Congenital absence of the eye or eyes.
A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Congenital or developmental anomaly in which the eyeballs are abnormally small.
Birth defect that results in a partial or complete absence of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. It may be isolated or a part of a syndrome (e.g., AICARDI'S SYNDROME; ACROCALLOSAL SYNDROME; ANDERMANN SYNDROME; and HOLOPROSENCEPHALY). Clinical manifestations include neuromotor skill impairment and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY of variable severity.
The X-shaped structure formed by the meeting of the two optic nerves. At the optic chiasm the fibers from the medial part of each retina cross to project to the other side of the brain while the lateral retinal fibers continue on the same side. As a result each half of the brain receives information about the contralateral visual field from both eyes.
Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Value of all final goods and services produced in a country in one year.
An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.
The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)
The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.
A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.

Compiling a national register of babies born with anophthalmia/microphthalmia in England 1988-94. (1/86)

AIM: To describe the prevalence of anophthalmia/microphthalmia in babies born in England 1988-94, as well as their overall survival, and the incidence of associated eye and non-eye malformations; to determine the usefulness of different sources of medical and health service information for establishing a retrospective register of anophthalmia/microphthalmia. METHODS: Multiple sources for initial (retrospective) case ascertainment were surveyed, followed by questionnaires to clinicians to establish severity, associated malformations, and aetiology for England, 1988-94. The population surveyed was all births in England for this time period (4,570,350 births). Cases included live births, stillbirths, or terminations after prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomaly, with anophthalmia/microphthalmia, with or without other malformations and syndromes. Trisomy 13 was subsequently excluded. RESULTS: The proportion of cases notified by any one information source was not more than 26% (Office for National Statistics Register 22%, paediatricians 26%, district sources 25%). Sixty nine per cent of cases (51% of severe cases) were notified by only one source. A total of 449 cases were reported, prevalence 1.0 per 10,000 births. The prevalence was stable over time, although the proportion notified by clinicians rose in more recent years. Thirty four per cent of affected babies had mild microphthalmia. Of those with severe anophthalmia/microphthalmia, 51% were bilateral, other eye malformations were present in 72%, non-eye malformations in 65%, and a "known aetiology" was attributed in 22%. Three quarters of those severely affected survived infancy. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high response rates from the sources of information contacted, the lack of duplication between sources indicates the difficulties of retrospective ascertainment and the need for multiple sources when establishing a register. Anophthalmos/microphthalmos is usually associated with other malformations. Most cases are of unknown aetiology.  (+info)

Anophthalmia in litters of female rats treated with the food-derived carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine. (2/86)

Anophthalmia in litters of pregnant rats treated with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a food-derived carcinogen, was incidentally encountered in a risk-assessment study with 2-generation exposure to PhIP. Female Fischer 344 animals were given 200 ppm PhIP in the diet for 4 wk before mating with nontreated males and also during gestation and lactation periods. Mean numbers of newborn rats per litter in control and PhIP-treated groups were 7.9 +/- 2.9 and 7.1 +/- 1.6 in trial 1 and 8.3 +/- 1.9 and 6.1 +/- 2.4 in trial 2. Among 49 (trial 1) and 63 (trial 2) offspring from PhIP-treated dams, 9 (18.4%) and 32 (50.8%) demonstrated anophthalmia, and 1 (2.0%) and 8 (12.7%) demonstrated hydrocephaly. Five of 7 (71.4%) and 13 of 14 (92.9%) dams delivered pups with malformations in trials 1 and 2, respectively. Also, in a previous study that was carried out with the same protocol and that used the Sprague-Dawley strain of rats, anophthalmia and hydrocephaly were observed in 2 and 1 out of 175 pups, respectively, from 100 ppm PhIP-treated dams. No congenital malformations were found in control groups of the same size in either experiment. In addition to having been previously identified as a cause of carcinogenic activity, our findings suggest that PhIP is capable of causing anophthalmia in rats when administered during the gestational period.  (+info)

Anophthalmia and retinal degeneration associated with stenosis of the optic foramen in Fischer 344 rats. (3/86)

Bilateral anophthalmia was discovered in a male rat (No. 1) and unilateral anophthalmia was found in the left eye of two female rats (Nos. 2 and 3) derived from a Fischer 344 inbred colony. One male rat (No. 4), a littermate of No. 3, had externally normal eyes, but his left eye had severe retinal atrophy, which was detected by ophthalmoscopy. The eyelids in both eyes of No. 1 and in the left eyes of Nos. 2 and 3 were present. Radiography of the skull revealed small optic foramina on both sides of No. 1 and on the affected side of Nos. 2, 3, and 4. Histologically, both globes and optic nerves (ONs) of No. 1 and the left globe and ONs of Nos. 2 and 3 were completely missing. Diffuse retinal degeneration in the left globe and axonal degeneration in the left ON and the right optic tract were observed in No. 4. Dysplasia of the sphenoid bone associated with stenosis of the optic foramen was detected on the affected side of all rats. Thus, ON aplasia in anophthalmic rats and atrophic ON in a rat with retinal degeneration seem to be closely related to stenosis of the optic foramen.  (+info)

