An eating disorder that is characterized by the lack or loss of APPETITE, known as ANOREXIA. Other features include excess fear of becoming OVERWEIGHT; BODY IMAGE disturbance; significant WEIGHT LOSS; refusal to maintain minimal normal weight; and AMENORRHEA. This disorder occurs most frequently in adolescent females. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
The lack or loss of APPETITE accompanied by an aversion to food and the inability to eat. It is the defining characteristic of the disorder ANOREXIA NERVOSA.
An eating disorder that is characterized by a cycle of binge eating (BULIMIA or bingeing) followed by inappropriate acts (purging) to avert weight gain. Purging methods often include self-induced VOMITING, use of LAXATIVES or DIURETICS, excessive exercise, and FASTING.
Eating an excess amount of food in a short period of time, as seen in the disorder of BULIMIA NERVOSA. It is caused by an abnormal craving for food, or insatiable hunger also known as "ox hunger".
A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.
A condition of metabolic imbalance that is caused by complications of initially feeding a severely malnourished patient too aggressively. Usually occurring within the first 5 days of refeeding, this syndrome is characterized by WATER-ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCE; GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; and DIARRHEA.
Absence of menstruation.
A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.
Abnormal distention of the STOMACH due to accumulation of gastric contents that may reach 10 to 15 liters. Gastric dilatation may be the result of GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION; ILEUS; GASTROPARESIS; or denervation.
Clinical manifestation of excessive LEANNESS usually caused by disease or a lack of nutrition (MALNUTRITION).
Individuals' concept of their own bodies.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.
Recurrent localized itching, swelling and painful erythema on the fingers, toes or ears, produced by exposure to cold.
Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition.
An acute infection of the skin caused by species of STREPTOCOCCUS. This disease most frequently affects infants, young children, and the elderly. Characteristics include pink-to-red lesions that spread rapidly and are warm to the touch. The commonest site of involvement is the face.
The consumption of edible substances.
Neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and other diseases of the hypothalamus. Clinical manifestations include appetite disorders; AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; SLEEP DISORDERS; behavioral symptoms related to dysfunction of the LIMBIC SYSTEM; and neuroendocrine disorders.
A condition characterized by alterations of the sense of taste which may range from mild to severe, including gross distortions of taste quality.
Modern medical literature refers to peer-reviewed articles, journals, and books published from the late 19th century to the present, encompassing advancements in medical knowledge, research, technology, and evidence-based practices that have contributed to significant improvements in diagnostic techniques, treatment methods, and public health interventions.
The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.
A disorder associated with three or more of the following: eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry; eating much more rapidly than normal; eating alone due to embarrassment; feeling of disgust, DEPRESSION, or guilt after overeating. Criteria includes occurrence on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behavior (i.e. purging, excessive exercise, etc.) and does not co-occur exclusively with BULIMIA NERVOSA or ANOREXIA NERVOSA. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
A state of internal activity of an organism that is a necessary condition before a given stimulus will elicit a class of responses; e.g., a certain level of hunger (drive) must be present before food will elicit an eating response.
The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.

Empirical comparison of two psychological therapies. Self psychology and cognitive orientation in the treatment of anorexia and bulimia. (1/642)

The authors investigated the applicability of self psychological treatment (SPT) and cognitive orientation treatment (COT) to the treatment of anorexia and bulimia. Thirty-three patients participated in this study. The bulimic patients (n = 25) were randomly assigned either to SPT, COT, or control/nutritional counseling only (C/NC). The anorexic patients (n = 8) were randomly assigned to either SPT or COT. Patients were administered a battery of outcome measures assessing eating disorders symptomatology, attitudes toward food, self structure, and general psychiatric symptoms. After SPT, significant improvement was observed. After COT, slight but nonsignificant improvement was observed. After C/NC, almost no changes could be detected.  (+info)

Psychosocial correlates of health compromising behaviors among adolescents. (2/642)

The objective of the present study was to examine psychosocial correlates of diverse health-compromising behaviors among adolescents of different ages. The study population included 123,132 adolescents in sixth, ninth and 12th grades. Psychosocial correlates of substance abuse, delinquency, suicide risk, sexual activity and unhealthy weight loss behaviors were examined. Risk-taking disposition was significantly associated with nearly every behavior across age and gender groups. Other consistent correlates included sexual abuse and family connectedness. Correlates of health-compromising behaviors tended to be consistent across age groups. However, stronger associations were noted between sexual abuse and substance use for younger adolescents, and risk-taking disposition and school achievement were stronger correlates for older youth. The results suggest the presence of both common and unique etiological factors for different health-compromising behaviors among youth. The results emphasize the importance of focusing on positive 'risk-taking' experiences for youth in prevention programs; being sensitive to possible sexual abuse experiences among both female and male adolescents in health-care consultations; integrating strategies for improved family connectedness into health promotion efforts; and making school relevant for all adolescents.  (+info)

Riboflavin and riboflavin-derived cofactors in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa. (3/642)

BACKGROUND: Thyroid hormones, riboflavin, riboflavin cofactors, and organic acids were assessed in girls with anorexia nervosa. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the effect of malnutrition and low thyroid hormone concentrations on erythrocyte and plasma riboflavin metabolism and their relation with urinary organic acid excretion. DESIGN: Seventeen adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2): 14.8 +/- 2.2] and 17 age-matched, healthy girls (control subjects; BMI: 20.5 +/- 2.2) took part in the feeding study. Erythrocyte and plasma riboflavin as well as riboflavin cofactors (flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide) were assessed by HPLC, whereas urinary organic acids were assessed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Anorectic patients who began a feeding program had higher erythrocyte riboflavin (3.5 +/- 2.2 compared with <0.1 nmol/mol hemoglobin; P < 0.001), lower plasma flavin adenine dinucleotide (57.8 +/- 18.5 compared with 78.5 +/- 54.3 nmol/L; P < 0.05), and higher urinary ethylmalonic acid (7.12 +/- 4.39 compared with 1.3 +/- 2.8 micromol/mmol creatinine; P < 0.001) and isovalerylglycine (7.65 +/- 4.78 compared with 3.8 +/- 0.9 micromol/mmol creatinine; P < 0.05) concentrations than did control subjects. Triiodothyronine concentrations were low and negatively correlated with plasma riboflavin concentrations (r = -0.69, P < 0.01). Not all patients showed improvements in these biochemical indexes after 30 d of refeeding. CONCLUSIONS: The low triiodothyronine concentrations observed in anorexia nervosa could alter the extent of riboflavin conversion into cofactors, thus leading to high erythrocyte riboflavin concentrations, low plasma flavin adenine dinucleotide concentrations, and high rates of ethylmalonic acid and isovalerylglycine excretion.  (+info)

Anorexia nervosa with severe liver dysfunction and subsequent critical complications. (4/642)

A twenty-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa (body mass index=11) suffered from severe liver dysfunction (aspartate aminotransferase 5,000 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase 3,980 IU/l, prothrombin time 32%), hypoglycemia (serum glucose 27 mg/dl), and pancreatic dysfunction (amylase 820 IU/l, lipase 558 IU/l). She fell into a depressive state with irritability, which was not improved by intravenous glucose. Despite treatment with plasmapheresis for the liver dysfunction, she subsequently developed pulmonary edema, acute renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Hemodialysis, mechanical ventilation and drug therapy including prednisolone, prostaglandin E1, and branched-chain amino acid, improved her critical condition. In this case, malnutrition may have been the cause for the liver dysfunction and subsequent complications.  (+info)

Altered dopamine activity after recovery from restricting-type anorexia nervosa. (5/642)

When ill, women with eating disorders have disturbances of mood and behavior and alterations of catecholamine activity. It is not known whether these alterations are cause or consequence of pathological eating behaviors. To avoid confounding effects of pathologic eating behavior, we studied women who were recovered (> 1 year, normal weight, regular menstrual cycles, no restricting eating pattern, no bingeing or purging) from anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) compared to healthy control women. Recovered AN women had significantly lower height-adjusted weight than did recovered BN women. CSF HVA (pmol/ml +/- SD), a major metabolite of dopamine, was significantly lower (p < .02) in six restricting-type AN women (131 +/- 49) compared to 19 BN women (216 +/- 73) and at a trend (p < .08) less than 13 bulimic-type AN women (209 +/- 53, p < .06) and 18 control women (202 +/- 57, p < .08). These four groups had similar values for CSF MHPG, a norepinephrine metabolite. Dopamine neuronal function has been associated with motor activity, reward, and novelty seeking. These behaviors are altered in restricting-type AN compared to other eating disorder subtypes. A trait-related disturbance of dopamine metabolism may contribute to a vulnerability to develop this sub-type of eating disorder.  (+info)

Serum leptin levels in patients with anorexia nervosa before and after partial refeeding, relationships to serum lipids and biochemical nutritional parameters. (6/642)

Leptin is a protein hormone produced by adipocytes that provide information about the body fat content. It was previously reported that serum leptin levels were decreased in patients with anorexia nervosa in comparison with healthy control subjects. The aim of our study was to compare serum leptin levels in patients with anorexia nervosa (n=11, initial mean BMI=15.4 kg/m2) before and after partial recovery with control age-matched subjects (n=11, mean BMI= 20.3 kg/m2) and to study the relationships of leptin levels, serum lipids and biochemical nutritional parameters. We found that serum leptin concentrations in patients with anorexia nervosa were significantly reduced in comparison with control subjects (3.61 vs 9.37 ng.ml(-1), p<0.01). Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein and albumin in patients with anorexia nervosa either before or after partial recovery did not differ from the control group. After partial recovery, a significant increase in serum leptin was observed (4.83 vs 3.61 ng.ml(-1), p<0.05), but the values still remained significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.01) Leptin levels correlated positively with the body mass index in the control group and anorexia nervosa group before recovery. The correlation with BMI in the anorexia nervosa group after refeeding was not significant. No significant correlation was found between leptin concentrations and serum lipids, total protein, albumin and prealbumin, respectively. Serum leptin thus represents a sensitive parameter that reflects the nutritional status in patients with anorexia nervosa suitable for long-term follow up during refeeding therapy.  (+info)

