Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Fee Schedules: A listing of established professional service charges, for specified dental and medical procedures.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Relative Value Scales: Coded listings of physician or other professional services using units that indicate the relative value of the various services they perform. They take into account time, skill, and overhead cost required for each service, but generally do not consider the relative cost-effectiveness. Appropriate conversion factors can be used to translate the abstract units of the relative value scales into dollar fees for each service based on work expended, practice costs, and training costs.Prescription Fees: The charge levied on the consumer for drugs or therapy prescribed under written order of a physician or other health professional.Medicare Assignment: Concept referring to the standardized fees for services rendered by health care providers, e.g., laboratories and physicians, and reimbursement for those services under Medicare Part B. It includes acceptance by the physician.Medicare Part B: The voluntary portion of Medicare, known as the Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) Program, that includes physician's services, home health care, medical services, outpatient hospital services, and laboratory, pathology, and radiology services. All persons entitled to Medicare Part A may enroll in Medicare Part B on a monthly premium basis.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Durable Medical Equipment: Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Inflation, Economic: An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.Rate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Niger: A republic in western Africa, north of NIGERIA and west of CHAD. Its capital is Niamey.Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.Insurance, Surgical: A specific type of health insurance which provides surgeons' fees for specified amounts according to the type of surgery listed in the policy.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.United StatesMedicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Environmental Policy: A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Current Procedural Terminology: Descriptive terms and identifying codes for reporting medical services and procedures performed by PHYSICIANS. It is produced by the AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION and used in insurance claim reporting for MEDICARE; MEDICAID; and private health insurance programs (From CPT 2002).Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Prospective Payment System: A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.NepalRemuneration: Payment for a service or for a commodity such as a body part.Burkina Faso: A republic in western Africa, south and east of MALI and west of NIGER. Its capital is Ouagadougou. It was formerly called Upper Volta until 1984.CambodiaPatient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Physician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.Burundi: A republic in eastern Africa bounded on the north by RWANDA and on the south by TANZANIA. Its capital is Bujumbura.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Employee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Copying Processes: Reproduction of data in a new location or other destination, leaving the source data unchanged, although the physical form of the result may differ from that of the source.AfghanistanRural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Single-Payer System: An approach to health care financing with only one source of money for paying health care providers. The scope may be national (the Canadian System), state-wide, or community-based. The payer may be a governmental unit or other entity such as an insurance company. The proposed advantages include administrative simplicity for patients and providers, and resulting significant savings in overhead costs. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993, p106)Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Medical Assistance: Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Surgicenters: Facilities designed to serve patients who require surgical treatment exceeding the capabilities of usual physician's office yet not of such proportion as to require hospitalization.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.MarylandHealth Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.HondurasDelivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Fiber Optic Technology: The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.Togo: A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Fees, Pharmaceutical: Amounts charged to the patient or third-party payer for medication. It includes the pharmacist's professional fee and cost of ingredients, containers, etc.Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.Hospitals, Rural: Hospitals located in a rural area.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Diagnostic Services: Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Hazardous Waste: Waste products which threaten life, health, or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise managed.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System: Uniform method for health care providers and medical suppliers to report professional services, procedures, and supplies. It consists of alphanumeric codes and modifiers for the use of all public and private health insurers. It is developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.Government Programs: Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Reimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Drugs, Investigational: Drugs which have received FDA approval for human testing but have yet to be approved for commercial marketing. This includes drugs used for treatment while they still are undergoing clinical trials (Treatment IND). The main heading includes drugs under investigation in foreign countries.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.