Total retinal degeneration in apparent anophthalmos of the Syrian hamster. (4/86)

Anophthalmia in the Syrian hamster was found to result from an extensive degeneration of retinal tissue and tissues derived from the retina. Eyes of affected animals were normal at the twelfth day of gestation (the average gestation period in the Syrian hamster is 16 days). However, the retina of these eyes showed rapid and extensive degeneration during the first two weeks after birth. In adults, the sclera-choroid complex was the only prominent structure of the original eye, with an occasional remnant of deteriorated lens.  (+info)

Spontaneous reversal of nystagmus in the dark. (5/86)

AIM: To report five children with horizontal jerk nystagmus in whom eye movement recordings in the dark revealed a spontaneous reversal in the direction of the nystagmus beat. Three patients were blind in one eye and were diagnosed as having a manifest latent nystagmus (MLN), and two patients had strabismus and congenital nystagmus (CN). METHODS: Eye movements were recorded using DC electro-oculography with simultaneous video recording, including infrared recording in total darkness. RESULTS: Four patients had decelerating velocity slow phase jerk nystagmus when recorded under natural lighting conditions; the fifth case had accelerating velocity and linear slow phase jerk nystagmus. Under absolute darkness, nystagmus reversed in direction of beat with a mixture of linear and decelerating velocity slow phase waveforms. One child with unilateral anophthalmos could wilfully reverse the beat direction of his nystagmus by trying to look with his blind eye in the light and dark. CONCLUSIONS: These observations support the theory that LN/MLN beat direction is determined by the "presumed" viewing eye and may be consciously controlled. The spontaneous reversal of beat direction in the dark suggests eye dominance is predetermined. Eye movement recordings identified mixed nystagmus waveforms indicating that CN (accelerating velocity slow phases) and LN/MLN (linear/decelerating velocity slow phases) coexist in these subjects.  (+info)

National study of microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) in Scotland: investigation of genetic aetiology. (6/86)

We report an epidemiological and genetic study attempting complete ascertainment of subjects with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) born in Scotland during a 16 year period beginning on 1 January 1981. A total of 198 cases were confirmed giving a minimum live birth prevalence of 19 per 100 000. One hundred and twenty-two MAC cases (61.6%) from 115 different families were clinically examined and detailed pregnancy, medical, and family histories obtained. A simple, rational, and apparently robust classification of the eye phenotype was developed based on the presence or absence of a defect in closure of the optic (choroidal) fissure. A total of 85/122 (69.7%) of cases had optic fissure closure defects (OFCD), 12/122 (9.8%) had non-OFCD, and 25/122 (20.5%) had defects that were unclassifiable owing to the severity of the corneal or anterior chamber abnormality. Segregation analysis assuming single and multiple incomplete ascertainment, respectively, returned a sib recurrence risk of 6% and 10% in the whole group and 8.1% and 13.3% in the OFCD subgroup. Significant recurrence risks were found in both unilateral and bilateral disease. In four families, one parent had an OFCD, two of which were new diagnoses in asymptomatic subjects. All recurrences in first degree relatives occurred in the OFCD group with a single first cousin recurrence seen in the non-OFCD group. A total of 84/122 of the MAC cases were screened for mutations in the coding regions of PAX6, CHX10, and SIX3. No pathogenic mutations were identified in the OFCD cases. A single PAX6 homeodomain missense mutation was identified in a subject with partial aniridia that had been initially misclassified as coloboma.  (+info)

A case of growth hormone and gonadotropin deficiency associated with unilateral anophthalmia, microphallus, cryptorchidism, and mental retardation. (7/86)

We report a rare case of growth hormone and gonadotropin deficiency associated with dysmorphic features. A 16-year-old boy had left anophthalmia, microphallus, bilateral cryptorchidism, and mental retardation. His chromosomal karyotype was normal, 46, XY. Endocrinological studies revealed growth hormone and gonadotropin deficiency, attributed to hypothalamic dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging scan of the head showed a hypoplastic pituitary gland, decreased high intensity signals in the pituitary posterior lobe, absence of the left eye, and a hypoplastic left optic nerve with no abnormality of the pituitary stalk, corpus callosum, or septum pellucidum. Although not completely consistent with the features of septo-optic dysplasia (SOD), his condition was considered within the spectrum of SOD. Despite similarities to the Hesx1 knockout mouse, a model of human SOD, mutation analyses revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in coding regions of any exons or intron-exon boundaries of the HESX1 gene. Further genetic studies of this patient may improve understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in pituitary development.  (+info)