Longitudinal changes of circadian leptin, insulin and cortisol plasma levels and their correlation during refeeding in patients with anorexia nervosa. (7/642)

OBJECTIVE: To study the longitudinal changes in plasma levels of leptin, insulin and cortisol during the transition from the state of starvation to the state of refeeding focussing on diurnal secretion characteristics and their temporal relationships. DESIGN: Leptin, insulin and cortisol were measured every 2h for 24h during acute starvation (T1). Sampling was repeated after reaching half the target-body mass index (BMI) (T2) and again at target-BMI (17. 5kg/m(2); T3). The temporal relationships between the diurnal secretion patterns were assessed by cross-correlation analysis. RESULTS: Although BMIs at T1 were uniformly low, leptin levels varied widely within a range clearly below normal levels (0.03-1. 7microg/l). With increasing body fat during the course of refeeding, mean leptin levels increased from 0.64microg/l (range: 0.27-1. 73microg/l) (T1) to 1.61microg/l (range: 0.36-4.2microg/l) (T2) and to 3.67microg/l (range: 0.7-9.8microg/l) (T3). Circadian leptin secretion patterns showed maximal values uniformly around 0200h and minimal values around 0800h at all stages of the study. At all three weight levels, plasma leptin levels were highest between midnight and the early morning hours and lowest around the late morning hours. Refeeding neither profoundly changed secretion patterns of leptin nor did it change the positive, time-delayed relationship between leptin and insulin with increments in insulin secretion preceding those of leptin by 6h. A temporal relationship between leptin and cortisol could not be demonstrated in the state of semistarvation but emerged after a substantial weight gain; at that time, leptin increases preceded cortisol increases by 8h. CONCLUSIONS: Absolute leptin, insulin and cortisol levels are profoundly changed during starvation in anorectic patients, while refeeding, paralleled by a BMI gain, reverses these changes. During refeeding the relationship between leptin and cortisol changed profoundly, showing no significant correlation in the state of starvation, whereas at T3 after refeeding a strong inverse relationship could be observed. Leptin and insulin did not correlate significantly at any of the three stages studied.  (+info)

Parental high concern and adolescent-onset anorexia nervosa. A case-control study to investigate direction of causality. (8/642)

BACKGROUND: Robust evidence that anorexia nervosa is preceded rather than accompanied by high-concern (overprotective) parenting is limited. AIMS: To look for evidence of parental high concern occurring before any onset of disorder. METHOD: Forty consecutive referrals of adolescent girls with DSM-III-R anorexia nervosa were compared with matched controls using obstetric records and maternal interviews. RESULTS: Index mothers reported higher rates of: near-exclusive child care (P = 0.02), infant sleep difficulties (P = 0.018), severe distress at first regular separation (P = 0.048), high maternal trait anxiety levels (P = 0.008) and later age for first sleeping away from home (P = 0.009). More index families had experienced a severe obstetric loss prior to their daughter's birth (P = 0.066). CONCLUSIONS: This study lends evidence to the clinical contention that high-concern parenting in infancy is associated with the later development of anorexia nervosa. This may derive, in part, from aspects of unresolved grief.  (+info)

Anorexia nervosa is a psychological eating disorder characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight, a distorted body image, and extremely restrictive eating behaviors leading to significantly low body weight. It primarily affects adolescent girls and young women but can also occur in boys and men. The diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa, as per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), include:

1. Restriction of energy intake relative to requirements leading to a significantly low body weight in the context of age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health. Significantly low weight is defined as a weight that is less than minimally normal or, for children and adolescents, less than that expected.
2. Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight.
3. Disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight.
4. In postmenarcheal females, amenorrhea (the absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles). A woman is considered to have amenorrhea if her periods occur only following hormone replacement therapy.

Anorexia nervosa can manifest in two subtypes: the restricting type and the binge-eating/purging type. The restricting type involves limiting food intake without engaging in binge eating or purging behaviors, while the binge-eating/purging type includes recurrent episodes of binge eating or purging through self-induced vomiting or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas.

Anorexia nervosa can lead to severe medical complications, including but not limited to malnutrition, electrolyte imbalances, heart problems, bone density loss, and hormonal disturbances. Early identification, intervention, and comprehensive treatment, which often involve a combination of psychotherapy, nutrition counseling, and medication management, are crucial for improving outcomes and reducing the risk of long-term health consequences.

Anorexia is a medical condition defined as a loss of appetite or aversion to food, leading to significant weight loss. It can be a symptom of various underlying causes, such as mental health disorders (most commonly an eating disorder called anorexia nervosa), gastrointestinal issues, cancer, infections, or side effects of medication. In this definition, we are primarily referring to anorexia as a symptom rather than the specific eating disorder anorexia nervosa.

Anorexia nervosa is a psychological eating disorder characterized by:

1. Restriction of energy intake leading to significantly low body weight (in context of age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health)
2. Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain
3. Disturbed body image, such as overvaluation of self-worth regarding shape or weight, or denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Anorexia nervosa has two subtypes: restricting type and binge eating/purging type. The restricting type involves limiting food intake without engaging in binge eating or purging behaviors (such as self-induced vomiting or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas). In contrast, the binge eating/purging type includes recurrent episodes of binge eating and compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain.

It is essential to differentiate between anorexia as a symptom and anorexia nervosa as a distinct psychological disorder when discussing medical definitions.

Bulimia nervosa is a mental health disorder that is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating, followed by compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain. These compensatory behaviors may include self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, or excessive exercise.

Individuals with bulimia nervosa often experience a lack of control over their eating habits and may feel intense shame, guilt, and distress about their binge eating and compensatory behaviors. The disorder can lead to serious medical complications, such as electrolyte imbalances, dehydration, dental problems, and gastrointestinal issues.

Bulimia nervosa typically begins in late adolescence or early adulthood and affects women more often than men. The exact cause of the disorder is not known, but it is believed to be related to a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and social factors. Treatment for bulimia nervosa may include cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication, nutrition counseling, and support groups.

Bulimia nervosa is a mental health disorder that is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating, followed by compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain. These compensatory behaviors may include self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, or excessive exercise.

Individuals with bulimia nervosa often have a fear of gaining weight and a distorted body image, which can lead to a cycle of binge eating and purging that can be difficult to break. The disorder can have serious medical consequences, including electrolyte imbalances, dehydration, dental problems, and damage to the digestive system.

Bulimia nervosa typically begins in late adolescence or early adulthood and affects women more often than men. Treatment for bulimia nervosa may include cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication, and nutritional counseling. If left untreated, bulimia nervosa can lead to serious health complications and negatively impact a person's quality of life.

Eating disorders are mental health conditions characterized by significant disturbances in eating behaviors and associated distressing thoughts and emotions. They include several types of disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other specified feeding or eating disorders (OSFED). These disorders can have serious medical and psychological consequences if left untreated.

Anorexia nervosa is characterized by restrictive eating, low body weight, and an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat. Individuals with anorexia may also have a distorted body image and deny the severity of their low body weight.

Bulimia nervosa involves recurrent episodes of binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors such as purging (e.g., self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives or diuretics), fasting, or excessive exercise to prevent weight gain.

Binge eating disorder is characterized by recurrent episodes of eating large amounts of food in a short period of time, often to the point of discomfort, accompanied by feelings of loss of control and distress. Unlike bulimia nervosa, individuals with binge eating disorder do not engage in compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain.

Other specified feeding or eating disorders (OSFED) include atypical anorexia nervosa, subthreshold bulimia nervosa, and subthreshold binge eating disorder, which may have similar symptoms to the above disorders but do not meet all the diagnostic criteria.

Eating disorders can affect people of any age, gender, race, or ethnicity, and they are often associated with other mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment typically involves a combination of psychological therapy, nutrition counseling, and medical management to address both the physical and psychological aspects of the disorder.

Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal shift in fluid and electrolyte balance that may occur in malnourished individuals when they begin to receive nutrition. This occurs due to significant metabolic changes, including increased insulin secretion, which leads to shifts of fluids and electrolytes from the extracellular to intracellular space.

This shift can result in hypophosphatemia (low phosphate levels), hypokalemia (low potassium levels), hypomagnesemia (low magnesium levels), and fluid overload, which can cause serious complications such as heart failure, seizures, and even death if not properly managed. It's important to monitor and correct electrolyte imbalances and fluid status during refeeding to prevent these complications.

Amenorrhea is a medical condition characterized by the absence or cessation of menstrual periods in women of reproductive age. It can be categorized as primary amenorrhea, when a woman who has not yet had her first period at the expected age (usually around 16 years old), or secondary amenorrhea, when a woman who has previously had regular periods stops getting them for six months or more.

There are various causes of amenorrhea, including hormonal imbalances, pregnancy, breastfeeding, menopause, extreme weight loss or gain, eating disorders, intense exercise, stress, chronic illness, tumors, and certain medications or medical treatments. In some cases, amenorrhea may indicate an underlying medical condition that requires further evaluation and treatment.

Amenorrhea can have significant impacts on a woman's health and quality of life, including infertility, bone loss, and emotional distress. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare provider if you experience amenorrhea or missed periods to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Family therapy, also known as family systems therapy, is a type of psychological counseling that involves all members of a nuclear or extended family. Its primary goal is to promote understanding and improve communication between family members in order to resolve conflicts and foster healthy relationships. It is based on the belief that the family system is an interconnected unit and that changes in one part of the system affect the other parts as well.