  • Founded in N/A, Bon Secours St Mary's Hospital School of Medical Imaging is a Less than 2-year college. (unigo.com)
  • Admissions at Bon Secours St Mary's Hospital School of Medical Imaging are considered N/A, with N/A of all applicants being admitted. (unigo.com)
  • The Bon Secours St Mary's Hospital School of Medical Imaging Academic calendar runs on a semester basis. (unigo.com)
  • Degrees awarded at Bon Secours St Mary's Hospital School of Medical Imaging include: Bachelor's Degree, Masters Degree, Post-master's certificate, Doctor's degree. (unigo.com)
  • N/A of students attending Bon Secours St Mary's Hospital School of Medical Imaging receive some sort of financial aid. (unigo.com)
  • The Queensland Ambulance Service provides emergency response services, pre-hospital patient care, specialised transport services, coordination of aero-medical services and inter-hospital transfers. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are proved to provide better clinical results and lower the overall costs of medical services through shorter hospital stays, shorter recovery times, and reduced need for repeated surgery. (igi-global.com)
  • Other facilities are Scripps Green Hospital, Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas, the Scripps Clinic and Scripps Coastal Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics has installed PerfectLum medical monitor calibration and quality assurance tool to perform calibrations and QA tests. (1888pressrelease.com)
  • Hospital fees make up two-thirds of medicare spending, and are the place Washington may look for ``quick savings,'' notes a congressional health-budget expert. (csmonitor.com)
  • Reimbursement for medical, surgical,and hospital services provided pursuant to section 48-120 shall be in accordance with such schedules, except for services covered by the inpatient hospital fee schedules established in section 48-120.04, and except for services covered by contract pursuant to section 48-120(1 )( d). (workerscompensation.com)
  • Such schedules and the inpatient hospital fee schedules established in section 48-120.04 shall be available free of charge on the court's website at http://www.wcc.ne.gov. (workerscompensation.com)
  • It funds, directly or indirectly, most non-hospital medical services, pharmaceuticals and health research. (abs.gov.au)
  • Many salaried specialist doctors in public hospitals are able to treat some private patients in hospital and usually contribute to the hospital a portion of the income earned from fees charged. (abs.gov.au)
  • An important component of the Australian health care system is private health insurance, which can cover part or all of the hospital charges to private patients directly, a portion of medical fees for services provided to private admitted patients in hospitals, paramedical services and some aids such as spectacles. (abs.gov.au)
  • Ms. Little's seemingly minor medical problem - she had the least dangerous form of skin cancer - racked up big bills because it involved three doctors from specialties that are among the highest compensated in medicine, and it was done on the grounds of a hospital. (nytimes.com)
  • What's more, the NHS spends more than £2 billion every year on back-pain-related costs including GP consultations, hospital fees and physical therapy. (patrickholford.com)
  • Casey Nolan, a hospital consultant and managing director of Navigant Consulting in Washington, D.C., said what matters most is not the number of high-level centers, but the degrees of coordination across the area's medical network, including the first responders. (healthcarefinancenews.com)
  • Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center in Las Vegas is a Level II facility and St. Rose Dominican Hospital in nearby Henderson, Nev. (healthcarefinancenews.com)
  • The Tampa Bay Times reported last year that the hospital chain charged significantly higher "activation fees" than other hospitals. (healthcarefinancenews.com)
  • Oklahoma was the first state to enact Anti-MOC legislation and six more states (Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas) have passed laws prohibiting the use of MOC as a condition for obtaining medical licensure and hospital admitting privileges. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Requires the commissioner of human services to increase medical assistance payments to any licensed health plan under contract with the medical assistance program that agrees to make enhanced payments to Hennepin County Medical Center or Regions Hospital (Sec. 8). (votesmart.org)
  • The fees, which consumers will see added to their premiums in many cases, have been largely lost amid the recent tumult over the health-care law - the faulty launch of its health-insurance website, HealthCare.gov, as well as the outcry from people who received notices this fall that their noncompliant individual health policies are being discontinued. (dispatch.com)
  • It commissioned a study that found that the fee will cost Ohio individuals and families an average of $180.60 and $426.30, respectively, in higher premiums each year over the next decade. (dispatch.com)