Delineation of an estimated 6.7 MB candidate interval for an anophthalmia gene at 3q26.33-q28 and description of the syndrome associated with visible chromosome deletions of this region. (8/86)

Anophthalmia or microphthalmia occur in approximately one in 10 children who have severe visual impairment. These eye malformations are often of unknown aetiology, but can be inherited in autosomal dominant, recessive or X-linked forms, and can also occur in association with specific chromosome abnormalities. Four children are described in the medical literature with microphthalmia or anophthalmia in association with chromosome rearrangements involving distal 3q, suggesting the presence of a micro/anophthalmia gene in this region. We have identified two further patients with micro/anophthalmia and chromosome rearrangements involving 3q26-->3q27 and identified a 6.7 MB common deleted region. Patient 1 had multiple abnormalities including bilateral anophthalmia, abnormalities of the first and second cranial nerves and partial absence of the corpus callosum. His karyotype was 46,XY,del(3)(q26.33q28). Patient 2 had right anophthalmia and left extreme microphthalmia. Her karyotype was 46,XX,del(3)(q26.33q28)t(3;7)(q28;q21.1). Both patients had intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and strikingly similar dysmorphic facies consisting of bossed forehead, downward-slanting palpebral fissures, grooved bridge of the nose, prominent low-set ears, small down-turned mouth and small mandible. We identified BAC clones mapping to distal 3q from the ENSEMBL and NCBI Entrez databases. These BAC clones were used as fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) probes to identify the minimum deleted region common to both patients. This interval, between clones RPC11-134F2 and RPC11-132N15, was estimated to be 6.7 MB. We conclude that there is an anophthalmia locus within this interval. Candidate genes mapping to this region include Chordin and DVL3, a homologue of the Drosophila Dishevelled gene.  (+info)

Anophthalmos is a medical condition where an individual is born without one or both eyes. It is a congenital disorder, which means it is present at birth. In cases where only one eye is affected, it is called unilateral anophthalmos, and when both eyes are missing, it is referred to as bilateral anophthalmos.

Anophthalmos is different from microphthalmia, another congenital condition where the eye is present but abnormally small. In some cases, anophthalmos may be accompanied by other developmental anomalies or syndromes. The exact cause of anophthalmos is not always known, but it can be associated with genetic mutations or environmental factors that affect fetal development.

Individuals with anophthalmos require specialized medical care and management to ensure proper eye socket development, visual rehabilitation, and overall well-being. This may include the use of prosthetic eyes, orthoptic therapy, and other supportive measures.

An artificial eye, also known as a prosthetic eye, is a type of medical device that is used to replace a natural eye that has been removed or is not functional due to injury, disease, or congenital abnormalities. It is typically made of acrylic or glass and is custom-made to match the size, shape, and color of the patient's other eye as closely as possible.

The artificial eye is designed to fit over the eye socket and rest on the eyelids, allowing the person to have a more natural appearance and improve their ability to blink and close their eye. It does not restore vision, but it can help protect the eye socket and improve the patient's self-esteem and quality of life.

The process of fitting an artificial eye typically involves several appointments with an ocularist, who is a healthcare professional trained in the measurement, design, and fabrication of prosthetic eyes. The ocularist will take impressions of the eye socket, create a model, and then use that model to make the artificial eye. Once the artificial eye is made, the ocularist will fit it and make any necessary adjustments to ensure that it is comfortable and looks natural.

Microphthalmos is a medical condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small due to developmental anomalies in the eye. The size of the eye may vary from slightly smaller than normal to barely visible. This condition can occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome with other congenital abnormalities. It can also be associated with other ocular conditions such as cataracts, retinal disorders, and orbital defects. Depending on the severity, microphthalmos may lead to visual impairment or blindness.

Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a birth defect in which the corpus callosum, the part of the brain that connects the two hemispheres and allows them to communicate, fails to develop normally during fetal development. In cases of agenesis of the corpus callosum, the corpus callosum is partially or completely absent.

This condition can vary in severity and may be associated with other brain abnormalities. Some individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum may have normal intelligence and few symptoms, while others may have intellectual disability, developmental delays, seizures, vision problems, and difficulties with movement and coordination. The exact cause of agenesis of the corpus callosum is not always known, but it can be caused by genetic factors or exposure to certain medications or environmental toxins during pregnancy.