Family therapy can be used to address a wide range of issues, including behavioral problems in children and adolescents, mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, substance abuse, marital conflicts, and chronic illness or disability. The therapist will typically observe the family's interaction patterns and communication styles during sessions and provide feedback and guidance on how to make positive changes.

Family therapy can be conducted with the entire family present in the same room, or it may involve individual sessions with different family members. The number of sessions required will depend on the severity and complexity of the issues being addressed. It is important for all family members to be open and willing to participate in the therapy process in order for it to be effective.

Gastric dilatation, also known as stomach dilation or distention, refers to the abnormal enlargement or expansion of the stomach. This condition often occurs when the stomach fills with gas, food, or fluids and is unable to empty properly. Gastric dilatation can be caused by various factors such as overeating, swallowing excessive air, gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying), intestinal obstruction, or certain medical conditions like hiatal hernia or pregnancy.

In severe cases, gastric dilatation may lead to gastric volvulus, where the stomach twists on itself, cutting off its blood supply and leading to ischemia and necrosis of the stomach tissue. This is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms of gastric dilatation include abdominal pain, bloating, vomiting, loss of appetite, and difficulty breathing.

Emaciation is a state of extreme leanness or thinness, often due to lack of nutrition or disease. It is characterized by significant loss of body fat and muscle mass, resulting in a noticeable decrease in overall body weight. Emaciation can be a serious medical condition that requires immediate attention and treatment. In addition to malnutrition and various diseases, emaciation can also result from substance abuse, eating disorders, or mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional if you are experiencing unexplained weight loss or signs of emaciation.

Body image is a person's perception and attitude towards their own physical appearance, shape, and size. It involves how a person thinks and feels about their body, including their self-perceived strengths and flaws. Body image can be influenced by many factors, such as cultural and societal standards of beauty, personal experiences, and media messages. A positive body image is associated with higher self-esteem, confidence, and overall well-being, while a negative body image can contribute to emotional distress, anxiety, depression, and disordered eating behaviors.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure used to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height. It's calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. Here is the medical definition:

Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight(kg) / [height(m)]^2

According to the World Health Organization, BMI categories are defined as follows:

* Less than 18.5: Underweight
* 18.5-24.9: Normal or healthy weight
* 25.0-29.9: Overweight
* 30.0 and above: Obese

It is important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying weight issues in populations, it does have limitations when applied to individuals. For example, it may not accurately reflect body fat distribution or muscle mass, which can affect health risks associated with excess weight. Therefore, BMI should be used as one of several factors when evaluating an individual's health status and risk for chronic diseases.

Feeding behavior refers to the various actions and mechanisms involved in the intake of food and nutrition for the purpose of sustaining life, growth, and health. This complex process encompasses a coordinated series of activities, including:

1. Food selection: The identification, pursuit, and acquisition of appropriate food sources based on sensory cues (smell, taste, appearance) and individual preferences.
2. Preparation: The manipulation and processing of food to make it suitable for consumption, such as chewing, grinding, or chopping.
3. Ingestion: The act of transferring food from the oral cavity into the digestive system through swallowing.
4. Digestion: The mechanical and chemical breakdown of food within the gastrointestinal tract to facilitate nutrient absorption and eliminate waste products.
5. Assimilation: The uptake and utilization of absorbed nutrients by cells and tissues for energy production, growth, repair, and maintenance.
6. Elimination: The removal of undigested material and waste products from the body through defecation.

Feeding behavior is regulated by a complex interplay between neural, hormonal, and psychological factors that help maintain energy balance and ensure adequate nutrient intake. Disruptions in feeding behavior can lead to various medical conditions, such as malnutrition, obesity, eating disorders, and gastrointestinal motility disorders.

Weight gain is defined as an increase in body weight over time, which can be attributed to various factors such as an increase in muscle mass, fat mass, or total body water. It is typically measured in terms of pounds or kilograms and can be intentional or unintentional. Unintentional weight gain may be a cause for concern if it's significant or accompanied by other symptoms, as it could indicate an underlying medical condition such as hypothyroidism, diabetes, or heart disease.

It is important to note that while body mass index (BMI) can be used as a general guideline for weight status, it does not differentiate between muscle mass and fat mass. Therefore, an increase in muscle mass through activities like strength training could result in a higher BMI, but this may not necessarily be indicative of increased health risks associated with excess body fat.

Chilblains are small, itchy, painful swellings on the skin that occur as a reaction to cold and damp conditions. They most often affect the extremities, such as the fingers, ears, and toes. The medical term for chilblains is "perniosis." Chilblains can cause the skin to turn red, purple, or blue, and they may also become painful, swollen, and sensitive to touch. In severe cases, chilblains can lead to blistering, open sores, and infection.

Chilblains occur when the small blood vessels in the skin constrict in response to cold temperatures, causing a lack of oxygen and nutrients to reach the skin tissue. When the skin is then exposed to warmth, the blood vessels dilate rapidly, leading to leakage of fluid into the surrounding tissues and inflammation.

Chilblains are more common in people who have poor circulation or who are sensitive to cold temperatures. They can be prevented by keeping the skin warm and dry, avoiding sudden changes in temperature, and wearing protective clothing when exposed to cold conditions. Treatment typically involves relieving symptoms with warm compresses, elevating the affected area, and avoiding further exposure to cold. In some cases, medication may be necessary to reduce inflammation and promote healing.

Nutrition disorders refer to conditions that result from eating, drinking, or absorbing nutrients in a way that is not consistent with human physiological needs. These disorders can manifest as both undernutrition and overnutrition. Undernutrition includes disorders such as protein-energy malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, and mineral deficiencies, while overnutrition includes conditions such as obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer.

Malnutrition is the broad term used to describe a state in which a person's nutrient intake is insufficient or excessive, leading to negative consequences for their health. Malnutrition can be caused by a variety of factors, including poverty, food insecurity, lack of education, cultural practices, and chronic diseases.

In addition to under- and overnutrition, disordered eating patterns such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other specified feeding or eating disorders can also be considered nutrition disorders. These conditions are characterized by abnormal eating habits that can lead to serious health consequences, including malnutrition, organ damage, and mental health problems.

Overall, nutrition disorders are complex conditions that can have significant impacts on a person's physical and mental health. They require careful assessment, diagnosis, and treatment by healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition and dietetics.

Erysipelas is a skin infection characterized by the rapid onset of sharply demarcated, raised, and indurated (hardened) red plaques or patches with surrounding edema (swelling). It is typically caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria (\*Streptococcus pyogenes*). The infection involves the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics, resulting in painful, tender, warm, and erythematous (red) lesions. Erysipelas can also present with fever, chills, malaise, and generalized fatigue. Common sites for this infection include the face and lower extremities. Treatment usually involves antibiotics to eliminate the bacterial infection and supportive care to manage symptoms. If left untreated, erysipelas can lead to severe complications such as sepsis or necrotizing fasciitis.

The medical definition of "eating" refers to the process of consuming and ingesting food or nutrients into the body. This process typically involves several steps, including:

1. Food preparation: This may involve cleaning, chopping, cooking, or combining ingredients to make them ready for consumption.
2. Ingestion: The act of taking food or nutrients into the mouth and swallowing it.
3. Digestion: Once food is ingested, it travels down the esophagus and enters the stomach, where it is broken down by enzymes and acids to facilitate absorption of nutrients.
4. Absorption: Nutrients are absorbed through the walls of the small intestine and transported to cells throughout the body for use as energy or building blocks for growth and repair.
5. Elimination: Undigested food and waste products are eliminated from the body through the large intestine (colon) and rectum.

Eating is an essential function that provides the body with the nutrients it needs to maintain health, grow, and repair itself. Disorders of eating, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, can have serious consequences for physical and mental health.

Hypothalamic diseases refer to conditions that affect the hypothalamus, a small but crucial region of the brain responsible for regulating many vital functions in the body. The hypothalamus helps control:

1. Body temperature
2. Hunger and thirst
3. Sleep cycles
4. Emotions and behavior
5. Release of hormones from the pituitary gland

Hypothalamic diseases can be caused by genetic factors, infections, tumors, trauma, or other conditions that damage the hypothalamus. Some examples of hypothalamic diseases include:

1. Hypothalamic dysfunction syndrome: A condition characterized by various symptoms such as obesity, sleep disturbances, and hormonal imbalances due to hypothalamic damage.
2. Kallmann syndrome: A genetic disorder that affects the development of the hypothalamus and results in a lack of sexual maturation and a decreased sense of smell.
3. Prader-Willi syndrome: A genetic disorder that causes obesity, developmental delays, and hormonal imbalances due to hypothalamic dysfunction.
4. Craniopharyngiomas: Tumors that develop near the pituitary gland and hypothalamus, often causing visual impairment, hormonal imbalances, and growth problems.
5. Infiltrative diseases: Conditions such as sarcoidosis or histiocytosis can infiltrate the hypothalamus, leading to various symptoms related to hormonal imbalances and neurological dysfunction.
6. Traumatic brain injury: Damage to the hypothalamus due to head trauma can result in various hormonal and neurological issues.
7. Infections: Bacterial or viral infections that affect the hypothalamus, such as encephalitis or meningitis, can cause damage and lead to hypothalamic dysfunction.

Treatment for hypothalamic diseases depends on the underlying cause and may involve medications, surgery, hormone replacement therapy, or other interventions to manage symptoms and improve quality of life.