  • Fees on Health Plans - A fee applied to all health insurance providers based upon net premiums and any third party fees associated with the administration of those programs. (infowars.com)
  • Coverage depends on several factors, including an individual's personal medical history and the amount of money the patient, or the sponsoring employer, is willing to spend on monthly premiums, copayments, co-insurance and deductibles. (ncsl.org)
  • 2 Organisations that offer professional indemnity insurance, such as the Medical Protection Society and the Medical Defence Union, charge premiums that increase annually in keeping with your increased experience. (bmj.com)
  • According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the business costs and profits of these plans currently take more than $150 billion from their premiums before paying for medical services and are projected to increase more rapidly than national expenditures on health care. (prospect.org)
  • According to the Legislative Council representative for the insurance sector, Chan Kin Por, health insurance premiums have risen by more than 10% annually, owing in part to abuses. (lexology.com)
  • Payments for outpatient therapy services are subject to a targeted medical review threshold of $3,000 . (asha.org)
  • Make sure to pay careful attention and ensure that the documents and fee payments are sent to the proper address. (oregon.gov)
  • Under the new system, payments are made under a fee schedule which is based on a resource-based relative value scale (RBRVS). (hhs.gov)
  • The flat fee, which is designed to be budget neutral, was determined based on the difference between total payments (using 2014 claims data) using the six percent add-on and total estimated payments using a 2.5 percent add-on, adjusted by the total number of encounters per day. (bakerdonelson.com)
  • In consideration for the license, Rockwell Medical received an upfront fee of $200,000 and will be eligible for milestone payments and royalties on net sales. (biospace.com)
  • Authorizes a county or groups of counties to provide health care services to individuals who are eligible for general assistance medical care if the services provided are similar to those provided by the general assistance medical care except for outpatient prescription drug coverage (Sec. 14). (votesmart.org)
  • Establishes payment rates for all covered services provided by the general assistance medical care program, except for outpatient drug coverage, between March 1, 2010 and July 1, 2010 as 50 percent of the rates on February 28, 2010 (Sec. 14). (votesmart.org)
  • The scholarship will provide for payment of the annual tuition fees for overseas students, and an annual living expense stipend set at the normal rate of the ANU PhD Scholarships. (edu.au)
  • 1st MSMU receives students paying for their tuition fees from Russia and other countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tuition fees are charged annually. (prospects.ac.uk)
  • Please see the University's Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed "When tuition fees change"), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years. (prospects.ac.uk)
  • Drug companies are required to report basic information about antibiotic sales to the FDA under the Animal Drug User Fee Act (ADUFA). (mercola.com)
  • Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) to require FDA to annually report the amount of antibiotic sales to farms failed. (nmpf.org)
  • Like California, which was the first to OK medical marijuana in 1996, Colorado's marijuana infrastructure and culture are well ahead of the other 12 states that followed. (drugs-forum.com)
  • A 1996 news report even stated that more money is spent on cat food annually than religious organizations receive in contributions. (ripoffreport.com)
  • In defending these changes, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs, called current Tricare fees for retirees, nearly frozen since 1996, "an anachronism" the military no longer can afford. (heraldnet.com)
  • Initially, Newcastle medical school drew Indigenous students from around Australia, but in 1996 it acquired a competitor with the founding of the Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health at the University of Western Australia (UWA). (mja.com.au)
  • Apply now, and if successful be awarded a 3-year, full fee waiver scholarship (for international students) plus living allowance to study at Australia's national university in Canberra, Australia's capital city. (edu.au)
  • This is a scholarship designed to attract overseas students of high calibre to pursue postgraduate research at The John Curtin School of Medical Research. (edu.au)
  • One Zinkernagel Scholarship will be awarded annually to an overseas PhD student who was the highest ranked successful JCSMR applicant for an International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (IPRS). (edu.au)
  • The John James Memorial Foundation PhD Scholarship for Medical Research provides a stipend and other benefits. (edu.au)
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD, is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA based at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. (abebooks.com)