The optic chiasm is a structure in the brain where the optic nerves from each eye meet and cross. This allows for the integration of visual information from both eyes into the brain's visual cortex, creating a single, combined image of the visual world. The optic chiasm plays an important role in the processing of visual information and helps to facilitate depth perception and other complex visual tasks. Damage to the optic chiasm can result in various visual field deficits, such as bitemporal hemianopsia, where there is a loss of vision in the outer halves (temporal fields) of both eyes' visual fields.

Craniofacial abnormalities refer to a group of birth defects that affect the development of the skull and face. These abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may involve differences in the shape and structure of the head, face, and jaws, as well as issues with the formation of facial features such as the eyes, nose, and mouth.

Craniofacial abnormalities can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Some common examples of craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis (premature fusion of the skull bones), and hemifacial microsomia (underdevelopment of one side of the face).

Treatment for craniofacial abnormalities may involve a team of healthcare professionals, including plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthodontists, speech therapists, and other specialists. Treatment options may include surgery, bracing, therapy, and other interventions to help improve function and appearance.

The optic nerve, also known as the second cranial nerve, is the nerve that transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. It is composed of approximately one million nerve fibers that carry signals related to vision, such as light intensity and color, from the eye's photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) to the visual cortex in the brain. The optic nerve is responsible for carrying this visual information so that it can be processed and interpreted by the brain, allowing us to see and perceive our surroundings. Damage to the optic nerve can result in vision loss or impairment.

MedlinePlus is not a medical term, but rather a consumer health website that provides high-quality, accurate, and reliable health information, written in easy-to-understand language. It is produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the world's largest medical library, and is widely recognized as a trusted source of health information.

MedlinePlus offers information on various health topics, including conditions, diseases, tests, treatments, and wellness. It also provides access to drug information, medical dictionary, and encyclopedia, as well as links to clinical trials, medical news, and patient organizations. The website is available in both English and Spanish and can be accessed for free.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Gross Domestic Product" (GDP) is an economic term, not a medical one. GDP is the total monetary or market value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country's borders in a specific time period. It serves as a comprehensive measure of a nation’s overall economic activity.

If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I would be happy to help!

Genetics is the scientific study of genes, heredity, and variation in living organisms. It involves the analysis of how traits are passed from parents to offspring, the function of genes, and the way genetic information is transmitted and expressed within an organism's biological system. Genetics encompasses various subfields, including molecular genetics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, and genomics, which investigate gene structure, function, distribution, and evolution in different organisms. The knowledge gained from genetics research has significant implications for understanding human health and disease, as well as for developing medical treatments and interventions based on genetic information.

In medical terms, the foot is the part of the lower limb that is distal to the leg and below the ankle, extending from the tarsus to the toes. It is primarily responsible for supporting body weight and facilitating movement through push-off during walking or running. The foot is a complex structure made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, and numerous muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves that work together to provide stability, balance, and flexibility. It can be divided into three main parts: the hindfoot, which contains the talus and calcaneus (heel) bones; the midfoot, which includes the navicular, cuboid, and cuneiform bones; and the forefoot, which consists of the metatarsals and phalanges that form the toes.

PubMed is not a medical condition or term, but rather a biomedical literature search engine and database maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), a division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). It provides access to life sciences literature, including journal articles in medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, health care systems, and preclinical sciences.

PubMed contains more than 30 million citations and abstracts from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Many of the citations include links to full-text articles on publishers' websites or through NCBI's DocSumo service. Researchers, healthcare professionals, students, and the general public use PubMed to find relevant and reliable information in the biomedical literature for research, education, and patient care purposes.