Dysgeusia is a medical term that refers to a distortion in the ability to taste. It can cause food and drinks to have a metallic, rancid, or bitter taste. Dysgeusia is different from ageusia, which is the complete loss of taste, and hypogeusia, which is a reduced ability to taste.

Dysgeusia can be caused by various factors, including damage to the nerves responsible for taste, exposure to certain chemicals or medications, and medical conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Treatment for dysgeusia depends on the underlying cause. If a medication is causing the symptom, changing the medication or adjusting the dosage may help. In other cases, addressing the underlying medical condition may improve taste perception.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems there might be a bit of confusion in your question. "Modern" is a term that refers to a period in time, specifically the modern period which is generally considered to be from the late 19th century to the present. "Literature," on the other hand, is a broad term that refers to written works, especially those considered to have artistic or intellectual value.

So, when you ask for a medical definition of "Literature, Modern," it's not entirely clear what you are looking for. If you are asking for examples of modern literature that deal with medical themes or issues, there are many notable works to choose from, including:

* "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot, which explores the ethical implications of medical research using human cells without consent.
* "The Hot Zone" by Richard Preston, a thriller about the Ebola virus and its potential to cause a global pandemic.
* "Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science" by Atul Gawande, a collection of essays that examine the challenges and uncertainties of medical practice.
* "Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness" by Susannah Cahalan, a memoir about the author's experience with a rare autoimmune disorder that affected her brain.

If you are looking for something else, please let me know and I will do my best to assist you!

Bone density refers to the amount of bone mineral content (usually measured in grams) in a given volume of bone (usually measured in cubic centimeters). It is often used as an indicator of bone strength and fracture risk. Bone density is typically measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, which provide a T-score that compares the patient's bone density to that of a young adult reference population. A T-score of -1 or above is considered normal, while a T-score between -1 and -2.5 indicates osteopenia (low bone mass), and a T-score below -2.5 indicates osteoporosis (porous bones). Regular exercise, adequate calcium and vitamin D intake, and medication (if necessary) can help maintain or improve bone density and prevent fractures.

Binge-Eating Disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time, often to the point of discomfort or pain. These episodes are accompanied by a loss of control over eating and are not followed by compensatory behaviors such as purging or excessive exercise.

To be diagnosed with BED, an individual must experience these binge-eating episodes at least once a week for three months or more, along with feelings of distress, shame, or guilt about their eating habits. Additionally, the binge eating must occur on average at least once a week for three months.

BED is different from overeating and can cause significant emotional and physical problems, including depression, anxiety, obesity, and other health issues related to weight gain. It is important to seek professional help if you suspect that you or someone you know may have BED.

In medical terms, "drive" is not a term that has a specific definition on its own. However, it can be used in the context of various medical concepts related to motivation, behavior, and physiological processes. Here are a few examples:

1. Motivational Drive: This refers to the internal push or desire that drives an individual to engage in certain behaviors or activities. It is often influenced by factors such as needs, goals, values, and emotions.
2. Sexual Drive: Also known as libido, sexual drive refers to a person's overall sexual desire or interest in sexual activity. It can be influenced by various factors, including hormonal changes, stress levels, relationship satisfaction, and mental health.
3. Aggression Drive: This refers to the tendency towards aggressive behavior, which can be motivated by various factors such as frustration, competition, or territoriality.
4. Homeostatic Drive: In physiology, homeostasis refers to the body's ability to maintain a stable internal environment despite changes in external conditions. Homeostatic drives are the physiological processes that help regulate and maintain this stability, such as hunger, thirst, or temperature regulation.

It is important to note that these are just a few examples of how the term "drive" can be used in a medical context. The specific meaning may vary depending on the context in which it is used.

Body composition refers to the relative proportions of different components that make up a person's body, including fat mass, lean muscle mass, bone mass, and total body water. It is an important measure of health and fitness, as changes in body composition can indicate shifts in overall health status. For example, an increase in fat mass and decrease in lean muscle mass can be indicative of poor nutrition, sedentary behavior, or certain medical conditions.

There are several methods for measuring body composition, including:

1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA): This method uses low-level electrical currents to estimate body fat percentage based on the conductivity of different tissues.
2. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA): This method uses low-dose X-rays to measure bone density and body composition, including lean muscle mass and fat distribution.
3. Hydrostatic weighing: This method involves submerging a person in water and measuring their weight underwater to estimate body density and fat mass.
4. Air displacement plethysmography (ADP): This method uses air displacement to measure body volume and density, which can be used to estimate body composition.