  • Acquire an understanding of the basic tenets of medical informatics (also called clinical informatics ), and gain an appreciation for both the challenges facing its practitioners and for the promise that it holds for healthcare, which differs from other sectors of the economy in many ways that also manifest themselves in medical informatics. (igi-global.com)
  • The system also includes clinical research and medical education programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rockwell Medical believes that FPC is uniquely suited for the treatment of IDA in the home infusion population based upon its kinetic profile and outstanding safety profile in both clinical trials and post-marketing use, and may fill an unmet clinical need as a uniquely suitable home infusion therapy for treatment of IDA. (biospace.com)
  • Rockwell Medical intends to hold a Type C meeting with the FDA in Q1 2021 to discuss the pathway for clinical development and anticipates conducting a Phase II observational study and a dose scheduling study to achieve proof-of-concept, with data expected to report around the end of 2021. (biospace.com)
  • In addition, because continuing education and training are mandatory for clinical progression, moving beyond deciding what jobs to apply for and filling in the relevant forms on their e-portfolio mean extra costs in courses and exam fees. (bmj.com)
  • One way HHS hopes to change this is by encouraging information sharing among healthcare providers electronically, so patients can see various medical professionals according to their needs while knowing that their updated medical records will follow them through the healthcare system. (acatoday.org)
  • The programme will equip medical and healthcare practitioners with knowledge and skills for developing outstanding educational expertise. (prospects.ac.uk)
  • Medical malpractice, also known as medical negligence, is the term for a legal claim alleging that a doctor or other health professional provided substandard healthcare. (medicalmalpracticehelp.com)
  • Our annual conference is a globally recognized event offering attendees multiple continuing educational (CEU) opportunities to enhance their understanding and knowledge, and develop their skills as a practicing professional in the medical and healthcare interpretation field. (imiaweb.org)
  • The technology growth in electronic health to smartphones apps in medical field has increased the market opportunity for personal healthcare apps. (medgadget.com)
  • Elaine Chan Sau Ho from the Taskforce on Healthcare Reform under the Hong Kong Federation of Insurers explained that the changes to the policy for 'simple procedures' were made to discourage inflated medical costs as a result of private doctors allegedly charging higher fees for patients with health insurance coverage and performing excessive procedures. (lexology.com)
  • Physician's time and fees would be funded by the legislation. (causes.com)
  • The Colorado legislature responded with a new law that allowed many pharmacies in Colorado to be licensed to sell liquor for religious and medical reasons if the patient had a physician's prescription. (drugs-forum.com)
  • There is also a trigger of $2,040, at which point the KX modifier must be included on the claim to demonstrate continued medical need for services. (asha.org)
  • Shortly before the House of Representatives left Washington for their districts, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the annual physician fee schedule proposal. (acatoday.org)
  • Any person, partnership, corporation or other legal entity that owns or possesses breeding stock of four or more unneutered male or unspayed female animals or any combination thereof, for the purpose of charging a fee for stud services or offspring. (ecode360.com)
  • B.Schedule of Fees for Medical Services. (workerscompensation.com)
  • 2. Effective January 1, 2016, the Schedule of Fees for Medical Services shall be established as follows. (workerscompensation.com)
  • 3. Services subject to the Schedule of Fees for Medical Services shall be reimbursed at the lower of the fee schedule amount or the provider's billed charge. (workerscompensation.com)
  • Medical or surgical services not covered under the schedule shall be paid in full unless the payor has evidence that the provider's charge exceeds the regular charge for such service by Nebraska providers. (workerscompensation.com)
  • 4. Coding for services subject to the Schedule of Fees for Medical Services shall be in accordance with the CPT manual published by the American Medical Association, and in accordance with the National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) established by CMS. (workerscompensation.com)
  • Questions about tuition and fee charges on student accounts should be directed to Financial Services . (evms.edu)
  • Many other jurisdictions, including the United States, Australia and Europe, also charge fees for regulatory services for drugs and medical devices. (canada.ca)
  • 3) the fees authorized by this title will be dedicated to meeting the goals identified in the letters from the Secretary of Health and Human Services to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate, as set forth in the Congressional Record. (govtrack.us)