6 Wikispecies has information related to Lethata anophthalma. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Lethata anophthalma. v t e ... Lethata anophthalma is a moth of the family Depressariidae. It is found in Brazil (Paraná, Amazonas), Venezuela, Bolivia, ...
... is a species of ground beetle endemic to Europe. It is found in Croatia, mainland Italy, and Slovenia. It ... "Anophthalmus schmidti Sturm, 1844". Fauna Europaea. Fauna Europaea Secretariat, Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. Retrieved 24 ... ISBN 978-1-118-94558-2. Media related to Anophthalmus schmidti at Wikimedia Commons v t e (Articles with short description, ...
... anophthalmus anophthalmus (Kollar, 1848)". Plazi. Retrieved 11 February 2018. Media related to Troglocaris anophthalmus at ... anophthalmus anophthalmus (Kollar, 1848)". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Vincenz Kollar (1848). "Ueber ein neues ... Troglocaris anophthalmus is a species of freshwater shrimp in the family Atyidae. It lives in karstic caves in Bosnia and ... De Grave, S. (2013). "Troglocaris anophthalmus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2013: e.T22267A19013927. doi:10.2305/IUCN ...
... (Slovene: Hitlerjev brezokec) is a species of blind cave beetle found only in about fifteen humid caves in ... Scheibel, O. (1937). "Ein neuer Anophthalmus aus Jugoslawien" (PDF). Entomologische Blätter. 33 (6): 438-440. Berenbaum, May ( ...
... is a species of ray-finned fish in the family Nemacheilidae. This cavefish is found only in Guangxi and ... Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2019). "Oreonectes anophthalmus" in FishBase. December 2019 version. v t e (Articles with ... Kottelat, M. (1996). "Oreonectes anophthalmus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 1996: e.T15478A4632001. doi:10.2305/IUCN. ...
The eyeless golden-line fish or blind golden-line barbel (Sinocyclocheilus anophthalmus) is a species of ray-finned fish in the ... Kottelat, M. (1996). "Sinocyclocheilus anophthalmus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 1996: e.T20250A9181609. doi:10.2305/ ... Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2013). "Sinocyclocheilus anophthalmus" in FishBase. April 2013 version. Romero, A.; Zhao ...
... anophthalmus is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List. New, T.R. (1996). "Tasmanipatus anophthalmus". IUCN Red ... The specific name anophthalmus refers to this species' lack of eyes. The body is entirely white except for the tips of claws ... nov., and T. anophthalmus, sp. nov.: two new and unusual Onychophorans (Onychophora : Peripatopsidae) from northeastern ... and Tasmanipatus anophthalmus sp. no.: two new and unusual onychophorans (Onychophora: Peripatopsidae) from northeastern ...
and Tasmanipatus anophthalmus sp. no.: two new and unusual onychophorans (Onychophora: Peripatopsidae) from northeastern ...
... anophthalma (Mrazek, 1907) (sometimes considered to be a separate species, Crenobia anophthalma) - Dinaric Alps, Montenegro C. ... Crenobia alpina anophthalma (Dana, 1766). Accessed 2023-06-24. Brändle, M., Roland Heuser, Andreas Marten, & Brandl, R. (2007 ...
One of these, N. anophthalma, is the only cave-adapted species in the family Nepidae, found in Movile Cave. Linnaeus listed a ... Nepa' is a classical Latin word for a 'scorpion' or 'crab'. The following species are included in Nepa: Nepa anophthalma Decu ... Vasile Decu; Magdalena Gruia; S. L. Keffer; Serban Mircea Sarbu (1994). "Stygobiotic Waterscorpion, Nepa anophthalma, n. sp. ( ...
Vasile Decu; Magdalena Gruia; S. L. Keffer; Serban Mircea Sarbu (1994). "Stygobiotic Waterscorpion, Nepa anophthalma, n. sp. ( ... and Nepa anophthalma is adapted to life in caves in Romania. Nepidae are brown insects, but some species have a bright red ...
He is best remembered for naming in honour of Adolf Hitler the beetle species Anophthalmus hitleri in 1937. The beetle is now ... Scheibel, O. (1937). "Ein neuer Anophthalmus aus Jugoslawien" (PDF). Entomologische Blätter. 33 (6): 438-440. Jozwiak, Piotr; ... most famous beetles that he described as new to science was the now endangered blind cave beetle that he named as Anophthalmus ...
Nepa anophthalma is the only known cave-adapted water scorpion in the world. While animals have lived in the cave for 5.5 ... Nepa anophthalma), and also a snail. Of these, 37 are endemic. The food chain is based on chemosynthesis by methane- and sulfur ... Nepa anophthalma, n. sp. (Heteroptera: Nepidae), from a Sulfurous Cave in Romania". Annals of the Entomological Society of ...
nov., and T. anophthalmus, sp. nov.: two new and unusual Onychophorans (Onychophora : Peripatopsidae) from northeastern ... R. Mesibov; H. Ruhberg (1991). "Ecology and conservation of Tasmanipatus barretti and T. anophthalmus, parapatric onychophorans ...