Understanding body composition can help individuals make informed decisions about their health and fitness goals, as well as provide valuable information for healthcare providers in the management of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Not all people with anorexia recover completely: about 20% develop anorexia nervosa as a chronic disorder. If anorexia nervosa ... "Anorexia Nervosa". My.clevelandclinic.org. Retrieved 9 June 2022. Attia E (2010). "Anorexia nervosa: current status and future ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Anorexia nervosa. Wikiquote has quotations related to Anorexia nervosa. National ... ISBN 978-0-07-803538-8. "Anorexia Nervosa". National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. Archived from ...
Overall, the remission rates of atypical anorexia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are similar at 71% for atypical anorexia nervosa ... Atypical anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder in which individuals meet all the qualifications for anorexia nervosa, ... However, only family therapy has shown real efficacy in treating patients with anorexia nervosa and atypical anorexia nervosa. ... Moskowitz, Lindsay; Weiselberg, Eric (2017-04-01). "Anorexia Nervosa/Atypical Anorexia Nervosa". Current Problems in Pediatric ...
Anorexia Nervosa (full name Anorexia Nervosa the Nihilistic Orchestra) was formed in 1991 as Necromancia, with a line-up ... "Anorexia Nervosa Biography", Allmusic, Macrovision Corporation "ANOREXIA NERVOSA Vocalist Quits Archived June 26, 2007, at the ... Anorexia Nervosa is a French symphonic black metal band from Limoges, formed in 1991. They are currently "on hold" due to the ... Anorexia Nervosa then went on hiatus for three years, returning with a new album, Redemption Process in 2004, now on Listenable ...
... the Enigma of Anorexia Nervosa in 1978. This book created a wider awareness of anorexia nervosa among lay readers. A further ... was attributed to heart failure as a consequence of anorexia nervosa. Awareness of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders ... The term anorexia nervosa was established in 1873 by Queen Victoria's personal physician, Sir William Gull. The term anorexia ... Holy Anorexia. U Chicago P Hepworth, Julie. 1999. The Social Construction of Anorexia Nervosa. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage ...
Exile is the first studio album by the French symphonic black metal band Anorexia Nervosa. It was released in 1997, through ... All tracks are written by Marc Zabé and Stéphane Gerbaut Anorexia Nervosa Pierre Couquet - bass guitar Nilcas Vant - drums Marc ... Anorexia Nervosa (band) albums, 1997 debut albums, Season of Mist albums). ...
Anorexia Nervosa is a psychological disorder characterized by extremely reduced intake of food. People with anorexia nervosa ... The distinction between the diagnoses of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) ... Vitousek, K.; Manke, F. (1994). "Personality variables and disorders in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa". Journal of ... Lin, L.; Liao, S. C.; Lee, Y. J.; Tseng, M. C.; Lee, M. B. (2003). "Brain tumor presenting as anorexia nervosa in a 19-year-old ...
List of people with bulimia nervosa List of deaths from anorexia nervosa "Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa." The New ... This is a list of notable people who had anorexia nervosa. Often simply known as anorexia, this is an eating disorder which is ... "Hoosier beauty queen, recalling bouts with anorexia nervosa, admits she was. . .STARVING INSIDE". Indianapolis Star. 29 August ... "Kings of Leon's Caleb Followill Admits to Struggling With Anorexia". Sams, Christine (6 June 2004). "Anorexia almost killed me ...
This is a list of notable people who have died from anorexia nervosa, in chronological order. 1380: Catherine of Siena - ... aged 35 History of anorexia nervosa List of people who died of starvation Lists of people by cause of death VH1, Behind the ... Deaths from anorexia nervosa, Lists of deaths from disease). ... "Brazil Model Who Battled Anorexia Dies". The Washington Post. ... anorexia activist, and actress, aged 28 2018: Javiera Muñoz - Swedish singer, aged 40 2021: Nikki Grahame - English television ...
She was told by experts, "Anorexia Nervosa is so rare that there are probably no more than 2000 cases of Anorexia Nervosa in ... ANAD assists people struggling with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa and also provides resources ... She opened up her home and her heart and launched the first helpline and referral service in the nation for anorexia nervosa ... When a family member was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, Vivian was unable to find any information or resources on eating ...
Amenorrhoea is often associated with anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders. Relative energy deficiency in sport, also ... Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Lock, James (2011-04-11). "Anorexia nervosa". BMJ Clinical Evidence. 2011: 1011. ISSN 1752-8526. ... Södersten P, Bergh C, Zandian M (November 2006). "Psychoneuroendocrinology of anorexia nervosa". Psychoneuroendocrinology. 31 ( ...
However, patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa frequently perceive their body as larger than it is in reality. ... Cash, T. F.; Deagle, E. A. (1997). "The nature and extent of body-image disturbances in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a ... As it is not always present in eating disorders, its prevalence is not comparable to that of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa ... In her article "Perceptual and Conceptual Disturbances in Anorexia Nervosa" she wrote: What is pathognomic of anorexia is not ...
"Anorexia Nervosa". AllMusic. Retrieved 10 September 2009. Leggett, Steve. "Antaeus". AllMusic. Retrieved 10 September 2009. ...
"Anorexia , Bulimia , Anorexia Nervosa , OCD , Psychotherapist Steven Levenkron". Levekron.com - his personal website Steven ... Becker, Daniel (2005). This Mean Disease: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Mother's Anorexia Nervosa. Gurze Books. Google Books. ... Steven Levenkron (born 1941) is an American psychotherapist and writer known for his research into anorexia nervosa and self- ... Levenkron started his research in 1970 and later took part in the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated ...
... anorexia nervosa; extreme old age; beta-blockers or other drugs; and/or hypothermia. In 1924, William Calvert Chaney (1888-1965 ...
Anorexia Nervosa. The unusually high prevalence among females, the focus on physical attractiveness, and the use of strategies ... anorexia nervosa, suicide and others. The thesis that psychiatry can achieve the status of a science has its basis in a theory ...
Anorexia nervosa Conatus , Wiktionary Metabolism Starvation Superior mesenteric artery syndrome Wasting "Metabolic Pathways , ...
... complications from anorexia nervosa; adverse effects of heavy metals intake; the long-term abuse of or ingestion at high doses ...
Golden, N. H.; Shenker, I. R. (July 1994). "Amenorrhea in anorexia nervosa. Neuroendocrine control of hypothalamic dysfunction ...
Fichter, Manfred M. (May 1987). "The Anorexia Nervosa of Franz Kafka". International Journal of Eating Disorders. Washington, D ... 3.0.CO;2-W. Fichter, Manfred M. (July 1988). "Franz Kafka's anorexia nervosa". Fortschritte der Neurologie · Psychiatrie (in ... "evidence for the hypothesis that the writer Franz Kafka had suffered from an atypical anorexia nervosa", and that Kafka was not ...
Anorexia nervosa increases vellus hair. Vellus hair can also be found in men with male pattern baldness or with hirsutism. ...
Tchanturia has addressed the link between autism and anorexia nervosa in a BBC interview. Tchanturia is the author of over 300 ... of women with anorexia nervosa have comorbid autism. However, females are at elevated risk of their autism going undiagnosed as ... "Expertise in Anorexia Nervosa: Worldwide". expertscape. November 2022. "BPS Practice Board 2020 winners". "Academy of Europe: ... "Towards an Improved Understanding of the Anorexia Nervosa and Autism Spectrum Comorbidity: PEACE Pathway Implementation". ...
Strober M (1983). "Personality factors in anorexia nervosa". Pediatrician. 12 (2-3): 134-8. PMID 6400211. Eiber R, et al. (2003 ... Comparison between obesity and anorexia nervosa". Orvosi Hetilap. 150 (24): 1135-43. doi:10.1556/OH.2009.28590. PMID 19482720. ... Nov 2000). "Perfectionism in anorexia nervosa: variation by clinical subtype, obsessionality, and pathological eating behavior ... Welch SL, Fairburn CG (Oct 1996). "Impulsivity or comorbidity in bulimia nervosa. A controlled study of deliberate self-harm ...
Anorexia nervosa is also misplaced. She felt an extreme urge for weight loss. Through his adoption from Buber of the importance ...
Those with anorexia nervosa have high plasma levels of ghrelin compared to both the constitutionally thin and normal-weight ... January 2003). "Balance in ghrelin and leptin plasma levels in anorexia nervosa patients and constitutionally thin women". The ... Misra M, Klibanski A (July 2014). "Endocrine consequences of anorexia nervosa". The Lancet. Diabetes & Endocrinology. 2 (7): ... April 2007). "Constitutional thinness and lean anorexia nervosa display opposite concentrations of peptide YY, glucagon-like ...
Because of this, dancers are three times as likely to develop eating disorders, more particularly anorexia nervosa and EDNOS. ... Maloney MJ (November 1983). "Anorexia nervosa and bulimia in dancers. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning". Clin Sports ... dancers are also at a higher risk of body image problems and eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia. Some dances ... "Anorexia and Dance. Looking for the perfect body in dance!". au-di-tions.com. Retrieved 26 April 2018. The Cleveland Clinic ...
... anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa); trauma-related psychopathology (acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, ...
Scoular had depression and anorexia nervosa. She attempted suicide in 1992. It was revealed in March 2009 that she had bowel ...
It is considered a key feminist text on anorexia nervosa. She married Manfred Mann singer Paul Jones in 1963, but they later ... ISBN 978-1-78873-481-3. Hepworth, Julie (22 April 1999). The Social Construction of Anorexia Nervosa. SAGE. ISBN 978-1-84860- ... MacLeod experienced anorexia during her teens and later wrote a book about her experiences based on diaries she kept at the ...
Risk factors for adolescents and young women generally include eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. ... Although this decreased bone density is also seen in anorexia nervosa, the severity of peak bone density loss is less in FHA ... Studies have shown similarities between women affected with FHA and women affected with anorexia nervosa, including a tendency ... This is especially true when psychological disorders (e.g. anorexia nervosa) co-present with amenorrhea through associated ...
Anorexia Nervosa in Context, which details a clinical model for the causes and treatment of anorexia nervosa based on an ... The book also features four case studies of families whose members have suffered from anorexia nervosa and how the model's ... Psychosomatic Families: Anorexia Nervosa in Context. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1978. with H. C. ... According to the book, optimal treatment of anorexia nervosa involves the application of behavioral and structural family ...
Not all people with anorexia recover completely: about 20% develop anorexia nervosa as a chronic disorder. If anorexia nervosa ... "Anorexia Nervosa". My.clevelandclinic.org. Retrieved 9 June 2022. Attia E (2010). "Anorexia nervosa: current status and future ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Anorexia nervosa. Wikiquote has quotations related to Anorexia nervosa. National ... ISBN 978-0-07-803538-8. "Anorexia Nervosa". National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. Archived from ...
Anorexia Nervosa News and Research. RSS A person with anorexia nervosa, often called anorexia, has an intense fear of gaining ... Altered function of neural circuitry contributes to bulimia and anorexia Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa -disorders ... Study shows anorexia linked to how cholesterol processes The largest DNA-sequencing study of anorexia nervosa has linked the ... Binge eating disorder is different from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa Food addiction is not yet recognised as a mental ...
Find in-depth information about eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. ... Two teenage friends struggling with anorexia and bulimia discuss their illness, treatment, and how to support one another. ...
The exact causes of anorexia nervosa arent established. But these social, genetic, biological, environmental, and ... Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder. Here are the signs and symptoms, what causes anorexia, and what treatments are ... What Is Chronic Anorexia? Medically reviewed by Karin Gepp, PsyD. Living with chronic anorexia can impact many aspects of your ... All About Anorexia Nervosa: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment. Medically reviewed by Joslyn Jelinek, LCSW ...
Low sex drive among people with anorexia nervosa is common. Here are five reasons why and what you can do about it. ... So if you have been diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and find your sex drive to be low, here are five reasons why this might be ... In the fall of 2017, as I set out to conduct interviews on sexuality in women with anorexia nervosa for my dissertation ... Why Anorexia Nervosa Can Impact Your Sex Drive and What You Can Do About It. ...