  • They have a direct conflict of interest with their customers, because a plan's net income is increased by avoiding coverage of patients with serious illnesses (who, of course, are most in need of insurance), restricting access to services, and limiting coverage of expensive medical conditions. (prospect.org)
  • TASKS: This staff member will perform the Health Services Administrator tasks described below in a combination to be reviewed and agreed on at least annually. (careerbuilder.com)
  • A. Operation Administrative Services Manage Electronic Medical Records System. (careerbuilder.com)
  • Some services are free, some are a flat fee and others have a fee based on a sliding scale. (virginia.gov)
  • Sliding scale means that in general, the more income you have, the larger the fee you pay for services. (virginia.gov)
  • An annual fee typically provides members with transportation, routine social events, discounted medical and wellness services, provider referrals, and volunteers to help satisfy a broad range of member requests (from moving furniture to grocery shopping and help setting up computers). (brookings.edu)
  • Membership dues average $600 annually, but can range from $250 to as much as $1000 for couples and packages that include additional services. (brookings.edu)
  • The legislation also authorized increased funding for research on patient outcomes for selected medical treatments and surgical procedures to assess their appropriateness, necessity, and effectiveness. (hhs.gov)
  • Medical training is expensive-a 2007 report by the Associations of Surgeons in Training showed that the total cost of surgical training, from medical school to completion of training, is over £400 000. (bmj.com)
  • Typically offered annually (fall semester). (cui.edu)
  • Wearable medical alert devices typically come in the form of a pendant or wristwatch and are monitored 24/7 by professional monitoring companies. (caring.com)
  • There are no platform or maintenance fees and a guarantee of no more than 5% increase annually. (igi-global.com)
  • to register provisionally as a foundation year 1 doctor is £95, but this will soon increase to an annual retention fee of £390 for full registration and a licence to practise. (bmj.com)
  • There may be an increase in coverage disputes as patients and their insurers disagree over the necessity of hospitalisation for medical procedures. (lexology.com)
  • From the perspective of an academic medical community in the United States, factors driving the increase in medical information on the Internet are examined. (jmir.org)
  • The resulting increase in medical information, and specifically that available readily and electronically on the Web, is driven by two groups of factors, which can be termed "pull," for those which create a demand for information, and "push," in which providers of information are actively seeking to find users. (jmir.org)
  • Students enrolled and those planning to enrol in various coaching institutes here have appealed to Prime Minister Narendra Modi to exempt GST on the coaching fees. (ndtv.com)
  • Companies with payrolls under $500,000 annually are exempt - a change from the original $250,000 level to accommodate concerns of moderate Democrats - and the penalty is phased in for companies with payrolls between $500,000 and $750,000. (capitolhillblue.com)
  • Medical alert systems allow seniors to access help 24 hours a day in the event of a fall, medical emergency or if they experience a flare-up of a chronic health condition, such as low blood sugar or symptoms of a heart attack or a stroke. (caring.com)
  • James Harvey Young, The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967). (tshaonline.org)
  • On April 1, the Medical Marijuana Registry at the state health department stopped accepting walk-up applications and will only process those sent by mail. (drugs-forum.com)
  • The changes are necessary due to the explosive growth in the number of medical marijuana applications,' said Mark Salley of the Colorado Health Department. (drugs-forum.com)
  • The office also responsible for QAS Policy on Staff Health and Wellbeing and setting medical priorities for ambulance resource dispatch. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health insurers are passing the mandatory fees on to many people, including those who buy coverage directly from insurers or who get health benefits through their jobs. (dispatch.com)
  • But even people who can keep their "grandfathered" individual health plans are among the Ohioans who are now receiving notices about the new fees. (dispatch.com)
  • While most of the reinsurance-fee money collected by insurers and turned over to the government will eventually circulate back to health insurers, it's not a windfall, said Medical Mutual of Ohio's Williamson. (dispatch.com)
  • An industry trade group, America's Health Insurance Plans, wants the fee to be repealed. (dispatch.com)
  • The fee is paid by insurers that offer fully insured health coverage to individuals and businesses, particularly smaller ones, which are seeing the fees passed along to them in many cases. (dispatch.com)