Wiese, K. Günter; Vogel, Martin; Guthoff, Rudolf; Gundlach, Karsten K.H. (1999). "Treatment of congenital anophthalmos with ...
... amphiophthalma Zwickel Leptolejeunea anophthalma Zwickel Leptolejeunea apiculata (Horik.) S.Hatt. Leptolejeunea ...
"Anophthalmos with limb anomalies - About the Disease - Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center". rarediseases.info.nih.gov ...
The blind cave beetle Anophthalmus langhofferi is named after him. Langhoffer was born in Kysáč to teaching parents Johann ...
Species: Pseudotyphlopasilia anophthalma (Bernhauer, 1903) Pseudotyphlopasilia coeca (Eppelsheim, 1878) "Pseudotyphlopasilia ...
The French entomologist Leon Fairmaire named this species Anophthalmus doriae in honor of Giacomo Doria. There are two ...
The cave is home to the freshwater cave prawn (Troglocaris anophthalmus), endemic to Dinaric karst. Vrtare Male is part of the ...
Subgenus Troglocaris Troglocaris anophthalmus (Kollar, 1848) Troglocaris bosnica Sket & Zakšek, 2009 Troglocaris planinensis ... anophthalmus, and its water only varies from 10 °C (50 °F) in the winter to 11 °C (52 °F) in the summer. In some Dinaric caves ... "Estimating population size of the cave shrimp Troglocaris anophthalmus (Crustacea, Decapoda, Caridea) using mark-release- ...
"Estimating population size of the cave shrimp Troglocaris anophthalmus (Crustacea, Decapoda, Caridea) using mark-release- ...
... anophthalma is a species of beetle in the family Silvanidae, the only species in the genus Amydropa. Some taxonomies ...
Among the other peculiarities of the Pyrenean fauna are blind insects in the caverns of Ariège (Anophthalmus, Adelops). The ...
These three species belong to the genus Typhloditha: Typhloditha anophthalma Beier, 1955 Typhloditha minima Beier, 1959 ...
... the principal genera of which are Anophthalmus and Adelops. The Pyrenean ibex, an endemic subspecies of the Iberian ibex, ...
For example, a species of beetle (Anophthalmus hitleri) was named by a German collector after Adolf Hitler in 1933 when he had ...
Anti-American caricatures in Nazi Germany Anophthalmus hitleri, a species of blind cave beetle found only in about fifteen ...
The eyeless 'Hitler beetle' (Anophthalmus hitleri), named after Hitler in 1933, is of interest to collectors purely because of ...
6 Wikispecies has information related to Lethata anophthalma. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Lethata anophthalma. v t e ... Lethata anophthalma is a moth of the family Depressariidae. It is found in Brazil (Paraná, Amazonas), Venezuela, Bolivia, ...
Only when there is a complete absence of the ocular tissue within the orbit can a diagnosis of true anophthalmos be made. ... encoded search term (Anophthalmos) and Anophthalmos What to Read Next on Medscape ... Congenital anophthalmos is a very rare condition that has a reported prevalence rate of 0.18 per 10,000 births. [3] With cases ... True or primary anophthalmos is very rare. Only when there is a complete absence of the ocular tissue within the orbit can a ...
Hitlerkäfer - Anophthalmus hitleri. Der Hitlerkäfer (so wird er oft von den Medien genannt), ist ein 5-5,5 mm langer augenloser ... Kaum Vorzustellen, dass Anophthalmus hitleri seinen Namen, nach dem Schrecken der Naziherrschaft und dem zweiten Weltkrieg ... Durch seine Benennung nach Adolf Hitler, ist der Anophthalmus hitleri ein beliebtes Sammlerstück geworden, für das bis zu 1000 ... lebender Käfer von brauner Farbe aus der Familie der räuberischen Laufkäfer und trägt den wissenschaftlichen Namen Anophthalmus ...
Anophthalmos with limb anomalies. *Anophthalmos-limb anomalies syndrome. *Microphthalmia with limb anomalies ...
Anophthalmos, microphthalmos and macrophthalmos, Congenital lens malformations, Congenital malformations of anterior segment of ...
Anophthalmus hitleri. source: Wikipedia. Posted By: Alex - Fri Sep 01, 2023 - Comments (1) Category: Dictators, Tyrants and ... To date, Anophthalmus hitleri has been found in but a handful of caves in Slovenia. Particularly after the media discovered and ... A well-preserved specimen of Anophthalmus hitleri can fetch upward of 2,000 euros on the collectors market; among the bidders ... in Entomologische Blätter a description of a light-brown ground beetle a mere five millimeters long under the name Anophthalmus ...
Sixteen children under 15 years of age and with non-traumatic cataract, microphthalmos, anophthalmos, congenital glaucoma and ... microphthalmos and anophthalmos should be investigated for possible congenital rubella syndrome [15]. A list of these children ...