In this age of day-by-day increasing mental stress, strain and competition, we are finding it more and more difficult to cope with the pressures of ...
... studies with 5,151 SNPs that were judged as likely candidate genetic variations conferring susceptibility to anorexia nervosa. ... Association Study of 182 Candidate Genes in Anorexia Nervosa. Citation. Copy Pinheiro, A. P., Bulik, C. M., Thornton, L. M., ... Association study of 182 candidate genes in anorexia nervosa. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric ... studies with 5,151 SNPs that were judged as likely candidate genetic variations conferring susceptibility to anorexia nervosa ( ...
Individuals with anorexia nervosa generally restrict the amount of calories or types of food they eat. Some also engage in ... Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious metabo-psychiatric disorder which affects about 1% of the population across all genders, ... Hypoglycemia May be the Cause of Death in Anorexia Nervosa, Jennifer L. Gaudiani, MD, CEDS, FAED ... Negative Energy Balance: A Biological Trap for People Prone to Anorexia Nervosa, Cynthia Bulik, PhD, FAED ...
Your donation to National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) goes directly to supporting our ... ANAD (National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders) is a non-profit, 501 (c)(3) organization providing ... All content © 2023 National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. All Rights Reserved. ... ANAD was founded in 1976 by Vivian Meehan, a nurse whose daughter had been diagnosed with anorexia and was unable to find ...
Anorexia nervosa is a serious illness that affects not only the patients mental wellbeing, but also their physical health. Can ... Struggles with anorexia nervosa can be compounded by comorbid, or accompanying, disorders like depression. Anorexia nervosa ... Cannabis and Mental Health: Anorexia Nervosa. Can cannabis be used to help people recover from anorexia nervosa? ... Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that causes a person to obsess over their weight, diet, and body. A person with anorexia ...
... J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Jun;84(6):2034-6. ... In the patients with anorexia nervosa, the serum ALS levels ranged from 0.7-16.9, with a mean of 10.6 +/- 0.7 mg/L, and the ... we investigated 33 patients with anorexia nervosa. Serum levels of ALS were measured by RIA. Furthermore, we measured serum IGF ... serum IGFBP-2 was the best predictor of BMI as nutritional status marker among the parameters in patients with anorexia nervosa ...
Your donation to National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) goes directly to supporting our ... All content © 2023 National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. All Rights Reserved. ...
anorexia nervosa. anorexia nervosa. Sorry, no results were found..  *2023. *2022. *2021 ...
"Anorexia nervosa is one of the deadliest psychiatric illnesses, and there is incredible urgency to study new treatment options ... The 14-week trial will study twenty individuals with anorexia nervosa who have been weight-normalized but continue to have high ... According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, approximately 28 million people in the ... "For several decades, it has been hypothesized that anorexia nervosa is a metabolic disorder of psychological origin," said Dr. ...
Psychiatry assumes that individuals who meet its vague criteria for anorexia nervosa have a disease, and the disease-causing ... Note the assumption: that individuals who meet psychiatrys vague criteria for anorexia nervosa have a disease, and the " ... Younger individuals with anorexia nervosa, as well as some adults, may not recognize or acknowledge a fear of weight gain. In ... "If you have suffered from anorexia nervosa at any point in your life, you can help us achieve this goal. If you have never had ...
Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating illness with one of the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder ... Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating illness with one of the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder ... Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating illness with one of the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder ... How Anxiety and Habits Contribute to Anorexia Nervosa. Sep 30, 2019. Teresa Rufin. Joanna Steinglass, MD ...
1. [Research Study] Do you work with individuals with atypical anorexia nervosa? ... practices for clients with atypical anorexia nervosa currently exist.. To participate, you must be age 18 or older and ... practices regarding atypical anorexia nervosa. We hope this will be useful to the AEDs membership because no empirical ...
ABSTRACT: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with marked decreases in caloric intake and a corresponding reduction in body ... The Paradox of Normal Serum Albumin in Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Report. International Journal of Eating Disorders 37(3):278-280 ...
"Anorexia nervosa is one of the deadliest psychiatric illnesses, and there is incredible urgency to study new treatment options ... The 14-week trial will study twenty individuals with anorexia nervosa who have been weight-normalized but continue to have high ... According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, approximately 28 million people in the ... "For several decades, it has been hypothesized that anorexia nervosa is a metabolic disorder of psychological origin," said Dr. ...
Anorexia Nervosa. May 8, 2019. March 11, 2020. Dr. Meenakshi Chauhan Natural Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Introduction Herbal ... Anorexia Nervosa. May 2, 2019. March 11, 2020. Dr. Meenakshi Chauhan Ayurvedic Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Introduction ... Different Types of Anorexia nervosa Binge or purge type: In this type of anorexia, after eating food person will purge and this ... Remedies About Anorexia nervosa This is an eating disorder that is characterized by weight loss. In this eating disorder, the ...
... at Karnac Books ... Anorexia nervosa: the wish to change. Author(s) : A.H. Crisp, Author(s) : Neil Joughin, Author(s) : Christine Halek, Author(s ...
Bulimia Anorexia Nervosa Association , Terms & Conditions , Privacy Policy , Sitemap , Website Design by WebGeeks ...
"Anorexia nervosa is one of the deadliest psychiatric illnesses, and there is incredible urgency to study new treatment options ... The 14-week trial will study twenty individuals with anorexia nervosa who have been weight-normalized but continue to have high ... According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, approximately 28 million people in the ... "For several decades, it has been hypothesized that anorexia nervosa is a metabolic disorder of psychological origin," said Dr. ...
The etiology of pathological eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) remains poorly understood. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is an ... The etiology of pathological eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) remains poorly understood. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is an ... nonhedonic aspects of hunger and satiety in women with active anorexia nervosa and weight-restored women with anorexia nervosa ... Fear of Food in Anorexia Nervosa: Harm Avoidance is Linked to Diminished Neural Response to Taste Reward. American College of ...
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Anorexia nervosa is a potentially fatal eating disorder that can cause severe health risks. Get anorexia facts and statistics ... Anorexia Nervosa. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that can be life-threatening. Discover anorexia symptoms and warning ... Anorexia FAQs. How dangerous is anorexia nervosa?. Anorexia is an extremely dangerous eating disorder. Without treatment, ... What is Anorexia? Anorexia nervosa is a serious and potentially fatal eating disorder. People with anorexia are fixated on ...
... interventions specifically targeting individuals at risk for anorexia nervosa (AN) are lacking. Objective: The aim of this ... Indicated Web-Based Prevention for Women With Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms: Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial Authors of this ... Indicated Web-Based Prevention for Women With Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms: Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial J Med Internet ... Indicated Web-Based Prevention for Women With Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms: Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial ...
Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder and mental health condition. Seek help today at Nightingale Hospital London with ... Home » Anorexia nervosa. Anorexia nervosa. Sometimes our relationship with food can be damaging by feeling like the only part ... Anorexia nervosa. Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder and mental health condition. Seek help today at Nightingale ... Anorexia nervosa specialists at Nightingale Hospital. Nightingale Hospital London has a number of Consultant Psychiatrists and ...
Reply to Letter to the Editor "Paroxetine-Induced Anorexia in a Patient With Bulimia Nervosa". Francisco J. Vaz ... with antecedents of anorexia nervosa) treated with fluoxetine. Dr. Sagduyu reports the case of a bulimic patient who presented ... He concludes that when anorexia occurs as a side effect after the administration of an SSRI antidepressant, the best procedure ... Salcedo and me in 1994 reporting the intermittent and dose-dependent appearance of anorexia in a bulimic patient ( ...
Anorexia Nervosa A Complex Disorder Both. Limited Time Offer at Lots of Essays.com!!! We have made a special deal with a well ... Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder Both Eating disorders are a cause for serious concern from both a psychological and a ... Anorexia nervosa in fact predominates in industrialized developed countries; yet is extremely rare in less industrialized and ... Kershenbaum, A. ; Jaffa, T. ; Zeman, A. ; and Boniface, S. A Bilateral Foot Drop in a Patient With Anorexia Nervosa, A ...
  • According to the DSM-5, the latest version of the "bible" of psychiatry, atypical anorexia nervosa fulfills the criteria for anorexia nervosa: food restriction leading to weight loss, intense fear of gaining weight and "disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced. (ucsf.edu)
  • She was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, binge-purging type according to the DSM-5, and she was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry 5 times because of abnormal weight loss. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We have identified for the first time to our knowledge a common molecular pathway involved in anorexia and hyperactivity," says Valerie Compan who led the work published in the journal Translational Psychiatry. (medical-actu.com)
  • A person with anorexia nervosa may exhibit a number of signs and symptoms, the type and severity of which may vary and be present but not readily apparent. (wikipedia.org)
  • What are the symptoms of anorexia nervosa in a child? (stlouischildrens.org)
  • Many physical symptoms linked to anorexia are often because of starvation and malnourishment. (stlouischildrens.org)
  • If caregivers or individuals themselves exhibit symptoms correlating to anorexia nervosa should consult a psychiatrist. (dailyarticles.org)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an extremely serious mental illness, with a high mortality rate and many debilitating physical and psychological symptoms. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As per another source 4 Atypical anorexia nervosa symptoms, risks, & treatment. (sehathub.com)
  • Perhaps it is convenient to clarify that when in this article we refer to anorexia nervosa or anorexia / bulimia we are not referring to the medical symptom of anorexia , understood as a lack of appetite and that can appear throughout the life of a subject in multiple everyday circumstances and in pathological states, such as feverish symptoms, gastrointestinal diseases, infectious problems, etc. (psychoques.com)
  • The symptoms often appear as a continuum between those of anorexia nervosa and those of bulimia nervosa. (psychoques.com)
  • There is no doubt that around anorexia / bulimia, from the first descriptions of the picture, there is a notable conceptual confusion, the result of visions that have only focused on partial aspects such as motivations, the pathogenesis of the disease or symptoms. (psychoques.com)
  • The symptoms of anorexia nervosa iii. (studymode.com)
  • There are a whole host of other signs and symptoms of anorexia nervosa that aren't outlined in the DSM-V diagnostic criteria. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • There are a number of people all over the world who exhibit many of the symptoms of anorexia nervosa but do not meet the specific diagnostic criteria for the disorder. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • Since 2007 I have been the Special Projects Coordinator for the Bulimia Anorexia Nervosa Association where my responsibilities include public relations, media, fundraising, administration and IT services. (bana.ca)