  • Scripps Health had issues with fees that Novation had collected from medical supply companies. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of clinics of the University are also receiving patients mainly for a fee or from voluntary health insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, Health Net, a large network-model HMO in California, has offered significant annual bonuses to medical groups that perform particularly well on its annual patient survey. (managedcaremag.com)
  • As the regulator for human and veterinary drugs and medical devices, Health Canada performs scientific evaluations of products before they are authorized for sale, monitors these products once made available to Canadians, and verifies compliance and acts on non-compliance using tools such as inspections. (canada.ca)
  • In the mid-nineties, Health Canada introduced fees for regulatory activities that are charged to industry. (canada.ca)
  • In 2011, Health Canada updated fees for human drugs and medical devices. (canada.ca)
  • Health Canada is now exercising these new authorities to amend fees related to human drugs, veterinary drugs, and medical devices. (canada.ca)
  • Fees related to food and human natural health products are not part of this proposal. (canada.ca)
  • Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., chairman of the House subcommittee on military personnel, vowed to oppose every initiative to curb compensation growth or to raise retiree health fees. (heraldnet.com)
  • Good sleep-The National Institutes of Health reports that between 30-40% of adults suffer from insomnia annually. (amazonaws.com)
  • Prebiotics (inulin) are food ingredients that are not digested but rather stay in your bowel and feed and promote the growth of the beneficial gut bacteria, which are crucial to our digestive health and overall well being. (amazonaws.com)
  • That was the prelude to a daylong medical odyssey several weeks later, through different private offices on the manicured campus at the Baptist Health Medical Center that involved a dermatologist, an anesthesiologist and an ophthalmologist who practices plastic surgery. (nytimes.com)
  • The health app market is expected to grow annually at the rate of about 47.6% CAGR. (medgadget.com)
  • Health apps are new mobile applications that assist patients to manage their medical condition on real time basis by feed the information back to the professionals. (medgadget.com)
  • These increasingly urgent calls have come from the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council, 2 the Australian Medical Association (AMA), 3 AIDA, 4 and many other leading Australian health, human rights, aid and development organisations. (mja.com.au)
  • It was made possible by the combination of the receptive environment created by Foundation Dean, David Maddison - with its strong focus on community, equity and engagement by the medical profession - and an individual with a passion in Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor of Behavioural Science, who came with extensive experience in Indigenous health from Western Australia. (mja.com.au)
  • The Centre's goal was both to improve the recruitment and retention of Indigenous medical students and to assist departments in Medicine and Dentistry with teaching about Aboriginal health and with improving links with Aboriginal organisations. (mja.com.au)
  • A pre-existing condition is a medical condition that existed before you obtained health insurance. (answers.com)
  • The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee reauthorized the Animal Drug User Fee Act on March 21. (nmpf.org)
  • The Animal Health Institute, the American Veterinary Medical Association and many livestock groups, including NMPF, supported the legislation. (nmpf.org)
  • However, the Hong Kong Medical Association has expressed concerns that AIA's approach may compromise patient safety, especially when there are underlying health conditions such as chronic illnesses or age factors. (lexology.com)
  • The Northwest Neighbors Village, for example, offers members a " medical note taker " to accompany them to doctor's appointments, increasing patient health literacy and ensuring the Village member has a thorough record of what was discussed during the visit. (brookings.edu)
  • Christian Ministry: Health Conservation, Neurology medical file reviews and second opinions for Ministers, Pastors, Religious servants and Priests. (chamberorganizer.com)
  • The fee for Tier 2 retirees ($22,590 to $45,178) would be $75 next year and climb to $300 by 2016. (heraldnet.com)
  • One, two, and three bedroom apartments are within walking distance from the Medical Center. (stanford.edu)
  • Founded in N/A, Ross Medical Education Center-Huntsville is a Less than 2-year college. (unigo.com)
  • Admissions at Ross Medical Education Center-Huntsville are considered N/A, with 100% of all applicants being admitted. (unigo.com)
  • The Ross Medical Education Center-Huntsville Academic calendar runs on a semester basis. (unigo.com)
  • Degrees awarded at Ross Medical Education Center-Huntsville include: Bachelor's Degree, Masters Degree, Post-master's certificate, Doctor's degree. (unigo.com)
  • 79% of students attending Ross Medical Education Center-Huntsville receive some sort of financial aid. (unigo.com)