66 01 98 Anophthalmos, surgical 66 01 98 Absent eye, postoperative 66 01 98 Enucleation 66 01 98 Evisceration (eye) 66 10 00 ... 66 11 00 Anophthalmos, congenital 66 12 00 Microphthalmos 66 19 00 Anomaly, congenital, eye, multiple or generalized, type ... 66 44 98 Anophthalmos, surgical, following injury 66 44 98 Absent eye, postoperative, following injury 66 44 98 Evisceration ( ... No light perception or anophthalmos 19 The code of 3 and the corresponding condition code was assigned by the headquarters ...
... anophthalmos, microphthalmos), and congenital heart defects ...
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Orbital cavernous hemangioma is the among the most common benign neoplasm found within the adult orbit. It is a slow-growing, benign tumour involving vascular structures within the muscle cone of the orbit, which pushes the eyeball forward as it grows, resulting in proptosis. Bilateral cases are rare. It is most commonly reported in middle-age adults (20-40 years), with women more affected than men. ...
Collagen is one of the long, fibrous structural proteins whose functions are quite different from those of globular proteins such as enzymes. Tough bundles of collagen called collagen fibers are a major component of the extracellular matrix that supports most tissues and gives cells structure from the outside, but collagen is also found inside certain cells. Collagen has great tensile strength, and is the main component of fascia, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, bone and skin. Along with soft keratin, it is responsible for skin strength and elasticity, and its degradation leads towrinkles that accompany aging. It strengthens blood vessels and plays a role intissue development. It is present in the cornea and lens of the eye in crystalline form. It is also used in cosmetic surgery andburns surgery. Hydrolyzed collagen can play an important role in weight management, as a protein, it can be advantageously used for its satiating power.. Collagen has been widely used in cosmetic surgery, as a healing ...
The procedure is performed under local or general anesthesia. Once the benefits and risks have been explained the patient, the area around the eyes is cleaned with antiseptic solution. A small incision is made in the inside of the eyelid just under the area known as the tarsal plate. The incision can also be made under the eyelashes on the skin side. ...
Schwannomas are slow-growing, benign tumours that develop within the outer covering of peripheral and sympathetic nerves formed by Schwann cells, called the nerve sheath. They are sometimes referred to as neurilemmomas and often involve sensory and motor nerves supplying the orbital region. Schwannomas are rare tumours and constitute about 1% of all orbital tumours and 35% of peripheral nerve tumours within the orbit. It has a ...
Anophthalmos with limb anomalies From NCATS Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center ...
Type Coleoptera 4002 (1) Paratype 04004:2 of Lathridiomorphus anophthalmus Franz 1969. Lathridiomorphus anophthalmus Franz 1969 ...
Pagets Disease Mammary Pagets Disease of Bone Pagets Disease of Breast Pain Pain Disorder Pain Insensitivity with Anhidrosis Congenital Pain Syndrome Type-I Regional Complex Pallister-Killian Syndrome Palmoplantaris Pustulosis Palsy Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Diseases Pancreatic Insufficiency Pancreatic Neoplasms Pancreatitis Panencephalitis Subacute Sclerosing Panhypopituitarism Panniculitis Panniculitis Subacute Nodular Migratory Papilledema Papillitis Optic Papilloma Papilloma Shope Papilloma Squamous Cell Papillomatosis Pappataci Fever Paraganglioma Paraganglioma Gangliocytic Parahemophilia Paraimmunoglobulinemias Parainfluenza Parainfluenza Virus Infections Parakeratosis Variegata Paralyses Familial Periodic Paralysis Paralysis Agitans Paralysis Bulbar Paramyxoviridae Infections Paraneoplastic Autonomic Dysfunction Paraneoplastic Encephalomyelitis Paraneoplastic Syndromes Nervous System Paraosmia Paraphilias Paraplegia Paraproteinemias Parapsoriasis Parapsoriasis en Plaques Parasitic ...
Nearly half of all young adult ptosis is related to trauma or acquired anophthalmos. Around one in eight young adults have ...
anophthalmia, blindness, choline, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, visual cortex, Adult, Anophthalmos, Case-Control Studies, ...
Congenital clinical anophthalmos and blind microphthalmos describe the absence of an eye or the presence of a small eye in the ... Congenital clinical anophthalmos and blind microphthalmos describe the absence of an eye or the presence of a small eye in the ... Clinical Congenital Anophthalmos and Microphthalmos-Experiences of Patients and Their Parents after More than 10 Years of ... Between 1999 and 2013, 97 children with anophthalmos or microphthalmos were treated with self-inflating, hydrophilic gel ...
A Slovenian cave beetle was named Anophthalmus hitleri in 1933 by a German anthropologist who admired the German dictator. A ...