  • We present three girls with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa (AN) presenting with erythema ab igne (EAI), a benign, reticular, erythematous dermatosis caused by repeated prolonged skin exposure to mild heat. (qxmd.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa is a serious and potentially life-threatening illness that involves a complex range of biological, psychological, and social factors," explained Mark Chavez, Ph.D., Program Chief of the National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) Eating Disorders Research Program. (nih.gov)
  • The study, led by Andrea Garber , PhD, RD, chief nutritionist for the UCSF Eating Disorders Program , compared weight loss and illness severity among two groups of patients aged 12 to 24 who had been enrolled in a clinical trial upon admission to the hospital for treatment: 66 with anorexia nervosa, which excluded those who were severely underweight, and 50 heavier patients with so-called atypical anorexia nervosa. (ucsf.edu)
  • Your donation to National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) goes directly to supporting our mission of providing free support services. (anad.org)
  • According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders , approximately 28 million people in the United States are living with an eating disorder, and an average of 10 % of patients die within ten years of disease onset, making anorexia nervosa one of the deadliest of all psychiatric illnesses. (whnt.com)
  • Introduction: Previous research has explored the overlapping presentation between autism and eating disorders (ED). This study aims to summarise the clinical challenges associated with co-occurring autism and anorexia nervosa (AN) based on clinicians' case notes and minutes from case discussions, to understand how to better support people with the comorbidity. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by conscious restriction of food intake, which causes numerous metabolic and hormonal disorders. (viamedica.pl)
  • Comorbidity of anxiety disorders with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. (qxmd.com)
  • A large and well-characterized sample of individuals with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa from the Price Foundation collaborative genetics study was used to determine the frequency of anxiety disorders and to understand how anxiety disorders are related to state of eating disorder illness and age at onset. (qxmd.com)
  • Ninety-seven individuals with anorexia nervosa, 282 with bulimia nervosa, and 293 with anorexia nervosa and bulimia were given the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and standardized measures of anxiety, perfectionism, and obsessionality. (qxmd.com)
  • The prevalence of anxiety disorders in general and OCD in particular was much higher in people with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa than in a nonclinical group of women in the community. (qxmd.com)
  • Anxiety disorders commonly had their onset in childhood before the onset of an eating disorder, supporting the possibility they are a vulnerability factor for developing anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. (qxmd.com)
  • As eating disorder spectrums are revised annually and their definitions improvised accordingly, it has been discovered recently that about 25 to 40 percent of patients admitted due to eating disorders in specialized units for psychiatric care have atypical anorexia nervosa. (sehathub.com)
  • Although anorexia and bulimia appear as two different conditions typified by the DSM-5 within eating disorders, in this monograph we will not make an express differentiation of them, except in certain chapters such as the response to pharmacological treatment, where we will make an express differentiation. (psychoques.com)
  • Therefore, it is important that treatment is pursued, as anorexia and other eating disorders are associated with serious medical complications and have the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric illnesses. (zencare.co)
  • Below are social workers in Connecticut who specialize in anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders. (zencare.co)
  • In addition, there is a fair amount of evidence that suggests that anorexia nervosa often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. (citeyouressay.com)
  • THE CAUSES OF ANOREXIA NERVOSA By simply glancing through almost any current magazine or newspaper, one can find articles on one of the most prevalent disorders in today's modern society, namely, anorexia nervosa, a well-known eating disorder which is primarily seen in teenage girls and women under the age of twenty- five. (citeyouressay.com)
  • As with all psychiatric disorders, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of anorexia nervosa. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • Rather, anorexia nervosa is caused by the complex interaction of various genetic and psychosocial factors 3 Striegel-Moore RH, Bulik CM. Risk factors for eating disorders. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • This chapter reports emerging evidence suggesting that some individuals with anorexia nervosa, like those with autism spectrum disorders, display ''weak central coherence'', a cognitive style characterized by a tendency to focus on detail at the expense of seeing the overall gestalt. (edu.au)
  • Anumber of studies during the past decade prevalence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in have investigated the comorbidity of mental diabetes is unknown, but interest in these disorders illness and diabetes. (nih.gov)
  • In extreme cases, patients with anorexia nervosa who continually refuse significant dietary intake and weight restoration interventions, and are declared incompetent to make decisions by a psychiatrist, may be fed by force under restraint via nasogastric tube after asking their parents or proxies to make the decision for them. (wikipedia.org)
  • such an intervention may be highly distressing for both anorexia patients and healthcare staff when administered against the patient's will under restraint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiopoietin-like protein 6 in patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and anorexia nervosa: The influence of very low-calorie diet, bariatric surgery, and partial realimentation. (medscape.com)
  • Olanzapine versus placebo for out-patients with anorexia nervosa. (medscape.com)
  • They found that patients with atypical anorexia nervosa are as likely as underweight patients to suffer from bradycardia, or slow heart rate, a key sign of medical instability that can lead to irregular heartbeat and other complications. (ucsf.edu)
  • Currently, one-third of eating disorder admissions are patients with atypical anorexia nervosa at normal weight or above. (ucsf.edu)
  • Emerging evidence suggests that ketogenic therapy may be able to reduce or eliminate the drive for weight loss, fear of weight gain, and body image distortion in patients with anorexia nervosa. (whnt.com)
  • Patients with anorexia may alternate between restrictive and bulimic periods at different stages of their evolution. (psychoques.com)
  • Concern about weight and an overvaluation of silhouette and thinness are equally present in anorexia as well as in bulimia, and most patients present a combination of bulimic and anorexic behaviors. (psychoques.com)
  • Vital sign changes found in patients with anorexia nervosa include hypotension, bradycardia, and hypothermia. (medscape.com)
  • However, fluoxetine, due to effects on serotonin levels, has been found to be generally helpful in patients with anorexia nervosa who have been stabilized with weight restoration. (medscape.com)
  • Group 1 consisted of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) without bulimia, complicated by cachexia and amenorrhea. (rudn.ru)
  • Thus, "the disruptions this receptor could explain the oscillations between anorexia and bulimia in some patients," said science quoted by AFP. (medical-actu.com)
  • Characterization of refeeding protocols for under 18 years old hospitalized patients with anorexia nervosa: A systematic review. (bvsalud.org)
  • To characterize and compare, through descriptive analysis , existing refeeding protocols for under 18 years old hospitalized patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). (bvsalud.org)
  • While anorexia became more commonly diagnosed during the 20th century, it is unclear if this was due to an increase in its frequency or simply better diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis and therapy of anorexia nervosa--an interdisciplinary challenge]. (nih.gov)
  • Initial evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. (nih.gov)
  • Anorexia nervosa: Concept, history and diagnosis. (psychoques.com)
  • In 1684 Anorexia Nervosa was described for the first time‚ but it was not until 1870 that it became identified and described with it's own diagnosis. (studymode.com)
  • Because an eating disorder is a clinical diagnosis, no definitive diagnostic tests are available for anorexia nervosa. (medscape.com)
  • Rapid diagnosis of anorexia nervosa is crucial to recovery and in some cases can prevent mortality as delay of treatment with persistent starvation from abnormal eating behavior results in treatment resistance due to the neuroadaptive changes, especially increases in angiopoetin-like protein 6 (ANGPTL6), that occur that increase the likelihood that AN will become chronic and persistent. (medscape.com)
  • Here we will review the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of anorexia, with an emphasis on what pediatricians need to know to screen and to facilitate treatment. (medscape.com)
  • When it comes to unifying the terminology, we say that there are two types of anorexia: restrictive anorexia and anorexia with bingeing and purging. (psychoques.com)
  • What is anorexia nervosa Anorexia nervosa is a complex eating disorder with three key features: refusal to maintain a healthy body weight an intense fear of gaining weight a distorted body image Types of anorexia nervosa There are two types of anorexia . (studymode.com)
  • Adolescents and young adults with anorexia nervosa whose weight is in the healthy, overweight or obese ranges face similar cardiovascular and other health complications as their counterparts with low body mass index (BMI), according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. (ucsf.edu)
  • Anorexia nervosa in adolescents is best seen within the context of a family. (psychiatrist.com)
  • To make changes in the family system is a critical component of the treatment of anorexia nervosa in adolescents. (psychiatrist.com)
  • This study evaluated the short-term outcome of a multimodal inpatient treatment concept for adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN). (foodisnottheenemy.com)
  • Anorexia Nervosa with significantly low body weight meets all definitional requirements for Anorexia Nervosa, with BMI between 18.5 kg/m2 and 14.0 kg/m² for adults or between the fifth percentile and the 0.3 percentile for BMI-for-age in children and adolescents). (mrcpsych.uk)
  • Anorexia Nervosa with dangerously low body weight meets all definitional requirements for Anorexia Nervosa, with BMI under 14.0 kg/m² in adults or under the 0.3rd percentile for BMI-for-age in children and adolescents. (mrcpsych.uk)
  • Typical Versus Atypical Anorexia Nervosa Among Adolescents: Clinical Characteristics and Implications for ICD‐11. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • What is Atypical Anorexia Nervosa? (sehathub.com)
  • To understand atypical anorexia nervosa, you must first learn what its typical version is. (sehathub.com)
  • It has the highest mortality rate to date among other psychiatric illnesses 1 Lindsay Moskowitz, Eric Weiselberg, Anorexia Nervosa/Atypical Anorexia Nervosa, Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care, Volume 47, Issue 4, 2017, Pages 70-84, ISSN 1538-5442, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cppeds.2017.02.003. (sehathub.com)
  • Atypical anorexia nervosa may make you extremely anorexic and maybe amenorrheic, too. (sehathub.com)
  • Although less prevalent than AN, atypical anorexia nervosa (AAN) is significantly present in various communities. (sehathub.com)
  • Atypical Anorexia Nervosa, not so atypical after all: Prevalence, correlates, and clinical severity among United States military Veterans. (sehathub.com)
  • DSM-5 diagnoses you with atypical anorexia nervosa when you meet one or all of the above-given criteria, except that you have a normal or above normal weight and your physical appearance is not impaired. (sehathub.com)
  • In most cases, these people meet criteria for what we call "atypical" anorexia nervosa. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • People with atypical anorexia nervosa are still impaired, both physically, psychologically and socially. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • Some people with anorexia will have a single episode and recover while others may have recurring episodes over years. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 5% of people with anorexia die from complications over a ten-year period. (wikipedia.org)
  • For people with anorexia, it is very important to control their weight and body shape, and they make all kinds of sacrifices that often interfere with their life significantly. (psychoques.com)
  • Given the known involvement of both mood and appetite in anorexia nervosa onset, abnormalities of genes in the serotonergic system (e.g., serotonin receptor 2A, 2C) and the dopaminergic system (D3, D4 receptor) have been implicated as possible factors placing people at risk for the disorder 5 Klump KL, Gobrogge KL. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • 1 This increase was almost solely among adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa (AN), which is often insidious in onset and more difficult to treat as it advances. (medscape.com)
