereby interest you in reading the second paragraph. (cmu.edu)
  • Does the newly added Part A adequately cover the requirements that authoring tools (both Web-based and not) should follow in order to provide accessible user interfaces to authors? (w3.org)
  • This fiery autobiographical novel captures a pivotal week or two in the life of fourteen-year-old Jack Gantos, as the author reveals the moment he began to slide off track as a kid who in just a few years would find himself locked up in a federal penitentiary for the crimes portrayed in the memoir Hole in My Life. (macmillan.com)
  • Find out more about the background of the attorney authors contributing to Lexis Practice Advisor in your practice area. (lexisnexis.com)