07/27/15 09:29 Mild crusted ocular discharge anophthalmos od BARH CWCT 07/26/15 09:28 QAR Mucoid nasal discharge Crusted ocular ... 07/27/15 09:29 Mild crusted ocular discharge anophthalmos od BARH CWCT 07/26/15 09:28 QAR Mucoid nasal discharge Crusted ocular ... discharge anophthalmos OD CWCT 7/25/15 VET CHECK - MONITOR URI AND UNDERWEIGHT CONDITION QAR. EATING WITH MINIMAL APPETITE ... discharge anophthalmos OD CWCT 7/25/15 VET CHECK - MONITOR URI AND UNDERWEIGHT CONDITION QAR. EATING WITH MINIMAL APPETITE ...
... anophthalmos, microphthalmos), and congenital heart defects. Alimentary tract, urinary tract, and genital malformations have ...
Clinical anophthalmos, unspecified 174303=Cystic eyeball, congenital 174306=Cryptophthalmos 174310=Microphthalmos, ...
... anophthalmos, microphthalmos), and congenital heart defects ...
This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Ectopia Lentis" by people in this website by year, and whether "Ectopia Lentis" was a major or minor topic of these publications ...
  • Der Hitlerkäfer (so wird er oft von den Medien genannt), ist ein 5-5,5 mm langer augenloser, in Höhlen in Slowenien lebender Käfer von brauner Farbe aus der Familie der räuberischen Laufkäfer und trägt den wissenschaftlichen Namen Anophthalmus hitleri . (meinwissen.info)
  • Kaum Vorzustellen, dass Anophthalmus hitleri seinen Namen, nach dem Schrecken der Naziherrschaft und dem zweiten Weltkrieg weiter behielt. (meinwissen.info)
  • Durch seine Benennung nach Adolf Hitler, ist der Anophthalmus hitleri ein beliebtes Sammlerstück geworden, für das bis zu 1000 Euro gezahlt wird. (meinwissen.info)
  • In 1937, Scheibel published in Entomologische Blätter a description of a light-brown ground beetle a mere five millimeters long under the name Anophthalmus hitleri . (weirduniverse.net)
  • To date, Anophthalmus hitleri has been found in but a handful of caves in Slovenia. (weirduniverse.net)
  • A Slovenian cave beetle was named Anophthalmus hitleri in 1933 by a German anthropologist who admired the German dictator. (top10bestluxuryapartmentsriversideca.com)
  • Only when there is a complete absence of the ocular tissue within the orbit can a diagnosis of true anophthalmos be made. (medscape.com)
  • 07/27/15 09:29 Mild crusted ocular discharge anophthalmos od BARH CWCT 07/26/15 09:28 QAR Mucoid nasal discharge Crusted ocular discharge anophthalmos OD CWCT 7/25/15 VET CHECK - MONITOR URI AND UNDERWEIGHT CONDITION QAR. (urgentpodr.org)
  • Medical rating 4 C - SEVERE CONDITIONS , 07/27/15 09:29 Mild crusted ocular discharge anophthalmos od BARH CWCT 07/26/15 09:28 QAR Mucoid nasal discharge Crusted ocular discharge anophthalmos OD CWCT 7/25/15 VET CHECK - MONITOR URI AND UNDERWEIGHT CONDITION QAR. (urgentpodr.org)
  • Congenital anophthalmos is a very rare condition that has a reported prevalence rate of 0.18 per 10,000 births. (medscape.com)
  • Sexual predilection for congenital anophthalmos has not been reported. (medscape.com)
  • Anophthalmos occurs in utero and is a congenital anomaly that is present at birth. (medscape.com)
  • Congenital anophthalmos is a very rare condition that has a reported prevalence rate of 0.18 per 10,000 births. (medscape.com)
  • Sexual predilection for congenital anophthalmos has not been reported. (medscape.com)
  • Anophthalmos occurs in utero and is a congenital anomaly that is present at birth. (medscape.com)
  • Anophthalmos, microphthalmos, and typical coloboma (AMC) form an interrelated spectrum of congenital eye anomalies that can cause significant visual loss and cosmetic disfigurement in children. (nih.gov)
  • Case of congenital bilateral anophthalmus. (nih.gov)
  • Major congenital anomalies were defined in accordance with the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) registry and included abnormalities such as anophthalmos, bilateral renal agenesis, congenital heart disease, limb reduction, neural tube defects, oral-facial clefts, and many others. (medscape.com)
  • Anophthalmos, microphthalmos, and typical coloboma in the United Kingdom: a prospective study of incidence and risk. (medscape.com)
  • Due to the common co-occurrence of microphthalmos or anophthalmos and craniofacial abnormalities or axial skeleton defects, a crucial role is played by the cooperation between ophthalmologists and other pediatric specialists, including geneticists. (edu.pl)
  • Only when there is a complete absence of the ocular tissue within the orbit can a diagnosis of true anophthalmos be made. (medscape.com)
  • Restoring the facial appearance in acquired anophthalmos entails precision fitting of a customised ocular prosthesis. (bmj.com)
  • Typical colobomatous defects were the commonest phenotype, and anophthalmos was rare (n = 7). (nih.gov)