  • SAN DIEGO , Sept. 19, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- University of California San Diego has begun enrolling participants in a clinical trial evaluating ketogenic therapy for the treatment of anorexia nervosa. (whnt.com)
  • We present the fatal case of a 66-year old woman with severe malnutrition and newly diagnosed anorexia nervosa. (medscape.com)
  • Here we present a case of an older woman presenting with severe malnutrition and undiagnosed anorexia nervosa. (medscape.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa is characterized by severely restricted food intake, severe weight loss (or lack of appropriate weight gain in growing children), intense fear of getting fat even if underweight, and often a distorted body image. (nih.gov)
  • Anorexia nervosa may be mild and transient or severe and persistent. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Severe anxiety in anorexia nervosa affected teenagers is a known cause for poor patient compliance to nutritional rehabilitation. (childhealth-explanation.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa is a serious mental health condition involving a severe disturbance in eating patterns. (zencare.co)
  • In the context of Anorexia Nervosa, severe underweight status is an important prognostic factor that is associated with high risk of physical complications and substantially increased mortality. (mrcpsych.uk)
  • Anorexia nervosa is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterised by a chronic restriction of energy intake leading to dangerously low body weight, in addition to severe body image distortions 1 Fairburn CG, Shafran R, Cooper Z. A cognitive behavioural theory of anorexia nervosa. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • Psychotherapy with adjunctive low-dose olanzapine may be useful for anorexia nervosa during inpatient treatment, especially in the context of anxiety, obsessive eating-related ruminations, and treatment resistance due to failure to engage. (medscape.com)
  • Individuals with anorexia nervosa have a fear of being overweight or being seen as such, although they are in fact underweight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Individuals with anorexia nervosa also often deny that they have a problem with low weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major depression has been shown to be 2.4 to 4 times more likely in individuals with anorexia than in controls. (medscape.com)
  • The 14-week trial will study twenty individuals with anorexia nervosa who have been weight-normalized but continue to have high impairment from the illness. (whnt.com)
  • For example, studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have shown that the brains of individuals with anorexia nervosa process food stimuli differently to healthy controls. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Individuals that have anorexia are lost. (robinvinge.com)
  • In therapy, individuals who struggle with anorexia nervosa might focus on understanding where the beliefs that drive disordered eating behaviors come from, while also learning new coping skills and self-soothing strategies to gradually replace them. (zencare.co)
  • Anorexia Nervosa with significantly low body weight, restricting pattern refers to individuals who meet the definitional requirements of Anorexia Nervosa with significantly low body weight and who induce weight loss and maintain low body weight through restricted food intake or fasting alone or in combination with increased energy expenditure (such as through excessive exercise) but who do not engage in binge eating or purging behaviours. (mrcpsych.uk)
  • Anorexia Nervosa with significantly low body weight, binge-purge pattern refers to individuals who meet the definitional requirements of Anorexia Nervosa with significantly low body weight and who present with episodes of binge eating or purging behaviours. (mrcpsych.uk)
  • Ten individuals in partial remission from anorexia obtained psilocybin remedy. (worldakkam.com)
  • Our studies will investigate how nutritional ketosis impacts brain circuitry and behavior in anorexia nervosa and ultimately, psychiatric disease. (whnt.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa is one of the deadliest psychiatric illnesses, and there is incredible urgency to study new treatment options. (whnt.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severely debilitating condition with the highest mortality of any psychiatric disorder. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The insula may play a crucial role in anorexia nervosa. (uu.nl)
  • Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia. (nih.gov)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in children and adults and O6-Benzylguanine endocrine adjustments include hypothalamic amenorrhea a nutritionally acquired growth hormones level of resistance with low insulin want growth element-1 (IGF-1) family member hypercortisolemia lowers in leptin insulin amylin and incretins and raises in ghrelin PYY and adiponectin. (immune-source.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa is characterized by a relentless pursuit of thinness, a morbid fear of obesity, a distorted body image, and restriction of intake relative to requirements, leading to a significantly low body weight. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Eisler I, Simic M, Russell GF, Dare C. A randomised controlled treatment trial of two forms of family therapy in adolescent anorexia nervosa: a five-year follow-up. (medscape.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa - diagnostics and therapy]. (nih.gov)
  • Anorexia is a mind control disease that cannot be cured by medication but by therapy. (studymode.com)
  • Of their paper, "Psilocybin remedy for females with anorexia nervosa: a part 1, open-label feasibility examine," revealed in Nature Drugs , the researchers element the therapy outcomes for an in any other case therapeutic-resistant dysfunction. (worldakkam.com)
  • The true fact of the high incidence in the last fifty years forces us to reflect on the differences between cases of classic anorexia and the cases that currently affect a good part of the adolescent female population. (psychoques.com)
  • An eating disorder that is characterized by the lack or loss of APPETITE, known as ANOREXIA. (uams.edu)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN) is medically defined as a neurotic loss of appetite. (sehathub.com)
  • Treatment of anorexia involves restoring the patient back to a healthy weight, treating their underlying psychological problems, and addressing behaviors that promote the problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of this Request for Applications (RFA) is to evaluate intervention(s) for treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). (nih.gov)
  • A recent NIH workshop "The Development of Research Priorities for the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Overcoming Existing Barriers" (summarized at http://www.nimh.nih.gov/scientificmeetings/ansummary.cfm ) was held to discuss both the serious nature of the disorder and the obstacles that hinder progress in research on AN. (nih.gov)
  • Effective treatment of anorexia nervosa is a complex integration of many disciplines and interventions. (psychiatrist.com)
  • Treatment Manual for Anorexia Nervosa: A Family-Based Approach takes that successful approach and develops it into an effective treatment manual. (psychiatrist.com)
  • Efficient management of anxiety could diminish the relapses and the drop outs of anorexia treatment. (childhealth-explanation.com)
  • Medicines have particularly no role in treatment of anorexia nervosa per se. (childhealth-explanation.com)
  • However, in adjunct to psychotherapy several pharmacological agents are frequently prescribed for psychological comorbidities and to facilitate patient compliance to anorexia treatment. (childhealth-explanation.com)
  • Treatment Anorexia Nervosa secara klinis memiliki pendekatan terapi keluarga. (bempsiunisba.com)
  • Anorexia Nervosa - When Is It Time for Residential Treatment? (sanfordbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The importance of anorexia , in recent years, is determined, not only by the unstoppable escalation of cases , which has made this disorder a true sociocultural phenomenon, but by the scarce therapeutic results obtained, especially when compared with other of the main pathologies with the highest prevalence today. (psychoques.com)
  • For this assignment I have chosen a patient 'Mary' who was diagnosed with ' Anorexia Nervosa '‚ from a clinical placement‚ on an adult acute ward. (studymode.com)
  • Knowledge of these changes is important due to growing morbidity and mortality of anorexia. (viamedica.pl)
  • Dr Jessica Scaife compares neural responses to high vs low calorie food pictures in restrictive Anorexia Nervosa. (ox.ac.uk)
  • For example, a person can present with the restrictive behaviours and all of the features of anorexia nervosa without meeting the diagnostic criteria for low weight. (breakbingeeating.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterised by extreme preoccupation, concern and misery surrounding meals, weight, restrictive consuming, and a distorted physique picture. (worldakkam.com)
  • They are also recommended in selected anorexia nervosa cases, who are unable to eat in spite of ongoing anti-anxiety medications. (childhealth-explanation.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN), often referred to simply as anorexia, is an eating disorder characterized by low weight, food restriction, body image disturbance, fear of gaining weight, and an overpowering desire to be thin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some exercise excessively, force themselves to vomit (in the "anorexia purging" subtype), or use laxatives to lose weight and control body shapes, and/or binge eat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Elran-Barak R, Accurso EC, Goldschmidt AB, Sztainer M, Byrne C, Le Grange D. Eating patterns in youth with restricting and binge eating/purging type anorexia nervosa. (medscape.com)
  • The main symptom of anorexia nervosa is that the person engages in binge eating and purging. (dailyarticles.org)
  • Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by attempts to lose weight to the point of starvation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anorexia nervosa, and the associated malnutrition that results from self-imposed starvation, can cause complications in every major organ system in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Definition of Anorexia Nervosa The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine defines Anorexia nervosa as, "an eating disorder characterized by unrealistic fear of weight gain, self-starvation, and conspicuous distortion of body image. (citeyouressay.com)
  • 12/16/2012 There are different main characteristic 's for the mental illness of anorexia nervosa . (studymode.com)
  • Anorexia is ego-syntonic, the place the ideas and actions surrounding the psychopathology of the illness turn out to be aligned with an inside worth system, self-image and sense of self. (worldakkam.com)
  • Gastrointestinal signs of anorexia nervosa include intestinal dilation from constipation and diminished intestinal motility. (medscape.com)
  • The present case shows the clinical features of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by a hypoglycemic event in addition to underlying anorexia nervosa. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This chapter addresses the history, concept and measurement of central coherence, and presents converging evidence from neuropsychological and clinical sources in relation to coherence problems in anorexia. (edu.au)
  • For several decades, it has been hypothesized that anorexia nervosa is a metabolic disorder of psychological origin," said Dr. Frank. (whnt.com)
  • Other psychological treatments may also be effective in treating Anorexia, but they have not been evaluated with the same scientific rigor as the treatments above. (div12.org)
  • Psychological factors can have an influence on developing anorexia nervosa. (dailyarticles.org)
  • Women suffering from anorexia nervosa have an absence of periods, known as amenorrhea. (dailyarticles.org)
  • The individual suffering from anorexia nervosa avoids eating due to the irrational fear of gaining weight. (dailyarticles.org)
  • In the restricting type of anorexia ‚ weight loss is achieved by restricting calories (following drastic diets‚ fasting‚ and exercising to excess). (studymode.com)
  • Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by the inability to maintain a minimally normal weight, a devastating fear of weight gain, relentless dietary habits that prevent weight gain, and a disturbance in the way in which body weight and shape are perceived. (medscape.com)
  • How to Get Rid of Anorexia Nervosa It is very reasonable to be concerned about your weight. (healthbeautytips.in)
  • Anorexia Nervosa is characterised by significantly low body weight for the individual's height, age and developmental stage that is not due to another health condition or to the unavailability of food. (mrcpsych.uk)
  • The people who struggle in managing stress, remain doubtful of their physical appearance are prone to suffer from anorexia nervosa but. (dailyarticles.org)
  • According to a study published in late 2012, anorexia nervosa and physical hyperactivity are linked by a common molecular mechanism. (medical-actu.com)