  • Daniel J. Wallace, a leading rheumatologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and Janice Brock Wallace, an expert medical writer, have updated the original classic resource, which has sold over 100,000 copies since 1999. (abebooks.com)
  • The organization has a number of projects planned, including the Scripps Prebys Cardiovascular Institute, which will serve as a center for heart disease treatment, research and graduate medical education. (wikipedia.org)
  • and the low SES trial included veterans and their families from the waiting areas at the White River Junction Veterans Affairs Medical Center, White River Junction, Vermont. (annals.org)
  • 9) Child will return to the Center annually or more often until his/her condition is stabilized. (causes.com)
  • In addition, salary figures often understate physician earning power since they often do not include revenue from business activities: fees for blood or pathology tests at a lab that the doctor owns or "facility" charges at an ambulatory surgery center where the physician is an investor, for example. (nytimes.com)
  • University Medical Center, Las Vegas. (healthcarefinancenews.com)
  • That's because the more trauma patients a center deals with annually, the better the results, studies show. (healthcarefinancenews.com)
  • A fee of $4000, which includes a $3500 registration fee and a $500 non-refundable application fee, must be paid at the time that you submit your online application. (oregon.gov)
  • http://www.eliresearch.com/surveyguide.html top Congress Considers New Repayment Tactics … You Should Too RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC (Medical Newswire) The debate on overpayments is roiling on Capitol Hill, as Congress debates new policies that could keep CMS from demanding repayment while a provider appeal is in the works. (w3.org)
  • WIXOM, Mich., Nov. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Rockwell Medical Inc. (Nasdaq: RMTI) ("Rockwell Medical" or the "Company"), a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to transforming the treatment of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia management and improving outcomes for patients around the world, today reported financial results and a business update for the three months ended September 30, 2020. (biospace.com)
  • But those engaged in the ' drug business' were required to have a $100 annual fee, and the pharmacist $5 annually. (drugs-forum.com)
  • The state charges a $90 processing fee, and dispensaries usually add notary or other smaller handling charges, for a total patient cost of about $250. (drugs-forum.com)
  • An analogy is that just like you can't buy auto insurance after an accident to cover the cost of the accident, medical insurance only covers issues that arise unexpectedly after coverage has begun. (answers.com)
  • Low cost lap band surgeries have been performed outside the United States, at a number of medical tourism destinations. (medicaltourismco.com)
  • A 62-year-old Dublin man provided paperwork from Medical Mutual of Ohio to The Dispatch showing that he and his 61-year-old wife will pay nearly $25 per month, or $295 annually, in fees. (dispatch.com)
  • Sure, we need to start prescribing antibiotics more judiciously in the medical setting as well, but when you consider that medical use of antibiotics accounts for just 20 percent of all the antibiotics sold each year, it makes sense to restrict the primary culprit the hardest, or else we'll never make a dent in this problem. (mercola.com)
  • The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. (prospects.ac.uk)
  • These scholarships are annually awarded and the recipients announced at the end of February each year. (imiaweb.org)
  • A foundation year 1 doctor is likely to have a total annual subscription bill of about £350 (GMC, BMA, and the medical defence organisations), whereas a year 3 specialty trainee in trauma and orthopaedics, for example, may have an annual bill of about £1250 (GMC, BMA, the medical defence organisations, the Royal College of Surgeons, and the British Orthopaedic Association). (bmj.com)
  • Over the latest half-year time frame, Symmetry Medical Inc. (NYSE:SMA) has seen zero unique insiders buying, and 2 insider sales ( see the details of insider trades here ). (insidermonkey.com)
  • Family coverage for Tier 1 retirees, those with retired pay below $22,590, would see the enrollment fee of $520 climb by $80 a year for the next three years. (heraldnet.com)
  • USMLE Step 1 and 2 are taken during our second year and fourth years of medical school, and Step 3 is taken over a two-day "vacation" during internship year. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Around 60 per cent of about 1.75 lakh students who seek admission annually for preparation to crack entrance exams for engineering and medical colleges hail from middle class and lower middle class, mostly from semi-urban or rural areas, said the director of a coaching institute here. (ndtv.com)
  • If not already, then very soon, this will be an area of concern for medical groups as they are increasingly being held accountable for the satisfaction data collected by MCOs they contract with. (managedcaremag.com)